Hagbourne CE Primary School

HOMEWORK Policy – Reviewed September 2018

Introduction

VISION

In the parable of the Good Samaritan Jesus teaches us to ‘Love your neighbour as you love yourself’.  It is from this that we get our key Christian values of Respect, Responsibility, Care and Courage.  These provide a stable and caring environment where we are 'preparing each child for their future in an ever- changing world'.

Hagbourne Church of England Primary School is inclusive, serving equally those of all faiths or none through the provision of an education of the highest quality within the context of Christian belief and practice.

Rationale

At Hagbourne CE Primary School we want children to have a positive experience of homework and to learn to take increasing responsibility for their own learning.

Aims

Through this policy we aim to:

The Sutton Trust (https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/homework-primary/) undertook research into the effectiveness of homework and found the following:

‘It is certainly the case that schools whose pupils do homework tend to be more successful. However it is less clear that the homework is the reason why they are successful. A number of reviews and Meta-analyses have explored this issue. There is stronger evidence that it is helpful at secondary level, but there is much less evidence of benefit at primary level.

There is some evidence that when homework is used as a short and focused intervention it can be effective in improving students’ attainment, but this is limited for primary age pupils.

Overall the general benefits are likely to be modest if homework is more routinely set. ‘

With the above in mind we, at Hagbourne CE Primary school,  believe that the following five key factors underpin homework and home learning for Hagbourne CE Primary School children:

  1. Primary school children cannot be expected to study at home as secondary students may study, nor to work as adults may work. Children spend six hours a day at school and are usually tired or “filled” with school learning by the end of the day.
  2. The best homework a child can do is “family living” – talking, listening, playing, cooking and sharing interests with family. It is these things that promote learning about life and enhance the values of the child.
  3. Homework is more effective if children can see that adults are genuinely engaged in the same or similar activity thus providing a model of appropriate attitudes to learning.
  4. Homework is more effective if adults provide positive feedback to children of their work. This not only encourages further learning but also reinforces success for the child.
  5. Homework should not cause undue stress on the child, family or the teacher.

Types of Homework

Homework can be instigated by teachers and parents. Homework can include reading alone or with an adult, visiting a local museum, investigations, undertaking individual research, learning multiplication tables, learning to dance, or to play an instrument, painting and model making, keeping a diary or writing a letter.  We also recognise the importance of playing and the impact it has on well-being and physical development.  

Rest time is a vital part of life too and at Hagbourne CE School we strongly believe that children need to be taught how to relax.  Relaxation techniques help children to manage their reactions to stress, anxiety and worry. Relaxation techniques are a good distraction from worrying thoughts and reduce tension in the body.  We strongly recommend that parents build in this time to home life.

At Hagbourne CE Primary School we believe that the most important academic homework is based around reading, spelling and the practising of key mathematical skills.

Research from the Institute of Education (IOE) shows that:

At Hagbourne CE Primary School we focus on maths, reading and spelling.

Each child has access to RMEasimaths and Reception and KS1 also have access to Phonics Bug. These have a wealth of activities to do at home (logons and passwords will be given at the beginning of each year).

Homework diaries

Homework diaries are provided for children to record any homework and reading.  

Staff will record the reading that takes place in school in these diaries.

Children should, when ready, be encouraged to fill in their homework diaries themselves.

Role of the school

Whilst there is a legal responsibility for a school to set homework on a regular basis, the school cannot enforce the completion of homework and therefore, will not punish children for failing to complete some, or all of their homework.  We will, where possible, provide time for children to catch up during the school day.

Children who complete the recommended reading times each week and record this in their homework diaries will be recognised appropriately.

Racial Equality & Equal Opportunities

All children have equal access and inclusive rights to the curriculum regardless of their gender, race, disability or ability. We plan work that is differentiated for the performance of all groups and individuals. We are committed to creating a positive climate that will enable everyone to work free from racial intimidation and harassment and to achieve their full potential.

What will be set?

Homework should never be too onerous nor should it ever create stress within the pupil’s family. If parents have any concerns they should not hesitate to contact the school. Normally, several days will be allowed for the completion of a homework task, except where daily practice is to be encouraged e.g. reading, spelling and maths.

Homework

Parents are requested to initial the reading recorded in homework diaries, and class teachers will also comment where appropriate. This enables effective partnership between school and families to best support the child’s progress at home.

Parents are free to determine how much time they wish to spend on the other homework activities so that it fits in with family life.

Y R

  • Regular/daily reading and discussing books/stories at home with parent/adult support.  Sharing stories (adults reading to them too).
  • Learning phonics and high frequency words to support reading and writing.
  • Counting, reading and writing numbers to 10 then 20 and then higher.  Any practical maths to develop addition, subtraction and problem solving.

Y1

  • Regular/daily reading and discussing books/stories at home with parent/adult support Sharing stories (adults reading to them too).
  • Learning phonics and high frequency words to support reading and writing.
  • Developing maths skills.
  • RMEasimaths or Phonics bug.

Y2

  • Regular/daily reading and discussing books / stories at home with parent /adult support. Sharing stories (adults reading to them too).
  • Developing mental maths fluency skills.
  • Weekly set maths homework using CGP books provided by school.
  • Learning phonics and spellings to support reading and writing.
  • RMEasimaths or Phonics bug.

Y3

  • Regular/daily reading discussing books / stories preferably with an adult.  Details must be written in in the homework diary and signed by an adult.Sharing stories (adults reading to them too).
  • Developing mental maths fluency skills.
  • Weekly set maths homework using CGP books provided by school.
  • Learning spellings to support reading and writing.
  • RMEasimaths

Y4

  • Regular/daily reading discussing books / stories preferably with an adult.  Details must be written in the homework diary and signed by an adult. Sharing stories (adults reading to them too).
  • Developing mental maths fluency skills.
  • Weekly set maths homework using CGP books provided by school.
  • Learning spellings to support reading and writing.
  • RMEasimaths.

Y5

  • Regular/daily reading discussing books / stories preferably with an adult.  Details must be written in the homework diary and signed by an adult. Sharing stories (adults reading to them too).
  • Developing mental maths fluency skills.
  • Weekly set maths homework using CGP books provided by school.
  • Learning spellings to support reading and writing.
  • RMEasimaths.

Y6

  • Regular/daily reading discussing books / stories preferably with an adult.  Details must be written in the homework diary and signed by an adult. Sharing stories (adults reading to them too).
  • Developing mental maths fluency skills.
  • Weekly set maths homework using CGP books provided by school.
  • Learning spellings to support reading and writing.
  • RMEasimaths.