Pupil Premium Review 2018-19

The following categories of 'disadvantaged pupils' are eligible for Pupil Premium (PP) funding:

Type of disadvantaged pupil

PP  per pupil 2018-19

Pupils in year groups 7 to 11 recorded as 'ever 6 FSM'

£935

Looked after children (LAC)

£2300 of which, in Durham,

£1700 is allocated

A school’s grant allocations are based on the number of eligible pupils recorded on the January 2019 census.

PP funding is targeted towards four key areas identified as creating significant barriers to learning for our students.

  1. Reading Comprehension
  2. Phonics Development
  3. Maths Fluency
  4. Resilience and Mental Health

Oral Language skills are also include, and evaluated, within this programme but not funded by PP

Two Governors are identified to ensure that the use of the additional funding is impacting on pupil progress. Their role is to liaise with appropriate staff and report to the full Governing Body termly. All Governors participated in bespoke training 16th May 2017 following the LA review of PP funding.

David Seed has responsibility for Pupil Premium funding detailed through the Pupil Premium report.

Karen Trevelyan monitors LAC+ funding which is detailed through individual pupil Personal Education Plans.

Karen Trevelyan has attended Personal Education Plan Meetings to enable her to monitor and challenge practice more effectively.

Personal Education Plans are reviewed termly. The LA quality assure these documents and provide feedback.

Pupil Premium updates are provided on a half termly basis to the Finance, and Standards and Effectiveness Committees. Minutes from these Committees are shared at the Full Governing Body and exceptions are discussed.

Governors are therefore able to monitor the Pupil Premium and the impact of the agreed funding regularly and robustly.  School leaders are required to use focused planning and recording and are held to account for the effective use of the focused Pupil Premium funding.

REPORT TO GOVERNORS: PUPIL PREMIUM

        

2018 -19 REVIEW APRIL TO APRIL

Summary

All of our students have complex social, emotional and mental health needs and the protection of an Education Health Care Plan. Our young people often have unpredictable lives outside of school. Significant events which are considered to be traumatic such as the loss of a parent, change to care provision and domestic violence are sadly relatively frequent occurrences[1].The ethnic background of the majority of students is white working class. The lower educational attainment of this group in comparison with students from other ethnic backgrounds with similar socio-economic backgrounds is a concern nationally[2]. In 2013 all disadvantaged ethnic minority groups were outperforming white working class students in terms of attainment at age 16.

Pupil Premium funding is targeted towards four key areas identified as creating significant barriers to learning for our students.

  1. Reading Comprehension
  2. Phonics Development
  3. Maths Fluency
  4. Resilience and Mental Health

2018-19  SPEND

Number of students and student premium grant (PPG) and PP+ based on January 2018 census

Total number of students on roll  

57 students

Total number of students eligible for PPG (January 2019)

37 Ever 6 FSM

57 students on roll          

65%

Students in years 7 to 11 recorded as Ever 6 FSM £935

£34 595.00

PP+

Detailed through Personal Education Plans reviewed termly.

12 LAC                                

21%

Total number of students eligible for PPG and PP+ (January 2019)

49 students                      

86%

The Education Endowment Foundation Toolkit is used to inform planned intervention and  details evidence of strength of impact.


1 Area for Development: Reading Comprehension  £4065.00

Moderate impact very low cost extensive evidence. 

Barrier and Proposed impact

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

Too few students are reaching the expected level in reading.

Students not reading widely and often.

Reading books lacked structure.

80% of students demonstrating that their reading ages increase to be closer to their chronological age.

Accelerated Reader appears to be effective for weaker readers as catch up intervention based on evidence from the Education Endowment fund. It allows the students to read for pleasure as well as widely and often. Programme can also be linked to out of school use and will help develop links with parents.

Annual licence to use Accelerated Reader for each individual student £1000.00

Literacy activities planned by English Teacher shared across VTG.

50 mins per week 39 weeks

£1365.00

Word Shark Licence

£1000.00

Recognition of achievement vouchers and experiences.

£350.00

Newspapers, magazines, books

£350.00

Speech and Language Therapist

£400 per clinical day 35 days

£14000 not costed PP

Literacy Lead reporting to SLT

72% of students have functional reading ages through reading regularly.

32 %increase to be closer to their chronological age

Progress on Accelerated Reader as evidenced through the standardised Star test.

There has been enough of a positive impact with achieving 9 years 6 months to suggest we should refine and develop the intervention to ensure targeted pupils achieve a functional reading age.

Reading books coded to support selection at appropriate level.

A focus on reading widely is developing as some students are more able to engage in a range of texts.

Reading is part of daily tutor routine.

2 Area for Development: Phonics Development  £4250.00

Moderate impact very low cost extensive evidence. 

Barrier and Proposed impact

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

Literacy skills needed to access curriculum.

80% students demonstrating that phonic skill development supports their reading ages increase to be closer to their chronological age.

Research indicates that the teaching of phonics should be explicit and systematic to support students in making connections between the sound patterns they hear in words and the way that these words are written.

Fresh Start is a catch-up literacy intervention for students at risk of falling behind their peers. It provides systematic and rigorous practice in phonics.

Students are assessed and then grouped according to their levels of reading ability. Teaching begins with recognition, practice and blending of sounds and graphemes, based on a set of module booklets.

Fresh Start Resources

£200.00

Delivery costs

50 minutes 5 sessions 39 weeks 195 sessions

£20.00

£3900

Phonics books £150

Fresh Start Team

RW (IP)

Reporting to ST

100% of students demonstrating that phonic skill development supports their reading ages increase to be closer to their chronological age.

Intervention has positive impact however staff absence undermined effectiveness.

3 Area for Development: Resilience and Mental Health  £23000.00

Barrier and Proposed impact

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

Students readiness to learn:

  • Emotional wellbeing
  • Problem solving

Exclusions sustained at low level

RPI reduced by 5% per term.

80% of student self report positive about therapeutic relationship.

In line with P2B evaluation 2016

50% of student self report evidencing self reflective changes.

Talking therapies and group work offer opportunities to connect feelings and thoughts and consider how to manage day to day challenges.

Talking therapies that have evidence base and are accessible to our young people

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy model (CBT)

Peter Mulholland

Solution Focused Brief Therapy model (SFBT)

Mark Shepherd

Development

Framework to establish impact, including both quantitative and qualitative measures in addition to self-report tools, information about the quality of the therapeutic relationship and student engagement and motivation

£7000.00

Senior Specialist Educational Psychologist

£16000.00

solution Focused Worker/s to develop narratives with young people that support change, develop readiness for learning and foster resilience  

Termly review from each practitioner qualitative and quantative data.

End of year review from each practitioner.

Focus Group RPI

Exclusions sustained at low level

RPI have reduced by at least 33%

Pupil feedback is positive

PM report

Certainly True

Partly True

Not True

Don’t Know

I felt listened to

4

0

0

0

My views were taken seriously

4

0

0

0

I feel Peter knew how to help me

4

0

0

0

I feel Peter and my teachers are working together to support me

3

1

0

0

If a friend needed this support, I would recommend they see Peter

4

0

0

0

Overall our meetings have helped me

4

0

0

0

Pupils self refer evidencing that they find the support to be helpful.

4 Area for Development: Mastery of maths skills  £2815.00 +

Moderate impact very low cost moderate evidence. 

Barrier and Proposed impact

Strategy

Cost

Evaluation

Impact

Too few students fluent in computational mathematical skills.

Basic skills not embedded

80% of all students using MathsFacts in a Flash and mastering at least 1 level.

70% of all students demonstrating an increase in Star Maths test scores evidenced through increase standardised scores.

Mastery learning has been identified as a learning strategy with good potential.

Delivery through VTG created opportunity for peer support with games and directed activities to support students to achieve a high level of success / fluency  in basic computational skills

 (+ - x ÷)

Whole Staff Training

Number Shark selected to support regular practice through games.

Star test to baseline for MathFacts in a Flash.

MathFacts in a Flash selected as students achieve the ability to recall math facts instantly and accurately.  Becoming fluent in maths facts towards developing maths mastery. It is highly rated for progress monitoring mastery measurement National Center on Intensive Intervention.

Number Shark £1000

MathsFacts in a Flash

£300.00

Numicon Resources

Dragon Games

Number books £150

Numeracy activities planned by Maths Teacher shared across VTG.

50 mins per week 39 weeks

£1365.00

Numeracy Lead data reporting to SLT

89% (42 / 47) pupils 94% (46/49) by June

using MathsFacts in a Flash and mastering at least 1 level.

Target of 70% of pupils with at least 2 levels per pupil set in January. At 66% in January.  June – 71% (35/49) of pupils have mastered at least 2 levels

29/49 pupils have made progress since Janurary.  Next STEP – remaining 20 pupils targeted to make progress by the end of the summer term

71.8% of students are demonstrating an increase in Star Maths test scores evidenced through  an increase percebntile scores.

Total PPG received

£34595.00

Total PPG expenditure

£34130.00

PPG remaining

£465

NB Speech and Language Therapist funding additional – Year 7 focus language group and assessment – staff dev


[1]SLT/ SIP/SEF/Events 2017

[2] A compendium of evidence on ethnic minority resilience to the effects of deprivation on attainment. Department of Education  (2015)