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Course Catalog

2019-2020

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Graduation Requirements        2

Academic Center for Enrichment        3

Advance College Project        4

Comparative Arts Division        5

Creative Writing Division         8

Dance Division        14        

Liberal Arts Division        

     English Department                                                                                                                               17

     English as a Second Language        22

     World Language Department        25

     History & Political Science Department        28

Math/Science Division        

     Mathematics Department        32

     Science Department        35

Motion Picture Arts Division                    39        

Music Division        44

    Classical

         Composition        44

         Performance (Brass, Percussion, Strings, Woodwinds)        45  

         Guitar        53

         Organ        53

         Piano        54

         Voice        55

   Jazz        57

   Singer-Songwriter        58

   Studio Music        59

   Music Electives        60

Theatre Arts Division        62

   Design & Production        71

Visual Arts Division        73

Open Electives        81

           

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The minimum requirement for graduation from the Academy is 22 credits. Credits transferred from other high schools count towards this total. A minimum of 10 of the 22 credits must be academic courses that include the specific requirements outlined below. Classes are worth 0.5 credit per semester unless otherwise indicated in the course description. Additional coursework beyond the minimum requirements is selected from a variety of electives to fulfill arts major requirements and to satisfy anticipated college/conservatory entrance requirements. See COLLEGE/CONSERVATORY EXPECTATIONS section that follows. Students should seek complete information from their counselor in the Academic and College Counseling Office regarding graduation and college entrance requirements.

Requirements for new students, regardless of class year:

(CREDIT) SUBJECT AREA

(1.0) 2 semesters of English I (grade 9 equivalent)

(1.0) 2 semesters of English II (grade 10 equivalent)

(1.0) 2 semesters of English III (grade 11 equivalent)

(1.0) 2 semesters of English electives successfully completed during grade 12

(2.0) 4 semesters of Social Science (2 semesters must be completed in grades 11 or 12)

(2.0) 2 years of Mathematics

(1.0) 1 year of Science

COLLEGE/CONSERVATORY EXPECTATIONS

Most colleges recommend students take at least 16 academic credits in high school, including:

4 credits in English

3-4 credits in Math

3-4 credits in Science

3-4 credits Social Science

Minimum 2 credits in the same Foreign Language

STUDENT SCHEDULES

A typical student schedule includes six to eight classes per semester. Students often supplement with online classes taken over the summer. Below is an example of a common academic path, though students will work with Academic and College Counseling to determine an individualized plan:

Grade 9

Interlochen 101

English I

Biology

Algebra I, Geometry, or Algebra II

Spanish or French

2-4 Required arts courses and electives

Grade 10

English II

World History

Geometry, Algebra II, or Precalculus

Spanish or French

2-4 Required arts courses and electives

Grade 11

English III

Social Science Electives (2)

Chemistry or Physics

Algebra II, Precalculus, or Advanced Math

2-4 Required arts courses and electives

Grade 12

English Electives (2)

Science Electives (2)

Advanced Math, Precalculus, AP Calculus or Statistics

3-5 Required arts courses and electives

Postgraduates are required to take one academic subject each semester and 3-5 arts courses and electives.

ACADEMIC CENTER FOR ENRICHMENT

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The Academic Center for Enrichment is the home of Interlochen's academic support services. There are four programs to address distinct areas of need: Interlochen 101, a course to build student success skills; Advanced Study, structure for students taking online courses; Assisted Study, homework and study help; and Peer Tutoring Services.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

ACE101

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Interlochen 101

ACE201-202

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Assisted Study

ACE301-302

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Online Learning

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

Interlochen 101

Interlochen 101 is a comprehensive program intended to help 9th grade Academy students achieve their greatest potential as independent learners. The objectives for the course are to help students more fully comprehend their own learning process and how to utilize all of their resources appropriately and effectively. Through workshops and seminars, curriculum is designed to help students develop an understanding of healthy wellness and learning habits including sleep, nutrition, sex education, the workings of the brain and memory, study skills, organization and executive functioning skills. The program also includes regular time during the scheduled day for Assisted Study in order to build and promote effective and long lasting study habits. Interlochen 101 also offers tutorial instruction and support that goes beyond the help available in the standard academic program. 

Assisted Study

Assisted Study facilitates the effective and timely completion of educational obligations, including short and long-term assignments. This course is scheduled during the Academic day; attendance is taken and an appropriate learning environment is maintained. Enrollment in this course is on a semester basis. Students are expected to come prepared with a work plan and the resources that they need. The program is beneficial to students who require a controlled environment that is free from distraction, and for whom an extra layer of monitoring may be necessary to fulfill educational requirements. ACE staff check in with Assisted Study students each class period. More individualized interventions to support executive functioning, reading or study skills, self-advocacy and other skills designed to promote independent learners may be available when necessary.


Online Learning

This course provides structure for students taking online classes.  The class gives students a formal time and place to work on their coursework as well as accountability encourage them to work during the designated class period.  ACE Staff are also happy to provide assistance as time allows.

ADVANCE COLLEGE PROJECT

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Interlochen partners with Indiana University’s Advance College Project to allow students to receive both high school and college credit through one of these IU courses, taught by Interlochen faculty on our campus:

ENG W131 Reading, Writing, and Inquiry (3 cr.)  Fee: $225

ENG L202 Literary Interpretations (3 cr.)  Fee: $225             

HIST H105 American History I (3 cr.) Fee: $225

HIST H106 American History II (3 c Fee:$225

BIOL L100 Advanced Biology (5 cr) Fee: $275

These are the same English, history, and biology courses that students will take in their freshman year at college or a university. ACP courses at Interlochen are taught with the identical content expectations, pedagogical approaches, student performance standards, and assessment strategies as occur on the IU campus. Unlike Advanced Placement courses, there is no high-stakes test at the end of the course to determine whether or not you will be able to earn credit. Instead, the grade earned in this course applies to your high school requirements and will be recorded, with college credits attached, on an official IU transcript. Students do not need to attend IU to benefit from these credits. Courses are transferable to any U.S. and most international colleges or universities. In fact, in a recent survey of ACP alumni, over 90% of respondents who tried to transfer their IU ACP credits to other colleges or universities were successful.

There is a flat fee of $150 for each ACP course plus an additional $25 per credit hour, though tuition may be waived for eligible students. In ACP English and history courses, students earn 3 credit hours per semester. ACP biology grants 5 credit hours for the entire academic year. Please contact your Academic and College Counselor if you think you may be eligible for a program discount.

ACP courses are currently available to returning seniors and post-graduates.

COMPARATIVE ARTS DIVISION

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The Comparative Arts division offers a curriculum for students who wish to study more than one art form. Each student is enrolled in a daily Individual and Collaborative Studio class in addition to three core classes: Contemporary Arts Performance and Culture, Leadership and Management in the Arts, and Portfolio and Resume Development. In these courses students develop their individual path of arts study and build skills in their selected areas of interest, under the guidance of the Comparative Arts Division Director. Independent studies, collaborative projects, individual studio time, and guest artist instruction are all part of the curriculum.

Students are required to take a minimum of one arts elective in majors across campus each semester. Available electives from other divisions are listed below. Students may also choose (but are not required) to participate in the Interdisciplinary Performance Collaboration, a year-long course open to all majors and grade levels that results in an original presentation in the spring.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

CPA052

Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Contemporary Arts Performance and Culture

CPA057-058

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Interdisciplinary Performance Collaboration

CPA053

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Leadership and Management in the Arts

CPA055

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Portfolio and Resume Development

CPA101-102

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Individual & Collaborative Studio

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

Contemporary Arts Performance and Culture

This class examines contemporary art movements, their historical underpinnings and the cultural and social movements that shaped them. Students will study art, performance, literature and film from today and, through research and analysis, connect these artistic expressions to the history of aesthetics and culture. Performances, installations and literature being made at Interlochen will also be used to illustrate discoveries made by student scholars.

Target Students: Required for all Comparative Arts majors regardless of grade level; open to all majors

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Comparative Arts majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Interdisciplinary Performance Collaboration

The Interdisciplinary Performance Collaboration class creates all elements required for the making of a devised, original presentation. This is a two semester class open to all majors. In the first semester, students collaborate around a central, guiding idea, bringing their individual artistic skills to the process of creative development and exploration, with the goal of devising content and the presentational style best suited to revealing it. In the second semester ideas are refined, organized and rehearsed, and production elements will be built for a presentation in the spring. Clyde Sheets and Guest Artist Sydney James Harcourt guide the process, along with select IAA faculty.

Target Students: Open to all majors regardless of grade level.

Prerequisite: Statement of Interest required

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: 0.5

Leadership and Management in the Arts

This class examines the organizational and personnel structure of arts organizations. Positions and work of individual functions within an arts organization are studied utilizing Interlochen Center for the Arts as a model. IAA instructors and staff bring their perspective and expertise to the classroom as students explore the processes and individuals that make an arts organization run and grow. In addition, this class produces the Comparative Arts Division performance series Academy Café, an open mic performance series held four times per semester, which is open to all students from all divisions.

Target Students: Required for all Comparative Arts majors regardless of grade level; open to all majors

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Comparative Arts majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Portfolio and Resume Development

Supervised development of materials for writing, mixed media and management portfolios and resumes through workshops in presentation and interview techniques, as well as introduction to standard industry business practices, unions and contracts. Includes arts career mentorship and college application preparation.

Target Students: Required for all Comparative Arts majors regardless of grade level; open to all majors

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Comparative Arts majors

Credit per semester: 0.25

Individual & Collaborative Studio

Mentored studies in creative work, focused in chosen discipline(s). Each self-directed creative project culminates in a workshop for in house presentation each December. In the second semester projects developed and refined for Spring presentation in the Interdisciplinary Arts Showcase.

Target Students: Required for all Comparative Arts majors regardless of grade level

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Comparative Arts majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Students will select a minimum of one elective each semester from the following list (subject to change):

Creative Writing

Elements of Poetry

Elements of Fiction

Introduction to Screenwriting

Writing the Body

The Writing of Non-Fiction

Writing the Fantastic

Hybrid Genres

Writing About Music

Experiments in Poetry

Dance

General Dance

Motion Picture Arts

Story

Great Directors

Music

Orchestra**

Band**

Choir

Class Piano

Music Theory

Jazz History

Composition

Private Lessons*

Theatre

Semester 1

Dance for Musical Theatre

Improvisation

Movement for Actors

Play Structure & Analysis

Makeup Design

Stage Management

Fundamentals of Design

Song and Dance Lab

Semester 2

Voice and Diction

Theatre Topics: Clown

Acting Foundations

Makeup Design II

Intro to Musical Theatre

Fundamentals of Design

Visual Arts

Art History

Studio Classes*

*Prerequisites or audition required

**Students in Orchestra/Band must also take lessons. Acceptance into lessons is based on skill level, availability of the instructor, and an audition. Students wishing to perform with a large ensemble will also audition with the ensemble director to determine if their skill level is appropriate for the repertoire chosen that year. In some cases students may participate in part of a concert and not on the more difficult repertoire. If a student is a woodwind, brass, or percussion major, they must audition for both the orchestra and band conductors. The audition consists of solo repertoire the student has prepared, all major scales, and sight reading.


CREATIVE WRITING DIVISION

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The Creative Writing division offers a curriculum designed to help young writers cultivate their talents, develop their imaginations, broaden their command of the writer’s craft at all levels, and to teach them how to read like writers. Fiction and poetry workshops form the core of the program, and students are encouraged to choose from a variety of electives in other genres. Becoming adept at a broad range of genres gives students more versatility and control in their writing and provides a strong preparation for college. Just as the developing writer must learn to write, so must the developing writer learn to listen, to see, and to read critically. Thus all classes involve reading, thinking deeply about, and discussing writing models. Through individualized mentorship and intensive workshops, faculty seek to instill in students an awareness of their challenges and strengths and to empower them with the patience and self-discipline needed to hone their own unique voices and visions. Students leave the program with a portfolio of carefully revised work in a variety of genres.

Each year, students edit and produce a quarterly literary magazine, The Red Wheelbarrow, and an annual online literary journal, The Interlochen Review (www.interlochenreview.org). Students also showcase their work with public readings and various collaborative performance opportunities. An impressive list of nationally renowned writers visits each semester, giving public readings and offering fresh perspectives on the writing craft in question and answer sessions.

A new Creative Writing student must take (a) Workshop and (b) Elements of Poetry and Fiction in his/her first year. Workshops rotate between Fiction, Poetry, and Nonfiction (prerequisite for Nonfiction Workshop is the The Writing of Nonfiction elective). Workshop placement is determined by Creative Writing faculty on the basis of student interest, portfolios, and the need for balanced workshop sizes. Returning seniors are eligible to apply for a one-semester Capstone projects in lieu of Workshop. Capstone Projects are contingent on faculty approval.

After the first year, majors must take Workshop and one other writing course.  In their junior and senior years, majors are encouraged (not required) to take three creative writing courses.  

Majors are also required to attend one-on-one tutorials with their writing instructors on a weekly basis, and they are expected to participate fully in all program activities, including all visiting writer events, student readings and faculty readings.

CREATIVE WRITING COURSES AS ENGLISH CREDIT

Some creative writing course may also be taken for English credit, but only at the 11th and 12th grade level.  These courses are:

*Note that freshmen and sophomores may not take the above creative writing courses to satisfy the English graduation requirements.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

CRW-051

Fall and Spring

9,10,11,12, PG

Writing Workshop

CRW-301 & 302  CRW-303 & 304

Fall and Spring

New 9,10,11,12,PG

Elements of Poetry

Elements of Fiction

CRW305 & 306

Fall and Spring

10,11,12,PG

Introduction to Screenwriting

CRW307

Fall

10,11,12,PG

The Writing of Non-Fiction

CRW312

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Literary Publications

CRW314

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Advanced Screenwriting

CRW316

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Hybrid Genres*

CRW325

Fall

10,11,12,PG

Writing the Fantastic

CRW351

Fall

10,11,12,PG

Experiments in Poetry: Laws and Wildness*

CRW352

Spring

11,12,PG

Writing the Novel

CRW353

Fall

10,11,12,PG

Writing the Body*

CRW354

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Writing About Music and Writing Musically*

*Hybrid Genres rotates every other year with Writing About Music. Experiments in Poetry rotates every other year with Writing the Body.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Workshop

Workshop is the central component of the Creative Writing Program. It is a seminar-style course in which students focus on producing their own poems, short stories, and essays. Workshops use the literature of both professional models and student models to provide extensive training in the writing process. Through discussion of readings, generative exercises, group critique and exchange, tutorials, feedback on drafts, and discussion of the elements by which a piece of writing may be assessed, the student participates in the development of writing and builds a vocabulary of the writing craft. In the process the student gains consciousness of writing as a communal and cultural act. Creative Writing majors rotate each term so that students receive instruction and practice in fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and experimental forms. Workshop is a two-hour course, with the first hour devoted to seminar-style discussion and critique and the second hour typically reserved for independent writing time and individual tutorials.

Target students: grades 9-PG

Prerequisite: none

Number of times course may be taken: Required each semester for Creative Writing majors.

Seating Priority: Creative Writing majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Elements of Fiction

This course will introduce students to the stylistic and thematic elements of short fiction through the close reading and analysis of published stories by a diverse range of authors. Students will participate in in-class writing exercises and will be asked to turn in short written exercises and assignments. Students will have the opportunity to meet with their instructor in tutorial sessions to gain insight into the revision process and further hone their stylistic techniques.

Target Students: Required for all new Creative Writing majors in first or second semester, regardless of grade level.

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Creative Writing majors, followed by Motion Picture Arts majors and Comparative Arts majors have priority seating. Seating open to non-writing majors in grades 11-12 space permitting.

Credit per semester: 0.5

Elements of Poetry

This course will introduce students to the stylistic and thematic elements of poetry through the close reading and analysis of published poems by a diverse range of authors. Assignments will advance students’ skills through intensive attention to imagery, voice, setting, form, and narrative.  Students will participate in in-class writing exercises and will be asked to turn in poems that draw from the techniques discussed in class. They will also have the opportunity to meet with their instructor in tutorial sessions to gain insight into the revision process and further hone their stylistic techniques.

 

Target Students: Required for all new Creative Writing majors in first or second semester, regardless of grade level.

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Creative Writing majors, followed by Singer-Songwriter majors and Comparative Arts majors have priority seating. Seating open to non-writing majors in grades 11-12 space permitting.

Credit per semester: 0.5

Introduction to Screenwriting

This course introduces the concepts of writing for the screen from an analytical and creative viewpoint. Students will learn about screenplay structure and format, explore the creation of character, setting, conflict, theme, tone, dialogue and subtext, and gain an understanding of how to use the tools of the filmmaker to create filmic language and write visually. Students are also given an introduction to some of the professional aspects of screenwriting and available resources including the art of pitching stories and learning how the Writers Guild of America helps screenwriters.

Target Students: Grades 10-PG for Motion Picture Arts majors and Creative Writing majors.

First Semester – Required for all NEW MPA Juniors and Seniors.

Second Semester – Required for all NEW MPA Sophomores.

Prerequisite if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating Priority: Creative Writing majors and Motion Picture Arts majors followed by Comparative Arts

--FIRST SEMESTER COURSES ONLY--

The Writing of Non-Fiction

With the faultiness of memory, the limitations of conventional literary forms, and the murkiness of even the most seemingly admirable writers’ motives, nonfiction has always been a fraught and self-conscious genre. Many writers have delighted in pushing the “non” of nonfiction into shades of increasing gray—a mischief that has taken on new ethical complexity with the rise of “fake news.” This course will dive right into these complexities as we explore a diverse range of subgenres that constitute creative nonfiction, including the lyric and personal essay, reportage, documentary poetics, graphic memoir, oratory, and hybrid forms. Along the way, students will be introduced to stylistic and thematic elements of creative writing as they apply specifically to nonfiction—structure, voice, temporality, point of view, characterization, setting, revision, defamiliarization, and use of evidence—while completing short written assignments and one longer piece that we will workshop as a class.

Target Students: Grades 10-PG for Creative Writing majors.

Prerequisite if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating Priority: Creative Writing majors followed by Comparative Arts majors have priority seating.

Credit per semester:  0.5

Writing the Fantastic

This course explores a wide range of contemporary and classic short stories by “genre-twisters,” authors of literary fiction who appropriate elements of “genre” fiction (fantasy, sci-fi, mystery, ghost stories, gothic, etc.), as well as those whose work is inspired by fables, myths and fairy tales. How and why these authors choose to interweave fantastic elements into their work, and the place of “fantastic” or “fabulist” fiction in contemporary literature will be a topic of investigation. We will discuss the role of storytellers in an increasingly fantastic postmodern culture, and examine the relationship between the “realistic” and “fabulist” veins of contemporary fiction. In-class creative written assignments will be given daily, and we will devote a portion of class time to sharing and discussing your own “genre-twisting” tales.

Target Students: Grades 10-PG, open to all majors

Prerequisite if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating Priority: Creative Writing majors followed by Comparative Arts majors have priority seating.

Credit per semester:  0.5

Experiments in Poetry: Laws and Wildness

In this course, we’ll be exploring—and writing—the borderlands of poetry and poetics. In Experiments in Poetry, we’ll begin by expanding our definition of what we mean when we say ‘formal’ poetry. Forget the sonnet: we’ll be writing poems in the form of dictionaries, ransom notes, and letters meant for people who can’t write back. What forms can the poem take while still remaining a poem? How do we determine the shape a poem should take? In the second half of the course, we’ll discuss the beauty and obsession of the long poem and the poetic sequence. What makes a subject ideal for a sustained poetic experiment? How does a writer examine a single subject from so many angles? We’ll discuss these topics and others as we study poetic projects by writers like John Berryman, Lyn Hejinian, and Gabrielle Calvocoressi. From this base of knowledge, we’ll plan, build, and workshop your own poetic experiments.

Target Students: Creative Writing majors, Comparative Arts majors, Singer-songwriter majors, and any other students who have a strong interest/background in poetry.

Prerequisite: None for Creative Writing majors. Elements of Poetry is a recommended Prerequisite for non-Creative Writing majors.

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Creative Writing majors have first priority.

Credit per semester: 0.5

Writing the Body

In this course, students will read contemporary texts in a variety of genres that take as their

subject the body. We’ll read and discuss work centered on questions of bodily identity and

states of being, discussing topics like gender, sexuality, illness, disability, monstrosity, and

physical change. Students will write and workshop original work in a variety of genres,

culminating in a final creative project.

Target Students: Creative Writing majors; open to other majors who meet the prerequisite

Prerequisite: None for Creative Writing majors. Elements of Poetry or Fiction for non-majors.

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Creative Writing majors have first priority.

Credit per semester: 0.5

--SECOND SEMESTER ONLY--

Literary Publications

The primary objective of Literary Publications is the production of the creative writing department’s annual online literary journal, the Interlochen Review. This is a collaborative enterprise that requires dedication, organization, flexibility, professionalism and teamwork. In addition to producing the Interlochen Review, students will be creating and presenting their own websites using Squarespace, a website builder; envisioning dream literary journals; researching publications and submitting writing to various journals and magazines; thoughtfully preparing questions for several Skype sessions with editors of literary journals; interviewing Visiting Writers, and helping to produce the Festival Chapbook.

Target students: grades 10-PG (9th grade only with instructor permission)

Prerequisite: Interest and solid writing or graphic design skills.

Number of times course may be taken: three

Seating Priority: Creative Writing majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Advanced Screenwriting

This course is designed as an intense workshop for screenwriting students who are ready to work on projects of their choice. Having learned the basics, students are now expected to further develop their voices as screenwriters, create their own goals, and actively engage in analysis of professional screenplays. There is also further exploration of the professional aspects of being a screenwriter.

Target Students: Grades 11-PG

Prerequisite if needed: Introduction to Screenwriting and Instructor Permission.

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating Priority: Creative Writing and Motion Picture Arts Majors.

Credit per semester: 0.5

Hybrid Genres

This course is designed to engage students possessing any background/interest in experimental writing, orienting that experimentation around a number of challenging questions for any artist. How do genre, form, and medium overlap and diverge? What constitutes a hybrid, what are the various effects of hybridity, and what do our answers to these two questions reveal about us? Do hybrids truly leave genre in the past—or do they actually invest us more deeply in its tangles? Is non-genre a possibility? Students will receive an introduction to aesthetic theory, those writers who, over the centuries, have treated the defining and ranking of the arts as a cultural and ideological battleground. In addition to deep, discussion-based engagement with texts that resist taxonomic impulses, we will track the transformation of Arnold Böcklin’s painting Isle of the Dead and Homer’s tale of Odysseus in the Underworld across a variety of treatments to discuss how media-specific affordances and limitations affect process and product. Assignments will include a live-film narration, a performance score in the style of the Fluxus artists, and an ekphrastic translation of a work of art in one medium into another, preferably of a campus performance or gallery showing. The open-guideline final project, workshopped, will encourage interdisciplinary collaboration with one another and with students in other departments.

Target Students: Grades 10-PG

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Seating Priority: Creative Writing majors and Comparative Arts majors have priority seating. Seating open to non-writing majors in grades 11-12 space permitting

Credit per semester 0.5

Writing the Novel

In this course, we'll discuss what features and strategies writers can use to create a strong foundation for their novel, whether it be ‘genre’ or literary fiction. The first month of this course will require the intensive generation of the first fifty pages of your novel; during class sessions, we’ll read and study the beginnings of a series of novels (and talk strategies with their authors via Skype Q&A). In addition, we’ll be practicing craft elements through in-class exercises that draw from the material of your novel. Topics to discuss include: what's the best way to invite readers into your world while also hinting at its complexities? What are good strategies for introducing your characters and their wants and needs? How do you plant the thematic seeds that will grow into a strong story? From there, we’ll move into writing a series of scenes meant to further flesh out our characters and our worlds. We’ll end by workshopping novel excerpts, with the intention of providing students with the tools, groundwork, and momentum for students to finish their novels on their own time.

Target Students: Creative Writing majors.

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Creative Writing majors only.

Credit per semester: 0.5

Writing About Music and Writing Musically

This is an interdisciplinary class ideal for Creative Writing, Music, and Singer/Songwriter

students but open to students from any major on campus who would benefit from exploring

the intersection between the written and spoken word and the medium of music. Topics will

range from poems, short stories, and non-fiction essays about music, ekphrastic attempts to

translate music into writing and vice versa, music journalism and album reviews, sound poetry,

performance writing, and musician/writer collaboration.

Target Students: Creative Writing majors, open to all majors.

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Creative Writing majors, followed by Music, Singer-Songwriters, and Comparative Artists

Credit per semester: 0.5

DANCE DIVISION

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The Dance Division offers a pre-professional training based program that allows students to study dance in preparation for higher education in the field and / or professional careers in the field which fosters critical and process-oriented thinking.  The Division provides a nurturing environment in which students can develop both artistic skills and technical proficiency allowing them to pursue a professional dance career or continue their education at a college/university level.

DESCRIPTION

The Dance Division offers a pre-professional ballet based program.  Highly experienced resident faculty are complemented by nationally renowned guest teachers and choreographers in ballet, modern, jazz, and other idioms.  Five hours per day of class work and rehearsals lead to three fully produced dance productions, two "in studio" performances, and interdepartmental concerts.  At least once a year, the Dance Ensemble performs with the Interlochen Orchestra in a full-length classical ballet.  Audition opportunities are provided on campus for college/university programs, professional companies, and summer schools.  The Dance Division works closely with Academic Division Chairs and support services to provide for the educational, emotional, and physical demands placed on young dancers.  Specialists in nutritional counseling, dance medicine, and related arts fields work closely with dance faculty.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

DAN201-202

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Classical Technique

DAN203-204

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Pointe

DAN205-206

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Male Dance Technique

DAN207-208

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Pas des Deux

DAN209-210

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Contemporary and Other Genres

DAN213-214

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Dance Repertoire

DAN215-216

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Special Topics in Dance

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

General Dance

General Dance provides a dance overview for students from other arts areas.  Students become acquainted to basic technique skills in genres of ballet, modern, and jazz dance along with engaging in special topics as dance history, music for dance, anatomy and pilates.  No previous dance experience is necessary.

Target Students: grade 9 – PG

Seating Priority: Non-majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

DANCE MAJORS

Placement auditions determine the student's class level for technique classes. Intermediate, Intermediate Advanced, and Advanced levels are offered to provide for each student's technical needs.

Classical Technique

The Ballet curriculum is designed to help dancers create a strong pedagogical foundation through repetitive movement of ballet vocabulary and the coordination.  A foundation is formed that may be adapted to any style and technique.  With focus on discipline, technical development, and artistic expression, dancers work on building a solid base that is appropriate toward their skill-sets and potential.

Target Students: 9 – PG dance majors

Seating Priority: Majors only

Credit per semester: .25

Pointe

The Pointe curriculum is designed to build the strength and technique necessary to properly execute ballet and ballet based movement on pointe. Focusing on how to stand on pointe correctly, use of the legs and feet and an appropriate and challenging vocabulary, students gain strength, technique and the cohesive fluidity required to executive classical ballet movement.

Target Students: 9 – PG dance majors (female)

Seating Priority: Majors only

Credit per semester: .25

Male Dance Technique:

The curriculum for Male Dance Technique is designed as a supplement to ballet technique and focuses on specific information for the male dancer: virtuoso technique, jumps, turns, and building the strength necessary to properly execute vocabulary of today. Emphasis is placed on implementation, coordination and a disciplined work ethic.

Target Students: 9 – PG dance majors

Seating Priority: Dance Majors only (Male)

Credit per semester: .25

Pas de Deux 

The Pas de Deux curriculum is designed to help dancers learn the art and skill of partnering.  Use of the hands for men, finding core support, balance and use of weight for coordinated movement quality are addressed.  Students acquire partnering technique with the ability to work cohesively for maximum artistic and technical results.

Target Students: 9 – PG dance majors

Seating Priority: Dance Majors only

Credit per semester: .25

Contemporary and Other Genres

The Contemporary curriculum is designed to incorporate movement and vocabulary from both established and relevant resources into a dancer’s training and development. Use of weight, space, music and dynamics are addressed in an explorative and disciplined environment. Composition, the ability to create and the use of movement and motivation is explored. Creativity and discussion is encouraged in a focused and challenging atmosphere.  

Target Students: 9 – PG dance majors

Seating Priority: Dance Majors only

Credit per semester: .25

Jazz and Hip-Hop Dance

The Jazz and Hip-Hop Dance curriculum is designed to offer students a fun, commercial based approach to dance which focuses on isolations, contractions and multi-faceted coordination of the arms, legs and torso. Different musical rhythms and accents are played with music and students will be exposed to a variety of styles of jazz based choreographers.

Target Students: 9 – PG dance majors

Seating Priority: Dance Majors only

Credit per semester: .25

Character Dance

A historical and important asset for all dancers, Character Dance teaches students about the styles and movements from a variety of different countries. Character dances are often seen in major full length story ballets such as Swan Lake, The Sleeping Beauty, and Don Quixote and can often be performed as individual works themselves. Students will learn the style and ways of movement that represent a variety of different nationalities through dances such as the mazurka, polonaise and fandango.

Target Students: 9 – PG dance majors

Seating Priority: Dance Majors only

Credit per semester: .25

Dance Repertoire

Dance Repertoire develops professional approaches to learning choreography be it for the sole purpose of study or rehearsals and performances.  Whether working in the corps de ballet or as a soloist, dancers are exposed to a variety of choreographers, repertoire and music which are determined by the IAA Dance Faculty in accordance to the students skillsets, strengths and foreseeable appropriate challenges.  The process of learning and potentially performing dance repertoire helps students develop technical skills, artistry and a broader understanding and appreciation toward a full spectrum of dance repertoire.

It should be noted that performances of dance repertoire are considered a privilege and not a right and that casting for such performances is determined by the IAA Dance Faculty based on what is appropriate and best suited for the performance at hand. There is no precedence for a student’s standing in the program (ie - a Freshman is just as eligible for a performance opportunity as a Four-Year Senior.)

Target Students: 9 – PG dance majors by audition

Seating Priority: Dance Majors only

Credit per semester: .5

Special Topics in Dance

This course covers such topics as nutrition, dance pedagogy, pilates, kinesiology, dance conditioning, anatomy, injury prevention and music for dance with the goal of every dance major learning about each topic before they graduate. Topics are taught on a seminar basis and some subjects may be taught by a guest lecture or specialist within the field. Topics classes give students a more academic approach that will provide opportunities for analysis and observation further into the actual physicality of their dancing.

Target Students: 9 – PG dance majors

Seating Priority: Dance Majors only

Credit per semester: .25

LIBERAL ARTS DIVISION     

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

Literature provides the awareness of a complex world through a multiplicity of views focused upon the fullness of life rather than upon any given accepted social, political, or religious orientation.  Concomitant to the study of literature is the study of language, which provides the ability to perceive and formulate meaning.  The objectives of the Interlochen Arts Academy English Department allow us to assist students in the exploration of human experience through the pursuit of literary appreciation and language skills.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

ENG101 & 102

Fall & Spring

9

English I

ENG201 & 202

Fall & Spring

10

English II

ENG301

Fall

11

English III: Articulating an Argument

ENG302

Spring

11

English III: Writing about the Arts

ENG304

Spring

11

English III: Contemporary American Literature

ENG307

Fall

11

English III: The Short Story

ENG309

Fall

11

English III: Women in Literature

ENG314

Spring

11

English III: Modern European Literature

HUM300

Spring

12,PG

Social Justice, Humanities, and the Arts

ENG403

Fall

12,PG

Russian Literature

ENG406

Spring

12,PG

Fantastical Literature

ENG412

Spring

12,PG

Shakespeare

ENG414

Spring

12,PG

Great Ideas, Then & Now

ENG415

Fall

12,PG

Literature of the American South

ENG425

Fall

12,PG

Outsiders, Misfits, and Weirdos

ENG427

Fall

12,PG

Middle Eastern Literature

ENG501

Fall

12,PG

Indiana University: Reading, Writing, and Inquiry

ENG502

Spring

12,PG

Indiana University: Literary Interpretation

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

English I: Coming of Age and the Quest for Identity 

In English I, we will explore the complementary themes of coming of age and the quest for identity. The thematic focus of this course provides us with a platform from which we can develop our skills as critical thinkers, readers, and writers. In our reading and discussion of various texts—including short stories, poetry, novels, and films—we will consider both the meaning and form of the works. Throughout the course we will write in a variety of genres including personal narrative, reflection, and literary analysis.

Target students: Grade 9

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite, if needed: none

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

English II

This required course engages students in an extensive study of the short story form in the first semester, helping them to acquire a critical vocabulary and learn specifically about the literary elements of Plot, Character, Setting, Theme, Style, Tone, and Point of View.  The writing component focuses on literary analysis, with an emphasis on organization, structure, and thesis statement development. Regular vocabulary study is required. In the second semester students study multiple or longer works by major authors as well as literary criticism.  The writing component focuses on research, with students preparing a major documented research essay on a literary topic.  Regular vocabulary study is once again required.

Target students:  Grade 10

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite:  English I

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Credit per semester:  0.5

English III: Articulating an Argument

This course invites students to engage in what is perhaps the most necessary skill to have in today’s increasingly complex and unpredictable world: articulating a strong and well-informed argument. Students are provided ample opportunities to read, discuss, and evaluate arguments from the world around them. Viewing writing as a conversational act, students form their own arguments in response to arguments they encounter in print and in person. The primary text includes readings on current social issues and offers useful templates for such academic writing “moves” as agreeing and disagreeing, introducing and using quotations, introducing ongoing debates, and answering objections. Students leave the course equipped to articulate their positions in various forums, from casual conversation to the formal academic essay.

Target students by:  Grade 11

Semester offered: Semester 1

Prerequisite:  English II or EL IV

Number of times course may be taken:  1

Seating priority:  by teacher recommendation

Credit per semester:  .50

English III: Writing about the Arts

This course invites students to utilize the writing skills they have garnered to-date to write about a variety of artistic genres, including but not limited to visual arts, classical music, popular music, dance, theater, film, and creative writing. While we will experience some canonical works as subjects, current Interlochen performances and exhibits will form the bulk of subject material for a variety of writing forms. Students identify the essential elements necessary for writing about each particular artistic genre through playing the role of the observer, the interviewer, the researcher, and the audience member. As students begin to consider their place in the world, they transition to writing about their own artistic endeavors, garnering skills in technical writing to market themselves in their post-secondary lives.

Target students by:  Grade 11

Semester offered: Semester 2

Prerequisite:  English II or EL IV

Number of times course may be taken:  1

Seating priority:  by instructor recommendation

Credit per semester:  .50

English III: Contemporary American Literature

This course is designed to familiarize students with the major themes of post-World War II American authors.  The literature focuses on the experiences of representative figures in their quest for self-actualization and their rightful place in contemporary society.

Target students by:  Grade 11

Semester offered: Semester 2

Prerequisite:  English II

Number of times course may be taken:  1

Seating priority:  none

Credit per semester:  .50

English III: The Short Story

This course considers the history and development of the short story, as well as several different critical approaches to short fiction. Reading stories that are thematically connected, students analyze classics of nineteenth- and twentieth-century short fiction, and finally they explore stories that have been published within the past few years.. Students hone their critical skills by reading great works of fiction by some of the world’s finest authors, and they also have opportunities to pursue the study of authors and works according to their own interests.

Target students: Grades 11

Semester offered: Semester 1

Prerequisite, if needed: English II

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

English III: Women in Literature 

This course has been designed to introduce students to some great literature that deals with the subject of women.  In this late day and age it would seem that anyone with a modestly evolved intellect can recognize the two most salient facts with regard to this subject: first, that women are and always have been at least as smart and capable as men, and second, that they have been given nothing close to the same respect or opportunities.  Literature both reflects this subjugation and contributes to it.  In all-too-rare instances, it offers resistance.

Target students by:  Grade 11

Semester offered: Semester 1

Prerequisite:  English II

Number of times course may be taken:  1

Seating priority:  none

Credit per semester:  .50

English III: Modern European Literature  

This course has been designed to introduce students to European Literature in the Modern Period, which necessarily involves an ongoing discussion of both the Modern Era and Modernism in all the arts.  The required texts represent several giants of this subject area, Modernist writers whose work and influence can hardly be overstated.  Emphasis is placed on the historical context in order to understand what forces were driving this transformative era in popular culture and the arts.

Target students: Grade 11

Semester offered: Semester 2

Prerequisite, if needed: English I, English II

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Social Justice, Humanities, and the Arts

NOTE:        This course is a Flex-Credit course and can satisfy EITHER an upper-level History OR upper-level English requirement.

Humanities, Social Justice, and the Arts is an interdisciplinary, humanities-style course built with the following goal at its heart: to allow students to explore issues related to social justice while honing their skills as thinkers, researchers, writers, and presenters. The course will open with an introductory unit aimed at investigating a complex and charged subject from a variety of perspectives within a range of different media. During this unit, students will read a selection of print pieces (newspaper articles, poems, and academic essays), view works of visual art, listen to a selection of songs and podcasts, and watch a film. At the conclusion of this unit, students will propose a research project they will pursue for the duration of the course.

To complete the research project, students will need to identify an issue tied to social justice, evaluate sources addressing the issue, synthesize the information they collect, and present an evidence-based argument on the issue. The culminating project for the course will ask students to craft a persuasive creation (a video, a piece of music, a work of visual art…) intended to persuade an audience to accept the position the student presented in their argument paper. The goal of this project is to allow students the chance to engage in the process of social justice awareness or activism. This course is intended to let students dive deeply into important social issues while exploring the arts and practicing key skills of critical thinking and expression.

Target students: Grades 12, PG

Semester offered: Semester 2

Prerequisite, if needed: English I, English II, English III, World History

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Russian Literature             

Throughout the nineteenth century and until the collapse of the Soviet Union in the late twentieth century, the Russian authors have been the voices of their society's most urgent concerns.  This course examines the evolution of the Russian and the lives and representative works of notable writers from both the Golden Age of Russian Literature and the era of Stalin.  Attention focuses on the evolving literary aesthetic and the range of cultural and political shifts which influenced its development.

Target Students:  Grade 12, PG

Semester offered: Semester 1

Prerequisite:  English III

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Credit per semester:  0.5

Shakespeare

Considering Shakespeare's plays as both enduring classics of literature and living theatrical experiences, students become acquainted with the vitality, versatility, and universality of the playwright.  The course closely examines the language of the plays, but it also probes how the other “languages” of the theatre interact with text in order to communicate meaning and create art.

Target students: Grades 12, PG

Semester offered: Semester 2

Prerequisite, if needed: English I, English II, English III

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Great Ideas, Then & Now

This course invites students to explore the concepts present in many of the great works throughout history—concepts such as courage, virtue, love, or justice—and examine how they manifest differently in literature across time. Students engage with various genres of literature, including music, film, fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction, ultimately selecting one classic text from the Western literary canon and a contemporary counterpart to utilize for their main focus. Students are taught how to approach and read complex texts and compare/contrast how these great ideas are presented in their canonical and contemporary selections. Ultimately, students become more critical thinkers, readers, and writers through their exploration, deepening their understanding of the great conversation taking place across literature and how the great ideas are at work in their own lives.

Target students: Grades 12, PG

Semester offered: Semester 2

Prerequisite, if needed: English I, English II, English III

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Literature of the American South

The American South, as a region ripe with the fruits of literary endeavor, has earned a reputation that ranks with that of the Irish or the Russians and as such, students examine its literature as place, custom and culture.  Like that of the Irish and the Russians, Southern literature has a tinge of mystique, an other-worldly quality wherein the line between language and music blurs, and “place” becomes almost a character in itself.  The novel, drama, and short story are the forms in which this distinction has been primarily achieved, and those are consequently the focus of the course.

Target students by:  Grade 12, PG

Semester offered: Semester 1

Prerequisite:  English III

Number of times course may be taken:  1

Seating priority:  none

Credit per semester:  .50

Outsiders, Misfits, and Weirdos

This course invites students to explore the insider/outsider dynamic present in various social structures and how this dynamic impacts the creation of writing, art, and film. Students engage with various genres of literature, including music, film, fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction. Students focus primarily on how literature reflects the position of the outsider, specifically in terms of race, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic status, in addition to how outsiders’ work is perceived by othersboth insiders and outsiders alike. Throughout the course, students gain an appreciation for the complexity of any rhetorical situation by studying the nuance involved in creating what we send out into the world.

Target students: Grades 12, PG

Semester offered: Semester 1

Prerequisite, if needed: English I, English II, English III

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Middle Eastern Literature

The people of the Middle East become familiar to us through their oral and written traditions of powerful storytelling as rendered in contemporary short stories, graphic novels, poetry, film, and novels.  These various texts introduce us to the ancient and recent history and geography of this region.   From uneducated, impoverished child-brides to wealthy, “westernized” students, authors invite us to share their characters’ perspectives and form new understanding of longstanding regional conflicts.  Students participate in dialectical discussion and writing activities, preparing them to create an independently or collaboratively designed artistic project that extends their new understanding of these rich cultures into the greater Interlochen community.

Target students: Grades 12, PG

Semester offered: Semester 1

Prerequisite, if needed: English I, English II, English III

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Fantastical Literature

“Fantastical Literature” offers a survey of the three genres of imaginative writing at the center of modern culture, science fiction, fantasy and horror. Over the course of the semester, we will explore how the development of these genres over the last three centuries reflect, critique and resist many of the seismic socio-culture shifts of the modern age, from the shock of the European industrial revolution, to the sexual anxieties of victorian England, to the apocalyptic intonations of the Cold War, the American civil rights movement, the computer revolution, and “Third World” postcolonial nationalism and the rise of global capitalism, to the looming horizon of environmental catastrophe that shapes our present. These historical changes will be traced through the various generic fragmentations and hybridizations imaginative writers have developed in response to them, leading us to explore diverse sub-genres like fairy and folk tales, adventure stories, space opera, gothic fiction, utopia/dystopia, ghost stories, weird fiction, cosmic horror, sword and sorcery, epic fantasy, dark fantasy, science fantasy, body horror, post-apocalyptic fiction, cli-fi, magical realism and slipstream. These generic explorations will be mediated through our self-reflexive attempt to understand the aesthetic distinctions between “high” and “low” culture that have, on the one hand, precluded these texts from serious academic study while, on the other hand, facilitated around them cultish social practices akin to religious devotion. Thus, in addition to discussions of various texts and their meanings, this class will contain an indelibly sociological-- and perhaps even ethnographic-- element, as we explore, analyze and discuss the practices and identities of communities devoted to fantastical writing through immersing ourselves in the culture of conventions, fan-zines, podcasts, cosplay and fanfic.            

Target students: Grades 12, PG

Semester offered: Semester 2

Prerequisite, if needed: English I, English II, English III

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Indiana University: Reading, Writing, and Inquiry

Instruction and practice in the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills required in college. Emphasis is on written assignments that require synthesis, analysis, and argument based on sources.

Target students: Returning students in grades 12, PG

Semester offered: Semester 1

Prerequisite, if needed: English I, English II, English III

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Indiana University: Literary Interpretation

Develops critical skills essential to participation in the interpretive process. Through class discussion and focused writing assignments, introduces the premises and motives of literary analysis and critical methods associated with historical, generic, and/or cultural concerns.

Target students: Returning students in grades 12, PG

Semester offered: Semester 2

Prerequisite, if needed: English I, English II, English III, ENG501 (Reading, Writing, and Inquiry)

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

ENGLISH AS A LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The English as a Second Language Department offers a curriculum structured to meet the needs of those international students with limited English proficiency. Current linguistic, psychological and educational research offers insight into the process of learning additional languages and the pedagogy that supports second language learning. Language learning takes place in the community and in classrooms. In the school setting several general principles underlie successful language teaching and learning for all students.  

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

EL120 & 121

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

EL Emerging: Integrated Skills

EL122 & 123

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

EL Emerging: Speaking & Listening

EL124 & 125

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

EL Emerging: Creative Thinking

EL 220 & 221

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

EL Developing: Integrated Skills

EL225 & 226

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

EL Developing: Life Science

EL320 & 321

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

EL Advanced: Integrated Skills

EL324 & 325

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

EL Advanced: History & Government

EL Emerging: Integrated Skills

In this course students will speak, listen to, read and write English.  Students will enlarge their vocabulary by acquiring new words and practicing new idioms.  Different grammar topics will refine knowledge of verb tenses and irregular verbs.  Reading comprehension will improve with study fiction and expository writing that will lead to acquiring academic skills for success in classes with native speakers of English.  Students will practice writing for different audiences and with different purposes.  Current events projects, such as Moth story writing, will include practicums for speaking and writing English.  Most importantly, students will become comfortable having English conversations with the instructor and with fellow students.

Target Students: Beginning English learners

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite if needed: EL Placement Exam

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple by instructor permission

Seating priority:  none

Credit per semester: 2.0

EL Emerging: Speaking & Listening

This course introduces students to basic structures and vocabulary of the English language through the skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students learn strategies in order to advance their reading, listening, and pronunciation skills.  They expand oral comprehensibility and write complete sentences, a standard paragraph, and short content-based essays. They utilize level-appropriate conventions of grammar and punctuation with a minimum of errors.

Target Students: Beginning English learners

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite if needed: EL Placement Exam

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple by instructor permission

Seating priority:  none

Credit per semester: 2.0

EL Emerging: Creative Thinking

In the first semester, this course introduces students to background in American history and culture. The students learn about the early years of American democracy, the development of civil society, and the influences of these principles on American culture. They will learn about American holidays and traditions and why we celebrate them. In the second semester, the students will concentrate on writing coherent, well-organized paragraphs and short essays. When they are able to write a good paragraph, they will work on learning to write short essays.

Target students: Beginning English learners

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite: EL placement exam

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple by instructor permission

Seating priority: none

Credit per semester: .5

EL Developing: Integrated Skills--reading, listening, writing, and speaking

This course uses academic skills and content that prepare students for success in the mainstream classroom, the TOEFL exam, and American universities.  Textbook readings are excerpted or adapted from textbooks, academic journals, and other academic sources.  Course content covers five academic areas and includes listening to lectures, note-taking, participating in discussions, preparing oral and written reports, and writing essays.

Target Students: Upper intermediate EL students

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite if needed: EL Level II or EL Placement Exam

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple by instructor permission

Seating priority:  none

Credit per semester: 2.0

EL Developing: Life Science

This is a content-based English as a language course. Students will learn academic reading and writing skills by studying Earth science. The topics we will study are (1) the planet Earth, (2) water on Earth, (3) Earth’s atmosphere, and (4) life on Earth. Some of our lessons will be “blended,” which means that part of our work will be in class and part of it will be online.

Target Students: English learners

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite, if needed: EL Emerging or EL Placement Exam

Number of times course can be taken: multiple by instructor recommendation

Seating priority: International Students

Credit per semester: 0.5

EL Advanced: Integrated Skills

This course is designed to help you improve your academic English. We will do nonfiction readings and listening, and each chapter will cover an academic subject that is commonly found in universities. In this integrated skills course, you will learn useful strategies to increase the speed and accuracy with which you listen to and read academic information in English. You will also improve your ability to express yourself, analyze ideas, and synthesize information in academic writing and speaking.

Target students: English learners who are advanced but require more English support than they would receive in a mainstream course.

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite, if needed: EL Developing or EL Placement Exam

Number of times course can be taken: multiple by instructor recommendation

Seating priority: International Students

Credit per semester: 0.5

EL Advanced: History & Government

The goal of this course is to build listening, speaking, reading and writing skills for students who are not yet fluent in English. This student-driven survey course begins with foundations of American government. It involves a study of the Constitution, including grants of power and limitations on those powers within a federal system of government. Students will examine the roles of the President, Congress, and the Supreme Court and the concepts of separation of powers and checks and balances.  It also involves an examination and analysis of the electoral process in the United States and the process of appointment of justices of the Supreme Court. In addition, students will be expected to research, write about and present the fundamentals of their home country’s government, and compare and contrast different forms of government. Students will be encouraged to bring questions and concerns about current events to be incorporated into the curriculum.

Target students: EL Advanced students

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite: EL Developing or concurrent placement in EL Advanced

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: 0.5

WORLD LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

Language is the art of communication through behavior, speech and writing. The study of a world language, therefore, involves the student in the communication patterns of other cultures.

In an effort to encourage communication, all of the languages are taught exclusively in the target language, and all communication between the teacher and students takes place in the target language, including grammatical explanations and cultural topics. In essence, the language classroom begins to approximate a microcosm of the foreign country. Contextual clues, cognates, gestures and visual aids assist the learner in understanding without the need to translate to or from his or her native language. Participation at weekly language tables is required to promote meaningful communication in a less structured environment.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

FRE101 & 102

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

French I

FRE201 & 202

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

French II

FRE301 & 302

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

French III

FRE303 & 304

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

French IV

FRE401 & 402

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

French V

SPA101 & 102

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Spanish I

SPA201 & 202

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Spanish II

SPA301 & 302

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Spanish III

SPA303 & 304

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Spanish IV

SPA401 & 402

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Spanish V

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES – All courses full year in length.

French I

The principal goal in French I is to communicate in French.  Various interactive activities play an important role in class.  French films, French Table and tutorials provide opportunities to practice and to sample francophone cultures.  Students gain an understanding of basic elements of French culture, along with a foundation in grammar.  Students learn the three major irregular verbs, regular -er, -ir, and –re verbs, several irregular verbs, the present and past tenses (with avoir and être).

Target Students:  grades 9-PG

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite:  none

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Seating priority:  none

Credit per semester:  0.5  (A year long course)

French II

The goal of this course is to communicate in French by incorporating the four communicative competencies, which are incorporated into daily activities. Students have many opportunities to practice the French language and to sample francophone cultures. By the end of French II, students have an understanding of the following grammatical structures: –ir verbs, l’imparfait, selected irregular verbs, indirect object pronouns, reflexive verbs, relative pronouns, le futur simple, and le conditionnel.

Target students: Grades 9-PG

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite: French I or its equivalent.

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: none

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

French III

The goal in French III is to extend fluency.  This class is taught entirely in French, with students being expected to express difficult concepts in French.  Students begin an exploration of French literature, reading Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Jean-Paul Sartre and other extracts.  Poetry and songs are also used as a vehicle for comprehension.  Advanced grammatical concepts are addressed.   Films, French Table, and general conversation play an increasingly important role.

Target students:  grades 9-PG

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite:  French II

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Seating priority:  none

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

French IV/V

The goal in French IV/V is to extend fluency.  This class is taught entirely in French, with students being expected to express increasingly difficult concepts in French.  Students begin an exploration of French literature, reading Jean-Paul Sartre, Molière and other authors according to the interests of the class.  Poetry and songs are also used as a vehicle for comprehension. Advanced grammatical concepts are addressed.  Films, French Table, and general conversation play an increasingly important role.

Target students:  grades 9-PG

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite:  French III

Number of times course can be taken:  2

Seating priority:  none

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

Spanish I 

Spanish I introduces the language and Hispanic culture through conversation, written and oral exercises, readings, and music.  Students learn a great deal of vocabulary and focus on basic grammatical structures.  This class is taught primarily in Spanish.  By the end of Spanish I students should be able to use the present and preterite tenses, along with tener + que + inf., ir + a + inf., and estar + ando/iendo.

Target Students:  grades 9-PG

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite, if needed: none

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority:  none

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

Spanish II

Spanish II expands the vocabulary and grammar structures through conversations, written and oral exercises, readings and music. This class is taught in Spanish, and it is expected that students speak only Spanish during class time.  Students will be practicing fluency and using the present, preterite and imperfect tenses.  They should also be able to use the present progressive tense, and have a good command of direct and indirect object pronouns.

Target Students:  grades 9-PG

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite, if needed: Spanish I

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating Priority:  none

Credit per semester: 0.5 (A year long course)

Spanish III

This course is conducted in Spanish. It reviews certain materials from prior levels within a literary context emphasizing art and culture. Pair work, small group work, class discussions, debates, and oral presentations serve to strengthen conversational skills in Spanish. Films, music, and articles enhance the understanding of Hispanic cultures. A research project exploring regional artists along with their customs and traditions will be completed, and will include a presentation.

Target Students: grades 9-PG

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite, if needed: Spanish II

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

Spanish IV/V

This course is conducted in Spanish. It reviews grammar and vocabulary from prior levels emphasizing art and culture, and introduces additional grammar and vocabulary specific to student interest. Pair work, small group work, class discussions, debates, and oral presentations serve to strengthen conversational skills in Spanish. Films, music, and articles enhance the understanding of Hispanic cultures. A research project exploring art and culture will be completed, and will include a presentation.  Spanish IV and V have class together, but are separated, with Spanish V working more intensely with the language in the context of literature, current events and conversing with native speakers.

Target Students: grades 9-PG

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite, if needed: Spanish III

Number of times course can be taken: 2

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The History and Political Science curriculum at Interlochen Arts Academy assumes the responsibility for stimulating an awareness of the human condition. The goals of the department, therefore, emphasize the application of rational thinking to an understanding of man's historical, economic, political, and social development.  The consideration of societal issues and the acquisition of the knowledge and skills that are fundamental and basic to the disciplines of History and Political Science are taught.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

HIS207 & 208

Fall & Spring

9,10

World History

HIS304

Fall

11,12,PG

Contemporary America

HIS311

Fall

11,12,PG

American Political Process

HIS313

Spring

11,12,PG

History, Research and Film

HIS318

Spring

11,12,PG

Century of Conflict: A Social and Cultural History

HIS323

Fall

11,12,PG

Intolerance, Bigotry and Genocide: Then & Now

HIS324

Spring

11,12,PG

Issues in Latin American History

HIS501 & 502

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Indiana University: American History I & II

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

World History

In World History, we will actually begin our investigations with pre-history. Long before the development of any lasting written record, humans were creating artifacts—works of art—which have endured to this day. Throughout the course we will examine this theme of creation. What is it that drives our need as humans to create? We will look closely at art, culture, and religion while covering many periods of history. This is a survey course, but you will have opportunities to explore in greater depth areas of study that excite you.

Target Students: grades 9 and 10

Semester offered: Semesters 1 & 2, full year course

Prerequisite, if needed: none

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Contemporary America

Between 1945 & 2010, American society evolved from one in which newspapers were the most common form of learning information to one in which you can communicate with a friend in Tokyo faster than you can walk from your dorm to the dining hall. How this transition took place and how its developments – social, technological, political & philosophical – impact your life today will be the focus of this course. The world we live in today is the result of generations of recorded events – inventions, wars, exploration, greed, good, evil and curiosity to name a few – and how this nation went from AM radio to receiving messages from a rover on Mars is what we will endeavor to understand. What happened to get us to this point explains why our culture is the way it is now. Ideally, this course will help you understand why certain Americans think, do and say what they think, do and say, and form opinions based on your learning.

Target students: Grades 11-12 - PG

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Grades 11-12

Credit per semester: 0.5

American Political Process

The study of the American political process involves knowledge of the foundations of American government.  Included within this is an examination of what is public policy and who participates in the making of policy. It therefore involves a study of the Constitution, including grants of power and limitations on those powers within a federal system of government. Students will also examine the meaning of civil rights and civil liberties in relation to the policy-making process. To understand the American political process, students are involved in an examination and analysis of the roles of the President, Congress, and the Supreme Court within the constitutional framework of a federal system of government and the concept of separation of powers and checks and balances.  It also involves an examination and analysis of the electoral process of the President and Vice-President of the United States, members of Congress and the process of appointment and the tenure of justices of the Supreme Court.  Students will be required to seek out the constitutional principles involved in the political process.

Target students: Grades 11-12 - PG

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Grades 11-12

Credit per semester: 0.5

History, Research, and Film

In this course students will examine several films that depict historical events from around the world. These films will be analyzed for their historical accuracy.  In other words, students will need to answer the question, did the filmmakers “get it right?”  In addition, where the filmmakers strayed from the “true” historical path, students will analyze why they chose to do so and if it seems like an appropriate decision.  Finally, the students in the class will have substantial input as to which films we study.  The only caveat to this is that the pieces must be about non-American historical events.

Target Students:  Grades 11-12 - PG

Prerequisite:  None

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Seating Priority:  Grades 11-12

Credit per semester:  0.5

Century of Conflict: A Social and Cultural History of the 20th Century

This course covers the social and cultural impact of the First World War, the rise of the fascist and communist dictatorships, the Great Depression, the Second World War, the Holocaust and the Cold War on the peoples of the major powers during the 20th Century.  It has a primary focus on social history, such as the experience of soldiers, the home fronts, the role of women and minorities, and the development of the visual arts, dance, music, literature and cinema in response to the violence that swept the world between 1914 and 1992.  Local veterans and others will be interviewed as part of the oral history focus of the course.  Military history will be a component of the course as the frame for the cultural and social movements caused by conflict.  The course has a global reach, with attention given to the experience of the peoples of Asia, Africa and South America as well as Europe and North America.

Target Students:  Grades 11-12 - PG

Prerequisite:  None

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Seating Priority:  Grades 11-12-PG

Credit per semester:  0.5

Intolerance, Bigotry, and Genocide: Then & Now

The goal of this humanities-style course is to allow students to explore issues related to intolerance, bigotry, and genocide as thinkers, researchers, writers, and presenters. This course will examine the issues of race, religion, gender, and attitudes towards ‘the other’ in the U.S. and globally. The course will begin with an introductory unit aimed at investigating the process of “othering” from a variety of perspectives within a range of different media. During this unit, students will read a selection of print pieces (newspaper articles, poems, and academic essays), view works of visual art, and listen to a selection of songs and podcasts. As a class, students will explore topics such as LGBTQ+ rights and indigenous decimation. Students will be encouraged to bring questions and concerns about current events to be incorporated into the curriculum.

The final weeks of class will be dedicated to researching a topic of the student’s choice. To complete the research project, students will need to identify a historic or contemporary issue tied to intolerance. They will identify and evaluate sources addressing the issue, synthesize the information they collect, and present that information to their class.  This course is intended to let students dig deep into important social issues, past and present, while exploring the arts and practicing key skills of critical thinking and expression.

Target Students:  Grades 11-12 - PG

Prerequisite:  English II

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Seating Priority:  Grades 11-12-PG

Credit per semester:  0.5

                                    

Issues in Latin American History

The goal of this humanities-style course is to allow students to explore issues related to Latin America as thinkers, researchers, writers, and presenters. During this class, students will read a selection of print pieces (newspaper articles, poems, and academic essays), view works of visual art, and listen to a selection of songs and podcasts. Students will explore social, economic, and political topics such as the encomienda system, foreign interventions, and and the role of the Catholic church. Students will be encouraged to bring questions and concerns to be incorporated into the curriculum.

This course is intended to let students dig deep into important issues in Latin America, past and present, while exploring the arts and practicing key skills of critical thinking and expression.

Target students: Grades 11-12-PG

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: .50

Indiana University: American History I & II

Evolution of American society: political, economic, social structure; racial and ethnic groups; sex roles; Indian, inter-American, and world diplomacy of the United States; evolution of ideology, war, territorial expansion, industrialization, urbanization, international events and their impact on American history.

Target students: Returning students in grades 12-PG

Semester offered: Semester 1 & 2

Prerequisite: High School World History

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: .50

MATH/SCIENCE DIVISION

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The Mathematics Department offers a curriculum with topics, course content, instructional emphasis, and teaching methods that meet standards of the new century.  Programs such as Fathom, EquatIO, and Geometers’ Sketchpad are used extensively and each student will need to bring his or her laptop and graphing calculator to all math classes.  The department will provide other technology tools, such as iPads and CBRs as needed.  The curriculum emphasizes experimental and exploratory problem solving and communication of mathematical ideas verbally and in writing.  Students create and use graphs of data and functions to develop mathematical skills, to reason through problems, and to understand complex relationships.  During evening tutorials, in which students may meet with instructors on an individual basis, an opportunity is provided for extra assistance, independent projects and/or laboratory work.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MTH101-102

Fall & Spring

9,10

Algebra I

MTH103-104

Fall & Spring

9,10,11

Geometry

MTH201-202

Fall & Spring

9,10,11

Algebra II

MTH301-302

Fall & Spring

10,11,12

Precalculus

MTH303

Fall & Spring

10,11,12

Advanced Math: Applications for Life

MTH304

Fall & Spring

10,11,12

Advanced Math: Applications in the Arts

MTH401-402

Fall & Spring

11,12, PG

AP Calculus AB

MTH405-406

Fall & Spring

11,12, PG

AP Statistics

MTH409

Fall

10,11,12, PG

Computer Science: Processing*

MTH410

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Computer Science: Programming*

*May be taken for science credit

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

Algebra I

Algebra I is the study of mathematical patterns and ideas.  It is balanced between learning skills, exploring concepts, and solving problems.  Technology is used to gather, interpret, and represent data from real-world situations.  Creating and using mathematical models is a theme throughout.  Algebra is integrated with geometry, probability, and statistics.  Topics covered include equations—linear, quadratic, and exponential—as well as systems of equations and inequalities, functions, and fractals.

Target students: Grade 9-10

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

Geometry  

This course is investigation-driven and activity-based. It covers topics of Euclidean Geometry such as deductive proof, properties of polygons, circles, similar/congruent triangles, parallel lines, area and volume, the Pythagorean Theorem, basic concepts of right triangle trigonometry, and general ideas of transformations. Computer technology and traditional Geometry tools are used in all investigations. Applications of Geometry concepts to various arts areas are incorporated within the course.

Target students: All who meet Prerequisite

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

Algebra II 

Algebra II is primarily the study of functions—linear, exponential, polynomial, and parametric—through the use of data. Introductory trigonometry, statistics, and probability topics are also explored. Students use calculators, computers, and data gathering devices to investigate all topics. Throughout the course students discover the sense behind the mathematics, rather than simply learn steps for solving problems. Small group work, discussion, and the real world interpretation of the mathematics are stressed. Applications to the arts are woven throughout the curriculum.

Target students: All who meet Prerequisite

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

Advanced Math: Application in the Arts 

The course will explore connections between math and the arts. The topics will vary based on the instructor, and technology will be introduced as needed. We will look at topics such as symmetry and perspective in visual art, generative art, formal languages, and mathematical music theory, among others. Technology will be introduced and used based on the topics explored. This course is meant for those students who do not plan on taking AP Calculus but would benefit from additional exploration of Algebra II concepts. 

Target students: 11-12-Post Graduate

Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: 0.5

Advanced Math: Applications for Life 

This course is meant for those students who do not plan on taking AP Calculus but would benefit from additional exploration of Algebra II concepts.  Concepts covered in the fall semester class may include the study of problem solving and critical thinking, set theory, logic, equations (linear, quadratic, rational and radical) and inequalities, functions and graphs, measurement and geometry, and other discrete math topics. Concepts covered in the spring semester include the study of modelling a business, banking services, consumer credit, budgeting, house/auto purchase and ownership, investing, retirement planning, counting methods, and probability and statistics.

Target students: 11-12-Post Graduate

Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: 0.5

PreCalculus

This course is designed to serve students who are preparing for Calculus or further work in mathematics.  As a pre-calculus course, it offers an analytical, graphical and numerical approach to understanding polynomials, exponential functions, logarithms, and a wide variety of trigonometry topics. Additional topics may include polar graphs, conic sections, matrices, sequences, and series. Real life applications and data interpretation are integral parts of this course of study.

Target students: 11-12-PG

Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics 

This course introduces the students to the basic concepts of one of the most important fields of mathematics most people ever encounter.  Statistics is about data, and data are numbers with a context.  Students learn to make statements of facts and inferences and to state a level of confidence in their inferences. They become proficient in accurately communicating statistical concepts, including methods of data collection and valid interpretations of data.  The course follows the topics outlined in the Advanced Placement curriculum in preparation for the AP Test in May.

Target students: 11-12-PG

Prerequisite: Algebra II required, Advanced Mathematics preferred

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester:0.5  (A year long course)

Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus 

This course covers approximately one and one-half semesters of college calculus. Students completing the course successfully are prepared to take the AP Calculus AB exam. Topics include limits, continuity, differentiability; optimization, related rates, separable differential equations, and slope fields; indefinite integrals, Riemann Sums, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and applications of the definite integral.  The course material is explored through class discussions, small group activities and investigations, sample exam questions, and individual study of problems.

Target students: Those that meet Prerequisite

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Students who plan to take the AP Calculus Exam

Credit per semester: 0.5

Computer Science: Processing (fall semester only)

This course offers students an exciting introductory course in Computer Science that is relevant for beginners and experts. Students will explore problem solving, data, encryption/decryption, and networking through activities and projects that encourage creativity. Students will culminate the semester by learning how to apply their knowledge in a practical way to build a computer.

Target students: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Algebra II, can be taken concurrently

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Computer Science: Programming (spring semester only)

This course offers students an exciting introductory course in Computer Science that is relevant for beginners and experts. Students will explore problem solving, app creation, programming in Java, and circuitry through activities and projects that encourage creativity. Students will culminate the semester by using their knowledge and creativity to work with apps and circuitry in an open ended project.

Target students: Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Algebra II, can be taken concurrently

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The Science Department offers students a rigorous, college preparatory curriculum with small classes and well-equipped laboratory facilities.  The Academy's 1200 acres of woods and lakeshore provide an exceptional laboratory of coursework in the natural sciences.  During evening tutorials, in which students may meet with instructors on an individual basis, an opportunity is provided for extra assistance, independent projects and/or laboratory work.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

SCI101-102

Fall & Spring

9,10

Biology

SCI201-202

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Chemistry

SCI301-302

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Physics

SCI303-304

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Ecology

SCI309

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Agricultural Science: Fall Harvest

SCI310

Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Agricultural Science: Spring Seedlings

SCI405

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Astronomy

SCI408

Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Forensics

SCI501-502

Fall & Spring

12,PG

Advanced Biology

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

Biology:

Evolutionary biology provides a framework for understanding everything from ecology to human physiology and genetics. This course takes advantage of the expansive and diverse outdoor study areas on campus and off. Ecosystem biology frames the fall semester, concluding with a creative expression of knowledge and concern for endangered species. The content moves indoors and online in the spring for cellular biology, genetics and human physiology. We close the year with a unit on botany and local food production.

Target Students: Grade 9-10

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Credit per semester:  0.5  (A year long course)

Chemistry

This course offers the student a modern, relevant course in high school level chemistry.  The program combines the theory and concepts of chemistry with practical applications for a basic program for high school students. Atomic structure, chemical bonding, and molecular changes are unifying concepts. Demonstrations and laboratory activities are an integral part of the course, emphasizing quantitative as well as qualitative relationships. Students are given the opportunity to explore particular topics in chemistry of special or personal interest through a variety of research projects.  A strong mathematics background is recommended.

Target Students: Grades 9-12-PG

Prerequisite: Algebra II, can be taken concurrently

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

Physics

This is a learner-centered, activity-based, and Modeling-oriented introductory physics course. It covers Special Theory of Relativity, basic Quantum Mechanics, classical mechanics, optics, electricity and magnetism, and waves and sound.  Students conduct experiments, discuss processes and results, discover laws themselves, apply learned material by completing STEAM projects. Students will engage in group activities both in and outside of class.

Target Students: 9 - PG

Prerequisite: Geometry (Algebra II is co-requisite)

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

Ecology

Ecology is a full year field course introducing the student to basic ecological concepts. While wading, hiking, and snowshoeing the class will study the abundant stream, lake, bog, swamp, marsh, dune, field and forest habitats of the area.  The course is presented as a synthesis of the naturalist’s sensitivity and the ecologist’s understanding of the natural world.  From frequent contact with and exposure to nature firsthand it is hoped that an awareness and appreciation of the beauty and interdependence within the natural world is kindled. The prime goal of the course is the development of an ecological ethic. Snowshoes and waders are provided, but sensible outdoor clothing is required for morning and cool-weather outdoor classroom experiences.

Target Students: Grades 11-PG

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Prerequisites: Ninth grade biology; co-requisite Algebra 2 or permission of instructor

Credit per semester: 0.5  (A year long course)

Astronomy

This course provides an introduction to Astronomy through individual, collaborative, as well as web-based tutorial-guided activities. The course will survey major concepts of Astronomy such as star formation, evolution of planetary and galactic systems, gravity and the role it plays in shaping up our universe as a whole, light and how its spectra allow us to observe the universe in a variety of ways using corresponding telescopes and data collection devices. Latest astronomical observations, results from recent space missions, and undergoing research in this ever-changing field will both guide as well as allow students to keep abreast with the progress Astronomy undergoes, which in turn improves their understanding of humanity’s place in this magnificent cosmos.

Target Students: Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 (Geometry is co-requisite)

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: none

Credit per semester: 0.5 per semester (one semester course)

Forensic Science

This course is an introduction to Forensic Science. Basic ideas of Forensic Science such as Locard’s Exchange Principle, Fingerprinting, Spectrum Analysis, Blood Spatter,  Document Analysis, Ballistics & Firearms, etc. would be introduced, defined, and shown how they may be used to solve a variety of actual crime scenes. Students should expect to be challenged to complete and solve case studies involving crime scenes. The course will feature lab and hands on activities as well as a variety of media that would facilitate the understanding of the covered concepts, which would make the learning experience deep, fruitful, and above all fun.    

 

Target Students: 9-PG

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 (Geometry is co-requisite) & Parents Approval (ask for form)

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: None

Credit per semester: 0.5 per semester (one semester course)

Agricultural Science: Art of Plant and Soil Science, Fall Harvest (semester one, only)

Designed for students in grades 11 and 12, this semester-course gives students a first-hand glimpse into modern agriculture, using lessons and hands-on activities that bring to life critical issues in sustainability, the science behind farming, organic farming principles, and entrepreneurship. This course investigates more deeply the importance of soil health, soil types, basic chemistry as applied to soil science, and weather trends, impacts on modern agriculture, and the impact of erosion. We will explore botany, understanding their biology, structure, life cycle, and growth needs of plants, with emphasis on the harvest cycle of plants. Students will learn about plant reproduction, pollination, fertilization, and the impact of invasive plants in native habitats in our area. The role of the nitrogen cycle, composting, aquaponics, land and water conservation, and climate change are interwoven threads recurring throughout the course.

Target students: Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Biology

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: none

Credit per semester: 0.5 per

Agricultural Science: Art of Plant and Soil Science, Spring Seedlings (semester two, only)

Designed for students in grades 11 and 12, this semester-course gives students a first-hand glimpse into modern agriculture, using lessons and hands-on activities that bring to life critical issues in sustainability, the science behind farming, organic farming principles, and entrepreneurship. This course investigates more deeply the importance of soil health, soil types, basic chemistry as applied to soil science, and weather trends, impacts on modern agriculture, and the impact of erosion. We will explore botany, understanding their biology, structure, life cycle, and growth needs of plants, with emphasis on the spring preparation and planting of plants. Students will learn about extended growing seasons (particularly in northern climates), the use of grow lights and greenhouses, plant reproduction, pollination, fertilization, and the impact of invasive plants in native habitats in our area. The role of the nitrogen cycle, composting, aquaponics, land and water conservation, and climate change are interwoven threads recurring throughout the course.

Target students: Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Biology

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating Priority: none

Credit per semester: 0.5

Advanced Biology

Students will explore the biological sciences from the macro end of biology (ecology and evolution) to the micro end of biology (cells and organelles). Students who successfully complete this course will receive university credit from Indiana University. Students will survey the biological sciences at the college level, with an emphasis on how the content applies to human beings. The syllabus, laboratories and assessments are dictated by Indiana University. At the university level, this course is intended for non-science majors, and at Interlochen Arts Academy, is intended for seniors and post-graduates. The pre-requisites are high school courses in biology, chemistry, and Algebra II.

Target Students: Grade 12-PG

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry

Credit per semester:  0.5  (A year long course)

MOTION PICTURE ARTS (MPA) DIVISION

Statement of Philosophy

The Motion Picture Arts Division provides students with a progressive interdisciplinary education through production and theory-based courses in digital video, screenwriting, film history and related arts. Students learn filmmaking as a truly collaborative art form. Emphasis is placed on all aspects of the medium: from the written word to the moving image, from the aesthetics of film art to the basics of practical filmmaking. In screenwriting workshops, students develop storytelling skills and come to  understand the narrative structure of a film. In production classes, students explore the visual and aural aspects of film, including but not limited to cinematography, lighting, music/sound, directing, and editing. MPA Foundation Electives from other disciplines, such as acting and photography, give students a deeper understanding of the components of the motion picture. Finally, students are given opportunities to learn the history of cinema, how it has evolved worldwide, investigating the impact of how developments in technology continue to challenge and inspire today’s filmmakers. Students graduate with experience in each area of cinema with opportunities to write, produce, direct and edit their own projects screened in a yearly festival.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MPA051-052

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

MPA Forum

MPA101

Fall

9,10

Story

MPA201

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Visual Story

MPA203

Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Film History

MPA302

Fall & Spring

10,11,12,PG

Resident Artist Class

MPA303

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Lighting

MPA306

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Film Genres

MPA308-309

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Production Workshop

MPA311

Fall

10,11,12,PG

Film Aesthetics

MPA312

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Scenes & Shorts

MPA316

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Great Directors

MPA400

Fall & Spring

12,PG

MPA Capstone

MPA330

Spring

11,12,PG

Directing I

MPA331

Fall

11,12,PG

Directing II

CRW305-306

Fall & Spring

10,11,12,PG

Introduction to Screenwriting

CRW314

Spring

11,12,PG

Advanced Screenwriting

COURSE OF STUDY

All MPA students take MPA Forum every semester. New students take MPA Production second semester and every semester thereafter. All freshmen and new sophomores take Story. All sophomores take Introduction to Screenwriting second semester; first-year juniors, seniors, and post-graduates take it first semester. All first-year students take Visual Story, Film History, and Lighting; first-year juniors, seniors, and post-graduates also take Fim Aesthetics and Directing I. Students are encouraged to take a foundational elective in another arts area each semester. Examples include Elements of Fiction and Poetry, Acting Foundations, General Dance, Jazz History, and Dance for Musical Theatre.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MPA Forum

Story

In this course, students learn the fundamental elements of story - what a story is and how stories are told.  Throughout the semester students study story as it exists in a variety of forms and lengths (novel, film, play, short story, song, poetry), examining the core aspects that span nearly all forms of storytelling, as well as aspects specific to single forms.

Target Students: Required for all new freshmen and sophomore MPA majors.

Prerequisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: MPA Majors, Seating open to non-MPA majors in grades 9-PG space permitting.

Credit per semester: 0.5

Visual Story

Film History

This course explores the historical eras of cinema from its birth in the late 1800s through current trends, focusing on Hollywood’s formation and transformation as well as major International movements.  Students gain an understanding of how technological advances, business practices, and cultural influences have changed the art of filmmaking, and how cinemas of different countries have influenced each other.

Target Students: All First Year MPA Students

Prerequisite if needed: none

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating Priority: MPA Majors Only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Resident Artist Class 

Lighting

This class is a hands-on introduction to skills and techniques in cinematic location lighting. Through discussions, guest artists, demonstrations, and class exercises, this class explores the artful use of light, with emphasis on aesthetics, exposure, instrument placement, rigging, safe use and motivation.

Target Students: All First Year MPA Students

Prerequisite: none

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: MPA Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Film Genres

This course rotates topic yearly, giving students an opportunity to immerse themselves in a specific movement, genre, or area in cinema. Critical examination of the subject may be explored through screenings, readings, discussion and written analysis.

Target Students: Grades 9-Post Graduate by placement

Prerequisite if needed: Film History

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple times

Seating Priority: MPA Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Production Workshop

This class is designed to guide students through advanced skills in pre-production, production and post-production, in order that they may complete a Thesis Screenplay and a Thesis Project.

Target Students: Grade 9-PG, New and Returning students

First Semester: All Returning MPA Majors

Second Semester: All MPA Majors

Number of times course can be taken: Second semester for new majors and then each semester after each returning year.

Seating priority: MPA Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Film Aesthetics

This course offers students an in-depth examination of film as an art form, analyzing specific elements of film to discover how they create cinematic language. Students focus on the theories of narrative structure, mise-en-scene, color, sound, space and editing, and be able to identify how filmmakers use each element to communicate story, character and theme.

Target Students: First Year Students in grades 10-PG

Prerequisite if needed: Film History

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating Priority: MPA Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Scenes and Shorts

Short films are a unique story form with their own rules, limits and opportunities. Scenes are the crucial building blocks upon which feature films are built. In this course, students sharpen their analysis of short films and scenes. Issues of drama and dramaturgy - character, conflict, escalating action, climax and resolution – as well as story, tone and meaning -- are examined from a screenwriting, directing and acting point of view.

Target Students: grades 10-PG by placement

Prerequisite, if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: MPA Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Great Directors

In this class, students examine the lives, processes and film work of important and influential directors of World Cinema. Students read biographies and criticisms as well as watch and analyze 3-4 major films by each director. Directors rotate yearly, but some possible directors whose films we might study are: Ingmar Bergman, Federico Fellini, Akira Kurosawa, Jean-Luc Godard, Jane Campion, Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola, Mira Nair, Stanley Kubrick, John Ford, John Cassavettes, Howard Hawkes, Emir Kusturica, Martin Scorsese, Kelly Reichardt and Satyajit Ray. For each director, students are expected to complete a creative project that demonstrates their understanding of some aspect of that director’s work. Examples of creative projects might be a study (a shot-for-shot recreation of an exemplary scene) or a short screenplay, story or film inspired by the life or work of the director being studied. Each creative project must be proposed and approved in writing prior to undertaking.

Target Students: grades 10-PG

Prerequisite, if needed: Acting Foundations (MPA Majors only)

Number of times course can be taken: 3

Seating priority: MPA Majors, followed by all other majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

MPA Capstone

Directing I

Students have the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of directing for the camera. Students work collaboratively to create 2-3 minute films in which each student will participate as both actor and director.  Focus will be on the clear articulation of movement and story through performance and shot design.

 

This course focuses on single camera directing techniques with emphasis on filming the narrative script and the director’s relationship with the actor. Through exercises in class, student directors will learn script analysis and methods which will increase their ability to penetrate a text and communicate with actors. Visualization skills will be introduced to help students discover the most effective means of telling their stories.

Target Students: new students in grades 10-PG

Prerequisite, if needed: Film Aesthetics

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: MPA Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Directing II

In this course, students learn advanced techniques of Directing for the Camera. The clear articulation of movement and story through script analysis, script breakdown and shot design continue to be emphasized. Additionally, students explore more advanced techniques of expressive camera, mise-en-scene and sound as well as other tools and skills needed to direct film. As much as possible, students use the exercises from this course in tandem with or as preparation for their thesis projects.

Target Students: grades 11-PG

Prerequisite, if needed: Directing for Camera

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: MPA Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Introduction to Screenwriting

This course introduces the concepts of writing for the screen from an analytical and creative viewpoint.  Students learn about screenplay structure and format; explore the creation of character, setting, conflict, theme, tone, dialogue and subtext; and gain an understanding of how to use the tools of the filmmaker to create filmic language and write visually. Students are also given an introduction to some of the professional aspects of screenwriting and resources for the writer.

Target Students: Grades 10-PG for Creative Writing, Motion Picture Arts & Comparative Arts majors

First Semester – Required for all NEW MPA Juniors, Seniors and Post Graduates

Second Semester – Required for ALL NEW and RETURNING MPA Sophomores

Prerequisite if needed: None, Story Recommended

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating Priority: Creative Writing, MPA, Creative Writing, & Comp Arts majors.  Non Writing majors 11-12th  if space allows

Credit per semester:  0.5

Advanced Screenwriting

This course is designed as an intense workshop for screenwriting students who are ready to work on projects of their choice. Having learned the basics, students are now expected to further develop their voice as a screenwriter, create their own goals, and actively engage in analysis of professional screenplays. This course also includes further exploration of the professional aspects of being a screenwriter.

Target Students: Grades 11-12-Post Graduate

Semester: Required for Returning MPA Juniors

Prerequisite if needed: Introduction to Screenwriting and Instructor Permission

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating Priority: Creative Writing and Motion Picture Arts Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

MUSIC DIVISION

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The Academy is widely recognized as America's foremost pre-professional school for musicians because of the scope of its music curriculum and the excellence of its music faculty.  Students can specialize in a specific instrument or voice, study additional instruments, investigate jazz history and improvisation, explore their potential as composers and gain a solid background in music theory as they develop their total musicianship.

GUIDELINES FOR ENROLLMENT AS A MUSIC MAJOR

CLASSICAL MAJOR

COMPOSITION

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MUS045-046

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Private Lesson

MUS0XX

MUS203-204

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Piano or Instrument Lesson (by audition)

OR

Class Piano

MUS101-502

Fall & Spring

10,11,12,PG

Music Theory

MUS511-514

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Musicianship Skills

MUS099-100

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Studio

MUSXXX

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Performing Ensemble*

*Faculty approval required

Statement of Philosophy

The composition curriculum at Interlochen is excellent preparation for those who wish to major in composition in college.  The individualized program encourages students to cultivate their own unique and creative expression, while becoming familiar with important trends in 20th and 21st century music.

Composers have the opportunity to present their works 4-5 times during the school year in Composers' Forums. In addition to the creation of individual pieces, emphasis is also given to knowledge of proper notation, professional preparation of scores and parts for rehearsals and performances, and the assembling of a diverse portfolio for college auditions. Composers in grades 10-PG enroll in the theory class appropriate to their level (Theory A, B, C, D, Advanced, Super or an Independent Study level that goes beyond the Super level of theory) and Musicianship Skills 1 or 2. Composers are also expected to be proficient on the piano; those lacking sufficient keyboard skills are required to take lessons or piano class. Others will take a weekly thirty minute lesson on their primary instrument. Students are required to be in a performing ensemble that is approved by the faculty. It is recommended that students reserve a large block of time (three hours or more) several times each week for individual composition.

COURSE OF STUDY

Composition Lesson 

The student and the instructor seek to develop short-term and long-term goals.  The focus in the course is on the student’s ability to combine the elements of music (melody, harmony, texture, etc.) into cohesive and performable works.  A student demonstrates his/her progress by completing pieces of high quality and by having those pieces performed.  Listening assignments, score study assignments, discussion of college choices, portfolio preparation and career goals, may augment the scope of the lesson.

Target Students: Composition majors

Prerequisite: Portfolio review/Instructor Consent

Number of times course may be taken: Multiple

Seating priority: Composition majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

 

Studio

The composition students meet with the composition faculty to pursue further studies in music composition.  This often includes guest composition faculty, master classes, group projects and collaborative topics with other disciplines.

Target Students: Composition majors (other students welcome to audit at any time)

Prerequisite: Required for all Composition majors

Number of times course may be taken: Multiple

Seating priority: Composition majors

Credit per semester: 0.5 (year-long course)

PERFORMANCE

CORE CURRICULUM

BRASS, PERCUSSION, STRINGS, WOODWINDS

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MUS0XX

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Private Lesson

MUS101-502

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Music Theory

MUS511-514

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Musicianship Skills

MUS099-100

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Studio

MUS049-052

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Large Ensemble

MUS065

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Brass Ensemble

MUS067-068

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Percussion Ensemble

MUS069-070

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Chamber Music

COURSE OF STUDY

PRIVATE LESSONS

BRASS 

Horn Private Lesson

This course focuses on the fundamental basic technique of the instrument, development of expression and musicality, solo and ensemble performance skills, knowledge of genres and musical styles and life skills necessary for future musical development.  Students are expected to practice a minimum of two hours a day on the assigned lesson materials.  Progress within the student’s potential is demonstrated in private lessons, studio class performance and the semester jury.  The student and instructor work towards specific short and long term goals including recitals, college auditions and career choices

Target Students:  Horn Majors

Prerequisite:  Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken:   Multiple

Seating priority:  Horn majors only

Credit per semester:  0.5

Low Brass Private Lesson  (Trombone, Tuba and Euphonium)

This course focuses on the fundamental basic technique of the instrument, development of expression and musicality, solo and ensemble performance skills and knowledge of genres and styles of music. Students are expected to practice a minimum of two hours per day on the assigned lesson materials.  Progress within the student’s potential is demonstrated in private lessons, studio class performances and the semester jury.  The student and instructor work towards specific short term and long term goals including recitals, college auditions and career choices.

Target Students: All Low Brass students, all grade levels

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating priority: Low Brass Majors Only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Trumpet Private Lesson

This course focuses on the fundamental sound production and the basic technique of the Trumpet. Playing efficiency, sound, expression and musicality are all focal points.  Performance skills including the knowledge of genres and styles of music will be emphasized. Students are expected to practice a minimum of three hours per day on the assigned lesson materials.  Progress within the student’s potential is demonstrated in private lessons, studio class performances and the semester jury.  The student and instructor work towards specific short term and long term goals including recitals, college auditions and career choices.

Target Students: Trumpet majors

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Trumpet Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

PERCUSSION

Percussion Private Lesson

The following serves as an outline of materials and playing techniques studied in private lessons and studio classes and is individualized to the needs and goals of each student.

Snare Drum: Rudimental & orchestral styles & techniques.  Methods include: Cirone Portraits in Rhythm; Whaley Musical Studies for the Intermediate Snare Drummer; Delecluse Twelve Etudes; Goldenburg Modern School for Snare Drum; Whaley Rhythmic Patterns of Contemporary Music; Pratt 14 Modern Contest Solos; Stone Stick Control; Reed Syncopation.

Mallet: Two and four mallet literature; Whaley Fundamental Studies for Mallets; Bach 6 Sonatas & Partitas; Green Instruction Course for Xylophone; McMillan Masterpieces for Marimba; Stevens Method of Movement.

Timpani: Orchestral repertoire;Tuning; Hochrainer Etudes for Timpani Book 1 and 2; Goodman Modern Method for Timpani; Firth The Solo Timpanist; Goldenburg Classic Overtures for Timpani; Hinger Vol. 1 Beethoven Symphonies.

Accessories: Include proper playing techniques for cymbals, triangle, tambourine, bass drum, &  tam tam.

Drum Set: John Riley books; transcriptions; Hand-outs as developed by the teacher; all styles.

Target Students: Percussion majors

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Percussion majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

 STRINGS

Cello Private Lesson

Scales and arpeggios in all keys with proficiency through four octaves are a corner-stone of the cello curriculum.  Of equal importance are technical exercises of Rowell, Dounis, Feuillard, Starker, Sevcik, and Cossman, to develop left hand ability and bow control. The third aspect of cello study is a methodical progression of etudes, including Lee, Op. 31, Schroeder 180 Foundation Studies, Duport 21 Etudes, Popper High School of Cello Playing, and Piatti Caprices, Op. 25.  Solo literature includes Baroque sonatas, the Bach solo suites, standard concertos, works by cellist composers, classic and romantic sonata literature, and concert prices of all types, as fits the need and ability of each student.  Representative materials: Sonatas -Vivaldi, Sammartini, Beethoven; Concertos -Goltermann, Haydn, Boccherini, Saint-Saens, Lalo, Bloch; Concert Pieces - Faure Elegie, Bruch Kol Nidre, Popper Hungarian Rhapsody.

Target Students: All Cello students, all grade levels

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating priority: Cello majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Double Bass Private Lesson

Students are to organize their practice time in order to master their assignment of scales, etudes, orchestral music and solo repertoire. Each student’s assignment will be individually determined based on the student’s experience and goals.

Target Students: All Bass students, all grade levels

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating priority: Bass majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Harp Private Lesson

The study of the harp is focused on development of a solid technique with relaxed form and playing; healthy awareness of the body pertaining to the skills of harp playing; development of musical imagination and refinement of expressive control; in depth study and application of strong musical basics, such as rhythm, sound production and the ear; and varied opportunities for performance, accompanied by exploration and application of performance concentration and tools. Daily practice includes a comprehensive exercise routine, etude(s), solo repertoire of varying compositional and stylistic genre, large ensemble excerpts and chamber music, when appropriate. Harp majors also meet as a group each week in both studio class and large ensemble sectionals. The studio classes involve various areas of musical and harpistic education including much performance, listening to recordings, harp history, harp care, harp ensemble and development of constructive and supportive comments.  

Target Students: Harp majors

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Harp majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Viola Private Lesson

The course of study for the violist is an individualized program for the development of technique, musical gesture, repertoire, and a broad study of music from all periods. Also emphasized are physical conditioning; mental process of concentration and alertness; development of practice habits; and the preparation of college and other types of auditioning. While technical studies vary from one student to another, the Flesch Scale System and the etudes of Fuchs, Uhl, Bruni, Campagnoli, and Kreutzer are used extensively. Dance suites, sonatas, concertos, and shorter works are the basic bodies of literature of study and performance.

Target Students: Grades 9—PG
Prerequisite if needed:  Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken:  Multiple by Instructor recommendation

Seating Priority:  Majors only

Credit per semester:  0.5

Violin Private Lesson:  

Emphasis on scales and arpeggios: Flesch or Galamian systems preferred.  Goal: proficiency in three and four octaves (all keys) with arpeggios: double-stops for advanced students.  We consider etudes paramount to technical growth and progress from Mazas through Gavinies and Paganini.  Solo literature includes repertoire from all periods.  Concerti: from Accolay through Tchaikovsky, Paganini, Vieuxtemps; Concert works: Kreisler, Sarasate, etc.; Sonatas: Baroque through Contemporary.

Target Students: Violin Majors, all grades

Prerequisite if needed:  Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken:  Multiple by Instructor recommendation

Seating Priority:  Majors only

Credit per semester:  0.5

WOODWINDS

Bassoon Private Lesson

Bassoon lessons are the backbone of study for a bassoon major. Student preparation for bassoon lessons requires not only many hours of individual practice and reed making, but also numerous hours of listening to solo, chamber and orchestral repertoire, theoretical analysis of lesson assignments, and participating in numerous ensembles of various sizes to acquire the skills needed to succeed. Although each student learns at his or her own pace, a specific standard of technical studies, scales and arpeggios must be achieved by graduation.

Target Students: Bassoon majors

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating priority: Bassoon majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Clarinet Private Lesson

Clarinet performance class is the progressive sequence of applied musical studies created to foster the art of excellent clarinet playing and musicianship. It is designed to help talented and highly motivated young artists to compete and excel in the performance of their chosen instrument and position them for success as they move on to the top music schools around the world. Students will be presented all the requisite skills essential to the mastery of clarinet playing: breathing, posture, hand and finger position, embouchure, tone production, articulation, technique, rhythmical precision, double tonguing transposition, and sight-reading. A wide selection of clarinet literature will be presented in the course, including classical, romantic and contemporary eras (baroque transcriptions as needed). Clarinet majors will be required to play auxiliary instruments, such as e-flat and bass clarinets. Orchestral excerpts will be taught throughout the course of study. Students will be encouraged to spend time on harmonic analyses of piano/orchestral scores of the works upon which they will be working.

Target Students: Clarinet majors

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of time course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Clarinet majors only

Credit per semester: .5

Flute Private Lesson 

Specific areas of emphasis include physical aspects of flute playing (breath control, playing position and posture, and how each relates to musical, tonal and technical ability on the instrument); tone production, projection and color; technique, including finger work, articulation, rhythmic precision and sight reading; phrasing and expression; warm-up techniques; piccolo techniques; orchestral excerpts; and a broad range of repertoire from Baroque to contemporary, often including some jazz basics.

Target Students: Flute majors

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating priority: Flute Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Oboe Private Lesson 

This course focuses on the fundamental basic techniques of the instrument, development of expression and musicality, solo and ensemble performance skills and knowledge of genres and styles of music.  Oboe students are expected to practice a minimum of two hours a day; another hour a day should be spent on developing reed making skills.  Progress within the student’s potential is demonstrated in private lessons, studio class performances, and the semester jury.  Student and instructor work towards specific short term and long term goals including recitals, college auditions, and career choices.

Target Students:  Oboe majors

Prerequisite:  Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken:  Multiple

Seating priority:  Oboe majors only

Credit per semester:  0.5

Saxophone Private Lesson

Saxophonists will follow a course of study designed to meet the specific needs and abilities of each individual. Areas of study include tone production, embouchure, air support and blowing, articulation, intonation, technique, expressive musicianship and interpretation, rhythm reading, sight reading, scales and arpeggios, etudes, solo literature, chamber music, jazz studies and experience on all members of the saxophone family.

Target Students: Saxophone Majors

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Saxophone Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

ENSEMBLES AND CHAMBER MUSIC

The Music Division offers a variety of opportunities for training in ensemble performance.  A rigorous rehearsal sequence coupled with frequent performances provides growth in ensemble skills and in the ability to sustain the challenges of intensive study and performance. Students have the opportunity to demonstrate improvement and achieve recognition by auditioning for positions in the large ensembles.  Annual tours provide on-the-road experience for most of the large ensembles

DESCRIPTION OF ENSEMBLES

Chamber Music BY AUDITION

Chamber music is designed to provide students with a performance opportunity in small ensemble repertoire.  Various ensembles will be formed using the available personnel of woodwind, brass, string, and piano students.  These ensembles may include:  woodwind quintet, clarinet quartet, flute quartet, brass quintets, string quartets, and other various ensembles based on the repertoire and available players.  Pianists may participate in chamber music based upon the availability of other instrumentalists to form piano-based ensembles. Students interested in including chamber music in their schedules should first make their wishes known to the private instructors during the audition time at the beginning of each year.

Target Students:  All brass, woodwind, string, and piano students, grades 9-PG

Prerequisite: Students interested in chamber music should notify their private instructor during the audition time at the beginning of the year.  

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple with instructor recommendation

Seating priority:  Music majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Academy Orchestra  (BY AUDITION)
The IAA Orchestra performs major pieces of the symphonic repertoire, full staged ballets, concerti, new music and classic as well, and performs with choir and other ensembles. The Orchestra
presents approximately eight concerts each year and frequently collaborates with renowned guest artists and conductors. Woodwind, brass and percussion students are placed into either Orchestra or Band based on preliminary auditions.

Target Students: Grades 9—PG
Prerequisite if needed: Participation in an Academy private lesson
Number of times course can be taken: multiple
Seating Priority: All wind or percussion majors are required to enroll in band or orchestra.  Non-majors may enroll in Orchestra on the recommendation of private instructor.

Credit per Semester: 1

Academy Band  (BY AUDITION)
The band provides a wide variety of performance experiences. Rehearsals offer the opportunity to develop and refine fundamental playing technique and ensemble skills.  Band typically presents seven concerts annually of original compositions, representative transcriptions, and works for smaller ensembles.  Placement within the ensemble is determined by audition with the studio faculty.

Target Students: Grades 9—PG
Prerequisite if needed: Participation in an Academy private lesson
Number of times course can be taken: unlimited
Seating Priority: All wind or percussion majors are required to enroll in band or orchestra.  Non-majors may enroll in Band on the recommendation of private instructor.

Credit per Semester: 1

Brass Ensemble  (BY AUDITION)

This course focuses on the development of ensemble skills and brass pedagogy through rigorous rehearsal and performance of major brass ensemble compositions.  The ensemble skills include individualism, group participation, intonation, style, leadership, communication and professional commitment and responsibility.

Target Students:  grades 9-PG

Prerequisite:  Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority:  Music majors

Credit per semester:  .25

Percussion Ensemble         BY AUDITION

The ensemble performs music from the baroque period through the twentieth century.  Melodic and non-melodic instruments are stressed equally.

Target Students: All Percussion majors grade 9-PG

Prerequisite: Audition

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Percussion Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

GUITAR

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MUS009-010

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Private Lesson

MUS101-502

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Music Theory

MUS511-514

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Musicianship Skills

MUS063-064

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Guitar Ensemble

MUS099-100

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Studio

Guitar Private Lesson

Guitar lessons are paced for and tailored to individual students. They address improvement in reading, physical skills, knowledge of repertoire, and expression. The primary goal is to develop these skills without unnecessary tension and with effective technique and mechanics. Students are guided to develop the presence and awareness necessary to identify tension, technical inefficiencies, and musical failings, and to develop the discipline necessary to address them immediately.

Target Students: Guitar majors

Minimum requirements: established reading skills, pitch and rhythm capability, prior exposure to traditional classical guitar, and/or traditional jazz literature, physical potential according to instructor judgment.

Prerequisites: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating priority: Guitar majors

Credits: 0.5

Guitar Ensemble

Guitar ensemble meets variously as a large group of 8 – 12 and in smaller settings. The literature includes compositions written for guitar ensembles and arrangements of pieces originally written for other settings, ranging from solo instruments such as piano to full orchestras. The ensemble brings individual skills to bear effectively on a collaborative effort, resulting in beauty of execution and expression along with pride for the members in the ability to communicate as one with an audience.

Target Students: Guitar majors

Prerequisite: none

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Guitar majors Credits per semester 0.5

ORGAN

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MUS033-034

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Private Lesson

MUS074

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

30-minute Piano Lesson

MUS101-502

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Music Theory

MUS511-514

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Musicianship Skills

MUS099-100

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Studio

MUS-055-056

Fal & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Choir

COURSE OF STUDY

Studio

This course is an extension of private lessons.  It addresses many of the same concepts, but in a group setting.  It is designed to be flexible to meet the varying levels and needs of the organ majors. Topics covered are hymn playing, improvisation, practice skills and performance skills.  Studio classes, master classes and regular performances at local churches are a large part of this course.

Target Students: Organ majors

Prerequisite if needed:

Number of times course can be taken: multiple by instructor recommendation

Seating Priority: Organ majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Private Organ Lesson

The program of organ study is individualized and tailored to the level, background, and needs of each student. It stresses a solid foundation in technical skills and covers a wide range of literature. Students are expected to develop highly proficient keyboard facility through daily study and practice of both organ and piano.

Target Students: Organ majors

Prerequisite if needed: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating Priority: majors followed by non-majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

PIANO

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MUS033-034

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Private Lesson

MUS101-502

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Music Theory

MUS511-514

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Musicianship Skills

MUS099-100

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Studio

COURSE OF STUDY

Students may study piano at several levels of intensity.  A piano major will have a primary focus on piano and will have an hour lesson weekly as part of their program of study.  Students who are less advanced but interested in developing their keyboard skills may take a group piano class; more advanced students may sign up for “piano minor” lessons as instructor time is available and as their own time commitments allow.  Piano majors are accepted as such in the admissions process or by audition during the year.  Placement in private minor-level lessons or piano class is determined by interview and audition at the beginning of the academic year.  At all levels, the aim is to build a strong foundation as a musician and performer: technique, productive and disciplined practice habits, and musical awareness.

In addition to regular training by the artistic faculty, students have special opportunities to participate in master classes, workshops and lectures by internationally known visiting artists.  Recent guests include Robert McDonald and Matti Raekallio (Juilliard), Frank Weinstock and Elizabeth Pridonoff (Cincinnati), YongHi Moon (Peabody), and many others.

Private Piano Lessons

The goal of private piano instruction is the development of the individual as a musician, pianist, and performer.  In addition to weekly private lessons, students will attend studio class weekly and will have opportunities to perform each semester in that class, on student recitals, in solo recitals, and in some cases, off campus as well.  Piano majors will be expected to practice at least three hours per day, and most piano majors at Interlochen practice more than this amount.

Non-major Students taking lessons will be expected to practice about two hours daily for a one hour lesson, or one hour daily for a half-hour lesson.  

Target Students: Piano majors

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course may be taken: Multiple

Seating Priority: Piano Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Studio 

This course consists of three components: Piano Literature, Keyboard Skills, and Master Class.  Generally Piano Literature meets twice per week, Keyboard Skills once per week, and Master Class once per week. There can be some flexibility in this schedule to accommodate guest teachers or other class needs.

Target Students: Piano majors

Prerequisite: Senior piano major or consent of instructor

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Senior Piano majors

Credit per semester: 0.5  

VOICE 

Statement of Philosophy

Voice study at the Interlochen Arts Academy provides instruction compatible with the student’s abilities and goals in a strongly classical voice environment. A strong commitment to classical voice studies is expected from the student to achieve the maximum benefit from this instruction. A typical voice student's schedule would include one lesson, choir, and music theory; and could also include piano study (private lesson by audition or class piano), chamber singers, opera workshop and appropriate academic classes. Each prospective voice student is evaluated at the beginning of each year to determine his/her current level of development, and then an assignment is made to a vocal instructor for private voice lessons. Students are expected to practice for one hour daily. Keyboard proficiency and foreign language study are strongly recommended

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MUS033-034

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Private Lesson

MUS101-502

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Music Theory

MUS511-514

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Musicianship Skills

MUS099-100

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Studio

MUS411-412

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Opera Workshop

Choir 

Academy Choir is a requirement for all Voice majors but is open to all students.  The choir participates in approximately 8 concerts during the year, performing works from a diverse range of styles, time periods and composers.

Target Students: Open to all students

Prerequisite if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: multiple by instructor recommendation

Seating priority: Voice majors followed by non-majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Chamber Singers (BY AUDITION)  

Chamber Singers is a small choral ensemble that performs mostly unaccompanied choral works.  The number of singers in the ensemble is based upon the director's discretion and the result of blind audition.

Target Students: Voice Major

Prerequisite, if needed: Concurrently in Academy Choir, Audition

Number of times course can be taken: multiple by instructor recommendation

Seating priority: Voice majors followed by non-majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Voice Private Lesson 

Students work to attain vocal growth in several aspects. Technical skills, the learning of sound appropriate literature, increased musicianship skills and gaining an appreciation of classical voice study and all that entails. We attempt to achieve these goals through sound vocal technique based appropriate concepts and vocalises for the young singer, and the study of classical voice repertoire, including diction studies and text comprehension.                            

Target Students: Voice majors

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating Priority: Voice Majors

Credits per semester: 0.5

Opera Workshop 

A performance ensemble of singing actors specializing in classical vocal repertoire. The Opera Workshop program, in conjunction with the other coursework offered in the voice major, is meant to provide students with the training and experiences that will guide them to be successful singers in the college music program and beyond. Students participate in a variety of performances throughout the year, including both in-class and public performances, and masterclasses with guest artists and teachers.

Target Students: Grades 9 through PG

Prerequisite: none

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating Priority: Voice Majors

Credits per semester: .25

JAZZ

Statement of Philosophy

All jazz students are required to enroll in the following course offerings at some point during their time at Interlochen:

Jazz Ensemble--required each semester student is enrolled

Jazz Improvisation--minimum of one year

Jazz History

Music Theory

Weekly private lesson on respective instrument

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MUS0XX

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Private Lesson

MUS101-502

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Music Theory

MUS511-514

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Musicianship Skills

MUS099-100

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Studio

MUS305-308

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Jazz Improvisation I & II

MUS059-060

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Jazz Ensemble

MUS209-210

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Jazz History

Jazz Ensemble  (BY AUDITION)

This select ensemble is one of the most popular concert groups on the campus.  The twenty piece ensemble in big band instrumentation studies and performs the music of the foremost big band composers, past and present.  Students must audition for placement in the Jazz Ensemble.

Target Students: Grades 9-12

Prerequisites: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Music majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Jazz Combo  (BY AUDITION)

The jazz combo is a select group of 4-8 musicians who rehearse twice weekly.  Auditions for the Jazz Combo occur in conjunction with the Jazz Ensemble auditions. During the course of the year the students involved in the combo work to improve their understanding of various styles of small group jazz and consistent growth as creative improvisers will be expected.  The jazz combo performs on all of the concerts with the large jazz ensemble.  The students in the jazz combo are excused from orchestra or band rehearsal during the Second period on Tuesdays and Fridays in order to rehearse at that time.  All members of the jazz combo are encouraged to enroll in the Tuesday - Friday section of Jazz Improvisation.

Target Students: Grades 9-12

Prerequisites: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating priority: Music majors

Credit per semester: 0.5  

Jazz Improvisation

Jazz Improvisation is divided into two sections, beginning and advanced.  In this class the student learns to apply the theory of improvisation to the instrument in order to successfully improvise over a variety of song forms.  The application of scales, chords, scale and melodic patterns to the chosen music, and transcribing solos from recordings form the basis by which the student learns to improvise.

Target Students: Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor Consent

Number of times course may be taken: multiple

Seating Priority: Music majors

Credit per Semester: .25 (Year long course)

Jazz History

Jazz History is a chronological study of jazz beginning with its origins in African and African-American folk music music, through the most recent trends.  Emphasis is placed on learning the subtle differences between the various eras and styles associated with jazz (New Orleans, Swing, Bebop, etc.).  There is a considerable amount of time devoted to listening and discussing recordings by important jazz stylists.  Additionally the students gain an awareness of the cultural events throughout the 20th century that affected jazz and the musicians who performed it.

Target students by: Music Majors

Pre-requisite: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Music Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

SINGER-SONGWRITER

Statement of Philosophy

The Singer-Songwriter program provides a comprehensive curriculum in the discipline of popular music songwriting. Students foster their own personal musical style while developing skills in melody, harmony, arranging and lyric-writing. Instruction in piano, guitar and voice are also provided to further the students' performance abilities. While the program is part of the music department, it draws on the resources of other departments, particularly the creative writing program. Through their studies, students prepare a personal portfolio of completed work to be used in all their future endeavors in performance, writing, composition, music production and music business.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MUS107

Fall

10,11,12,PG

Music Archaeology

MUS106

Fall & Spring

10,11,12,PG

Songwriting Foundations

MUS228

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Performance Lab

MUS219-222

Fall & Spring

10,11,12,PG

Songwriter Theory

MUS105

Fall

10,11,12,PG

Performance Shangri-La

MUS048

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Songwriting Lesson

MUS109

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Music Business

MUS055-056

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Choir

MUS199-200

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Contemporary Piano Class

MUS211-212

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Class Guitar

MUS324

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Creative Identity and Music Performance

MUS313-314

Fall & Spring

10,11,12,PG

House Band

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Space at the Table

MUS108

Fall & Spring

10,11,12,PG

Recording and Production Techniques

MUS076

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Private Voice Lesson

MUS075

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Private Guitar Lesson

MUS074

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Private Piano Lesson

STUDIO MUSIC

Statement of Philosophy

The Studio Music major is a select group of electric guitarists, drummers, electric bass and keyboard players. The group focuses on commercial music in conjunction with other coursework offered within their individual instrument major. Students are provided with the training and experiences to guide them to be successful commercial musicians. Students participate in a variety of performances throughout the year, including both in-class and public performances, and masterclasses with guest artists and teachers. Students play in the House Band, which performs rock and roll, pop, and serves as the standing band for the singer-songwriter program.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

MUS045-046

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Private Lesson

MUS090

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Introduction to Audio Production

MUS101-502

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Music Theory

MUS511-514

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Musicianship Skills

MUS099-100

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Studio

MUS313-314

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

House Band

Introduction to Audio Production

This course explores the skills and concepts fundamental to live sound reinforcement and audio recording. Students will be introduced to gain levels, I/O (inputs and outputs), cabling and monitoring, PA systems, basic microphone designs and application, sound reflection and room treatments, digital/Audio interfaces, DAW’s, audio plugins, mixing, mastering, and bouncing formats.

Target Students: Music, MPA, and Theater Majors – This is the course required by Studio Musicianship majors in the IAA Music Division.

Prerequisite: none

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Music Majors in the Studio Musicianship track

MUSIC ELECTIVES

Beginning Organ Class

This course is designed as an introduction for students with no prior experience with the organ.  As students become comfortable with combining hands and feet, the class addresses topics such as organ repertoire, mechanics of the instrument, practical applications (hymn playing in particular), touch,

articulation and registration. Supervised practice time is included as part of the class.

Target Students: Students wishing to study organ as a non-major

Prerequisite if needed: Proficiency in piano and primary instrument

Number of times course can be taken: multiple by instructor recommendation

Seating Priority:

Credit per semester: 0.5

Class Piano 

Using the piano lab in a group setting, this course teaches students to read fluently from the grand staff, develop a process of effectively learning multi-part music, and to play piano repertoire with a healthy technique. This course also emphasizes sight reading and keyboard theory.  Class Piano is paced for the motivated student beginning with no keyboard skills.  More advanced students supplement the pace with additional repertoire and technique.

Target Students:  Non-keyboard music majors

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating Priority: music majors, followed by non-music majors

Credit per semester: (0.5)

Conducting

The purpose of this course is to study how musical ideas can be communicated to an ensemble. Students will engage in score study, transposition, movement exploration, score reading, developing musicianship, and conducting their peers.

Target Students:  All students grade 12, PG

Prerequisite:  Theory D

Number of times course can be taken:  Multiple

Seating priority: Music Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

                        

Composition Class

This class is designed for those who have never tried to compose AND for those who have been composing for awhile. The course will explore such topics as composing a melody, composing harmony, texture, development, and form.  Each student will work at their own pace and will be evaluated based on their personal progress throughout each semester.  In addition, it is very important to learn how to listen to the music of other people.  One focus for the class will be to learn how to listen critically and make astute, clear observations that lead to deeper understanding of the music they are hearing and to the music they are composing.

Target Students:  All students grade 9-PG

Prerequisite:  Music Theory B or higher

Number of times course can be taken:  Multiple

Seating priority: Music Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Piano Technology

Students explore the mechanisms and craft of piano technology. The art of piano tuning and repair can become a lifelong study - enriching in musicianship, craftsmanship, and business.  This elective covers topics including the science of acoustics; construction and history of tuning systems; mechanisms of modern and historical instruments; and techniques of tuning, maintenance, and repair.  The course is conducted in both classroom and lab environments; tools are provided.

Target Students:  All students grade 9-PG

Prerequisite:  

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating priority: Music Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

PRIVATE LESSONS FOR NON-MUSIC MAJORS - BY AUDITION

Upon audition, during opening weekend, any qualified Academy student may elect to take one private lesson depending on studio space/teacher availability. Students will be charged according to the current year fee schedule for individual lessons.  The length of lessons (half period/full period) will be determined by the faculty based upon the student's ability level and commitment of time to practice.

MUSIC THEORY PROGRAM

The Theory program offers instruction in musicianship skills essential for the serious music student.  The program objectives are to provide complete and thorough training in all basic musicianship skills; to offer advanced, college-level theory for the highly motivated student; and to stimulate and encourage exploration of the creative process through composition of concert art music ("classical").

As part of the orientation program for entering music students at the Academy, students are required to take an examination in written skills and ear training to determine their placement in theory courses.

All music majors must complete one year of Music Theory.  Music majors are defined as students who have been admitted as an instrument or voice major.

Music Theory A and B

This course is designed for the music major with little or no formal music theory training.  The student be introduced to basic written theory, sight-singing with solfeggio, auditory skills and basic piano skills.

Target Students: Music Majors Only

Prerequisite: Music Theory and Musicianship Exam

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Music Majors who have not passed the Music Theory and Musicianship exam beginning with Postgraduates and working backwards through grades 12-9

Credit per semester: 0.5 per course

Music Theory C & D

This course is designed for the music major with music theory training that is equivalent to the IAA Music Theory A & B Courses.  The student will substantially increase his/her knowledge of written theory, sight singing with solfeggio, aural skills and piano skills.  The course covers material that is on a par with a year and a half of the typical college-level music theory curriculum.

Target Students: Music Majors Only – This is the course required by the IAA Music Division.

Prerequisite: Theory and Musicianship Exam, or successful completion of the IAA Music Theory A & B.

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Music Majors whose performance on the Music Theory and Musicianship Exam merits their placement in the course or those who have successfully completed the IAA Music Theory A & B Courses; beginning with Seniors/Postgraduates and working consecutively through grades 11-9.

Credit per semester: .5 per course

Advanced Theory

A comprehensive course in which harmony, analysis, form, counterpoint, ear training, sight-singing, keyboard skills, and some composition are studied concurrently from a historical perspective.

Target Students: Music Majors Only – This is an elective course.

Prerequisite: Theory and Musicianship Exam, or successful completion of the IAA Theory D Course.

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Music Majors whose performance on the Theory and Musicianship Exam merits their placement in the course or those who have successfully completed the IAA Theory D course; beginning with Seniors/Postgraduates and working consecutively through grades 11-9.

Credit per semester: .5 per course

Theatre Arts Division

Statement of Philosophy

The Theatre Arts Division offers programs of study for theatre majors with two emphases: Performance studies, and Design and Production studies.  

CORE CURRICULUM - PERFORMANCE MAJOR

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

THA051-052

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Theatre Company

THA053-054

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Acting Technique

THA202

Fall

9,10,11

Play Structure & Analysis

THA302

Fall

9,10,11

Song & Dance Lab

THA309-310

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Fundamentals of Design

THA313-314

Fall & Spring

10,11,12,PG

Voice & Diction

THA323

Fall

11,12,PG

Dance for Musical Theatre: Int/Adv

THA325

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Private Voice Lessons: Musical Theatre

THA401

Fall

12,PG

Stage Movement

THA403

Fall

12,PG

Directing

THA404

Fall & Spring

11,12,PG

Acting Shakespeare

THA405

Fall

12,PG

Audition Technique

THA411

Fall

11,12,PG

Acting a Song

THA333

Fall

10,11

Movement for Actors

THA102

Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Acting Foundations

THA106

Spring

9,10

Introduction to Musical Theatre

THA315

Spring

11,12,PG

Classical Acting

THA316

Spring

11,12,PG

Mask

THA320

Spring

11

Audition

THA322

Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Dance for Musical Theatre: Beg/Int

THA324

Spring

11,12,PG

Advanced Musical Theatre Workshop

THA326

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Musical Theatre Dance Styles

THA402

Spring

11,12,PG

Acting for Camera

THA406

Spring

10,11,12,PG

Improvisation

THA410

Spring

11,12,PG

Physical Characterization

GUIDELINES FOR ENROLLMENT IN THEATRE CLASSES

Freshmen

Theatre Arts performance freshman will be placed into Theatre Company and a section of Acting Technique.  They are also expected to enroll in Play Structure and Analysis and Introduction to Musical Theatre.  Schedule permitting, Freshmen may be able to enroll in a theatre elective with the approval of the division director.

Sophomores

In addition to Theatre Company and Acting technique, new sophomores should enroll in Play Structure and Analysis (first semester) and Introduction to Musical Theatre (second semester).  Schedule permitting, new Sophomores may be able to enroll in a theatre elective with approval of the division director.  Returning sophomores enroll in Acting Technique, Theatre Company and a theatre elective.

Juniors

In addition to Acting Technique and Theatre Company, Juniors should enroll in 1-2 of the following first semester courses:

Juniors should enroll in 1-2 of the following second semester courses:

Seniors and Postgraduates

In addition to Acting Technique and Theatre Company, all Seniors and Postgraduates should enroll in Audition Technique.

Seniors and Postgraduates should enroll in two of the following first semester courses:

Seniors and Postgraduates should enroll in two of the following second semester courses:

Additional Electives

The following courses may be taken outside of the Theatre Arts department for credit:

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Theatre Company

This serves as the primary “lab course” for the Academy Theatre Division, allowing students to utilize the skills that they are evolving in their other theatre curricular offerings.  Division students actively participate in all facets of the practical preparation of theatrical productions to be presented to audiences of the school community as well as the general public.

Target Students:: Theatre Majors, grades 9-PG

Prerequisite:  Instructor consent, Audition

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple

Seating priority: Theatre Majors

Credit per semester: 1.0

Acting Technique 

This course provides the foundational studio experience for all Performance majors in the Theatre Division.  Students are divided into four class sections to work with individual Acting faculty members and a select ensemble of peers for the entire school year, with the opportunity to work with a different teacher for every year that they are a Major at the Academy.  Basic exercises from primary theorists are intermixed with ensemble improvisations and analytical and practical work with assigned dramatic texts.

Target Students: Theatre Majors grades 9 through Post Graduate

Prerequisite, if needed: Theatre Major status

Number of times course can be taken: multiple by instructor recommendation

Seating priority: Theatre Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Play Structure and Analysis

Play Structure and Analysis is a critical thinking and writing class that is designed to set a foundation for students to have a true appreciation for dramatic literature. Students will explore various elements of dramatic literature with the primary goal being to develop facility in the reading of plays as meaningful theatrical experiences.  Theatrical styles such as Tragedy, Comedy, Farce, Naturalism, Realism and Theatre of the Absurd will be analyzed and dissected from the point of view of language, character, design and theme. The play readings will be accompanied with movies of these great texts.

In addition to analytical writing, students will undertake experiential projects in realizing the underlying theatrical and narrative examples of the plays studied. Exemplary plays from the cannon of both Western and Eastern literature from antiquity to the present will be chosen for their contrasting qualities. If you enroll in this course, you should be prepared to read all of the required plays and to participate in short-form collaborative projects that will deepen your appreciation of the experiential qualities of plays in performance.

Target Students:  Grades 9-11 (strongly recommended for 11th grade)

Prerequisite if needed:  Instructor consent

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Seating Priority:  Majors only

Credit per semester:  0.5

Song and Dance Lab

This course is designed to link vocal and dance skills in a team-taught class that will focus on developing the student’s ability to dance and sing simultaneously. Choral numbers from the Musical Theatre repertoire will be learned vocally and fully choreographed.

Target Students:  Grades 9-11 (Strongly recommended for 11th grade)

Prerequisite if needed:  Instructor consent

Number of times course can be taken:  1

Seating Priority:  Theatre Majors only, Non-Majors upon instructor permission

Credit per semester:  0.5

Voice and Diction 

This class explores the essential tool of the voice in an actor’s work. Emphasis will be placed on examining the breathing process as well as resonance, vocal production, and articulation. Students will learn how to effectively structure and design a vocal warm-up to prepare them to be in optimal condition for performance. All sounds of the International Phonetic Alphabet will be introduced as students discover how to transcribe in both Standard American English and, time permitting, various dialects.

Target Students: Theatre Majors

Prerequisite, if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Theatre majors followed by non-majors with instructor approval

Credit per semester: 0.5

Dance for Musical Theatre: Intermediate/Advanced

This course will allow students to exercise physical skills and coordination through the practice of dance methodologies for Musical Theatre. Students will be instructed in various dance styles (ie. Jazz, tap, ballet). The course will provide a serious and specifically focused dance opportunity for Theatre Majors.

Target Students: Grades 11-PG

, Theatre

Prerequisite if needed: dance experience is required for the Intermediate/Advanced offering during first semester.

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating Priority: Theatre Majors have priority, other placement dependent on space availability and Instructor approval.

Credit per semester: 0.5

Private Voice Lessons: Musical Theatre

This course provides individual voice lessons to Theatre Majors with a talent for and interest in Musical Theatre. Students will learn important vocal techniques for optimum performance and receive instructions on repertoire from the musical theatre canon.

Target Students: Grades 9-PG, Theatre

Prerequisite: Instructor and Division Director approval

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating Priority: Theatre Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Stage Movement 

This course will provide students with the ability to create a three-dimensional character and theatre by using techniques that focus on physicality and expressive emotion. The course will utilize the techniques and methodologies of Jacques Lecoq, Jerzy Grotowski’s physical theatre approach, Anne Bogart’s Viewpoints and psychological gesture work. The student will be asked to create a whole theatre that is infused with discipline, instinct and technique. The work will culminate weekly in a Performance Lab where they will be asked to devise/create a world and character each week utilizing these techniques in an ensemble setting.

 

The course will also focus on the creation and understating of ensemble.  The expectation of the class is to break down the barriers of a traditional theatre where leads and non-leads, actors and crew are separate and hierarchical.  The class will explore the true nature of ensemble and will inculcate the ability to say “yes” to a proposal with the understanding that your partner is the best partner, your role is the best role no matter how large or small. I invest in the strength and energy of the ensemble where ferocious play and reliance on one another resonate in the audience. Development of the craft does not happen alone. Students may also be asked to do tasks such as being responsible for the room.

Target Students: Seniors preferred, Juniors considered by Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: 2

Seating priority: Theatre Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Directing

This class will provide the student with the basic directing techniques needed to direct a play.  We will explore composition, terminology and the ethics of good stage directing.  We will learn to recognize the various theatrical styles and their influence on directing choices.  We will learn to analyze scripts for practical production purposes.

Target Students:  grades 12-PG

Prerequisite, if needed:  A short description of why a student is interested in this course and what he/she expects to get out of the course must be submitted to the instructor by July 1st.

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority:  Theatre majors only

Credit per semester 0.5   

Acting Shakespeare

This course applies the major principles of acting theory covered in the Acting Technique classes to the texts of Shakespeare.  Students are challenged to develop a practical methodology for joining together modern naturalistic performance theory to the special demands of heightened language and verse drama.

Target Students: Seniors preferred, Juniors considered

Prerequisite: Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: 2

Seating priority: Theatre Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Audition Technique

Audition Technique provides students the opportunity to create quality audition material through individual appointments with the instructor. Each student will be required to have six monologues prepared and ready to be performed by the end of the semester. These pieces will work together to form ‘packages’ consisting of a mix of comedy and drama, classical and contemporary, in a way that will showcase the student’s individual strengths. Each student will meet with the instructor in a weekly 25-minute session. Students are required to identify the pieces on their own, although the instructor will give advice on appropriate material selection. This is a student-driven course.

Target Students: Senior and PG Theatre Arts Majors

Prerequisite, if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Credit per semester: 0.5

Acting a Song

This course is for seniors and PGs who will be auditioning for college Musical Theatre programs. Students will address song selection, song analysis, technical performance and a truthful acting performance.

Target Students: Grades 11-PG

Prerequisite if needed: none

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating Priority: Theatre Majors have priority

Credit per semester: 0.5

Movement for Actors

This course introduces Theatre majors to fundamental skills in movement for the stage. Incorporating elements of yoga, dance, and other physical techniques, actors will gain greater control over their physicality while discovering their own flexibility and strength.

Target Students: Grades 10-11

Prerequisite if needed: none

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating Priority: Theatre Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Acting Foundations

Acting Foundations  guides students to an understanding of the craft of acting through their participation in a wide variety of theatrical exercises. Each day begins with a series of warm-up activities designed to stimulate the imagination and encourage exploration of vocal and physical freedom. These skills will be further developed through improvisation exercises and scene work.

Target Students: Open to all grades and majors

Prerequisite: Desire to learn acting

Number of times course can be taken: Multiple by instructor recommendation

Seating priority: Non-Majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Introduction to Musical Theatre

This course offers new and returning Theatre students interested in pursuing a Musical Theatre option in their studies a chance to explore basic techniques of breathing, voice production, music reading, and ear training, and the use of those skills in a Musical Theatre repertoire. Particular focus will be placed on “milestone” shows in American Musical Theatre. Research and song analysis will be required for selected shows to incorporate acting skills in solo presentations.

Target Students: Grades 9-11

Prerequisite, if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Theatre majors followed by non-majors with instructor approval

Credit per semester: 0.5

Classical Acting

This course applies the major principles of acting theory covered in the Acting Technique classes to the classical texts from such playwriting eras as Greek, Elizabethan, Jacobean, Restoration and French neo-classical.  Students are challenged to develop a practical methodology for joining together modern naturalistic performance theory to the special demands of heightened language and verse drama.

Target Students: grades 11-PG

Prerequisite: Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: 2

Seating priority: Theatre Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Mask

This course will provide students with the ability to create a three-dimensional character and theatre by using the technique of MASK to create physicality and expressive emotion. The course will utilize the techniques and methodologies of Neutral and larval masks by Jacques Lecoq and move through to the work in commedia dell’arte. The student will be asked to create pieces of theatre (verbal and nonverbal) that will be infused with discipline, instinct and technique. The work will culminate weekly in a Performance Lab where they will be asked to devise/create a world and character each week utilizing these techniques in an ensemble setting.

Target Students: Senior and PG priority. Juniors with instructor consent.

Number of times course can be taken: 2

Seating priority: Theatre Majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Audition

This course provides students the opportunity to learn about the audition process in a classroom setting through performance of their own material, as well as observation of others.  Each student will be required to have four monologues prepared and ready to perform at the end of the semester in mock auditions.  These pieces should work together to form “packages” or “sets” consisting of a mix of comedy and drama, classical and contemporary, which will showcase the student’s individual strengths.  This course is designed for juniors and sophomores.

Target Students: grade 11

Prerequisite, if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 2

Seating priority: majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Dance for Musical Theatre: BEG/INT

Dance for Musical Theatre: Beginner/Intermediate is designed for students with some exposure and experience in musical theatre dance styles. This course will allow students to exercise physical skills and coordination through the practice of dance methodologies for Musical Theatre. Students will be instructed in various dance styles (ie. Jazz, tap, ballet). The course will provide a strong foundation of dance skills for use in the theater/musical theater profession.

Target Students: Grades 9-12, Theatre

Prerequisite if needed: none

Number of times course can be taken: multiple

Seating Priority: Theatre Majors have priority, other placement dependent on space availability and Instructor approval.

Credit per semester: 0.5

Advanced Musical Theatre Workshop

This course will explore the utilization of the acting process through song.  It will address the unique challenges of the genre for the performer through work with scenes, ensemble and small group songs, characterizations, vocal work and choreography.  This course culminates with a showcase of selected material performed during Festival at the end of the school year.

Target Students: Grade 12-Post Graduate, grade 11 considered

Prerequisite, if needed: Audition required for placement for this class (a song from musical theatre repertoire of no more than 2 minutes in length - audition will occur during first week of classes in September); Students must be concurrently enrolled in Acting Technique.

Number of times course can be taken: May be repeated with instructor permission

Seating priority: Theatre Arts Majors only, unless granted permission by instructor

Credit per semester: 0.5

Musical Theatre Dance Styles

This course will introduce students to the wide variety of dance styles used in Musical Theatre. Students will participate in numbers from musicals across multiple genres, gaining valuable experience across a wide range of choreography.

Target Students: Grades 10-PG

Prerequisite, if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Theatre Arts, followed by other majors with instructor consent

Credit per semester: 0.5

 Acting for the Camera:

Students will study the specialized style of acting for the camera through exercises and scene work. Fundamentals of artistic approach will mirror and reinforce techniques covered in acting classes for the stage, with attention given to appropriate adjustments in the scale of an individual performance.  Students will learn the basic approaches to utilizing camera techniques in order to give their most unique, truthful performance.  All students will learn and practice essential competence with the MPA equipment required for the class.  

Target Students: Grade 12-Post Graduate, grade 11 considered

Prerequisite, if needed: Instructor Consent

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating priority: Theatre Arts and Motion Picture Arts majors

Credit per semester: 0.5

Improvisation

This course offers an introduction and overview of various uses of improvisation in the theatrical process.  Primary focus is on the development of ensemble skills; secondary focus is on the exploration of individual acting technique through the development of spontaneity in performance.

Target Students: Grades 11-12 and returning 10

Prerequisite, if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 2

Seating priority: majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Physical Characterization

Students will focus on various techniques for bringing characters to unique physical life in rehearsals and performances, with emphasis on exploring the techniques of Michael Chekhov, Eugene Vakhtangov, Anne Bogart, Tina Landau, Augusto Boal, Moni Yakim, Viola Spolin, and others.

Target Students: grades 11 (by instructor consent), 12, PG

Prerequisite, if needed: None

Number of times course can be taken: 2

Seating priority: majors only

Credit per semester: 0.5

Theatre - Design and Production Department

In the Design and Production concentration the educational approach eventually enables the student to perceive, visualize, and realize practical theatrical designs. Contact with and control of the individual, creative, and expressive instinct is the intent of the study.  The many and varied performing arts programs at Interlochen provide the student in Technical Theatre the opportunity for hands-on experience in the art and techniques of production.  In addition to their focused work in Theatre Arts productions, Technical Theatre students may occasionally work with Dance and Music divisions as well, thus enhancing and broadening their design and production experiences.  Imaginative problem solving, management of time and energy, proficiency of skills - in short, the practical disciplines and tools necessary for the effective realization of a creative vision will be studied and practiced.  As the student progresses, he/she may choose to concentrate more fully on specific areas and become directly involved in creative production responsibilities.  Upper level students may serve as both assistants to the resident and guest Technical Theatre staff and/or as designers/technicians themselves with faculty supervision.

Students in Theatre Arts at Interlochen are encouraged to take classes in both Performance and Technical Theatre areas to enhance their total understanding and experience of the dramatic art, and to study musical theatre as their interest dictates.

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

THA051-052

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Theatre Company

THA310-311

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Fundamentals of Design

THA4XX

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Independent Study

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES - THEATRE - DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

Fundamentals of Design

Fundamentals of Design is structured to provide students with the skills required to research, analyze and communicate theatrical design ideas in Sets, Lights and Costumes. Students will gain experience in the basic graphic techniques used by design professionals including freehand sketching and thumbnail drawing, figure drawing and watercolor painting, drafting in scale and mechanical perspective drawing. Study of design process and objectives and the nature of the collaborative environment will also be examined along with contemporary design and designers.

Target Students: Theatre D&P Majors

Prerequisite: Instructor Permission

Number of times course can be taken: 1

Seating Priority: Theatre Majors, MPA Majors, Non-majors if space allows

Credits per semester: 0.5

INDEPENDENT STUDIES/TECHNICAL THEATRE APPRENTICESHIPS

Independent studies will be organized and graded by the Theatre Design and Production faculty member in conjunction with the campus supervisor (personnel of the Costume Shop, IPR Productions, Corson Production Services, individual faculty director, and/or other designated instructor).  Apprenticeships may incorporate tests and approaches described in those design courses listed below.

Target Students: Theatre D&P Majors

Prerequisite: Elements of Production, Fundamentals of Design or by Instructor permission

Number of times course can be taken: multiple with instructor consent

Seating Priority: Theatre D&P Majors

Credits per semester: 0.5 (semester long class)



VISUAL ARTS DIVISION

STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

The Visual Arts program develops a student's capacity for expression through a correlation between the visual arts and an awareness of the student’s broader environment. Interlochen’s location, state-of-the-art studios, individualized instruction, visits from professional artists, and collaborative opportunities within and outside of the institution support this unique learning environment.

This program develops a young artist's technical and conceptual abilities through an integrated curriculum that fosters connections between disciplines, as well as between traditional and contemporary media. Creative practices, including flexible thinking, creative problem-solving, inquisitiveness, and perseverance through a broad range of experiences build the foundation for deeper understanding of the arts and innovation. Regular individual and group critiques develop and refine the artist’s personal vision within an intimate community of artists. Through an understanding of a wide-range of applications within the visual arts, students gain confidence and an understanding of empathy that prepares them to become artistic citizens and leaders in our constantly changing society.

CORE CURRICULUM:

Students are required to sequentially take each of the four core visual arts courses. These courses meet four days a week for the entire Academy year and serve as an incubator where concepts and various techniques can be synthesized. While the first two courses focus primarily on skill building, the purpose of these four courses is to develop problem-solving skills, creativity and the student’s individual voice as a conceptual artist.

Required Core Courses:

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level(s)

Course Title

VA101-102

Fall & Spring

9

2D Ideation

VA201-202

Fall & Spring

10

Visual Awareness

VA301-302

Fall & Spring

11,12

Thesis I

VA401-402

Fall & Spring

12,PG

Thesis II

Students are also required to take two technique courses each semester, totalling four techniques for the Academy year. All new students are required to take Introduction to Photoshop and Illustrator, Sculptural Forms, The Figure and Photography: Composition and Documentation.  New students entering after ninth grade are required to take the Drawing and Painting Intensive classes in place of the 2D Ideation Core Course. All juniors are required to take two semesters of Art History: Ancient Greek through Renaissance and Baroque  - 21st Century. If there are open spaces, sophomores may enroll in this course.

Required Technique and Art History Courses:

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level

Course Title

VA211-212

Fall & Spring

New 10, 11, 12

Drawing and Painting Intensive

VA111-112

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12

Sculptural Forms

VA121-122

Fall & Spring

9, 10, 11, 12

The Figure

VA131-132

Fall & Spring

9, 10, 11, 12

Introduction to Photoshop & Illustrator

VA110

Spring

9, 10, 11, 12

Photography: Composition and Documentation

VA351

Fall

11

Art History: Ancient Greek through Renaissance

VA352

Spring

11

Art History: Baroque - 21st Century

After the requirements are fulfilled, students can choose the technique classes based on their interests. Freshmen, sophomores and juniors are encouraged to take a balanced combination of 2D, 3D and 4D/digital courses, while seniors have the ability to customize their classes based on the direction of their approved thesis topic.

Elective Courses

Course Number

Semester

Grade Level

Course Title

VA221

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Ceramics: Intro to Handbuilding and Wheel Throwing

VA231

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Fibers: Intro to Sewing and Garment Construction

VA241-242

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Paint as a Metaphor: Abstraction and Interpretation

VA251-252

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Interdisciplinary Sculpture

VA261

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Metals: Fabrication

VA271

Fall

9,10,11,12,PG

Ceramics: Experimental Processes

VA281-282

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Exploring the Figure

VA222

Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Experimental Fashion

VA232

Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

Printmaking: Relief Printing

Fall & Spring

9,10,11,12,PG

New Genres

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

REQUIRED CORE COURSES

Visual Awareness (Year-long)

This course investigates the foundations of drawing, painting and design principles while encouraging proficiency in a wide range of approaches.  Students will strengthen their drawing and painting abilities and knowledge through practice and progressive exploration. They will examine the differences between media, such as oil and water-based paint, and experiment with a variety of surfaces, such as panel, canvas, and paper. Preparation of surfaces is emphasized, while students learn to build their own painting stretchers in the woodshop. Study of proportion, form, perspective, visual measurement, portraiture, chroma, mark and value making with a wide range of materials will be emphasized in a series of observational and experimental projects. In addition to foundational techniques, conceptual development will be promoted. Students will also be expected to take part in critiques, classroom discussions and research.

Target Students: VA majors in 9th Grade

Materials: Charcoal, Graphite, Acrylic, Oil, and other wet and dry materials

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA majors only

Credits per semester: 1.0 Credits

Design Thinking (Year-long)

This course develops and refines two-dimensional and three-dimensional foundational techniques while cultivating the capacity for visual and conceptual thinking. Students will also develop their ability to brainstorm, research and collect reference images and materials, in order to learn to independently develop ideas for assignments. Students in Visual Awareness will embrace unique solutions to creative problems, and develop the skills necessary for conceptual growth and experimentation with material. Group critiques and discussions throughout the year will allow students to gain insight from fellow students and strengthen their own speaking skills.

Target Students: VA majors in 10th Grade

Materials: Open Media (with an emphasis on design)

Prerequisites: 2D Ideation

Seating Priority: VA majors only

Credits per semester: 1.0 Credits

Thesis I (Year-long)

In this year-long course, students will develop a rigorous artistic practice that yields a cohesive and sophisticated portfolio. Skills emphasized will relate to the presentation and completion of major bodies of work, articulation of personal creative process, and continued honing of craft. Extensive independent research into contemporary and historical art and both cultural and autobiographical influences will be necessary to create a meaningful and developed body of work. Instructors will encourage flexibility on the part of the students, asking “Why?” and “What if...?”. Interdisciplinary, collaborative and community-based creative investigations will be highly encouraged. By the end of the Term, students will be able to articulate their Thesis clearly and demonstrate research in the form of a cohesive body of work.

Target Students: VA majors in 11th Grade and one year seniors

Materials: Open Media

Prerequisites: Visual Awareness

Seating Priority: VA Majors Only

Credits per semester: 1.0 Credits

Thesis II (Year-long)

This course is designed to prepare students for their Thesis Exhibition at the end of the year. Students are expected to develop a thesis idea that is connected to them through personal experience in order for their work to be genuine and original. Through an in-depth exploration of their chosen thesis idea, students will learn how to interpret ideas metaphorically with multiple solutions and in multiple media. They will continuously examine their idea and develop a body of work that is both visually and conceptually cohesive.  In addition to the Thesis Exhibition, students will be expected to complete college applications or research other professional opportunities available after graduation, write essays and artist statements, and enter scholarship competitions. This course emphasizes making art as an ongoing process that involves the student in informed and critical decision-making. Technical mastery will be emphasized and demonstrated through a wide range of approaches and media. Abstract, observational, and inventive works will be explored and developed.

During the course of the spring semester, students will work collaboratively and individually to curate and to install their thesis exhibitions. The Dow Visual Arts Gallery will serve as the main exhibition site. Exhibitions that students will oversee also include, the Student Juried Exhibition, Senior Thesis Exhibitions, and the annual Festival Exhibition. Upon completion of the Thesis Exhibition, students are expected to continue to create meaningful artwork for their portfolios.

Target Students: VA majors in 12th Grade or PG

Materials: Open Media

Prerequisites: Portfolio Development

Seating Priority: VA Majors Only

Credits per semester: 1.0 Credits

Drawing and Painting Intensive (Year-long)

This course investigates the foundations of drawing, painting and design principles while encouraging proficiency in a wide range of approaches.  Students will strengthen their drawing and painting abilities and knowledge through practice and progressive exploration. They will examine the differences between media, such as oil and water-based paint, and experiment with a variety of surfaces, such as panel, canvas, and paper. Preparation of surfaces is emphasized, while students learn to build their own painting stretchers in the woodshop. Study of proportion, form, perspective, visual measurement, portraiture, chroma, mark and value making with a wide range of materials will be emphasized in a series of observational and experimental projects. In addition to foundational techniques, conceptual development will be promoted. Students will also be expected to take part in critiques, classroom discussions and research.

Target Students: Required for all incoming VA students entering after freshman year. Upperclassmen can place out with a portfolio review and permission from the Director.

Materials: Charcoal, Graphite, Acrylic, Oil, and other wet and dry materials

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: 1 Credits

Sculptural Forms (First and Second Semester)

Sculptural Forms will explore visual and physical concepts and processes such as form, volume, plane, line, space, texture, and surface. Students will gain experience with a diverse selection of sculptural processes including addition (construction or fabrication), subtraction (carving), manipulation (modeling), and substitution (casting). Students will also be exposed to a variety of methods such as working with found objects and installation. Contemporary and traditional issues related to sculpture and design will be explored through assigned readings, personal research, class discussion, critiques, and individual projects. Students will be required to work proficiently in their sourcebooks and develop their ideas through course-related research.

Target Students: Required for all incoming VA students.

Materials: Wood, plaster, metal, found materials

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5 Credits

The Figure (First and Second Semester)

Figure exploration will be a study of figurative anatomy and proportion as depicted through observational painting and through digital technology.  Students will develop a working knowledge of both skeletal and musculature anatomy and how these can be employed and manipulated to create a convincing figure.  We will develop strategies for work through the process of creating an armature, sculpting, and finishing.  In this course we will also look at digital tools of capturing a 3d model and how this can be employed as a tool in hand sculpting and painting.

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials: Various 2D and 3D materials

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5 Credits

Introduction to Photoshop & Illustrator (First and Second Semester)

This course will explore the broad range of digital image editing tools offered by Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. We will enhance our digital literacy by examining the different capabilities of these two image editing software programs, and understand the difference between vector and raster-based imagery. Graphic Design, Image Formatting and Photo Editing, and Digital Painting and more will be explored in this introductory class.

Target Students: Required for all incoming VA students. Upperclassmen can place out with a portfolio review and permission from the Director.

Materials: Photoshop and Illustrator

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5 Credits

Photography: Composition and Documentation (Second Semester)

In this course, students will be learning basic and advanced compositional techniques, and the

proper methods for documenting artwork and other visual projects. Special attention will be

paid to – different historical ideas of proper composition, photographers who utilize these

varied practices, and their application in abstracted and documentary photography.

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials: Analogue and Digital cameras, film

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors Only

Credits per semester: .5 Credits

Art History: Ancient Greek through Renaissance

An introduction to the history and developments in arts and culture from the ancient world through to the Renaissance. This encompasses Prehistory to 1600 CE. Students will study the historical chronology of human kinds expressive impulse and the evidence that reveals it. The interconnected evolution of culture, patronage and technological advancement will be examined in art, architecture and styles of dress.

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials: Art History Textbook

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors, open to all majors

Art History: Baroque - 21st Century

An introduction to the history and developments in arts and culture from the 15th century through to the 21st century. This encompasses the dates 1600 to 2019. Students will study the historical chronology of human kinds expressive impulse and the evidence that reveals it. The interconnected evolution of culture, patronage and technological advancement will be examined in art, architecture and styles of dress.

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials: Art History Textbook

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors, open to all majors

ELECTIVE COURSES

Ceramics: Intro to Handbuilding and Wheel Throwing

This introductory course in ceramics is developed to direct the student through the introduction and use of a wide variety of handbuilding and wheel throwing techniques.  Students will study the uses of the wheel and construct work that challenge their skills. This course is designed to provide a hands-on studio art experience.  Students will use the wheel to help them expand their way of ceramic making.

This course will develop a strong skill base to enable successful construction of functional and sculptural ceramic objects. Students will learn to use the hand-building processes of pinch, slab, coil and hollowing. Students will also learn to utilize templates to aid in construction, the coil extruder, slab roller and the use of simple one part plaster hump/slump molds. For those students aware of these handbuilding process we will push scale, complexity of the skill and technique. Glaze application will be covered.

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials: Clay, glaze, slip, mixed materials,

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5

Fibers: Introduction to Sewing and Garment Construction (First Semester)

Using a dress form and three dimensional draping, students will begin this course by assembling a paper-based pattern that introduces the basic steps and rules for constructing a garment. Students will become familiar with the parts of, how to thread, and practice sewing via sewing machine(Bernina 210/215). Through deconstructing and reconstructing ready-to-wear garments students will begin to understand fit and measurements, silhouette, and fabric choices. Students will then use cotton muslin to create an original prototype based on their own artistic interests/thesis idea.

Target Students: VA majors

Materials: paper, found materials/clothing, cotton muslin, sewing

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5

Paint as a Metaphor: Abstraction and Interpretation (First and Second Semester)

This interdisciplinary course will explore various ways of creating work that goes beyond representational modes of painting.  By expanding upon the historical and contemporary contexts of abstraction and metaphor in painting, we will create exciting new ways of expressing our ideas in paint. Experimentation with mark-making, implements, and paint media will be highly encouraged. Pouring, repetition, subtractive processes, texture, storytelling and more will be explored.  This course will strengthen conceptual thinking, dialogue and is geared towards having fun experimenting!

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials: oil paint, acrylic, canvas, mixed media

Prerequisites: Painting Applications and Surfaces

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5

Interdisciplinary Sculpture (First and Second Semester)

Students in Interdisciplinary Sculpture will work with a variety of media and processes. Students will review and elaborate on their understanding of the principles and elements of sculpture. Students will create pieces in traditional sculptural media ( wood, metal, plaster) as well as investigating mixed media, kinetics, installation, and 4D application. These projects, with a more advanced and independent focus, allow students to continue building their existing knowledge of sculpture while experimenting. Students will be asked to consider the relationship between material and content and to incorporate their thesis topic into the projects created in this class.

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials: Wood, plaster, metal, found materials

Prerequisites: Sculptural Forms

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5

Metals: Fabrication

The focus of this course is on fabrication and forming techniques such as soldering, cold connections in sheet metal and wire. Mechanisms such as hinges, clasps, and closures will be explored. Forming and forging methods approaches will aid students in creating three-dimensional forms. While building or constructing objects are the primary techniques covered, students will be exposed to surface treatments such as creating texture on metal, patinations (adding color through the use of chemicals), and stone setting. Wearable and non-wearable objects will be considered.

Target Students: VA majors

Materials: copper, brass, nickel, sterling silver, stone, enamel

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: Students are not awarded credit for quarterly technique classes; instead, they earn 2.0 credits per semester under the categories of Personal Practice and Engagement in Visual Arts.

Ceramics: Experimental Processes

This interdisciplinary course will explore various ways of making outside of the traditional norms of handbuilding and throwing.  By expanding upon the contemporary field of ceramic artists and variant practices we will look at how raw clay, photography, installation, mixed materials can become part of the ceramic process. This course will strengthen conceptual thinking, dialogue and is geared towards experimenting!

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials: Clay, glaze, slip, mixed materials,

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5

Exploring the Figure (First and Second Semester)

Figure exploration will be a study of figurative anatomy and proportion as depicted through observational painting and through digital technology.  Students will develop a working knowledge of both skeletal and musculature anatomy and how these can be employed and manipulated to create a convincing figure.  We will develop strategies for work through the process of creating an armature, sculpting, and finishing.  In this course we will also look at digital tools of capturing a 3d model and how this can be employed as a tool in hand sculpting and painting.

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials: Various 2D and 3D materials

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5

Experimental Fashion (Second Semester)

Students  in Experimental Fashion will explore a variety of materials and design applications as they are related to fashion, wearable art, and soft sculpture. We will explore design elements both functional and non-functional and how these relate to the wearer and use of the garment/object.  Students will research fashion designers and artists  and discuss recent trends as well as students’ artistic interests. Students will continue to develop and hone their sewing and garment construction craft; projects in this class are expected to have a high level of craft. This class will also emphasize the documentation, performance,  and presentation of wearable artworks.

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials:

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5

Printmaking: Relief Printing (Second Semester)

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials:

Prerequisites: none

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5

 

New Genres (First and Second Semester)

This course will introduce students to historical and contemporary examples of New Genres in Art. Students will apply critical thinking, research and discussion in the creation of their own immersive installation(s), performances, and time-based media projects. Students will apply their knowledge of problem solving, craft, and technical processes to create engaging and innovative works of art.

Target Students: VA Majors

Materials: Open Media

Prerequisites: Sculptural Forms

Seating Priority: VA Majors

Credits per semester: .5 credit per semester

OPEN ELECTIVES

These classes are open to all students regardless of major.

Comparative Arts

Interdisciplinary Performance Collaboration

Contemporary Arts Performance and Culture

Leadership and Management in the Arts

Portfolio and Resume Development

Creative Writing

Elements of Poetry

Elements of Fiction

Introduction to Screenwriting

Writing the Body*

The Writing of Non-Fiction

Writing the Fantastic*

Hybrid Genres*

Experiments in Poetry*

Writing About Music and Writing Musically*

Dance

General Dance

Motion Picture Arts

Story

Great Directors

Music

Choir

Class Piano

Jazz History

Private Lessons

Jazz Improv I

Jazz Improv II

Introduction to Music Production

Theatre

Dance for Musical Theatre

Improvisation

Movement for Actors

Play Structure & Analysis

Makeup Design

Stage Management

Fundamentals of Design

Song and Dance Lab

Voice and Diction

Theatre Topics: Clown

Acting Foundations

Makeup Design II

Intro to Musical Theatre

Fundamentals of Design

Visual Arts

Art History

*Offered every other year