Presenter: Elizabeth Griffin, MA, LMFT

Title: The Art and Science of Sex Offender Treatment

Abstract: Treating and managing individuals who commit sexual offenses is both rewarding and challenging. In order to successfully intervene on sexual offending, it is crucial to remain informed of the current research. Too often there is a gap between the those who treat or manage sex offender and researchers in the field. Treatment providers and probation officers often do not have the time to keep abreast of the research and many researchers are disconnected from the front lines of human change.

This workshop will provide an overview of the research regarding sex offender treatment.  Foundational concepts such as the RNR model, stages of change, cognitive behavioral therapy, relapse prevention, the Good Lives model and motivational interviewing will be discussed.  Additionally the treatment of individuals who commit online sexual offenses will be highlighted.

Participants will leave the workshop with a toolbox full of new, practical, and innovative ideas that are reflective of current research.  Additionally, the workshop will provide examples of how various treatment interventions can be adapted and used by probation.

Objective/Goals:

Participants will be able to identify the dynamic risk factors associated with sexual offending recidivism.

Participants will be able to identify two areas of psychology research that are relevant to developing effective treatment and management strategies for sexual offenders.

Participants will be able to identify and implement various responsivity (RNR principle) elements into their sex offender treatment and management plans.

References

Laws, D. R., & Ward, T. (2006). When one size doesn’t fit all: The reformulation of relapse prevention. In W.L. Marshall, Y.M. Fernandez, L.E. Marshall, & G.A. Serran (Eds.), Sexual offender treatment: Controversial issues (pp. 241-254). New Jersey, NY: John Wiley & Sons.

Marshall, W.L., Marshall, L.E., Serran, G.A. & O’Brien, M.D. (2011). Rehabilitating sexual offenders: A strength-based approach. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association,

Prochaska, J.O. (1999). How do people change, and how can we change to help many more people? In M.A. Hubble, B.L. Duncan, & S.D. Miller (Eds.), The heart and soul of change: What works in therapy (pp. 227-255). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Ward, T. (2002). Good lives and the rehabilitation of sex offenders. In T. Ward and S. Hudson (Eds.), Sexual deviance: Issues and controversies. Sage Publications.

Ward, T. & Beech, A.R. (2004). The etiology of risk: A preliminary model. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 16, 271-284.

Bio: Elizabeth Griffin, MA is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist with over thirty-three years of experience treating individuals with sexually problematic behaviors, including sexual offense behavior.  She has worked in out-patient, in-patient, military, prison and civil commitment settings.  Ms. Griffin is certified in the Penile Plethysmograph, the Abel Assessment for Sexual Interest, the Affinity assessment of sexual interest and the LOOK.  Ms. Griffin lectures nationally on the assessment and treatment of offline and online sexual offenders as well as those with sexually compulsive behavior.  She has written numerous professional articles on these topics, and is co-author of several books and workbooks.