TABLE OF CONTENTS

Beverly High School        2

The Community         2

What Makes Beverly High School Special         2

High School Completion Requirements         3

Mission Statement of Beverly High School         3

Advanced Academic Endorsements         4

Course and Credit Requirements         7

General Information         8

Preparing for the Future          13

Career and Technical Education Program         16

Courses of Study         19

Course Descriptions         25

Business and Computer Technology ….............................................................................. 25

English, Media and Communications  …........................................................................... 27

Fine and Technical Arts …................................................................................................. 30

Music………………………………………………………………................................... 33

World Language …......................................................................................................... 36

History – Social Studies …................................................................................................. 43

Mathematics …................................................................................................................... 46

Science, Engineering and Applied Technology  ….............................................................49

Wellness...............................................................................................................................55

Unique Courses....................................................................................................................59

Marine Corps Junior Reserve Officer Training Corp …......................................................59

Accreditation Statement.        60

Temporary Records Statement         61

Chapter 622 Law Statement.        61

BEVERLY HIGH SCHOOL

Enrolling approximately 1300 students, Beverly High School offers a variety of programs for its diverse student body, almost ninety-five percent of whom go on to two or four year colleges. Those programs include 13 Advanced Placement courses, 4 foreign languages, six science laboratories, and fine arts courses.  

Complementing the classroom curriculum are many co-curricular and extracurricular activities. Beverly is proud of its strong high school academic program and its widely celebrated fine arts program, its athletic teams, and its award-winning student publications. Beverly High School values the various student organizations that foster leadership, service, and social awareness among its student body.

THE COMMUNITY

The late John Updike, one of Beverly's best-known residents, said, “Beverly is a town with something for everyone. If you can't be happy in Beverly, you're not trying." Beverly is a residential and industrial community covering fifteen square miles with a wealth of natural beauty and resources, including nine miles of coastline. Parks and woodlands complement the rural landscape of the city, which is close to Boston and its many cultural and educational resources. Once dominated by the shoe machine manufacturing industry, Beverly has developed a more diversified economy including high tech companies located in industrial areas along the Route 128 corridor. The shoe facility has become the site for more than a hundred thriving small businesses, which rent space in that building. Beverly boasts a four-year private co-educational college, and an emerging art college in the heart of downtown Beverly. A year-round theater provides a source of culture renowned throughout New England. The city is also home to a large, progressive hospital. Almost 40,000 residents make Beverly their home. Many newcomers have moved to the community because of its physical beauty and its commitment to the development of its children. There are a wide variety of recreational, social and cultural opportunities for young people.

WHAT MAKES BEVERLY HIGH SCHOOL SPECIAL?

HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION

In order to participate in the commencement exercises for Beverly High School, students must satisfy all requirements designated for either a Diploma or a Certificate of Achievement. Recipients of Diplomas and Certificates will also be eligible to receive Advanced Academic Endorsements in recognition of significant academic performance in various fields of study.

To receive a Diploma, a student must:

  1. Complete his/her fourth year of high school, or its equivalent.
  2. Attend Beverly High School for at least one semester. *
  3. Meet the course and credit requirements approved by the School Committee and presented in the Program of Studies, or meet the graduation requirements of his/her Individual Education Plan (IEP) with the approval of the Superintendent of Schools.
  4. Meet the requirements for a high school diploma as specified under state law.

Certificate of Achievement

To receive a Certificate of Achievement, a student must:

  1. Complete his/her fourth year of high school, or its equivalent.
  2. Attend Beverly High School for at least one semester. *
  3. Meet the course and credit requirements approved by the School Committee and presented in the Program of Studies, or meet the graduation requirements of his/her Individual Education Plan (IEP). (*Special Education students in an out-of-district placement will be considered to have met this requirement.)

Advanced Academic Endorsements

Advanced Academic Endorsements are acknowledged at commencement exercises to those students who receive a Diploma or Certificate of Achievement and who have achieved significant academic performance in various fields of study as designated in the Program of Studies. These endorsements are intended to recognize and communicate significant student success concentrated in beginning and advanced coursework and/or related areas of performance in a particular discipline. Students are eligible to receive more than one endorsement. Interested students should see their guidance counselor for an application.

THE MISSION STATEMENT OF BEVERLY HIGH SCHOOL

The mission of Beverly High School is to provide a safe, respectful environment where all students are challenged to reach their academic and social potential.

  1. Academic Expectations

Beverly High School students will:

  1. Social/Civic Expectations

Beverly High School students will: 

ADVANCED ACADEMIC ENDORSEMENTS

Endorsement

Content Area Study *

Grade / GPA Requirement

Extensions

English Language Arts

25 credits of English including two electives from the following list: Creative Writing Journalism Media Production Public Speaking, Sports Literature ,Women’s Literature

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Minimum of two years participation in one of the following: Ledger, Aegis, Yearbook, Theatre, or Media.

Successful completion of one of the following:

  1. Senior project (exhibition) presented to the English faculty.
  2. An approved School-to-Career internship in an English-related field.
  3. Independent Study in English.

Mathematics

20.0 credits in Mathematics

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Minimum of two years participation in BHS Math Team. Successful completion of one of the following:

  1. Senior project (exhibition) presented to the Mathematics faculty.
  2. An approved School-to-Career internship in a Math-related field.
  3. An “A” average in advanced computer programming.

Science

20.0 credits in

Science

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Minimum of two years participation in Science League activities. Successful completion of one of the following:

  1. Senior project (exhibition) presented to the Science faculty.
  2. An approved School-to-Career internship in a Science-related field.
  3. Submit project in Regional Science Fair.

Social Studies

22.5 credits of Social Studies including two elective courses

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Successful completion of two of the following:

  1. Senior project (exhibition) presented to the Social Studies faculty.
  2. An approved School-to-Career internship in a Social Studies-related field.
  3. Demonstrate civic involvement in school and community.

Foreign Language

20 credits in the same foreign language

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Successful completion of two of the following:

  1. Senior project (exhibition) presented to the Foreign Language faculty.
  2. An approved School-to-Career internship in a Foreign Language-related field.
  3. Participate in a school-sponsored foreign trip or in an approved program of equal value.

Wellness

10 credits in Wellness

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Successful completion of two of the following:

  1. Senior project (exhibition) presented to the Wellness faculty.
  2. An approved School-to-Career internship in a Wellness-related field.
  3. Letter of recommendation from a member of the Wellness faculty.
  4. Presentation at a community-wide health fair.

Music

Successful completion of three years in one choral or instrumental performance class and Introduction to Music Theory

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Successful completion of one of the following:

  1. Preparing and auditioning for a junior or senior district festival (MMEA) for two years.
  2. Two years of on-stage or pit band performance in the musical.
  3. Two years of study with a private instructor.
  4. A.P. Music Theory

Visual Arts

Minimum of 10 credits in CP/ Advanced Level art courses

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Successful completion of one of the following:

  1. Minimum of two years participation in any of the following adjudicated art shows: Boston Globe Scholastic Art Competition; Congressional District Art Competition; Worcester Art Museum – Art All State (junior year only); other adjudicated art shows deemed appropriate by art faculty.
  2. A.P. Studio Art

Business Education

10 credits from the business elective field, including at least 5 credits from Marketing or Accounting

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Successful completion of two of the following:

  1. District participation in DECA.
  2. An approved School-to-Career internship in a Business-related field.

Technology

10 credits from the Technology field

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Successful completion of two of the following:

  1. Serve on the Computer Help Desk for one semester.
  2. Assist with website design and maintenance for one semester.
  3. Perform technical support for BevCam for one semester.
  4. Enter and be judged in one technology design / invention competition.

Culinary Arts

Successful completion of Introduction to Culinary Arts, and additional elective in the content area

GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Successful completion of two of the following:

  1. Senior project (exhibition) presented to the Culinary Arts faculty.
  2. NSCC Culinary Competition/Tech Prep.
  3. An approved School-to-Career internship in a Culinary Arts-related field.

MJROTC

17.5 credits in JROTC Leadership, including one semester of JROTC Leadership IV

Attain GPA of 3.3 (B+) or above in the content area

Successful completion of two of the following:

  1. Serve in a company level billet for at least two semesters.
  2. Member of the JROTC drill team for at least two semesters.
  3. Serve as a Public Affairs, Administration, or Supply Officer for two semesters.

COURSE AND CREDIT REQUIREMENTS

Subject

Credits

Notes

English

20

All Four Years

Mathematics

20

All Four Years

Science, Engineering & Applied Technology

17.5

15 credits in Lab Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physics and Engineering)

Computer Technology

2.5

History/Social Science

17.5

Includes Modern World History 9, United States History Pt. 1, and United States History Pt. 2

Fine Arts

5

Foreign Language

10

Two-year requirement, same language

Wellness

10

All Four Years:  Which Includes Health Development, Fitness Enhancement, a choice of one physical activity course, and any other wellness course and/or online learning options.

Electives

37.5

Total

140

SCHEDULING REQUIREMENTS:

The total number of units required for graduation is 140.  Students in all grades must be fully scheduled for each year.  Seniors must be scheduled for a minimum of 30 credits in order to graduate.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

TYPE OF SCHOOL

Beverly High School is a four-year comprehensive senior high school. Through its subject matter offerings and its activity programs, it seeks to meet as many of the educational needs of its students as possible. The school is concerned with its responsibility for all youth of the city whatever their backgrounds, abilities, interests or ambitions.

PLANNING A HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM 

Upon entering ninth grade, students will begin to develop a four-year academic plan with their counselor. This academic/career plan will be developed and revised throughout their four years. Parents will continue to review the course selections. Parents should consult with guidance counselors when necessary.

There are five full time guidance counselors, two full time adjustment counselors and one half time adjustment counselor, and a student resources/registration secretary. The guidance counselors provide academic planning and college, career, personal, and crisis counseling.  Each student is assigned to a guidance counselor and is seen individually and in groups to address academic, social and emotional issues and to create plans for careers and postsecondary education. In addition, parents and students are encouraged to access the services of the guidance staff.

COURSE AND CREDIT REQUIREMENTS 

In planning a program of studies, a student must annually enroll and be fully scheduled each year.

No student may elect courses for credit that are above his or her grade level without the approval of an assistant principal.  Students in grades 10, 11, and 12 may not elect subjects intended for grade 9 students without similar approval. Permission to initiate such requests should be secured by a student through his or her counselor. Any student failing a required subject should attend summer school in order to meet graduation requirements.

MINIMUM PROMOTION CRITERIA 

At the completion of the freshman year (Grade 9), a student must have earned a minimum of 35 credits to be considered a full sophomore. A 9th grade student who earned 30 credits will be considered a conditional sophomore. A 9th grader who earned fewer than 30 credits WILL NOT be promoted to Grade 10.

At the completion of the sophomore year (Grade 10), a student must have earned a minimum of 75 credits to be considered a full junior. A 10th grade student who earned 70 credits will be considered a conditional junior. A 10th grader who earned fewer than 70 credits WILL NOT be promoted to Grade 11.

At the completion of the junior year (Grade 11), a student must have earned a minimum of 105 credits to be considered a full senior. An 11th grade student who earned 100 credits will be considered a conditional senior. An 11th grader who earned fewer than 100 credits WILL NOT be promoted to Grade12.

PLACEMENT DESCRIPTION

Courses are offered according to their rigor based on four criteria:  pace of instruction, depth and breadth of content, challenging classroom activities, and work assignment expectation outside the classroom.  Homework is expected in all courses.

Requested course placements should be discussed with the students, parents, current teachers, and guidance counselor in order to best facilitate the best chances for success.        Students should be challenged without becoming overextended by the material and performance tasks.

Beverly High School works diligently to fulfill each student’s requests for courses. However placement in the courses requested is not guaranteed.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES (AP):

These courses contain highly challenging material, presented at an accelerated and more intense pace.  They require advanced reading, writing, verbal, conceptual, mathematical, and study abilities, as well as extensive outside preparation.  Students who chose AP must be motivated to academically achieve and already possess well developed study habits, and who will initiate seeking extra help if necessary, plan long term assignments effectively, and organize their time well.  

The Advanced Placement (AP) Program sponsored by the College Board provides the means for secondary schools and colleges to provide such educational experiences.  The Advanced Placement (AP) Program provides descriptions of and examinations in college-level courses to interested schools and the results of those examinations to the colleges of the student's choice. Participating colleges, in turn, may grant credit or placement or both to students who have performed at a certain level on the Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations.  

Many students are capable of completing college-level studies during secondary school. The Advanced Placement (AP) Program sponsored by the College Board provides the means for secondary schools and colleges to provide such educational experiences. To take an AP level course is not something a student and their parent/guardian should enter into lightly.  Beverly High School continues to increase enrollment and with limited resources, schedule changes are not allowed once the master schedule is set and teachers are assigned to particular courses.

Any Advanced Placement courses that fail to meet adequate enrollment may not run. This will be dependent upon availability of faculty.  Advanced Placement courses may require students to complete a summer project or assignment.

HONORS COURSES (H):

These courses contain highly challenging material, presented at an accelerated and more intense pace than the typical college preparatory courses taken by a majority of four-year college-bound students.  They require advanced reading, writing, verbal, conceptual, mathematical, and study abilities, as well as extensive outside preparation.  

COLLEGE (CP):

These courses are designed to prepare students for college and / or career placement.  They will require well-developed reading, writing, verbal, conceptual, mathematical, and study abilities, as well as outside preparation.  They will have a strong emphasis on fundamental communication skills and essential concepts. They will contain much practice and reinforcement.  In addition, all elective courses will be considered CP courses unless otherwise stated.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE AND RANK-IN-CLASS 

Grade Point Average is an average of grade points divided by final grades.  Our scale utilizes a weighted GPA of leveled courses.  Quarter grades or grades other than final grades in leveled, credit bearing courses are not counted in calculating GPA.  A preliminary grade point average is calculated at the end of freshman year. Class rank is based on students' GPA.

GPA SCALE

There are three levels of courses at the high school that count for GPA: College Preparatory, Honors, and Advanced Placement. There’s a 1.0 value difference between the Standard/College Preparatory level and the AP level. For example, an A+ in a Standard/College Prep course gets 4.30 quality points. The same grade in an Honors class receives 4.80 quality points, and 5.30 quality points in an Advanced Placement class. The following table gives all of the values.

Letter Grade

C.P.

Honors

AP

A+

4.30

4.80

5.30

A

4.00

4.50

5.00

A-

3.70

4.20

4.70

B+

3.30

3.80

4.30

B

3.00

3.50

4.00

B-

2.70

3.20

3.70

C+

2.30

2.80

3.30

C

2.00

2.50

3.00

C-

1.70

2.20

2.70

D+

1.30

1.80

2.30

D

1.00

1.50

2.00

F

0.00

0.00

0.00

(0.5 is added for Honors courses, 1.0 is added for A.P. Courses)

COURSE SELECTION AND CHANGES 

It is expected that courses be chosen carefully by students with the help of their parents and counselors in terms of their capabilities, objectives, and ability to meet course prerequisites. Course selection should be a collaborative process involving student, parent, and counselor. If there are disagreements about which course should be taken, the counselor will make the final decision. This decision may be appealed to the Principal.

As is states elsewhere, the master schedule and other courses are set based upon student requests (and signed by parents/guardians).  Therefore, there will not be any changes except those involving errors in the scheduling process, conflicts with other classes, or revised course offerings. In order to drop a course, students must follow the Course Change and Withdrawal Policy.  This includes a form completed by student, parent, teachers and assistant principal by the specified date.  Courses dropped after the specified time (see below) will carry a final mark of W. 

COURSE CHANGE AND WITHDRAWAL POLICY

All withdrawals must be approved by the student’s teacher, assistant principal, parent/guardian and guidance counselor. Students must complete the Course Change Form with signatures from all aforementioned personnel. If the student does not have approval from all personnel, the student will not be able to drop the course.

Students may appeal to their assistant principal in regard to the withdrawal deadline if there is an unusual circumstance such as a medical concern.

Course Withdrawal Policy for Electives:

The last day to change an elective course is the seventh school day of the school year. After this day, electives will not be able to be changed or dropped.

Course Withdrawal  Policy for Advanced Placement Courses:

The last day to withdraw from an Advanced Placement (AP) course is the 45th school day of the first quarter. After the first quarter has ended, students will not be permitted to drop an AP course.

Level Change Policy:

Level changes, to either increase or decrease the difficulty of a course, are granted if a student is academically misplaced in the class in terms of the level of difficulty.  In order to change a level of a course, students must have the approval of their current teacher, assistant principal, parent/guardian and guidance counselor to either increase or decrease a level. The deadline to change a level is the last day of the second quarter. Level changes are considered for Honors and College Preparatory courses. AP courses are not considered for a level change.

SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES

This program is designed to help students develop their skills and meet their needs in reading, basic mathematics, spelling and other academic subjects. This assistance is provided in either small group and/or individualized instruction sessions. The program now includes full-time teachers as well as instructional aides.  Psychologists, adjustment counselors, and social workers are available as needed.

ACCOMMODATION PLANS (504) 

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination against persons with a handicap in any program receiving federal financial assistance. The act defines a person with a handicap as anyone who:

In order to fulfill its obligation under Section 504, the Beverly Public Schools recognizes a responsibility to avoid discrimination in policies and practices regarding personnel and students. No discrimination against any person with a handicap will knowingly be permitted in any of the programs and practices in the school district. The school district has specific responsibilities under the Act, which include the responsibility to identify, evaluate, and, if the child is determined to be eligible under Section 504, to afford access to appropriate accommodations to enable access to educational services.

EXTENDED EDUCATION PROGRAM

The Extended Education Program provides students with a range of opportunities to extend the regular school program and to develop a stronger sense of responsibility for their unassigned time through participation in and exploration of meaningful educational alternatives.

SUMMER SCHOOL AND CREDIT RECOVERY 

The Beverly Summer School Program offers students an opportunity to make up course failures. Courses are offered for credit. Students, who wish to make up credits for courses through some other program or through private tutoring, must first apply for approval through their counselor.  There is a fee for attending summer school courses.

BHS (STAY Program) does provide a credit recovery program for students requiring additional courses in order to graduate. Students must get permission from the principal to participate in the program. The STAY Program provides the opportunity for students to recover credits by utilizing GradPoint, an online curriculum resource. Courses include all major subjects, as well as health, art, computer technology and elective offerings. Any summer course offered at BHS has a fee associated with enrollment.  

ADVANCED STUDIES: DUAL ENROLLMENT WITH PUBLIC & PRIVATE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

Students may earn college credits, which also are applicable toward high school graduation for courses taken at accredited colleges with the approval of their guidance counselors and the principal. It is the responsibility of students who wish to pursue courses for high school credit to complete an application form for each course before enrolling and to arrange to have a final grade report forwarded to the school. Dual enrollment is a program offered to juniors and seniors.  For the MA state-funded program (public colleges and universities) that offers courses tuition free, limited space is available each semester.  Tuition-free courses are offered on a first-come, first-serve basis at the individual colleges.  Grades earned in core classes (English, Science, Social Studies, Mathematics and Foreign Language) through any Dual Enrollment Program or through courses completed at local colleges will be factored in a student's G.P.A. at the AP level.  Beverly High School looks to continually expand the Advanced Studies offerings each year.

HONOR ROLL

Each quarter Beverly High School publishes an Honor Roll of those students who have maintained the following qualifications.  All courses will count for the purpose of determining Honor Roll. Please note that GPA and Class Rank are not impacted.

Distinction

A student must have no grade lower than an A-, and a P in any course where a pass/fail standard is in place.

Honors

A student must have at least one A- or higher, no grade below a B-, and a P in any course where a pass/fail standard is in place

Honorable Mention

A student must have no grade lower than a B- and a P in any course where a pass/fail standard is in place.  

PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE

The Guidance Department assists students and their parents with plans for the future. Counselors provide information on high school graduation requirements and on general college admission requirements. The counselors will assist the students in formulating post- secondary plans, and write recommendations for students upon request.  The Guidance Secretary/Registrar sends transcripts to colleges.   In addition, counselors will provide information on tests such as The Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and the American College Test (ACT). The counselors host several College Planning Sessions and a Financial Aid Night for parents and students.

It is the responsibility of the students and parents to obtain the particular requirements for college admission and to complete applications of specific schools to which they intend to apply. The responsibility for requesting transcripts and recommendations from the guidance office and responsibility for sending in applications remains with students and their parents.

SCHOOL AND COLLEGE SELECTION ASSISTANCE 

The Guidance Department has implemented Naviance, an online program designed to assist students and parents in accessing and organizing information on college selection and admissions procedures.

Information on using Naviance will be provided to parents by the Guidance Department when requested.

All members of the school staff and particularly the guidance counselors will do everything possible to help all students create post-secondary plans utilizing the Naviance Program, in advisory and in classroom presentations.

TYPES OF SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

There are many types of post-secondary institutions for students and parents to consider. They may be classified as follows: (l) Degree-granting institutions offering curricula generally requiring four school years for completion; (2) community colleges and technical institutes offering programs of two years duration; (3) and a large class of schools, giving courses from six weeks to several years in length. The latter group of schools is often vocational in nature.

In selecting a school or college, a student and his or her parents should analyze its offerings to be sure there is likelihood that it will fulfill expectations. Students are encouraged to visit schools during school vacations and to narrow their choices to a reasonable number. (5-7 schools)

COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS

The requirements for admissions to colleges vary so greatly in detail that it is impossible to establish guidelines that may be trusted to qualify a candidate for all colleges. However, generalizations may be made.

Schools and colleges usually require a candidate to be prepared in sixteen units of work. A unit as presented to a college from Beverly High School consists of five credits of work in a subject for which study outside of class is required. For example, five credits of English is one unit. For subjects that meet less frequently throughout the year, a fraction of credit is allowed. The grades required in the sixteen units vary among the schools and colleges.

The 16 CARNEGIE UNITS are courses usually required for consideration for admission to a four-year college or university:

It is important to note that colleges and universities vary in their admissions criteria; requirements for a specific college or university should be checked with that college's or university’s Admission Department.

Schools and colleges usually list the subjects and units that they require. Engineering colleges require several units in mathematics and in physics. Some colleges require a certain number of units in world languages. The catalogs of institutions carefully list subjects and scholastic requirements for admission, and a prospective student must make sure the program he or she is following in high school will meet these requirements.

Criteria in addition to specific subjects that colleges use in determining a student's preparation for advanced study are as follows:

  1. The results of the SAT given by the College Board.  Most colleges also accept the American College Test (ACT).
  2. The results of SAT Subject Tests also made available by the College Board.
  3. A transcript.
  4. Class Rank/Grade Point Average (GPA).
  5. Participation in extra-curricular activities.
  6. 2 Academic Teacher recommendations.
  7. The recommendation of the Guidance Counselor.

STANDARDIZED TESTING/COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

The PSAT is a practice SAT administered ONLY in October.  Juniors and sophomores who might be interested in college are encouraged to take this exam.  Scores are not shared with colleges, only with parents, the student, and the student’s counselor.  The College Board provides a detailed report of the student’s performance on the test, which can be used as a tool to determine SAT preparation needs.  Top Scorers during junior year may qualify for the prestigious National Merit Scholarship awards.  The PSAT is returned with the test booklet the student used as well as the detailed score report in order to allow each student to review the test and their own answers.  In addition, students' score reports are online at www.collegeboard.com and linked to Khan Academy, which allows for tailored practice for the SAT.  The SAT is required for admission to many four-year colleges.  The redesigned SAT (Spring 2016) consists of a Reading test, a Writing and Language test, a Math test and an optional Essay (students are encouraged to register with the essay).  All sections are multiple choice except the essay. For more information on the content of the questions of all parts of the redesigned SAT, visit www.collegeboard.com.

The SAT Subject Tests are subject-based tests required by a small percentage of colleges and universities, most of which are considered elite. The test requirements for each college or university should be checked to determine which tests are required before registering for these, or any, exams. They are one hour each and three can be taken on the same test date. One cannot take both SAT and SAT Subject Tests on the same date. SAT Subject Tests should also be completed during sophomore and junior year, preferably in the spring or at the end of a course.

The ACT is another test that is considered by most four- year colleges and universities for admission. This test can be used as an alternative to the SAT or in addition to the SAT. Many colleges or universities that require SAT Subject Tests will accept ACT scores in place of both the SAT and SAT Subject tests. This curriculum-based test is 3 hours long and includes four sections: English, Math, Reading, and Science Reasoning. The ACT can be taken at any time during the junior year and again in the fall of senior year.

Information, including test dates, is available in the guidance office. Visit www.collegeboard.com for further information on the PSAT, SAT, or SAT Subject Tests. Visit www.act.org for more information on the ACT. Registration for all of these tests except PSATs may be completed at these websites, or through registration materials available in the guidance office. Be aware of registration deadlines.

Registration for the PSAT starts in late September. This test is given only once a year on its national test date. Announcements for registration will be posted, and registration will be through the guidance office. For the SAT and ACT, registration does not happen in the guidance office, but rather through the website of the testing company.

Fee waivers for these tests are available for low-income students. Students should see their guidance counselor for one if appropriate. As always, students and parents are encouraged to meet with guidance counselors for clarification and direction.

NCAA INITIAL ELIGIBILITY STANDARDS

Students who wish to enroll in any Division I or Division II college or university in the fall, and want to participate in athletics or receive an athletic scholarship during the student’s first year must:

For more information see your Guidance Counselor or go online to www.ncaaclearinghouse.net

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR ADULTS

The guidance counselor to whom a student has been assigned is his or her best source of information at present. For those who have terminated their formal training at Beverly High School, the services of the guidance staff are available by appointment.

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM (CTE)

Students may begin training for many vocational and technical careers while at Beverly High School. The CTE program at BHS allows students interested in pursuing a vocational career path to earn college credit while at high school. CTE students work with their counselor to develop career plans in their chosen field. The plan continues after high school and may result in students earning a certificate, license, or a two-year degree in their field. Services offered to CTE students are:

Active Articulation Agreements

An articulation agreement provides pathways to a seamless transition from high school to college while and provides a chance for students to receive college credit for class work done in high school.

You might be eligible to receive college credit that you can transfer into North Shore Community College upon earning a B or higher in the following courses:

NSCC also has articulation agreements with 4 year colleges and universities. Once students are enrolled at NSCC, they can take advantage of articulation agreements and transfer opportunities that are in place with four-year colleges and universities.

For more information on opportunities available through CTE, please contact Ms. Sudak.

COLLEGE READINESS/ACCUPLACER 

Students entering four year or two year public colleges or universities may be required to prove college readiness before they can take credit-bearing courses at the college level. Typically, students scoring lower than 500 on the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing section and Math section of the SAT will be required to take an Accuplacer Exam. Students who do not demonstrate college readiness through this exam will be required to take additional, remedial, noncredit courses.  Students can eliminate the need for remedial courses at the college level by taking the Accuplacer Exam early, ideally in the junior year. Also developing the areas in which they may be weak before retaking the exam will be helpful. All students can take the Accuplacer Exam for free at North Shore Community College. Please see your Guidance Counselor for details.

REACH:  SENIOR INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

The Senior Internship Program provides an eligible senior with the opportunity to investigate a career, explore an interest, invent a project of his or her design, or extend an existing school project. The senior will be granted permission to leave Beverly High School and work solely on his or her internship during the fourth quarter.  The senior is required to seek a Site GUIDE, a specialist who can provide training and support with his or her internship. In this winning combination, the student gains valuable real life experience and the guide benefits from the efforts of the student and any project produced.  This is a non-paid learning experience and should not be viewed as a job.

Eligibility - A senior is deemed in good standing if he or she has abided by the rules and regulations established in the Student/Parent Guide, particularly in regards to attendance and conduct during the senior year. This determination will be made by the student’s Assistant Principal. The senior must also have completed and successfully passed all the coursework required to satisfy his or her graduation requirements prior to beginning of his or her internship/project.

Ineligibility - If you do not meet the requirements for the Senior Internship Program you will attend all classes as assigned by the Assistant Principal.

General Requirements

Proposal - This is the plan of action in which the project is described and the guidelines established. It is the role of the intern to contact the guide prior to submitting his or her proposal. The guide can provide insight and support with the design of the project. The proposal must be submitted no later than March 25, 2016. See proposal form on BHS website for more information.

Approval & Permission Forms - There are several approval and permission forms which need to be completed prior to the start of the internship. It is the responsibility of the intern to obtain these signatures. No internship will begin without the appropriate signatures.

Internship Schedule        - The internship will be conducted over a four week period in which the intern is expected to work a minimum of thirty hours per week.

AP Classes & Exams & Performing Arts - Students who take one or more Advanced Placement classes will attend those classes until the AP Exam

  1. Performing Arts Students will attend performing arts classes until the final performance
  2. You will start your internship on time and attend the appropriate AP classes to prepare for the AP test (Performing Arts classes also).  Because you are attending classes as well, your expected hourly internship is reduced by five hours per AP Exam per week/Performing Arts Course (So if you are taking 2 AP Exams, your internship would be about 20 hours per week.  
  3. After your AP Exams, you would begin a normal 30 hour per week internship.  

Since time will be limited, the scope of your Internship should be greatly reduced.  It may be more like a project.

Grading - The final course grade will be calculated using grades from quarters 1, 2, 3 and the midterm exam and final exam. Seniors on internship who are taking Advanced Placement and Performing Arts courses will be graded for 4th quarter. Their final course grade will be calculated using grades from all four quarters and the midterm exam.

STUDENT ADVISORY PROGRAM

Our Student Advisory Program was established in 2009 to increase personalization for students and to create a greater connection to our school community.  Advisory is a formal ongoing program through which each student is assigned an Advisor in grade nine, who over the course of four years, will support and assist the student through guided research-based activities and 21st Century Skills preparation that include the following:

BUSINESS/COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS

Grade:

Course Title:

Number:

Credits:

10-12

C.P. Accounting 1

703

5

C.P. Business and Entrepreneurship Essentials

707

5

Marketing

701

5

11-12

C.P. Marketing 2 & 3

702/704

2.5

C.P Business Law and Ethics

706

5.0

Sports and Entertainment Marketing/Management

711

2.5

Accounting II

705

5

C.P. Business Management & Globalization

708

5

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY

9

Intro to Media and Computer Science

722

5

10-12

Computer Assisted Design (CAD Drawing)

730

5

BHS Tech Support

725

2.5

Computer Programming I

727

2.5

Computer Programming II

728

2.5

ENGLISH/ MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS

9

Honors English 9

100

5

C.P. English 9

101

5

10

Honors English 10

110

5

C.P.  English 10

111

5

11

Advanced Placement English Language

123

5

Honors English 11

120

5

C.P.  English 11

121

5

12

Advanced Placement English Literature

133

5

Honors English 12

130

5

C.P. English 12

131

5

9-12

Creative Writing

152

2.5

Public Speaking

157

2.5

American Film Studies

158

2.5

World Mythology (English/Social Studies)

230

2.5

MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS

Print Media and Broadcast Journalism

155

5

Media Remix

151

5

Studio Production

154

5

Original Short Movies

159

5

FINE AND TECHNICAL ARTS

FINE ARTS 

9 - 12

Art Foundation

640

2.5

10 - 12

Drawing/Painting

641

2.5

Clay/Sculpture

650

2.5

Printmaking

652

2.5

Designing with Photoshop

654

2.5

Advanced Art

642

5.0

Designing Adobe Photo/Illustrator & Panther Press Design Co.

654

5.0

11 - 12

Advanced Placement Studio Art/Portfolio Development

660

5.0

TECHNICAL ARTS

10-12

Web Design & Development

732

2.5

Video Game Design

735

5.0

MUSIC

9 - 12

Band

606

5

Chorale

602

5

Treble Choir

603

5

Jazz Ensemble

611

5

String Ensemble

612

5

Vocal Ensemble

601

5

History of Rock Music I

618

2.5

History of Rock Music II

619

2.5

Intro to Piano/Keyboard

616

2.5

Intermediate Piano 

617

2.5

Guitar I

615

2.5

Guitar II

620

2.5

Music Technology

622

2.5

Intro to Music Theory

613

2.5

Advanced Placement Music Theory

614

5.0

WORLD LANGUAGE / ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

C.P. French 1

500

5.0

C.P. French 2

502

5.0

Honors French 2

503

5.0

C.P. French 3

504

5

C.P. French 4

506

5

Honors French 3

505

5

Honors French 4

507

5.0

*

Honors/Pre-AP French 5

508

5.0

C.P. German 1

520

5.0

C.P. German 2

522

5.0

Honors German 2

523

5.0

C.P. German 3

524

5

C.P. German 4

526

5

Honors German 3

525

5.0

Honors German 4

527

5.0

*

Honors/Pre-AP German 5

528

5.0

5.0

C.P. Spanish 1

540

5.0

C.P. Spanish 2

542

5.0

Honors Spanish 2

543

5.0

C.P. Spanish 3

544

5

C.P. Spanish 4

546

5

Honors Spanish 3

545

5

Honors Spanish 4

547

5.0

*

Honors/Pre-AP Spanish 5

548

5.0

AP Spanish Literature

549

5

*

Courses can be taken as AP Language, with completion of AP

Exam in May of the following spring.

CP American Sign Laguage 1

510

5

CP American Sign Language 2

511

5

Honors American Sign Language 2

513

5

CP American Sign Language 3

512

5

Honors American Language 3

514

5

ESL 1

570

10.0

ESL 2

571

5

ESL 3

572

5

SEI History (Sheltered English Immersion History)

573

5

HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES

9

Honors Modern World History 9

200

5.0

C.P. Modern World History 9

201

5.0

10

Advanced Placement World History

213

5.0

Honors US History 1

210

5.0

C.P. US History 1

211

5.0

11

Advanced Placement United States History

223

5.0

Honors United States History 2

220

5.0

C.P.  United States History 2

221

5.0

10 - 12

21st Century Civics

240

2.5

Criminal Justice

241

2.5

Facing History

247

2.5

Irish Studies

231

2.5

History of Beverly and Essex County

232

2.5

The Sixties and Beyond

233

2.5

Economics

234

2.5

World Mythology (English/Social Studies)

230

2.5

Sociology

244

2.5

Psychology

242

2.5

MATHEMATICS

9        

Honors Algebra I

310

5

C.P.  Algebra I

312

5

Honors Algebra II

320

5

RTI Math 9

395

5

10

Honors Geometry

330

5

C.P.  Geometry

331

5

RTI Math 10

396

5

11

Honors Algebra II

321

5

C.P. Algebra II

323

5

RTI Math 11

397

5

11 - 12

Honors Pre-Calculus

340

5

C.P.  Pre-Calculus

341

5

Advanced Placement Statistics

366

5

Advanced Placement Calculus AB

350

5

12

College Review Mathematics

302

5

C.P.  Trigonometry/Statistics

363

5

C.P.  Calculus

352

5

Honors Calculus

351

5

Advanced Placement Calculus BC

349

5

10-12

Art of Mathematics

377

2.5

PSAT/SAT Math Prep

379

2.5

History of Math

378

2.5

SCIENCE, ENGINEERING & APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

9

C.P. Biology+

413

5

Honors Biology+

412

5

10

C.P. Chemistry+

424

5

Honors Chemistry+

422

5

C.P. Earth Science+*

425

5

11

C.P. Engineering+

441

5

Honors Engineering+

440

5

C.P. Physics+

433

5

Honors Physics+

432

5

Advanced Placement Chemistry+

420

5

Advanced Placement Physics I+

435

5

Advanced Placement Biology+

410

5

12

Advanced Placement Physics II+

436

5

Electives

C.P. Anatomy and Physiology

450

5

10, 11, 12

Honors Anatomy and Physiology

449

5

Environmental Science

451

2.5

Introduction to Forensic Science

452

5

C.P. Robotics

455

2.5

Honors Robotics

454

5

Marine Biology

448

2.5

Basic Electronics

464

2.5

Physics of Astronomy

437

2.5

*open only to select students based on recommendation of teacher

+counts towards the three lab sciences for graduation requirement

WELLNESS/FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE

WELLNESS

9

Health Development/Foundations of Sport

900

5.0

10

Fitness Enhancement

902

2.5

10- 12

Lifetime Fitness

910

2.5

Foundations of Sport

911

2.5

Competitive Team Sports

913

2.5

Food, Nutrition & Exercise

922

2.5

Intro to Athletic Training/CPR

912

2.5

Advanced Athletic Training

914

2.5

Life Issues

908

2.5

Psychology of Sport and Exercise

921

2.5

EMR – Basic Course

923

2.5

FAMILY/CONSUMER SCIENCE

10 - 12

Child Development I

916

2.5

Child Development II

918

2.5

Introduction to Culinary Arts

930

2.5

Food Service

931

5

International Foods

932

2.5

America’s Regional Foods

934

2.5

UNIQUE COURSES

9-12

Virtual High School

059

5.0

Leadership 101

089

2.5

M.C.J.R.O.T.C. – Leadership I

O83

5

M.C.J.R.O.T.C. - Leadership IB

O84

2.5

M.C.J.R.O.T.C. – Leadership II

O85

5

M.C.J.R.O.T.C. – Leadership III

O86

5

M.C.J.R.O.T.C. - Leadership IV

O87

5

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BUSINESS and COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS

707 CP BUSINESS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP ESSENTIALS     5.0 credits

In this year-long CTE course students will explore how business and entrepreneurship, along with communication can ensure a successful future. This course will include curriculum in entrepreneurship, economics, information technology and business through Junior Achievement, Virtual Business Simulations and other Industry-endorsed materials. This is a core course designed to give students an overview of the business, marketing and entrepreneurship cluster occupations. The course will introduce and reinforce the ideas of lifelong learning by sharpening higher-order thinking skills, such as problem solving, critical thinking and synthesis, while focusing on ethical and social responsibility.

Recommendation: Digital Media and Communications. Designed for students in Grade 10 or 11.

708 CP BUSINESS MANAGEMENT & GLOBALIZATION    5.0 credits 

This course expands student understanding of gained in Business & Entrepreneurial Essentials. Course topics will include cultural diversity, the global economy, strategic management and the international business environment. The content and activities of the course allow students to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to work in a global marketplace. Students will also have opportunities to work collaboratively and give presentations based on research gathered on international business projects. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing.  C.T.E. Course: Successful completion of this course with a B+ or better may qualify students to earn credit at a college level.

Prerequisite: Completion of Business & Entrepreneurial Essentials. Open to 11th and 12th graders

701 MARKETING     5.0 credits

Marketing is a basic introduction to micro and macro marketing with emphasis on terminology, business principles and application. Students become active members of DECA, a national student organization with a focus to develop greater understanding and appreciation of marketing concepts. Students will develop leadership skills, professional attitudes, business competency, citizenship characteristics and social growth. Students will apply economic principles to hypothetical problems. Fundraising is expected for students who become DECA members. Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12.

702/704 CP MARKETING 2 & 3 (DECA) 2.5 credits 

This course will prepare for DECA competition by studying additional Marketing chapters, including Promotional Concepts, Visual Merchandising, Advertising, Pricing, Product Planning, Market Research and Business Plan Development. Students will conduct a market research study and act as a consultant for a company by preparing a proposal/plan for the situation being addressed for their DECA category. At the end of the first semester, students enrolled in DECA will be expected to attend scheduled DECA meetings. Fundraising is expected for students who become DECA members.  C.T.E. Course: Successful completion of this course with a B or better may qualify students to earn credit at a college level.

Recommendation: A grade of C or better in Marketing, or permission of the teacher. Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

703 CP ACCOUNTING I    5.0 credits

This course covers the principles and practices encompassing the entire accounting cycle and how this applies to keeping records for a small business. Simulated job experiences with the students acting as bookkeepers and accountants will be covered in the course. Recommended for all students taking a concentration in business. Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12. C.T.E. Course: Successful completion of this course with a B or better may qualify students to earn credit at a college level.

705 ACCOUNTING II     5.0 credits  (not offered 2018-2019)

This course will cover the accounting cycle for a merchandising business organized as a corporation. Students will use a variety of hands-on activities to learn how to keep track of cash payments and purchases as well as create and analyze financial statements for a corporation. Computer simulations will also be used to master the accounting concepts taught. Prerequisite: Accounting I.

Recommendation:  B or better in Accounting I.

706 CP BUSINESS LAW AND ETHICS    5.0 credits

This course will provide a foundation in understanding legal issues. The course will begin with an overview of basic law and legal studies. The topic of Business ethics will also be covered. The remaining course time will be structured as to law according to life. Topics will include: Being a Consumer, Being an Agent, and Starting a Business. Personal law relating to insurance, real estate, marriage as well as crimes and torts will also be discussed and researched. Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12.  C.T.E. Course: Successful completion of this course with a B+ or better may qualify students’ to earn credit at a college level.

711 SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING/MANAGEMENT     2.5 credits (not offered 2018-2019)

Sports and Entertainment Marketing/Management is a very popular and exciting field. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of marketing concepts, foundations and functions, as they relate to career opportunities in the growing area of sports and entertainment. Topics covered include: leadership, finance, product management, human resources, legal and ethical issues, managing change, and customer relations. Recommendation: Marketing Open to students in grades 10 – 12.

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY

722 INTRO TO MEDIA AND COMPUTER SCIENCE    5.0 credits

Students will be participating in a variety of media and computer science activities with a focus on creative thought and hands on learning. The media unit will include a variety of projects with a focus on storytelling and effective communication using iMovie. Computer science units will attempt to answer the following questions: How do computers work? How can people can program computers to solve problems? How do we use computers to analyze data? How do we get computers to do what we want? Students will use problem solving, programming, communication, and personal expression to see where computer science exists around them and how they can engage with it as a tool for exploration and expression. The impact of computer science on society will be explored including, how their personal data is collected and used on the web. Students will see how computers collect input and return output in a variety of ways. Scheduled in grade 9.

725 BHS TECH SUPPORT   2.5 credits

Are you the person your family and friends turns to when the computer stops working? The BHS Technology Intern Program might be of interest to you. You will spend time in the BHS Tech Support center learning new skills from our tech support staff. You will be trained to troubleshoot technical issues and provide support to students and teachers who need assistance with BHS software and hardware including laptops, projectors, printers and interactive tablets.  

727 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING I   2.5 credits (not offered 2018-2019)

This course is designed for students who want to learn how to write computer programs. The course introduces students to the BASIC language as well as concepts like data abstraction and user interface design.

Recommendation: Knowledge of basic computer skills or C or better in C.P. Algebra I.

728 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING II   2.5 credits

Advanced programming topics in visual BASIC. Topics include animation, sorting, database and user interface design. Research topics will include programming for the web, language comparisons and artificial intelligence.

Recommendation: C+ or better in Computer Programming I

730 COMPUTER ASSISTED DESIGN (CAD Drawing) 5.0 credits

Presents an introduction to computer-aided design and it's applications using SKETCHUP. The essential goal is simple: to allow students to become familiar with the basic functions of 3D Drawing. Topics include basic drawing and editing tools, adding text and basic dimensions, using images as textures as well as photo matches, and manipulating and printing the drawing. Later in the course, the focus will be a 3D approach to computer aided design and its applications in architecture and engineering. The essential goal is to enable the student to create architectural and engineering drawings. Focus will be placed on applying design process and in designing to proper dimensions.

ENGLISH, MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS

Each year, all students are required to take and pass a five-credit course constructed according to the standards of writing, reading, listening, speaking, and language.  Teachers in all classes work toward differentiating instruction to meet the needs of all learners.  Lessons and units based on standards and skills are taught within the larger context of literature.

Requirements for Honors English 9, 10, 11, 12, and Advanced Placement English Language/Literature

Students in Honors/AP courses exhibit superior preparation in the language arts.  They must be prepared to read critically, write analytically, and adjust to an accelerated pace and a heightened challenge in all aspects of the curriculum.

100 HONORS ENGLISH 9         5.0 credits

101 C.P. ENGLISH 9                        5.0 credits

All freshman English course units incorporate the standards of writing, reading, listening, speaking, and language.  Units include, but are not limited to, The Odyssey, Oedipus the King, The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, Animal Farm or Night, short stories, poetry, and excerpts of non-fiction.  A research paper is also required.

110 HONORS ENGLISH 10  _        5.0 credits

111 C.P. ENGLISH 10                5.0 credits

All sophomore English course units incorporate the standards of writing, reading, listening, speaking, and language.  Units include, but are not limited to, The Catcher in the Rye, Antigone, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar or MacBeth, Lord of the Flies or The Things They Carried, short stories, poetry, and excerpts of non-fiction.  A research paper is also required.

120 HONORS ENGLISH 11                5.0 credits

121 C.P. ENGLISH 11                5.0 credits

All junior English courses emphasize American literature, and course units incorporate the standards of writing, reading, listening, speaking, and language.  Units include, but are not limited to, The Crucible, Of Mice and Men, To Kill a Mockingbird, short stories, poetry, and excerpts of non-fiction.  A research paper is also required.

130 HONORS ENGLISH 12        5.0 credits

131 C.P. ENGLISH 12                5.0 credits

All senior English courses emphasize British literature, and course units incorporate the standards of writing, reading, listening, speaking, and language.  Units include, but are not limited to, 1984 or Brave New World, A Thousand Splendid Suns or Life of Pi, a modern novel, poetry, short stories, and excerpts of non-fiction.  A research paper is also required.

123 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENGLISH LANGUAGE      5.0 credits

The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.  Additional summer reading and writing is required.  Students who take this course are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Exam in English Language in May.  Recommendation:  This class is recommended for students in their junior year, and successful completion of sophomore English is required for Advanced Placement Language.  This course is recommended for students with a B- or above in honors English 10 and/or for students with an A- or above in CP English 10.   All students must complete summer reading requirements.

133 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENGLISH LITERATURE  5.0 credits

The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to the introductory college-level literary analysis course.  The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginitive literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure.  As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone.  Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require sudents to analyze and interpret literary works.  The course is open to seniors only, and additional summer work is required.  Recommendation:  Successful completion of junior English.  This course is recommended for students with a B- or above in Honors English 11 or students with an A- or above in CP English.  All students must complete summer reading assignments.

152 CREATIVE WRITING     2.5 credits

This course is designed to engage students in various forms of creative writing e.g., poetry, short stories, plays, children’s literature, journals, and song lyrics.

158 AMERICAN FILM STUDIES _        2.5 credits

This course is designed to introduce students to a wide breadth of American filmmaking. Students will explore different eras, genres and styles of cinema and demonstrate their understanding though writing, discussion and digital media.

157 PUBLIC SPEAKING       2.5 credits

For this course, students will gain confidence speaking in front of their peers by giving speeches and presentations.  The class will study and employ effective techniques used to enhance public speaking.  Throughout the course, participants will become familiar with PowerPoint, Google Slides, Prezi, and other 21st century communication tools.

230 WORLD MYTHOLOGY        2.5 credits

This course provides an introduction to the nature and function of myth. The specific literature studied because of the breadth of subject matter will vary in content.  This is a Humanities class that consists of myths, hero-tales and legends that represent a society’s basic cultural and moral values recorded in literary form.  Students will read the basic mythologies of Greece, Rome, the Middle East, Northern Europe, the British Isles, the Far East and Pacific Islands, Africa, and the Americas.  Students will analyze the stories and trace parallel elements to show that human beings are remarkably alike in their principal values and concerns. This course illustrates the influence of these myths on the art, literature and culture of the modern world. Students will also continue to develop their writing skills and their use of the writing process.  

MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS

155 PRINT MEDIA AND BROADCAST JOURNALISM  _        5.0 credits

Students learn best practices for print and broadcast journalism through project-based learning.  Students will write timely and meaningful articles which subsequently will be published in The Ledger, the high school newspaper page in The Citizen, Beverly's weekly newspaper.  Additionally, students will learn how to use the BevCam studio, a professional digital cable broadcast studio, to produce The Ledger Live!, a broadcast show based on the print Ledger page.  In addition to learning the technical and artistic components of the studio, students will collaborate and assess the best ways to transform print journalism into video media, considering the parameters of both mediums.

151 MEDIA REMIX       5 credits

Learn how to craft quality media productions using iMovie, hand-held cameras and smartphones.  Students will create projects using original video footage, still photos, music, transitions, special effects, editing software, and original writing.  During the first semester of the course, students will focus on basic shot composition, rule of thirds, good camera technique, the importance of planning with storyboards as well as scripts, and editing skills in order to build the foundation for longer creative projects in the second semester.  Shorter technique-based projects of the first semester will progress to longer, creative, and self-directed projects second semester.  A majority of projects will be aired on the school’s local public access channel and be eligible for state and national competitions.  The course will reflect 21st century literary skills throughout all projects and lessons.  Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12.

154 STUDIO PRODUCTION   5.0 credits

Focus of this course will be to create regular programming for channel 22. Studio course work will be completed in conjunction with Bevcam, Beverly's public access channel. Students will learn how to operate studio equipment and be responsible for studio productions encompassing a variety of genres. Students will learn elements of the studio including 3 camera principal, control room operation, and professional editing software. Students will also be responsible for creating regular studio shows to be aired on Channel 22. Students will also learn the basics of remote shoots and synching three cameras on an editing timeline.

This course could be taken more than once.

Prerequisites:  Media Remix

159 ORIGINAL SHORT MOVIES     5.0 credits

This is a student-centered project-based media class which will focus on creative short films written, recorded, edited, and produced by students.  Each quarter, students will be responsible for completing and presenting a finished short film.  Students will create their own script and storyboard, develop a working plan to execute their project paying particular attention to time management as well as class objectives and standards.  Each student project will focus on effective short composition, varying camera angles, artistic editing choices that enhance their work as well as music to enhance their film.  This is a year-long course where learning will build upon the learning of the previous quarter's project.

FINE AND TECHNICAL ARTS

ART

640 ART FOUNDATION   2.5 credits

This course is an introduction to visual art, both two and three-dimensional. Techniques will include some, if not all of the following: drawing, painting, printmaking, collage, design, assemblage, modeling, carving, casting, hand-building, and wheel throwing. A variety of media will be explored with emphasis on visual vocabulary, elements and principles of art and design, art history and individual interpretation of assignments. The course will also include research work done both in and out of class. This course is aligned with the Mass. Curriculum Frameworks for visual art.

641 DRAWING & PAINTING         2.5 credits

This course will explore drawing and painting in many forms. It is a more in-depth exploration of drawing and painting than art foundation and is intended for students who are interested in developing those skills. Projects may include life drawing, self-portrait, still life, interiors, landscape, and drawing from direct observation and from the imagination. A variety of media will be employed including some or all of the following: pencil, charcoal, pastel, watercolor, acrylic, ink, printmaking, etc. This course is aligned with the Mass. Curriculum Framework for visual art. This course will also include research on various artists and periods of art history done both in and out of class. Works generated may be suitable for a portfolio.

Recommendation: B- or better in Art Foundations or permission of the teacher. Open to students in grades 10, 11, and 12.

642 ADVANCED ART    5.0 credits

This year-long course is intended for the motivated art student who is interested in extending their learning in a variety of art media.  In this course, students will be building on skills with sustained effort and interest.  Projects will use both two and three-dimensional materials to continue to create a bridge between drawing/painting and sculpture.  Assignments will reinforce and recognize the differences and similarities between the two.  A variety of materials will be explored with opportunities for students to focus on learning new material, building on skills and developing an individual learning project.  Work will be from direct observation, imagination, build on historical movements and consider utilitarian and non-utilitarian functions.  Works generated will be suitable for a portfolio.  This course is aligned with Mass Curriculum Frameworks for visual art.

Recommendation:  Art Foundation (B or better) and one additional visual art class.

650 CLAY/SCULPTURE      2.5 credits

This course will deal with three-dimensional expression in many forms. Sculpting techniques, as well as the more utilitarian skills of hand building and wheel throwing, will be developed. Works will be created using a variety of materials including clay, plasticine, metal, wood, wire, stone, plastic, found materials, etc. Projects will be developed from direct observation, imagination and in abstract and non-abstract formats. This course will also include research done both in and out of class. This course is aligned with the Mass. Curriculum Frameworks for visual art.

Recommendation: B- or better in Art Foundation or permission of the teacher. Open to students in grades 10, 11, and 12.

652 PRINTMAKING       2.5 credits

This course will deal with the various techniques of printmaking. Works will be created using a variety of printmaking techniques including monoprints, silk-screens, linoleum, woodcuts, cyanotypes, etc.  Projects will be developed from direct observation, imagination, abstract and non-abstract formats.  Outside research will be required for this course.  This course is aligned with the Mass. Curriculum Frameworks for Visual Art.

Recommendation:  B- or better in Art Foundation.  Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12.

654 DESIGNING WITH PHOTOSHOP       2.5 credits

In this lab style course, students will use Adobe Photoshop to create real world projects.  This is a project-based course where students will choose a project, design the work to be completed and present the project to the “client,” faculty and peers.  Students will work independently and in groups through the project (s) to be able to learn Photoshop.  Other skills will include using a digital camera, scanning, tablets and other programs to further develop skills for real world applications.

Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12.

654  DESIGNING W/ ADOBE PHOTO/ILLUSTRATOR & PANTHER PRESS DESIGN CO.   5 credits

This is a lab-style course where students will learn Adobe software and apply it to real world projects.  Works generated will be suitable for a design portfolio and as part of the business, Panther Press Design Co.  This business is supported by RealWorldScholars.   Students will spend the first portion of the class learning the Adobe programs, about design and art standards and how the work generated can be applied in real-world situations.  There will be opportunities for students to learn entrepreneurship skills developing and building work for the newly formed “Panther Press Design Co.”  Students will learn aspects of running the business as they continue to build on what the company is doing as well as come up with innovative new ideas for the business.  Panther Press Design creates custom dye-sublimated water bottles, “Bottles for Bob,” which seek t bring awareness to and raising funds for ALS.  Other dye-sublimation and vinyl projects will be explored.  Design jobs for the community, including the high school community will be explored.  Ideas for jobs might be designing menus and logos for Panther’s Den, designing widgets for the Beverly Schools website, designing posters for events, product photo shoots, logo design, t-shirt design, etc.  This course can be considered advanced level (for students who have had Designing with Photoshop prior) or a beginning level class.

660 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) STUDIO ART/DRAWING/2D DESIGN and 3D DESIGN/PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT        5.0 credits

This course is designed for the serious art student who may be preparing a portfolio for higher education, who may be thinking of an art major/minor, or who is interested in furthering their artistic pursuits. This course will build directly on the skills learned in advanced art classes. Students will work independently to establish a coherent, individual body of work, which meets all of the AP Portfolio requirements for submission to the College Board. Speakers, guest artists/instructors, research, critiques, and workshops will enhance this course. Students will also take part in a multiple partnership program with the Peabody Essex Museum and Montserrat College of Art. Students must meet with the teacher in the year prior to that which they wish to enroll. Students will be required to do summer work and must choose an area of concentration prior to the start of class in the fall. A list of requirements is available from the instructor or from guidance. Students may enroll and submit their portfolio as a junior and/or senior. It is recommended that students begin this course or take a minimum of two upper level art courses in their junior year. Students may also wish to enroll in art classes outside of the high school. Students must meet all of the AP portfolio requirements each year, regardless of whether they submit their portfolio to the College Board.

Students should check with the colleges of their choice to see if they accept AP credit. Students are required to make a digital portfolio of their artwork. Students will have access to a digital camera to use in class as well as use of the computer to edit images. Students must provide their own flash drive. Students are responsible for that cost as well as for the AP exam fee. This course has been approved by the College Board to carry the AP designation.

Recommendation: Portfolio review/recommendation of an art teacher along with a B or better in Art Foundation and B or better in at least one other visual art course. Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

TECHNICAL ARTS

735 VIDEO GAME DESIGN    5.0 credits

Students will be introduced to the concept of games and video game creation. Using GameMaker, students will study the design process, as well as learn the practical aspects of game implementation using computer game engines and 3D graphic tools. Students will research gaming history, genre, storylines, elements of gameplay, as well as challenges to game design. Students will make simple arcade style games, maze games, and side scrolling games. Later in the course, students will continue to study the concept of games and video game creation. Students will continue using GameMaker, to study the design process, as well as learn the practical aspects of game implementation using computer game engines and 3d graphic tools. Students will research gaming history, genre, storylines, elements of gameplay, as well as challenges to game design. Students will make platform games, driving simulators, as well as custom programing. COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES: The student will be able to: Identify the components of a successful game, describe the history and evolution of video and computer games and game genres, identify the phases and processes involved in developing a computer game, design a simple computer game from initial concept to final design document, describe current trends in the game industry.

732 WEB DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT   2.5 credits

This class will focus on web page content, planning, design, setup and maintenance of a Web site. Throughout the course, students will work with partners and individually to create Web sites with multiple pages and functions. Students will become familiar with terms and components of the Internet, and develop an awareness of design considerations that affect Web page construction. HTML and CSS will be learned, as it is the basis of all Web pages. With the widespread use of the Internet, Web page design will provide students with technology skills and knowledge to become effective communicators in this exciting new medium.

Recommendation: Passing grade in Digital Media. Open to students in grades 10-12, or permission of the teacher

MUSIC

The music program of Beverly High School offers a varied selection of instrumental and vocal music classes, which are open to all students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12.

602 CHORALE     5.0 credits

The Chorale comprises one of the largest ongoing full- year activities at B.H.S. The course is designed to develop skills and interests in the performance of vocal music from the classics to pop. All students electing Chorale are expected to participate in all functions and performances scheduled throughout the year unless they are excused by the instructor or principal. Membership is available to all B.H.S. students and no prior experience is necessary.   Students are required to sign out a uniform, and return it dry cleaned at the end of the year.  Open to all students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 with an interest in vocal music and ensemble singing. Students must earn a B- or better to continue after their first year. The course must be taken for an entire year in order to receive credit.

609 TREBLE CHOIR     5.0 credits

This group is smaller than the chorale, and consists of students who have a desire to perform music of a more challenging nature. Varied music from madrigals to popular styles will comprise the repertoire. This group participates in at least two competitions per year. Students are expected to attend all rehearsals and performances. Quire members may be asked to attend rehearsals outside the school day before concerts or competitions.

601 VOCAL ENSEMBLE        5 credits  (Audition Only)

This course is only open to students that have been accepted through prior audition. It is designed to develop skill and interest in the performance of vocal music, especially in the cappella style. Music from the classics to pop and of a highly challenging nature will comprise the repertoire. This group is very active in the community and requires more time outside of the school day for performances.  Rehearsals for this group occur during I block and must provide their own transportation to school in the morning. Students are expected to attend all rehearsals and performances.

Prerequisites: Prior audition by the ensemble director. Open to students in grades 10-12. Ninth graders may be offered an opportunity to audition after upperclassmen have been accepted.

606 BAND             5.0 credits

This ensemble consists of the standard concert and marching band instrumentation. The band rehearses every other day throughout the entire school year. During marching season, one additional rehearsal will take place in the evening for wind players.  Students who are in the drum line (battery) will be required to attend two-week night practices. Music studied by the band will include marches, symphonic band music, and some popular or light classical selections. There will be opportunities for qualified players to perform solos with band accompaniment. Emphasis will be placed on ensemble playing and technique. All students electing Band automatically agree to participate in all functions at which the Band performs unless they are excused by the instructor or Principal. These functions include assemblies, competitions, football games, concerts and an occasional civic affair such as a parade on Memorial Day or other holidays. This is not a beginner’s course and students should be able to play their instrument at an intermediate level, as well as read music.

612 STRING ENSEMBLE        5.0 credits

Rehearsals will include the study of string literature including symphonic and/or chamber works and popular selections. More advanced string skills and coordination of ensemble playing will be emphasized. Attendance at after-school performances is a part of the program and membership in the Beverly Symphony Orchestra is highly encouraged. All students electing String Ensemble automatically agree to participate in all functions at which the Strings perform unless they are excused by the instructor or principal. These functions include community events, concerts and competitions.

611 JAZZ ENSEMBLE     5.0 credits  (Audition Only)

Students in this course will study and perform music from the jazz idiom, which will include styles such as swing, Dixieland, Latin, funk, fusion, rock, and current popular music fields.  Instrumentation will be limited to trumpet, trombone, saxophone, electric guitar, acoustic and electric bass, keyboard, vibraphone, and drum set.The group rehearses every other day throughout the entire school year. This is not a beginning jazz band course and students should be able to play their instrument at an intermediate to advanced level, as well as read music. All wind and percussion players must be members of the BHS Band. Auditions will take place in February and/or March of the previous school year. Students should contact the instructor to arrange an audition. All students electing Jazz Ensemble automatically agree to participate in all functions at which the group performs unless they are excused by the instructor or principal. These functions include assemblies, competitions, concerts and an occasional civic affair.  The Jazz Ensemble performs at more than a dozen events annually.

Prerequisite: Prior audition by the Jazz Ensemble director.

613 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC THEORY      2.5 credits  

This course is an introduction to the mechanics of music. It is meant for students with little or no prior experience reading notation, and the desire to learn more about the elements of music, and those intending to continue study in the AP music Theory course. The course will cover notation, intervals, scales, chords, metric organization and rhythmic patterns. The course will make use of the keyboard to aid instruction.

614 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) MUSIC THEORY _5.0 credits  (not offered 2017-2018)

This is a fast paced music class which is intended for students with a strong interest in studying the mechanics of music, and who may be preparing for extended study in music at the college level.

This class will give a brief review of notation, intervals, scales and keys, chords, metric organization, and rhythmic patterns.  This course will focus primarily on the systems of major- minor tonality, and will progress to include more sophisticated and creative tasks, such as Harmonization of a melody Realization of figured bass, and analysis of repertoire.  An in depth study of sight singing and melodic and harmonic dictation will be covered and practiced.Course material is intended to prepare the student to take the AP Music Theory Exam.

Recommendation:  A B- or better in the introduction to theory class, or pass an entrance examination, and be planning on taking the AP exam or extending their music education in college.

615 GUITAR I        2.5 credits (not offered 2018-2019)

This class offers all students an opportunity to study guitar in class groups. The semester course is open to beginning level guitarists. Students should provide their own six-string acoustic or electric guitars, though there is a limited inventory of school-owned instruments that can be loaned out to students in need.  Emphasis will be placed on basic skills including chord formation, note reading, proper right and left hand technique, and tablature interpretation.  A survey of the guitar's history and important contributors to the instrument's development will also be explored.

620 GUITAR II    2.5 credits  

A continuation of the skills first addressed in Guitar I.  For more advanced guitar players.

Recommendation:  Passing grade in Guitar I or permission of the teacher.

Open to grades 10-12.

616 INTRODUCTION TO PIANO/KEYBOARD        2.5 credits

This course is designed for students in the general student body with no prior piano instruction who are interested in beginning piano or keyboard instruction as well as for students who are already active student musicians in the music program that would like to obtain basic piano skills. Classes will be offered in a setting utilizing an electric piano laboratory format. However, the instruction is designed to be easily transferable to acoustic piano and to other types of electronic keyboards. Students will learn the basics of piano music notion as well as hand and fingering positions for a span of at least three octaves. In addition to notation, students will also be introduced to the basics of traditional chording with major and minor chords in several easy keys.

617 INTERMEDIATE PIANO        2.5 credits

This course is designed for students who have received a B or better in Intro to Piano/Keyboard, or who have had at least one year of private instruction on the Piano. Classes will be offered in a setting utilizing an electric piano laboratory format, however, the instruction is designed to be easily transferable to acoustic piano and to other types of electronic keyboards. Students will expand their knowledge of basic notation to include the notes in a span of five to six octaves while studying and practicing music of a more difficult nature. In addition to notation, students will also build upon their knowledge of basic traditional chording to include augmented and diminished chords as well as chords with 6ths, 7ths, 9ths, and other popular and jazz chord symbols. Students will be expected to be able to work independently and to produce a series of pieces to be performed at quarterly recitals.  Recommendation: A B or better in Introduction to Piano/Keyboard, or have completed at least one year of private instruction.

618 HISTORY OF ROCK MUSIC       2.5 credits  (not offered 2018-2019)

This course will deal with the development of American popular music as an art form and its relationship to American history and pertinent cultural issues.  Students will explore the evolution of rock music and its genesis in both Europe and North America.  Particular focus will be placed on the events leading up to rock and roll's mainstream breakthrough in the 1950s and subsequent sub-genres that have materialized since then (folk rock, soul, psychedelic rock, progressive rock, heavy metal, funk, and punk rock.  Emphasis will be placed on sociological cause and effect in musical development.

619 HISTORY OF ROCK MUSIC II      2.5 credits  

HoR II is a continuation of HoR.  Where HoR focuses mostly on popular music trends from the 1950s-1970s, HoR II delves into the music that shaped our culture from the 1980s to the dawn of the 21st Century, including the dawn of MTV, hip-hop, hair metal, alternative rock, Britpop, and the garage band revival of the 2000s.  Recommendation:  Passing grade in HoR I or permission of the teacher.  Open to grades 10-12.

622 MUSIC TECHNOLOGY     2.5 credits  

This course will educate students on the wide variety of resources (many of them free) at their disposal for the making of, distribution of, and consumption of music in the digital age.  Open to grades 10-12.

WORLD LANGUAGE

The World Language Department at Beverly High School offers instruction in the modern languages of American Sign Language, French, German, and Spanish. College-bound students who started a modern language in the middle school are recommended to continue this language for a minimum of two years in high school or, preferably, three or four years. Any student can choose a new language and start that sequence of study any time during their high school careers. Many interested students study two languages at the same time.  The primary goal of modern language courses is to help the student develop active communication skills: facility in listening to and understanding, reading, writing, and speaking the language in a culturally appropriate manner. Students receive extensive daily practice in these skills in class, but they have to expect to study and practice the language at home and complete homework assignments as a regular aspect of the class.   In the attempt to bring the reality of the target language to the classroom, teachers in the department take advantage of the full range of modern media used in language learning: textbooks, listening materials, traditional literature and non-literary readings, video, film, music and the Internet. Students also have the many study abroad opportunities through Beverly High School’s exchange programs in Albertville, France, Bargteheide and Nuremberg, Germany as well as study tours to Spain and other Hispanic countries. (Dropped Recommendations)

500 C.P. FRENCH 1          5.0 credits

This introductory course assumes the student has no prior knowledge of French. Emphasis is placed on speaking, listening to and understanding French. Students will also develop elementary reading, writing and grammar skills. Students will explore many aspects of French culture.

502 C.P. FRENCH 2          5.0 credits

This course is the sequential continuation of C.P. French 1 with more attention now being given to the structural patterns of the language and special emphasis on writing skills. By the end of this level, students possess the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills necessary to handle simple, everyday survival tasks in French (e.g. handling routine travel needs or taking care of physical needs). In addition, the student will be trained to express his or her own thoughts in French, initiate a conversation and relate personal information about the past and the future.

503 HONORS FRENCH 2    5.0 credits

This course is designed for the highly motivated, highly skilled foreign language student who plans to continue studying French at advanced levels. Material is covered at a faster rate than in C.P. French 2 and student performance expectations are higher. Vocabulary will permit discussions of topics beyond the basic survival needs such as personal history and leisure time activities. Greater evidence of grammatical accuracy will be required in all basic oral and written constructions.

Recommendation: A Grade of B or better in middle school French 7 and 8, plus recommendation of the teacher. Students who complete CP French 1 at the high school need the recommendation of the teacher to enroll in Honors French 2.

504  C.P. FRENCH 3      5.0 credits

This course will review the skill of listening, understanding, speaking and writing in the target language. The goal is for students to build/review knowledge gained in their previous years of foreign language study while continuing to study French in the context of cultural topics.  Students will review grammar and practice open response writing. Class will be conducted as much as possible in the target language and projects may be required to be completed.

506 C.P. FRENCH 4      5.0 credits

C.P. 4 is a terminal course. The Language and Culture course will review the skill of listening, understanding, speaking and writing in the target language. The goal is for students to build/review knowledge gained in their previous years of foreign language study. Students will review grammar and practice open response writing. Class will be conducted as much as possible in the target language and projects may be required. Recommendation: Grade of C or better in C.P. French 3 or permission of the teacher.

505 HONORS FRENCH 3    5.0 credits

This course is a continuation of the advanced work begun in Honors French 2. There will be a basic review of the fundamental language structures, but with a decided increase in the amount of difficulty of the readings and material covered, compared to the normal C.P. French 3 program. Students will be likewise expected to master more vocabulary and be more responsible for producing a highly correct written language. Directed topic essays will be required.

507 HONORS FRENCH 4   5.0 credits

This course continues and strengthens the skills acquired in previous Honors French classes. Grammar is reviewed and refined as needed. Greater emphasis is now placed on reading and writing. Readings of French literary works form an important segment of this course. Oral and written reports required.  

508 HONORS/PRE-AP FRENCH 5   5.0 credits

This advanced course is open to any student who has successfully completed the Honors Level 4 course in their chosen target language.  It is a year long sequence conducted in the target language.  This course offers an introduction to the history and culture from earliest civilizations to present day in the target language speaking countries.  Students will review basic grammar and learn idiomatic expressions and other essential vocabulary.  Students will have the opportunity to read authentic texts and literary works, study film and music, and use their laptops as a tool for research and creative self-expression.  Ability to converse freely in the target language is developed through class discussions and oral projects.  Videos relating to the target language culture as it relates to art, politics and history are used to enhance students' listening comprehension and spontaneous discourse.  

This course may also prepare students to take the AP exam with guidance and further study materials provided by the teacher.

510 C.P. AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1        5.0 credits

This course is designed to develop basic receptive and expressive skills using language situations they may encounter in the local Deaf community.  Students will earn to respect and better understand Deaf people and ASL with an appreciation for linguistic and cultural diversity.  ASL grammar and cultural information will be introduced through the target language of ASL, with written English as a secondary means of communication.  The functional-notional teaching approach will be implemented, which focuses on how language is used in real-life situations and allows students to personalize how they might communicate in those situations.

511 C.P. AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2      5.0 credits

This course expands on principles presented in ASL I.  CP ASL II will focus on further developing students' knowledge and understanding of ASL grammar and vocabulary by building upon students' receptive and expressive language skills.  Students will continue to focus on fingerspelling, numbers, facial grammar and sentence structure.  Students will also continue to study Deaf culture through short stories, narratives, and articles pertaining to Deaf individuals.

513 HONORS AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3     5.0 credits

This course is designed for students who are highly motivated and expands on principles presented in ASL I.  This course is designed for those who have completed CP ASL I with distinction.  Honors ASL 2 will focus on further developing students' knowledge and understanding of ASL grammar and vocabulary by expanding upon students' receptive and expressive language skills at a rigorous pace.  Students will continue to focus on fingerspelling, numbers, facial grammar and sentence structure.  Students will also continue to study Deaf culture through short stories, narratives, and articles pertaining to Deaf individuals.

512 C.P. AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3       5.0 credits

This course builds on skills learned in ASL 2, adding more complex ASL grammatical features and vocabulary, short stories, narratives and dialogues.  The course will include; description of general surroundings, appropriate sequencing, temporal aspects and conditionals.  Information about the Deaf Community and Deaf Culture will be expanded upon from previous courses.

514 HONORS AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3      5.0 credits

This class is designed for students who have completed Honors ASL 2 witha  C- or better, or who have completed CP ASL 2 with distinction.  This course will provide an advanced curriclum on idioms in both ASL and English, Role Shifting, Storytelling, Classifiers and more.

520 C.P. GERMAN 1           5.0 credits

This course is designed for students with no prior knowledge of German, the most frequently spoken native language in the European Union. Working with a textbook program, Komm Mit 1, students acquire beginning communication skills by viewing videos, listening to German spoken by natives, and learn how to use the language for practical communication. Students learn to comprehend, read, speak and write the language while they get to know the culture and history of the German speaking nations of central Europe.

522 C.P. GERMAN 2    5.0 credits

This course is the sequential continuation of the CP German 1 exploration of German language and culture with the Komm Mit instructional program. By the end of this level, students possess the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills necessary to handle simple, everyday survival tasks in German (e.g. handling routine travel needs or taking care of physical needs). In addition, the student learns to express personal thoughts in German, initiate a conversation and relate personal information about the past and future.

523 HONORS GERMAN 2           5.0 credits

This course, open to students who completed 8th Grade German or C.P. German 1 with distinction, is designed for the highly motivated, highly skilled foreign language student who is eager to develop active communication skills and who plans to study German into advanced levels. The video-based material is covered at a faster rate than in C.P. German 2 and students are expected to use German for all class communication. Vocabulary will permit discussions of topics in the present, past and future tenses beyond basic survival needs such as personal history and leisure-time activities. Greater evidence of grammatical accuracy will be required in all basic oral and written constructions.

524  C.P. GERMAN 3      5 credits

This course will review the skill of listening, understanding, speaking and writing in the target language. The goal is for students to build/review knowledge gained in their previous years of foreign language study while continuing to study German in the context of cultural topics.  Students will review grammar and practice open response writing. Class will be conducted as much as possible in the target language and projects may be required to be completed.

526 C.P. GERMAN 4       5 credits

C.P. 4 is a terminal course. The Language and Culture course will review the skill of listening, understanding, speaking and writing in the target language. The goal is for students to build/review knowledge gained in their previous years of foreign language study. Students will review grammar and practice open response writing. Class will be conducted as much as possible in the target language and projects may be required. 

525 HONORS GERMAN 3     5.0 credits

This course continues the advanced work started in other Honors German classes. After completing a basic review of the fundamental language structures, students strive to gain control of more advanced grammar and stylistic challenges. Students will be expected to master more vocabulary and use it as they develop their expository skills in German to write short essays, keep a journal, or perform a demonstration of their skills. Challenging readings of representative literary works, along with study of contemporary German media, give the student a better understanding and appreciation of the German-speaking nations of Europe.

527 HONORS GERMAN 4     5.0 credits

This course strives to develop skills in students that prepare them for advanced work in German. Students hone their advanced grammar skills while developing a sense of style and register in the language. Students focus on massive vocabulary expansion through reading and study of contemporary literature, non-fiction texts, recent newspaper and magazine articles, and Internet resources. Movies, videos and music are important components of the study of modern German culture. Oral and written reports and multimedia projects are required.  

528 HONORS/PRE-AP GERMAN 5   5.0 credits

This advanced course is open to any student who has successfully completed the Honors Level 4 course in their chosen target language.  It is a year long sequence conducted in the target language.  This course offers an introduction to the history and culture in the target language speaking countries.  Students will review basic grammar and learn idiomatic expressions and other essential vocabulary.  Students will have the opportunity to read authentic texts and literary works, study film and music, and use their laptops as a tool for research and creative self-expression.  Ability to converse freely in the target language is developed through class discussions and oral projects.  Videos relating to the target language culture as it relates to art, politics and history are used to enhance students' listening comprehension and spontaneous discourse.  

This course may also prepare students to take the AP exam with guidance and further study materials provided by the teacher.

540 C.P. SPANISH 1            5.0 credits

This course is the introductory course for the study of Spanish. It assumes the student has no prior knowledge of Spanish. Working with the Avancemos 1Textbook, students learn to speak, listen to and understand spoken Spanish, and pay attention to reading, writing and grammar. In addition, the student will explore many aspects of the Spanish speaking cultures of Europe, South and Central America.

542 C.P. SPANISH 2            5.0 credits

This course is the consequential continuation of C.P. Spanish 1, using the second half of Avancemos 1, with more attention now being given to the structural patterns of the language and special emphasis on writing skills. By the end of this level, students should possess the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills necessary to handle simple, everyday survival tasks in Spanish (e.g. handling routine travel needs or taking care of physical needs). In addition, the student will be trained to express his or her own thoughts in Spanish, initiate a conversation and relate personal information about the past and the future.

543 HONORS SPANISH 2         5.0 credits

This course, open to students who completed 8th grade Spanish or C.P. Spanish 1 with distinction, is designed for the highly motivated, highly skilled foreign language student who is eager to develop active communication skills and who plans to study Spanish into advanced levels. Material is covered at a faster rate than in C.P. Spanish 2 and student performance expectations are higher. Vocabulary will permit discussions of topics beyond the basic survival needs such as personal history and leisure time activities. Greater evidence of grammatical accuracy will be required in all basic oral and written constructions. Open responses are required.

544  C.P. SPANISH 3       5 credits

This course will review the skill of listening, understanding, speaking and writing in the target language. The goal is for students to build/review knowledge gained in their previous years of foreign language study while continuing to study French in the context of cultural topics.  Students will review grammar and practice open response writing. Class will be conducted as much as possible in the target language and projects may be required to be completed.

545 HONORS SPANISH 3          5.0 credits

This course is a continuation of the advanced work begun in Honors Spanish 2. There will be a basic review of the fundamental language structures, but with a decided increase in the amount of difficulty of the readings and material covered, compared to the normal C.P. Spanish 3 program. Students will be likewise expected to master more vocabulary and be more responsible for producing a highly correct written language. Open responses are required.

546 C.P. SPANISH 4        5 credits

C.P. 4 is a terminal course. The Language and Culture course will review the skill of listening, understanding, speaking and writing in the target language. The goal is for students to build/review knowledge gained in their previous years of foreign language study. Students will review grammar and practice open response writing. Class will be conducted as much as possible in the target language and projects may be required. 

547  HONORS SPANISH 4        5.0 credits

This course concentrates on a thorough continuation and strengthening of the skills acquired in previous levels. Grammar is reviewed as needed; greater emphasis is now placed on independent reading and writing. Readings of Spanish literary works form an important segment of this course. Texts include representative authors from the 17th through the 20th centuries. Oral and written reports are required.

548 HONORS/PRE-AP SPANISH 5    5.0 credits

This advanced course is open to any student who has successfully completed the Honors Level 4 course in their chosen target language.  It is a year long sequence conducted in the target language.  This course offers an introduction to the history and culture from earliest civilizations to present day in the target language speaking countries.  Students will review basic grammar and learn idiomatic expressions and other essential vocabulary.  Students will have the opportunity to read authentic texts and literary works, study film and music, and use their laptops as a tool for research and creative self-expression.  Ability to converse freely in the target language is developed through class discussions and oral projects.  Videos relating to the target language culture as it relates to art, politics and history are used to enhance students' listening comprehension and spontaneous discourse.  

This course may also prepare students to take the AP exam with guidance and further study materials provided by the teacher.

549 ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH LITERATURE & CULTURE     5.0 credits

AP Spanish Literature and Culture is designed to introduce students to the formal study of Peninsular Spanish, Latin American and U.S. Hispanic literature.  The course aims to develop students’ critical reading and analytical writing skills in Spanish as well as their ability to make interdisciplinary connections and explore linguistic and cultural comparisons.  This class will be conducted entirely in Spanish appropriate to this level and offers the entire official AP Spanish Literature and Culture Reading list.  Literary texts are grouped by themes and presented in chronological order within each theme.  Students are expected to discuss literary textx and and their different historical, socio-cultural, and geopolitiical contexts in a variety of interactive oral and written formats in Spanish.  Videos relating to the target language culture as it relates to art, politics and history are used to enhance students’ listening comprehension and spontaneous discourse.  

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)

570 ESL 1       5.0 credits

This is a beginner's level class for students with little or no English; students would have just arrived in the U.S. or have been in the U.S. for less than 6 months.  New arrivals must take a pre-assessment test (W-APT); those who score 1 or 2 (Entering or Emerging) would take this class.  The focus of this class would be on communication for social and instructional purposes within the school setting, building academic vocabulary found in the core classes, demonstrating basic sentence and paragraph structure, utilizing reading startegies for fictional and non-fictional texts, etc.  Students in this course meet daily to allow for optimal language instruction and practice.

571 ESL  2      5.0 credits

This class would give instruction to students with some English language proficiency. Students in this class would score a 3 or 4 on the ACCESS or W-APT assessments.  The focus of the instruction would build on language skills attained in ESL 1 and continue to frontload and build academic language, reading and writing skills, and concepts found in the core subjects.  Mastery would be measured by the summatives, such as tests, projects, compositions and essays.  Students would take this class every other day in the block schedule.

572 ESL 3       5.0 credits

The class would focus on the more complex structures and tenses in English. The perfect tenses, the passive voice, modals, conditionals and other more complex structures would be taught. More emphasis would be placed on composition and more difficult reading skills and vocabulary.  Students in this class typically score a 5 or 6 on the ACCESS or W-APT assessments and close to exiting the ESL Program.

573 SEI HISTORY (Sheltered English Immersion History)     5.0 credits

SEI History is designed to frontload or build academic vocabulary and skills needed for history classes at the high school.  We will give special focus to our pronunciation, fluency, vocabulary, decoding and text-comprehension skills.  We will explore the English language through the use of academic articles and videos focusing on topics related to history, such as social studies skills (acdemic resources), world history, U.S. History I and U.S. History 2.  Students taking ESL 1 are required to take this class.

HISTORY / SOCIAL STUDIES

The Social Studies Program at Beverly High School seeks to instill in students the desire for lifelong learning. A curriculum designed to create independent and critical thinkers will assist students in defining their roles as involved citizens of their community, their country, and their world. To accomplish these goals, the Social Studies Department has designed the following course of study. The freshman, sophomore, and junior year courses are required, and the senior year is elective.

REQUIRED SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

200 HONORS MODERN WORLD HISTORY (grade 9)    5.0 credits

201 C.P. MODERN WORLD HISTORY (grade 9)     5.0 credits

This course covers the social, political and economic developments of modern Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas.  This survey course will emphasize the development of critical thinking and study skills as it examines such topics as the French Revolution, Imperialism and the World Wars.  Students will be expected to stay informed of current events.  The use of both primary and secondary sources will be used to reinforce the themes stated in the Massachusetts History and Social Studies Curriculum Framework.  A research paper is required.

213 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) WORLD HISTORY     5.0 credits

AP World History is a rigorous college-level course designed to explore human history from 8000 BCE to the present. The focus of the AP program in World History is on an understanding of the six major themes in world history. Students are also expected to make comparisons and examine how global connections have changed over time.  The course will examine the history of the human experience from a global perspective. The course emphasizes the critical and analytical thinking skills, independent learning, reading, and writing skills necessary for success in a college level history course. Course requirements will include the critical evaluation of primary and secondary sources, and considerable outside reading and a summer assignment. Students will be strongly encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Exam in World History in May; those who achieve passing scores may be awarded college credit.

Recommendation: Successful completion of World History 9 or the equivalent.

Open to students in grades 10, 11, and 12.

210        HONORS US HISTORY 1    5.0 credits

211        C.P. US HISTORY 1     5.0 credits

In US History I, students will focus on the creation and development of the United States from the late colonial period through Reconstruction. The causes and events of the American Revolution, the critical period and the writing of the Constitution, westward expansion, and the Civil War are among the topics that students will examine. The curriculum emphasizes reading and understanding of the founding documents, particularly the United States Constitution. Civics and government, economics and geography will be integral to the course.

Recommendation: Successful completion of World History 9 or the equivalent.

223  ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) UNITED STATES HISTORY    5.0 credits

This course is intended for independent learners who wish to study United States History at a fast pace, but also at a higher level than they would in the U.S. History part 2 course.  Students in this course will be expected to learn about American History from exploration through the American Revolution during the summer months.  They will then examine the early National period through the mid-late twentieth century in somewhat more depth.  Integrated into the curriculum will be consideration of major themes in American History such as the American identity, environment, politics, citizenship, culture, globalization and economics.  . The course emphasizes critical and analytical thinking, reading, and writing skills necessary for success in a college level history course. Emphasis is also placed on ways in which interpretations of United States history have changed over time. Students who take this course are strongly encouraged to take the Advanced Placement (AP) United States History Examination in May; those who achieve a passing score may be awarded college credit.

Recommendation: Successful completion of Modern World History 9 and either U.S. History PT I or AP World History, or the equivalent. Open to students in Grades 11 and 12.

220 HONORS U.S. HISTORY 2      5.0 credits

221 C.P. U.S. HISTORY 2      5.0 credits

In US History II, students will concentrate on the United States and the world from 1877 to the present. The curriculum emphasizes the emergence of the United States as an industrial, economic and political world power and the impact of that development on American society. Students will be expected to analyze primary and secondary sources throughout the course.  In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, civics and government, economics, and geography will be integral to the course.

Recommendation: Successful completion of US History PT.I or the equivalent.

230 WORLD MYTHOLOGY        2.5 credits

This course provides an introduction to the nature and function of myth. The specific literature studied because of the breadth of subject matter will vary in content.  This is a Humanities class that consists of myths, hero-tales and legends that represent a society’s basic cultural and moral values recorded in literary form.  Students will read the basic mythologies of Greece, Rome, the Middle East, Northern Europe, the British Isles, the Far East and Pacific Islands, Africa, and the Americas.  Students will analyze the stories and trace parallel elements to show that human beings are remarkably alike in their principal values and concerns. This course illustrates the influence of these myths on the art, literature and culture of the modern world. Students will also continue to develop their writing skills and their use of the writing process.  

244 SOCIOLOGY             2.5 credits  

Sociology is the study of human relationships.  In this course, students will be given the opportunity to study a behavioral social science for the first time. In this course, students will study the general organization of society in terms of class structure and social institutions.  They will also look at social processes such as cooperation, competition, conflict, prejudice and discrimination.  Students will also consider the cultural heritage and values of Americans.  A major part of the course will deal with peer relationships, education, deviant social behavior, cults and religions.  Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

233 THE SIXTIES AND BEYOND      2.5 credits 

Students will study major world events and trends from 1945 to the present.  Key topics will include the Cold War, Social & Political trends, Global Civil Rights Movements, Human Rights, Globalization,  and Current events.  Students will examine how these recent events continue to impact the world and the US today.  Students will be expected to use skills learned in other history classes, such as public speaking, research, and writing.Recommendation:  Successful completion of grade 9 World History.  Open to Students in grades 10, 11, and 12.

234 ECONOMICS     2.5 credits  (not offered 2018-2019)

This course is the basic introduction to micro and macroeconomic concepts.  Students will examine common economic terms, basic supply and demand principles, the role of government in the economy, measurements of economic performance and international trade.  Emphasis is placed on important social issues and real world problems and how to use simple economic tools to analyze them.  Student will use a variety of media and resources including books, news articles and data from various Internet sources to gain and understanding of how economics affect the world we live in.

232 HISTORY OF BEVERLY & ESSEX COUNTY     2.5 credits  

In this course, students will explore the history of Beverly and the North Shore from its founding to the present day.  This course will examine key events that defined America and Beverly's role in those events, including the settlement of America, the American Revolution, Industrialization, the Gilded Age, the World Wards, etc.  This course will use numerous primary sources and field trips, when possible, as students investigate their local community.  Open to students in grades 10-12.

231 IRISH STUDIES    2.5 Credits (not offered 2018-2019)

Students will be provided with an opportunity to explore ideas, events, and individuals of Irish culture and heritage in greater depth.  Course requirements will include research and writing, oral presentations, debate and field trips.  Open to students in grades 10-12.

240 21ST CENTURY CIVICS    2.5 credits

This course will prepare students to become active participants in our republic.   Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to participate in the political process by reviewing the United States Constitution and by examining government institutions, public policy, political beliefs and behavior, civil rights and responsibilities, and the media.  They will focus on projects designed to demonstrate our government in action and sharpen their skills to become more informed and responsible citizens.

Open to students in grades 10, 11, and 12.

241 CRIMINAL JUSTICE _         2.5 credits

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the rule of law and the operation of the criminal justice system in the United States. Students are encouraged to investigate legal protections of rights and liberties while developing skills of critical analysis, decision-making, and values clarification.

Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12.

247 FACING HISTORY     2.5 credits

Students will examine the roots of hate and acts of hatred in an attempt to understand history not as a series of inevitable events, but as a sequence of events resulting from individual actions and decisions through time. Students will examine their roles and responsibilities as global citizens, the diameters of their “universe of obligation,” and the potential for wide- reaching impact that every individual has daily. These themes will be examined through a series of readings, videos, activities and reflections. Activities also include guest speakers and possible trips to Holocaust or genocide exhibits. The primary historical case study of the course will be the examination of the Holocaust. Also included will be shorter units that will examine other acts of genocide, such as Rwanda, Armenia and Cambodia. Course requirements would include the examination of primary documents concerning the Holocaust, outside readings, document-based questions and a research project.

Recommendation: Successful completion of Modern World history 9 & U.S. History PT. I.

Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

242  PSYCHOLOGY         2.5 credits

Students will be presented with an introductory behavioral social science course. This curriculum provides basic understandings in the history of psychology, the scientific approach to social studies, schools of psychology, learning and memory, stress and stress-reduction, psychological dysfunction, and parapsychology. Current issues in psychology will be presented throughout the course with emphasis on reading and writing units, public speaking, testing skills, and transition to college-level work.

Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

MATHEMATICS

The Mathematics Department at Beverly High School offers a variety of courses in accordance with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics as well as several math electives.  Students are exposed to a wide variety of learning experiences to achieve success. The mathematics department encourages students to purchase a TI-84 graphing calculator for use in their math classes.  It is important to note that the graphing calculator is permitted for use on the MCAS, PSAT, SAT, SAT Subject Tests, AP, and ACT exams.  

 

312 C.P.  ALGEBRA I      5.0 credits

This course studies the properties and structure of the real number system. Topics include solving, graphing and writing linear equations, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, laws of exponents, systems of linear equations, and inequalities. Graphing calculators will be used in this course.

310 HONORS ALGEBRA I     5.0 credits

This course addresses all of the same topics as C.P. Algebra I. Its purpose is to expand and reinforce the skills that a student has previously acquired in an 8th grade Algebra I course.

Recommendation: The student must have previously passed an Algebra I course, or receive permission from the academic division leader.

395 RTI MATH 9     5.0  credits

This course is designed for students who require support with the Algebra I course. Students will receive individual interventions based on their specific needs. The focus of this class will be on 5 major types of equations and their solutions, along with selected topics in numeral sense, and preparation for the MCAS exam.

330 HONORS GEOMETRY             5.0 credits

This course consists of all the topics in a Euclidean Geometry course such as geometric definitions and symbols, angles, triangles and congruencies, geometric inequalities, parallel lines in a plane and in space,
quadrilaterals, similarity, areas of polygons, circles, spheres, solids and volumes, three-dimensional figures and transformations. It emphasizes the logic and abstract reasoning necessary to do proofs as well as problem
solving.

331 C.P.  GEOMETRY     5.0 credits

Geometry teaches students to represent problem situations with geometric models and apply properties of figures, to classify figures in terms of congruence and similarity and apply these relationships, to deduce properties of and relationships between figures from given assumptions, and to develop an understanding of an axiomatic system. Algebra skills will be applied and reinforced throughout these courses. Graphing calculators will be used.

396 RTI MATH 10       5.0 credits

This course is designed for students who require support with the Geometry course. Students will receive individual interventions based on their specific needs. This course will focus on plane and solid geometric figures, similarity and proportion, measures of area and volume and coordinate geometry.

320/321 HONORS ALGEBRA II (9th/Non-9th)      5.0 credits

Recommendation: For 8th grade students, a grade of A- in Algebra I  and 8th grade teacher recommendation. For High School students, a grade of A- in C.P. Algebra I is required.

323  C.P. ALGEBRA II        5.0 credits

Algebra II continues the study of algebraic concepts and methods so that students can model real-world phenomena with a variety of functions and represent and analyze relationships using tables, verbal rules, and graphs. Topics will include quadratics, arithmetic, and geometric sequences and series, circles, complex numbers, systems of linear and quadratic equations, and inequalities. Graphing calculators will be used extensively in this course.

Recommendation: Passing grade in Algebra I.

397 RTI MATH 11    5.0 credits

This course is designed for students who require support with the Algebra II course. Students will receive individual interventions based on their specific needs.

340 HONORS PRECALCULUS     5.0 credits

The study of Honors Precalculus will show that algebra is modeling language in rea-life problems.  Students should have a firm grasp of topics covered in Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II.  Students will strengthen their understanding of the underlying concepts of algebra while studying precalculus topics.  These topics will include analyzing functions, exponential funcations, logarithmic functions, trigonometry, and analytic geometry.  This course will prepare you for the study of AP Calculus or Honors Calculus.

341 C.P.  PRECALCULUS     5.0 credits

This course presents advanced topics in trigonometry, analytic geometry, and algebra II in preparation for the study of CP or Honors Calculus.  Graphing calculators will be used in this course.

302 COLLEGE REVIEW MATHEMATICS      5.0 credits

This course will reinforce and expand upon concepts presented in Algebra/Geometry Concepts. The emphasis will be on collecting and analyzing data, solving problems, and using mathematics to model real world situations. This course will prepare the college bound non-math major students for the required math courses he/she will encounter in his/her college career. Technology will be used throughout the course as a tool for problem solving and to develop students’ understanding.

Students who have completed Pre-Calculus ARE NOT eligible for this course.

363 C.P. TRIGONOMETRY/STATISTICS            5.0 credits

This course is designed for students who have completed Geometry and Algebra II.  This course is an alternative to College Review Math or Precalculus.  Right triangle trigonometry will be expanded to include the
investigation of circular functions as well as the unit circle.  Problem situations requiring the use of trigonometric equations and identities will also be investigated.  Statistics will deal with the collection,
organization, and interpretation of numerical data as well as the study of random experiments.  Computers and graphing calculators will be used extensively in this course.  This course should not be taken after CP or Honors PreCalculus.

366 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) STATISTICS          5.0 credits

AP Statistics will acquaint the students with the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The broad concepts include: Exploring data – describing patterns and departures from patterns, Sampling and Experimentation – planning and conducting a study, Anticipating patterns – exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, Statistical inference – estimating population parameters and testing hypothesis. The TI 84 Graphing Calculator is required for class. Computers and calculator will allow students to focus deeply on the statistics concepts involved, the ideas, computations and connections with actual events. Students will work on projects involving the hands-on gathering and analysis of real world data. This course prepares students for the AP examination in Statistics.

Recommendation: May take Algebra II concurrently or have completed Algebra II.

352 C.P . CALCULUS     5.0 credits

This course provides an introduction to differential calculus for students who plan to continue their study of calculus at college. Graphing calculators will be used in this course.

Recommendation: A grade of B- or better in C.P. PreCalculus. C or better in Honors PreCalculus.

351 HONORS CALCULUS    5.0 credits

This course provides an introduction to differential and integral calculus for students who plan to continue their study of calculus at college. Graphing calculators will be used in this course.

Recommendation: A grade of B- or better in Honors PreCalculus.

350  ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CALCULUS AB     5.0 credits

This course serves those students who wish to pursue college-level study in mathematics while in high school. It offers the equivalent of a semester of college calculus in preparation for the Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB examination of the College Board. Graphing calculators will be used in this course.

Recommendation: A grade of B- or better in Honors Pre- Calculus or an A in Pre-Calculus.

349 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CALCULUS BC       5.0 credits

This course serves those students who wish to extend their college-level study in mathematics, while in high school, beyond the parameters offered by AP Calculus AB. The course reviews all the same topics as the AP Calculus AB in addition to a many more advanced Calculus II topics. Students who complete this course will be prepared to take the AP Calculus BC college board exam.

Prerequisite: a grade of B or better in the AP Calculus AB course.

377 ART OF MATHEMATICS   2.5  credits

This course is designed to explore the space where math meets art. Students will have the opportunity to be creative while learning about mathematical topics through the study of tessellations, polyhedra, perspective, paper folding, origami, Pascal’s Triangle, Mobius bands, and a myriad of other subjects. Students will be fascinated in the discovery math in everyday life, such as architecture, landscape design, nature design and more.

378  HISTORY OF MATH    2.5 credits

History of Math will explore mathematics in the ancient civilizations up to the present day.  It will take a look at how mathematics has evolved over the years and how it has become what it is today through its successes and failures.  Students will get a chance to explore everything from ancient Babylonia and Egypt to modern day cryptography, as well as well-known mathematicians.  Assessments will be given in a variety of different ways, including summatives on ancient math processes and projects on different math discoveries over the years.  Students will have a chance to show both their math skills and creativity.

379 PSAT/SAT MATH PREP   2.5 credits

This course serves those students who want to be better prepared for taking college entrance exams. Math topics and test taking strategies are covered. It focuses on improving performance on the SAT reasoning test. Some time may also be spent reviewing for the ACT test.

SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

Honors Courses: Honors Biology, Engineering, Chemistry and Physics are demanding in both commitments of time and sophistication. These courses are designed for the highly motivated and self-disciplined student. The Honors science courses are designed for students considering science or engineering majors in college. Honors courses are prerequisites for Advanced Placement Courses in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

College Preparatory Courses: All college preparatory courses require a significant time commitment and seriousness of purpose on the part of the student.

MCAS

Under the present state law, in order to graduate and receive a high school diploma, students must pass the state-mandated MCAS test in science in addition to English/Language Arts and Mathematics. This science MCAS test, unlike the other two exams, will be an end of course assessment, not a cumulative assessment. All students will take the biology course in the ninth grade in preparation for the MCAS.

413 C.P. BIOLOGY    5.0 credits

This course is designed to investigate the biological concepts of life as applied to all living organisms from single cells to mammals. The topics cover basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetics and heredity, evolution, ecology and anatomy and physiology. If time, basic concepts of ecology will also be included. This course is designed to meet the Massachusetts State Frameworks.

Laboratory exercises, demonstration and cooperative activities, including basic computer applications will be used in this course to supplement the text and classroom materials. Students will be required to demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method through laboratory activities and/or an independent research projects.

412 HONORS BIOLOGY     5.0 credits 

Honors biology is designed for the highly motivated and self-disciplined high school student who wants to pursue science or a related field while in college. This course is designed to provide the student with an in depth understanding of the fundamentals of biology at an accelerated pace. Topics to be investigated include biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetics and heredity, evolution and some anatomy and physiology and ecology. This course is designed to meet or exceed the Mass. State Frameworks. Students will be expected to do outside reading and independent work. Laboratory exercises, demonstrations and cooperative activities, including basic computer applications will be used in this course to supplement the text and classroom materials. Students will be required to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the scientific method through laboratory activities and/or an independent research projects. Students electing to take this level of biology should be interested in pursuing a science-related major at a four- year college or university upon graduation from high school. Calculators and/or computers will be used in this course.

Recommendation: An A- in 8th Grade science.

424 C.P. CHEMISTRY     5.0 credits

CP Chemistry fulfills the lab science requirement for graduation.  A student selecting this course should be planning on furthering their education at a two or four year college/university.  The goals of this course are to teach students the basic principles of chemistry, to develop students' problem solving skills, to help students become scientifically literate citizens, and to prepare the student for college science courses.  Topics to be investigated include properties of matter, atomic structure periodicity, chemical bonding, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, chemistry of gases, acids and bases.  Calculators are required for this course.  

Recommendation:  Passing grade in CP Biology and at least a C in Algebra I, or successful completion of Geometry.

422 HONORS CHEMISTRY     5.0 credits

Honors chemistry is designed for the highly motivated and self-disciplined student. A student electing this course should have serious interest in the possibility of pursuing science or a related field at a four-year college/university. The goals of this course are to teach students the basic principles of chemistry, to develop students’ problem solving skills, to help students become scientifically literate citizens, and to prepare the student for college science courses.  Topics to be investigated include: properties of matter, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, chemistry of gases, acids and bases. Graphing calculators will be used in this course.

Recommendation: A B in Honors Algebra II, or A- in Honors Algebra I, and a B- in Biology

425 C.P. EARTH SCIENCE             5.0 credits

The course is designed to investigate the concepts of Earth Science as applied to the world and universe around us.  The topics studied in the class will be Matter Interactions, Earth and the Universe, Earth Structure and Earth Systems.  This course is designed to meet the Massachusetts State Frameworks.  Laboratory exercises, demonstration and cooperative activities, including basic computer applications will be used in this course to supplement text and classroom materials.  Students will be required to demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method through laboratory activities and research projects.  Students electing to take this course must have a recommendation by their teacher and/or guidance counselor.

441 C.P. ENGINEERING     5.0 credits

This course is designed to challenge students to solve engineering problems by thinking creatively, investigating options, and developing solutions.  Students will explore the role of math, science, technology and engineering in today’s society and develop skills and knowledge outlined in the Massachusetts Technology/Engineering Curriculum Standards.  Topics will include the engineering design process, technical drawing, manufacturing, communication systems, renewable energy technology, and a variety of applied physics concepts (forces, materials, thermal energy transfer, fluid mechanics, and electric circuits).  Students will work individually and on design teams to create and test prototypes, evaluate solutions, and communicate findings.

440 HONORS ENGINEERING    5.0 credits

This course is designed to challenge students to solve engineering problems by thinking creatively, investigating options, and developing solutions.  Students will explore the role of math, science, technology and engineering in today’s society and develop skills and knowledge outlined in the Massachusetts Technology/Engineering Curriculum Standards.  Topics will include the engineering design process, technical drawing, manufacturing, communication systems, renewable energy technology, and a variety of applied physics concepts (forces, materials, thermal energy transfer, fluid mechanics, and electric circuits).  Students will be required to conduct electronic and traditional research, analyze data, and prepare class presentations.  Students will work individually and on design teams to create and test prototypes, evaluate solutions, and communicate findings.

Recommendation: B- in Honors Algebra II and Geometry or A- in C.P. Algebra II and Geometry.

433 C.P. PHYSICS     5.0 credits

This course is designed to investigate matter and energy and their transformations. Students will study mechanics, magnetism and electricity. There will be an emphasis on mathematical problem solving. A student electing this program should have a strong desire to enter a four-year college/university. Graphing calculators will be used in this course.

Recommendation:  C in C.P. Geometry.

432 HONORS PHYSICS   5.0 credits

Honors Physics is designed for the highly motivated and self-disciplined student. Honors Physics is designed to provide students with all the fundamentals of C.P. 1 Physics, including additional topics at an accelerated pace. Course description includes; mechanics, and selected topics as determined by the instructor. This course requires a basic knowledge of the fundamentals of trigonometry. Graphing calculators will be used in this course. Students electing this course will be required to complete “outside” reading work independently and conduct project work and should have a serious interest in pursuing a science or engineering field at a four year college/university.

Recommendation:  B- in Honors Geometry or A- in C.P. Geometry.  

410 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) BIOLOGY        5.0 credits

This course is a second year, second level biology elective for juniors and seniors. The curriculum will include an in-depth study of the following topics: evolution, cellular processes (energy and communication), genetics and information transfer, interactions in biological systems, and selected topics as determined by the instructor.  This course includes several laboratory investigations including independent, inquiry experimentation of the topics being studied. This course serves to prepare students who wish to challenge themselves with college level study of biology and biochemistry while in high school. The program offers the equivalent of a year of college biology in preparation for the Advanced Placement (AP) Biology examination, offered in the spring. A student electing this program should have a serious interest in the possibility of majoring in science or a related field at a four-year college/university. The course includes outside reading and independent work.  Students enrolled in this class are expected to take the AP exam in May.

Recommendation: B+ in Honors Biology or A in CP Biology, and a B- in Chemistry and is taking, or has taken Anatomy and Physiology.  Anatomy and Physiology is recommended but not required.

420 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CHEMISTRY     5.0 credits

This course is a second year, second level chemistry elective. The curriculum will include, but not be limited to: atoms and ions; stoichiometry; gases; thermochemistry; chemical thermodynamics; atomic structure and periodicity; chemical bonding; liquids and solids; properties of solutions; chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria; acids and bases; electrochemistry; nuclear reactions; and selected topics as determined by the instructor.

This course serves to prepare students who wish to maximally challenge themselves with college level study of chemistry while in high school. The program offers the equivalent of a semester of college chemistry in preparation for the Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry examination offered in the spring.

Students electing this course must be highly motivated to do "outside" reading and work independently.

A student electing this program should have a serious interest in the possibility of majoring in science or a related field at a four-year college/university.  Graphing calculators will be used in this course.  Students enrolled in this class are expected to take the AP exam in May.

Recommendation:  B+ in Honors Chemistry and is taking, or has taken Honors PreCalculus.  Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

435 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) PHYSICS I   5.0 credits

This course serves to prepare students who wish to maximally challenge themselves with college level study of physics, while in high school. AP Physics I is intended to be a first-year physics course and covers kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, waves and an introduction to electricity.    The program offers the equivalent of the first semester of college physics in preparation for the Advanced Placement (AP) Physics 1 examination offered in May.  Students electing this course must be highly motivated to do “outside” reading and work independently. A student electing this program should have a serious interest in the possibility of majoring in science or a related field at a four-year college/university.  The course requires basic knowledge of the fundamentals of trigonometry.  Scientific calculators are required.  Students enrolled in this class are expected to take the AP exam in May.Recommendation: B or better in Honors Algebra II and Geometry or A- or better in C.P. Algebra II and Geometry.  Open to students in grades 11 and 12.  

436 ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS II        5.0 credits

This course serves to prepare students who wish to maximally challenge themselves with college level study of physics, while in high school.  AP Physics II explores the principles of fluids, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, optics, and topics in modern physics.  The program offers the equivalent of the second semester of college physics in preparation for the Advanced Placement (AP) Physics II examination offered in May.  Students electing this course must be highly motivated to do "outside" reading and work independently.  A student electing this program should have a serious interest in the possibility of majoring in science or a related field at a four year college/university.  Scientific calculators are required.  Students enrolled in this class are expected to take the AP exam in May.

Recommendation:  B or better in Honors Algebra II and Geometry or A- or better in C.P. Algebra II and Geometry.  Open to students in grades 11 and 12.  Prior completion of AP Physics I or Honors Physics is required.

450 C.P. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY    5.0 credits

The study of the structure and function of human body systems will be the major focus of this course. Students will learn basic terminology and will study diseases relative to the human body. Content will reinforce and

expand upon basic human structure and function from the molecular level through the organ system level. Selective laboratory exercises, demonstrations, and videos will be used to supplement the assigned

readings and classroom material.  Manual dissection is a requirement of this course. Students electing this course should have a high interest in the study of the structure and function of the human body and will be required to do outside research, work independently, and conduct project based work.

Recommendation:  All students must have successfully passed Biology, and taken, or are taking another core lab science course.

449 HONORS ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY     5.0 credits

Honors Anatomy and Physiology is designed for the highly motivated and self-disciplined high school student who is interested in pursuing a career in the medical or healthcare field. This course is designed to

provide the student with an in depth understanding of structure and function of the human body from the molecular level through the organ system level at an accelerated pace. Students will learn terminology and

will study diseases relative to the human body. Selective laboratory exercises, demonstrations, and videos will be used to supplement the assigned readings and classroom material.  Manual dissection is a requirement for this course.  Students electing this course will be required to do outside research, work independently, and conduct project based work. This course is designed to prepare students for further medical and healthcare training.

Recommendation: B- in Honors Biology or A- in CP Biology.  In addition you must have taken or are taking another core lab science course.

 451 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE     2.5 credits (not offered 2018-2019)

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning more about the environment.  We will be looking at the local ecology and resources as well as national and global issues.  Through research and group activities we will investigate the impacts of human activity on the world around us (including pollution, resource depletion, global warming, and land use).  We will also examine and evaluate sustainable technologies, policies, and personal choices that can help protect the Earth and its resources.  Student will be expected to analyze data, research current environmental issues, participate in individual and group projects, and present information to the class.  

Recommendation: All students must have successfully passed Biology, and taken, or are taking another core lab science course.

455 CP ROBOTICS   2.5 credits

This course is designed for students who want to learn more about robotic technologies and the computer systems that control them.  Students will explore the principles of robotics and how robots sense, think, and act as well as their current limitations.  This course will integrate mechanical engineering, electronics, and computer programming as we design, build, instruct, and test robots.  We will use Lego Mindstorm technology with software and a wide range of sensors and components to encourage creative solutions to design challenges.  In addition to team projects, we will investigate the impacts and future potential of robotic systems in areas such as manufacturing, space exploration, and medical technologies.

454 HONORS ROBOTICS     5.0 credits

This course is designed for students who want to learn more about robotic technologies and the computer systems that control them.  Students will explore the principles of robotics and how robots sense, think, and act as well as their current limitations.  This course will integrate mechanical engineering, electronics, and computer programming as we design, build, instruct, and test robots.  We will use Lego Mindstorm technology with software and a wide range of sensors and components to encourage creative solutions to design challenges.  In addition to team projects, we will investigate the impacts and future potential of robotic systems in areas such as manufacturing, space exploration, and medical technologies. Students will be required to conduct electronic and traditional research, analyze data, and prepare class presentations.

Recommendation: All students must have successfully passed Biology, and taken or are taking another core lab science course.  A strong interest in exploring technology.

452 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE     5.0 credits

Forensic Science is the application of science to law. In this course the student will be introduced to scientific criminal investigation. This involves the application of biological and chemical techniques to the analysis of physical evidence. This course focuses on the activities of a crime lab and deals with methods used to link suspect, victim and crime scenes. Lab activities include fingerprinting, document and handwriting analysis, ballistics, serology, hair and fiber examination, anthropology, botany, and other analytical procedures. The use of DNA analysis for typing and profiling is investigated. Case studies and current events will be used extensively.

Recommendation: All students must have successfully passed Biology, and taken or are taking another core lab science course.  A strong interest in exploring technology.

464 BASIC ELECTRONICS     2.5 credits (not offered 2018-2019)

This course is designed for those students who have a desire to become familiar with the basic components used in electronic circuitry. Topics to be discussed during the course include: 3 basic components of electricity, Ohm’s Law, multimeer measurement, resistors, capacitors, inductors, semiconductors and digital electronics. The course will also focus on circuit diagrams (schematics) to develop the fundamentals of interpreting circuit diagrams so that these illustrations of the arrangement of electronics components are used to actually construct a simple electronic circuit.

Recommendation: All students must have successfully passed Biology, and taken or are taking another core lab science course.  A strong interest in exploring technology.  Passing grade in CP Algebra I.

448 MARINE BIOLOGY     2.5 credits

This course is designed for students who are interested in Marine Biology.  The course will emphasize the study of marine organisms and their environment.  Through classroom projects, research and laboratory activities, it is intended that students will develop an understanding of the structural and behavioral diversity of marine organisms.  Major topics covered in this course will include: 1) Geology of ocean basins, 2) Properties of water as they relate to tides, currents, waves, climate and seawater chemistry, 3) Types of marine organisms, 4) Interactions between marine organisms and their environment, 5) Marine ecosystems and habitat diversity.

Recommendation: All students must have successfully passed Biology, and taken or are taking another core lab science course.  A strong interest in exploring technology.

437 PHYSICS OF ASTRONOMY     2.5 credits

This semester course will introduce students to the field of Astronomy.  Topics will include:  The earth's participation in the solar system, the Sun - its internal makeup and its influence in the solar system, our solar system - the planets, asteroids, comets, possible age and origins of solar system, our galaxy - nearby star systems, black holes, life cycle of a star, space telescopes, the astrophysics of light spectral analysis - The broader universe - other galaxies, theories on age and origin of the universe, and possible future technology for space exploration.  Recommendation:  Passing grade in chemistry.

WELLNESS:  PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND FAMILY/CONSUMER SCIENCE

The goal of the Physical Education program is to encourage students to develop active lifestyles for overall health benefits.  Through diversified course offerings, students are encouraged to develop skills and positive attitudes toward lifelong participation in exercise.  To receive credit, students must participate and to insure safety, students are expected to change for activity.  Health and Family/Consumer Sciences offer a variety of courses.  Each has been designed to enable students to develop fundamental health concepts and skills that foster healthy habits and behaviors, assess risks, and make health enhancing decisions.  According to M.G.L. c.71, s. 3, students must participate in Wellness all four years of high school.  Through participation in the following wellness courses and/or athletics, health-related clubs, outside sports/wellness activities and our Student Advisory Program, which includes Health and Wellness modules and discussions, this requirement can be reached by all students.

REQUIRED COURSES :

ALSO REQUIRED:  completion of 10 total credits in wellness (starting with the class of 2019)

        

WELLNESS

901 HEALTH DEVELOPMENT       2.5 credits

This skill based course offers numerous opportunities for building personal, social and life skills.  The curriculum is designed to aid the student in transitioning to the rigors and pressures of high school.  Discussions and guided activities will be used to cover stress management, substance abuse, relationships, disease prevention, hazing, harassment, bullying, cyber-bullying and healthy food choices.  Communication, decision making and goal setting skills are infused throughout the course.

902 FITNESS ENHANCEMENT     2.5 credits

This course will focus on cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles needed to reduce the risk of heart disease, and the theories/methods and safety precautions relative to muscular growth and development. Each student will be given a pre- and post- assessment to establish his/her fitness level and will develop a personalized exercise plan, which will be challenging, productive and fun. Open to grades 10, 11 and 12.

908 LIFE ISSUES   2.5 credits

This class is designed to develop mature decision- making skills. Students will use health and wellness knowledge and current information available when addressing health issues and choices confronting young adolescents today. Class will involve discussion, projects, and activities that utilize critical analysis, and problem solving skills.

910 LIFETIME FITNESS   2.5 credits

This elective course will provide opportunities to learn and develop knowledge and skills useful as tools in maintaining an active lifestyle in the years during and after high school.  Activities include: badminton, golf, pickleball, power walking, racquetball, orienteering, tennis, weight training, yoga, and Zumba.

911 FOUNDATIONS OF SPORT     2.5 credits 

This elective course emphasizes the enhancement of skill necessary to participate in team sports. In each sport unit students will learn the history of the game, care and selection of equipment, terminology, skills, scoring, rules, strategy and teamwork.

Sports Include:

Basketball        Team Handball

Volleyball        Lacrosse

Ultimate Frisbee        Broomball

Flag Football        Floor Hockey

Soccer        Softball

                

913 COMPETITIVE TEAM SPORTS     2.5 credits 

This course will consist of tournament play for the activities listed below. Students will understand how to set up tournaments (Round Robin, Double Elimination, Single elimination), foster good sportsmanship, and learn the setup and breakdown of all equipment.  Recommendation: Foundations of Sport

Sports Include:

Basketball        Team Handball

Volleyball        Lacrosse

Ultimate Frisbee        Broomball

Flag Football        Floor Hockey

Soccer        Softball

        

912 INTRO. TO ATHLETIC TRAINING AND CPR/FIRST AID    2.5 credits

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to help keep someone alive, reduce pain, and help minimize the consequences of injury and sudden illness. Students will understand the steps of infant, child, and adult CPR, the proper use of an automatic external defibrillator, and learn the appropriate first aid techniques. Successful completion of this course will result in a two-year certification card from the American Heart Association.

Open to grades 9-12.

914 ADVANCED ATHLETIC TRAINING     2.5 credits  (not offered 2018-2019)

Students taking this course will be able to conduct thorough injury/illness evaluation and determine the nature, type and severity of injuries for the basis of providing First Aid/Emergency Care, referring for medical diagnosis/treatment and follow up treatment. Therapeutic modalities, indications and contraindications, and use of such, will be covered.  Lab hours will be utilized working with an athletic trainer/physical therapist.

Recommendation:  Basic Athletic Training/CPR (11-12)

922 FOOD, NUTRITION, AND EXERCISE     2.5 credits

This class will provide students will all the necessary information to build a strong foundation for vital health and improved quality of life.  Students will learn the basics of appropriate nutrition and reaching fitness benchmarks for their age.  Units of study include sources and functions of nutrients, food preparation activities, weight management, eating disorders, hunger consumer issues.  Students will participate in fitness activities and will create their own fitness and nutrition plan.

921 PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE   2.5 credits 

This class is designed for students interested in the mental aspects of athletics and exercise.  This course will cover the role that psychology plays in the world of sports and exercise, current issues and challenges within the field, motivation within sport and exercise settings, and factors that affect performance such as environment, stress, and anxiety.  Performance enhancement techniques used by many sport consultants and professional athletes and role of youth sports and how it can affect the children's future in athletics will also be discussed.

Open to grades 11 and 12.

923 EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONDER TRAINING COURSE        2.5 credits (not offered 2018-2019)                                                                                         Emergency Medical Responder training course prepares the EMR student to provide emergency prehospital assessment and care for patients of all ages with a variety of medical conditions and traumatic injuries.  Areas of study include an introduction to emergency medical services systems, roles and responsibilities of EMRs, anatomy and physiology, medical emergencies, trauma and special considerations for working in the prehspital setting.   Prerequisite:  Intro to Athletic Training/CPR.

FAMILY/CONSUMER SCIENCE  

The Child Development Program (consisting of 2 courses) is a program based on child development instruction. It is designed to present the information necessary for basic knowledge of child growth and to provide, at the same time, a variety of personal experiences that will give the student an understanding of the role of the caregiver. Development includes not only physical maturation, but also an understanding of how emotional, social and intellectual development are fostered and hindered.

916 C.P. CHILD DEVELOPMENT I     2.5 credits

This course focuses on the physical, psychological, social and emotional development of children from conception to age three. Many important issues concerning children, parenting and changes in today's family structure will be covered. Anyone interested in working with children or social services as a college and career choice should take this course.

Open to students in Grades 10 and 11.

918 C.P. CHILD DEVELOPMENT II     2.5 credits

This course will further advance the contribution of the psychological theories and practices of how children typically develop mentally, physically, socially and emotionally. It will focus on children from ages four to pre-adolescence. It will include discussions of the issues of learning and psychological issues facing children in today’s educational environment.

Recommendation: Successful completion of Child Development I, open to Grades 11 and 12.

CULINARY ARTS

The Culinary Arts Program offers a variety of courses that allow for self-expression, creativity, and personal satisfaction. Skills can be developed in areas covering baking, cooking, and dining room service. The courses are also effective in helping students identify and develop competencies that will be useful in personal and family life as well as in entry-level positions in the food industry.

930 INTRODUCTION TO CULINARY ARTS    2.5 credits

Students will develop life skills necessary to survive in today’s changing world. Many basic food preparation skills and techniques, as well as nutrition for good health will be emphasized. Different units covered include baked goods, yeast breads, quick breads, main dishes, vegetables, soups, healthy meals, and snacks.

931 FOOD SERVICE     5.0 credits

Learn the many aspects of the restaurant operation through hands-on experience. Students plan, organize, and run “The Panther’s Den,” a weekly restaurant for faculty and staff that opens once per week. Experience gained will be useful for future employment in the growing field of the food service industry. Students will get some experience with ethnic foods. The many college and career opportunities available will be explored. This course can lead a student to explore food service/restaurant management for work or a college major.

Recommendation: Introduction to Culinary Arts.

C.T.E. Course: Successful completion of this course with a B+ or better may qualify student’s to earn credit at a college level.

932 INTERNATIONAL FOODS    2.5 credits (not offered in 2018-2019)

Students will take a gastronomical tour around the world. Students will prepare foods from many different countries including: France, Italy, Germany, China, Greece, Spain, and other countries as time allows. Regional dishes of the United States will also be covered.

Recommendation: A grade of B- or better in Introduction to Culinary Arts. Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12.

C.T.E. Course: Successful completion of this course with a B+ or better may qualify students to earn credit at a college level.

934 AMERICA’S REGIONAL FOODS     2.5 credits  

This course will explore the regional foods, techniques, and seasonings of the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico. Regions to be covered include New England, the Mid- Atlantic, the South, the Southwest, the Midwest, and the Pacific Coast. Special areas such as Pennsylvania Dutch, New Orleans, the Canadian, and the South of the Border influences will be covered as time allows. Cultural and family traditions will be explored.

Recommendation: A grade of B- or better in Introduction to Culinary Arts is required. Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

C.T.E. Course: Successful completion of this course with a B+ or better may qualify students to earn credit at a college level.

UNIQUE COURSES

VIRTUAL HIGH SCHOOL        2.5 or 5.0 credits

The Virtual High School is a national program for delivering high caliber (many courses are for honor credit), nontraditional curriculum over the Internet. At Beverly High School, a predetermined number of students may choose exciting courses from a very diverse catalog, developed by specially trained motivated to use cutting-edge information technology, can budget their time effectively, enjoy working independently, and have some pioneer spirit. This program can offer some flexibility to students who, due to scheduling conflicts, cannot take a course to receive credits required for graduation. For electives, students will find unique courses in the catalog, taught by teachers with special interests. Students will be scheduled for computer access time during the day for VHS course work and they may work at home. Take a look at over 100 courses offered by Virtual High School by going to www.govhs.org.  A VHS course counts for the same amount of credits as any other course at Beverly High School. Choose from Standard, Honors and Advanced Placement level courses with VHS.

Priority given to seniors, then juniors... See your guidance counselor to determine if VHS is for you. See Mrs. DiCarlo in Guidance for an application.

 

MARINE CORPS JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS (MCJROTC)

The program aims at developing informed and responsible citizens. It helps build character by developing social and emotional skills through acts of citizenship and leadership. Cadets develop goal setting, problem solving and self-discipline through activities inside and outside of the classroom. The MCJROTC leadership courses are a yearlong class. The student may switch the leadership course to a different block during the second semester in order to accommodate their academic schedule and may even begin the course of instruction in the second semester if approved by the Senior Marine Instructor. Completing one year of JROTC will meet the 2.5 credit Wellness requirement for Fitness Enhancement. This is not a recruitment tool and there is no military obligation to take this course. All uniforms, equipment and textbooks are supplied.

Requirements:

        1. Each student must wear a MCJROTC uniform once a week and look presentable.

2. Each student must participate in physical fitness on Friday’s and take a physical fitness test during the semester

JROTC Standards:

1. Develop informed and responsible citizens through community service events and the study of current events, roles of the government and national defense.

2. Enable cadets to identify life-management skills and protective factors that contribute to achieving personal wellness goals.

3. Describe the signs of destructive behavior, and identify intervention strategies and kinds of professional intervention.

4. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a health enhancing level of physical activity and fitness.

5. Develop discipline and respect for peers, superiors, subordinates, parents, and faculty.

6. Enable cadets to develop confidence to improve their academic and social skills that can enhance their career and educational choices after graduating from Beverly High School.

083 MCJROTC LEADERSHIP I      5 credits

Emphasis is on study techniques, fundamentals of leadership, ethical standards, goal setting, public speaking, health and fitness, stress management, military history, protocol and current events.

Open to students in grades 9, 10,11, and 12.

085 MCJROTC LEADERSHIP II      5 credits

Emphasis on leadership styles and leadership dynamics, human motivation, problem solving, intermediate public speaking, drill and ceremonies, employment opportunities, military justice system and current events. Completion of this course along with MCJROTC Leadership I meets the academic requirement for Health Development & Fitness Enhancement.  Prerequisite: Passing grade in Leadership I.

086 MCJROTC LEADERSHIP III      5 credits

Emphasis is on the fundamentals of management, group dynamics, conflict resolution, citizenship, world leaders, organization of Veterans Day ceremony, current events, national security organization.  Prerequisite: Passing grade in Leadership II.

087 MCJROTC LEADERSHIP IV      5 credits

Emphasis is on the fundamentals of management, group dynamics, conflict resolution, citizenship, world leaders, organization of Veterans Day ceremony, current events, national security organization.  Prerequisite: Passing grade in Leadership III.

ACCREDITATION STATEMENT

Beverly High School is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc., a non-governmental, nationally recognized organization whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools through collegiate institutions offering post-graduate instruction.

Accreditation of an institution by the New England Association indicates that it meets or exceeds criteria for the assessment of institutional quality periodically applied through a peer group review process. An accredited school or college is one which has available the necessary resources to achieve its stated purposes through appropriate educational programs, is substantially doing so, and gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is also addressed through accreditation.

Accreditation by the New England Association is not partial but applies to the institution as a whole. As such, it is not a guarantee of the quality of every course or program offered, or the competence of individual graduates. Rather, it provides reasonable assurance about the quality of opportunities available to students who attend the institution.

Inquiries regarding the status of an institution's accreditation by the New England Association should be directed to the administrative staff of the school or college. Individuals may also contact the Association.

TEMPORARY RECORDS STATEMENT

Pursuant to state law, the school maintains a student transcript and a temporary record. The transcript includes information such as the student's name and address, the courses taken and the final grades received, by year, credits earned, and grade levels completed. This is kept for sixty years after graduation.

The temporary record contains the majority of the information maintained by the school system about the student. This includes standardized test results, class rank, participation in extracurricular activities and teacher evaluations. This is destroyed after five years. Prior to that, a student may obtain a copy of anything in the folder. Just before it is destroyed, the student may take the originals.

In order to comply with both Massachusetts and Federal regulations, parents and children associated with the Beverly Public Schools are annually informed of three pieces of legislation affecting public school students. These three pieces of legislation specifically prohibit discrimination in the public schools. 

  1.     CHAPTER 622 OF THE MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL LAWS

"All educational and non-academic programs, activities and employment opportunities at Beverly Public Schools are offered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, age and/or, disability, homelessness and any other class or characteristic protected by law.”

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Federal) provides that:

"No otherwise qualified handicapped individual . . . shall, solely by reason of his handicap, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance." 

On June 24, 1975, the State Board of Education approved regulations for Chapter 622. These regulations address five areas of school policy: school admissions, admission to courses of study, guidance, course content, and extracurricular athletic activities. In compliance with Chapter 622 and Title IX regulations, the Beverly School Committee has designated Mrs. Suzanne Charochak as Coordinator of Title IX, Chapter 622 and as coordinator of Section 504 for the school system.

If you have any questions as to Beverly's compliance with these regulations, you may write or call:

Mrs. Suzanne Charochak, Assistant Superintendent        Dr. Steven A. Hiersche, Superintendent

978-921-6100 x714                978-921-6100 x711

Beverly Public Schools                 Beverly Public Schools

70 Balch Street, Beverly, MA 01915                 70 Balch Street, Beverly, MA, 01915