Central Coast State Parks Association presents

September 14-22, 2019 in San Luis Obispo County

Film Schedule & Synopses

Saturday, September 14, 6 - 11pm

Butterfly Ball Gala - SLO Brew The Rock

Monarchs & Milkweed | Sponsored by The Coastal Awakening

Take a microcosmic safari through a field of milkweed and discover a whole world of life, from bees to wasps to hummingbirds to butterflies. The charismatic Monarch butterfly is completely dependent on milkweed for its survival, and places like Yosemite National Park offer protection for this often overlooked plant.

 

Aiden’s Butterflies | Sponsored by New Times

Meet 11-year-old Aiden Wang, who has been growing milkweed and harboring and releasing monarch butterflies since he was 6 years old. We join Aiden in a journey ranging from nature preserves to city streets as he meets new friends and asks us all to help preserve the endangered, beautiful monarch butterfly with its dependence on the diminishing supply of milkweed. (USA, 14 min)

Thursday, September 19th, 7 - 9pm

Pursuing the Monarchs - Black Box Theatre, Clark Center, Arroyo Grande

 

A New View of the Moon | (no trailer available)

Become reacquainted with awe alongside strangers interacting with a telescope trained on the moon. Watch as Wylie Overstreet takes a telescope around the streets of Los Angeles to give passersby an up-close look at a familiar object: a new view of the moon. (3 min)

 

Clay Bolt | (no trailer available)

Clay Bolt is a natural history and conservation photographer for World Wildlife Fund and has been featured in prominent magazines such as National Geographic. Affectionately referred to as the bug guy, Clay explains how and why he focuses on 99% of life on earth that is smaller than your finger. (4 min)

 

Resilience at the Roots | Sponsored by Cal Poly ISLA

This short documentary follows a community in El Salvador who, after fleeing government repression and spending a decade in exile, returned to their country to rebuild their lives in the coastal lowland areas surrounding the Bay of Jiquilisco. But their challenges were not over: in 1998 Hurricane Mitch hit, and other severe storms followed, washing away homes, destroying crops, and burying the community in rising waters. They recognized that these storms were linked to climate change and loss of protective mangrove forests, and so began to organize. Today, the movement they started has succeeded in creating a network of vibrant, democratic communities that protect and restore their natural resources and ecosystems, and has grown into one of the most successful global organizing models working for climate justice. (El Salvador, 13 min)

 

Fire Followers - Yosemite Nature Notes | Sponsored by The Coastal Awakening

Yosemite botanists search for fire-following flowers that germinate and bloom after a fire covering the landscape in a beautiful but brief wildflower display that may not return until the next fire. (California, 6 min)

 

The Last Green Thread | (no trailer available)

Amidst the backdrop of massive development and population growth, three friends embark on a journey through the Everglades Headwaters in Florida to survey a fragile wilderness corridor before it disappears forever. (Northern Florida, 18 min)

 

Pursuing the Monarchs | Sponsored by New Times

It's the story of a majestic species: symbol of American pride, embodiment of the returning dead in Mexico, it's the story of the Monarch butterfly. It would be a happy story, only, today they are dying. The Monarch butterfly population has declined by up to 80% in the last decade. Who is to blame? Both the modern agricultural practices such as GMO and herbicide use, and the illegal logging carrying on in the Mexican forest of Michoacan, the butterflies' overwintering site. (52 min)

Friday, September 20th, 7 - 9pm

Environmental Stewardship - South Bay Community Center

 

The Thunberg Effect | Sponsored by Cal Poly ISLA

At the age of 15, Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg started what would become one of largest movements in history when she began walking out of school and sitting outside the Swedish Parliament. As the months went on, her platform grew when she gave her own TED talk and was even nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize at the age of 16. Her influence has spread across the world, helping kick start a youth movement that has even reached San Luis Obispo. We followed the youth climate strikes throughout the county and interviewed several high school students of Slo’s Environmental Youth Coalition as well as the mayor to talk about climate change and Greta’s effect. (10 min)

 

Backyard Wildlife | Sponsored by The Coastal Awakening

"Backyard Wildlife" is a story of the abundance of wildlife in San Luis Obispo County. Filmmaker Emmet Arries says, “I made this film to demonstrate the abundance of wildlife that lives among us. I hope it encourages you to venture into your own backyard and other local nature areas. See what nature has in store for you. You never know what wildlife you may find!” (10 mins)

 

Greenland Melts | (no trailer available)

Dr. Konrad Steffen, the Swiss climate scientist whose research propelled Al Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth" and "An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power", reveals his alarming findings around glacial melt impacts on global sea level rise, climate change, and mass migration. Greenland Melts is stunningly filmed at remote polar monitoring stations where Dr. Steffen has been tracking the melting of the Greenlandic Ice Sheet for over 25 years. (Greenland, 4 mins)

 

Growing Together | (no trailer available)

Sierra Harvest educates, inspires and connects families to fresh, local seasonal foods through farm to school education, training the next generation of farmers, and supporting low-income families in growing food at home. Their programs reach 96% of the K-8 students in Western Nevada County, CA. Prepare to get inspired by this regional model of food systems change. (California, 10 min)

 

WILD UTAH - America’s Red Rock Wilderness | (no trailer available)

This short documentary advocates for protecting more than 9 million acres of federally managed public lands as Wilderness, areas of pristine natural beauty, unique and untrammeled ecosystems, and unfathomable cultural significance. Wild Utah: America's Red Rock Wilderness takes the viewer through the varied landscape and draws upon diverse voices to tell the story of why these lands are worth protecting and what can be done to ensure these public lands are protected for generations to come. (Southwest USA, 14 min)

 

Becoming | Trailer: https://vimeo.com/242564740

The miraculous genesis of animal life is explored in great microscopic detail in Becoming. We see the "making of" an Alpine Newt in its transparent egg from the first cell division to hatching. A single cell is transformed into a complete, complex living organism with a beating heart and running bloodstream.

 

The New Environmentalists - From Hanoi to Paris | Trailer: https://vimeo.com/285197890

The New Environmentalists share a common goal, safeguarding the Earth's natural resources from exploitation and pollution. The film features portraits of seven passionate and dedicated activists around the globe who have placed themselves squarely in harm's way to battle intimidating adversaries for environmental justice in their communities. Narrated by Robert Redford, The New Environmentalists illustrates how ordinary people are affecting extraordinary change. (30 min)

 

Great Old Broads for Wolves | (no trailer available)

Welcome to the southwest, where the land is wild and the women...might be even wilder. Introducing the Great Old Broads for Wilderness and their fight to keep southwestern Colorado's wilderness an intact and natural environment. These women have come together to find their voice, and now are using it to give these lands a fighting chance. (Colorado, 5 min)

 

Cowboys & Scientists | Sponsored by Cal Poly ISLA

Thirty years ago, a partnership between Archbold Biological Station and Buck Island Ranch inspired a new mission: cowboys and scientists working together to advance scientific discovery on a ten thousand acre working cattle ranch in Florida's Northern Everglades. Bridging this cultural divide has resulted in a series of transformative discoveries that have begun to reshape our misconceptions about agriculture, sustainability, and conservation in the 21st century. (Florida’s Northern Everglades, 8 min)

 

What Does it Take? | (no trailer available)

The New Environmentalists share a common goal, safeguarding the Earth's natural resources from exploitation and pollution. Narrated by Robert Redford, The New Environmentalists illustrates how ordinary people are effecting extraordinary change. (2 min)

Saturday, September 21st, 7 - 10pm

Seas to Streams - Fremont Theatre

Pacific Gold | Sponsored by New Times

The Morro Bay Oyster Company and their floating fields are found where high winds and strong waves meet streams that flow from age-old volcanic aquifers. See the labor of love it takes to raise and deliver Pacific Gold oysters from Morro Bay to your favorite local restaurant or seafood market. From unpredictable weather to wet working conditions, watch what it takes to make it in the world of sustainable aquaculture.

 

In Perpetual Motion | (no trailer available)

Surfers and free divers know well those dark, lung-searing seconds waiting to surface after a wave has pinned you to the ocean floor. It can feel like an eternity. In those underwater minutes, Australian adventure photographer, Krystle Wright, envisions herself in a desert with roiling grey skies and bootpacking a snowy ridgeline, her trusty camera capturing the stunning dreamscapes. Vivid and ethereal, In Perpetual Motion, is about the remarkable beauty revealed when time stands still for just a moment. (5 min)

 

Junk | Sponsored by Cal Poly ISLA

On June 1st, 2008, Marcus Eriksen and Joel Paschal embarked from California for Hawaii aboard a plastic bottle raft. Without a motor or support vessel, the duo set out determined to raise awareness about the proliferation of plastic waste in our seas. Guided by Eriksen's first-person narration, viewers will be transported from the North Pacific to war-torn Kuwait, down the Mississippi River, and back again as the raft's origins are revealed and a movement is born. (Pacific Ocean, 29 min)

 

Blue Carbon | (no trailer available)

"Blue carbon" is carbon that's captured and stored by coastal wetlands, helping to mitigate climate change. This film is about mud and the multiple benefits that estuaries provide for us. "You never go into a wetland and just restore one benefit," says wetlands ecologist John Rybczyk. It improves water quality, provides salmon habitat, protects our shorelines, and also benefits our climate. (Pacific Northwest, 6 min)

 

Defending the Deep | Sponsored by New Times

A tireless defender of the oceans and marine life, Claire Nouvian led a focused, data-driven advocacy campaign against the destructive fishing practice of deep-sea bottom trawling, successfully pressuring French supermarket giant and fleet owner Intermarché to change its fishing practices. Her coalition of advocates ultimately secured French support for a ban on deep-sea bottom trawling that led to an EU-wide ban. Narrated by Robert Redford, Defending the Deep is part of The New Environmentalists, which illustrates how ordinary people are effecting extraordinary change. (France, 6 min)

 

Visions of the Lost Sierra | Sponsored by The Coastal Awakening

This film examines the past, present, and future of the Middle Fork of the Feather River, one of the first eight rivers protected by the Wild & Scenic Act in 1968. Through the eyes of local Maidu, fisherman, and conservationists, viewers will experience this unique place and understand the hopes and dreams of those who are working to keep it wild. (California, 15 min)

 

Carpe Diem | (no trailer available)

In a city full of people trying to catch a break, one lucky man hooks into an unexpected dream that becomes the role of a lifetime, reminding him to seize each new day as a chance to do what he loves. (Los Angeles, 6 min)

 

Big World | (no trailer available)

As parents, how do we teach our kids that there is a world beyond social media, standardized tests, and soccer practice? Join Eddie Bauer athlete David Morton and his seven-year-old son Thorne on a week-long stand up paddle boarding journey down the Karnali and Bheri Rivers in Western Nepal. "There's a basic paradox to parenting", says David. "You have to keep your kids safe, but you have to teach them to take risks and follow curiosity. Life is undeniably richer with a little bit of daring." (Nepal, 13 min)

 

Renewal: Think Like A Scientist | (no trailer available)

Featuring an emerging young scientist from the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, Renewal is a heart-warming story of transformation and restoration. Produced with HHMI Tangled Bank Studios, this film is part of HHMI's Think Like A Scientist series. It follows up on Producer Jessica Plumb's award-winning feature, Return of the River, which chronicled the largest dam removal in history. (Pacific Northwest, 8 min)

 

Mexican Fishing Bats | (no trailer available)

When the sun sets over the Sea of Cortez, a tiny bat weighing about as much as five nickels emerges from the boulder-covered hillsides on Isla Partida and heads out to sea. And night, according to Hurme, “is when the magic happens.” All night, the bats swoop across the sea surface, snagging fish that still elude capture by the researchers despite their boats, nets, and high-tech gear. This video follows Hurme and his team in action, as they untangle the mystery of how these endangered bats find their prey. (Mexico, 6 min)

 

Hear the Call: Salmon Nation | (no trailer available)

In Hear the Call: Salmon Nation, singer Ashleigh Ball of Hey Ocean! travels with filmmaker Josh Thome to the remote coast of British Columbia where marine biologist Alexandra Morton and First Nations Chief Ernest Alfred are on the front lines of a battle that will decide the fate of wild salmon and the entire coastal ecosystem that depends on them. (Pacific Northwest, 24 min)

 

March of the Newts | (no trailer available)

Follow one of the forest's funkiest creatures into a gangly gathering of amphibious affection... and learn how you can help protect these sensitive animals from an emerging disease. (5 min)

Sunday, September 22nd, 2:30 - 4pm

“Wild Child” Family Films - Morro Bay Natural History Museum

 

March of the Newts | (no trailer available)

Follow one of the forest's funkiest creatures into a gangly gathering of amphibious affection... and learn how you can help protect these sensitive animals from an emerging disease. (5 min)

 

Meet The Real Wolf | (no trailer available)

What happens when fairy tales and reality collide? Throughout history, myths about the “big bad wolf” have generated fear and concern that creeps out of our storybooks and into the real world. Meet The Real Wolf introduces a new chapter where the apex predator becomes the protagonist, changing the narrative of the ecosystems they are rebuilding. We learn what happens when the wolf is no longer antagonized, but instead realized as the missing link, and the denouement of our story. (3 min)

 

Mexican Fishing Bats | (no trailer available)

When the sun sets over the Sea of Cortez, a tiny bat weighing about as much as five nickels emerges from the boulder-covered hillsides on Isla Partida and heads out to sea. And night, according to Hurme, “is when the magic happens.” All night, the bats swoop across the sea surface, snagging fish that still elude capture by the researchers despite their boats, nets, and high-tech gear. This video follows Hurme and his team in action, as they untangle the mystery of how these endangered bats find their prey. (Mexico, 6 min)

 

How Animals Hibernate | (no trailer available)

What if hibernating animals of different species formed an orchestra and performed a symphony about their winter’s sleep? Well, they did—sort of. Because this is the science version of “Peter and the Wolf,” starring a frog, a turtle, a bird, a mosquito, a bear, and a fish… Ladies and gentlemen, “The Sleep Cycle” by L’orchestre D’hibernation Animaux. (5 min)

 

The Path Back | (no trailer available)

For thousands of years, the buffalo or plains bison sustained the many native tribes that inhabited the Great Plains region of North America. But when Europeans arrived in the area, they nearly exterminated the buffalo and an indigenous way of life. In recent years, however, the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of Montana’s Fort Peck Reservation have joined with other tribal groups throughout the region to bring buffalo back to their ancestral lands and into their lives. (5 min)

 

Clay Bolt | (no trailer available)

Clay Bolt is a natural history and conservation photographer for World Wildlife Fund and has been featured in prominent magazines such as National Geographic. Affectionately referred to as the bug guy, Clay explains how and why he focuses on 99% of life on earth that is smaller than your finger. (4 min)

 

Aiden’s Butterflies | (no trailer available)

Meet 11-year-old Aiden Wang, who has been growing milkweed and harboring and releasing monarch butterflies since he was 6 78years old. We join Aiden in a journey ranging from nature preserves to city streets as he meets new friends and asks us all to help preserve the endangered, beautiful monarch butterfly with its dependence on the diminishing supply of milkweed. (USA, 14 min)

 

Moonline | (no trailer available)

When night falls on the mountains, it is by no means time to go to bed for Valentin Delluc. It’s in the dark that one of the best speed riders in the world finds a whole new playground. Like a firefly, it illuminates the darkness… (France, 2 min)

 

Blue | (no trailer available)

Fresh off training wheels, a four-year-old growing up in Valdez, Alaska begins to push her boundaries and explore what’s possible on her bike, her eyes naturally drifting to the mountains. We dive into the world of her fantasy and explore the mountains, glaciers, and rivers of Valdez by fat bike with a crew of boundary-pushing female athletes hailing from Alaska and beyond.

Blue is a fantastical journey into a young girl’s imagination and a testament to the inherent creativity, innovation, and strength forged in women of the north.(USA, 4 min)

 

Girls & Glaciers | (no trailer available)

This film follows teenagers Akua and Melodie as they expand their personal boundaries in challenging high alpine glaciated terrain. They learn field science, art, wilderness skills, and teamwork through the nonprofit organization Girls on Ice. (USA, 10 min)

 

My Mom Vala | (no trailer available)

Life has a way of putting us where we need to be. For Vala, that’s in both Greenland – where she works at her family’s fishing lodge – and Reykjavík, where she teaches her daughter how to do it all on her own, too. (Greenland & Iceland, 10 min)

 

Big World | (no trailer available)

As parents, how do we teach our kids that there is a world beyond social media, standardized tests, and soccer practice? Join Eddie Bauer athlete David Morton and his seven-year-old son Thorne on a week-long stand up paddle boarding journey down the Karnali and Bheri Rivers in Western Nepal. "There's a basic paradox to parenting," says David. "You have to keep your kids safe, but you have to teach them to take risks and follow curiosity. Life is undeniably richer with a little bit of daring." (Nepal, 13 min)