ICS Course Proposal:

IDS: The Legacy of Seerveld, Hart, and Olthuis

Instructors: Bob Sweetman and Nik Ansell with appearances of Calvin Seerveld, Hendrik Hart and James Olthuis

  1. New or Repeat Course:        X        New                        Repeat
  2. ICS Title:  IDS: The Legacy of Seerveld, Hart, and Olthuis
  3. Previous ICS Title:        
  4. TST Title:                 
  5. Previous TST Title:        
  6. Level  (ICS):                  MWS                X   MA                X   PhD
  7. Level  (TST):                 Basic Degree            2000  (General / Survey course)                                                                           3000  (Specialized)

   Advanced Degree            6000  (3000 level upgraded for AD credit)                                   5000  (AD program courses)

  1. Semester & Year:                   Fall                        X   Winter           Summer
  2. ICS Cluster(s):        Theology and Biblical Studies; History of Philosophy; Aesthetics, Hermeneutics and Philosophy of Discourse; Anthropology and Ethics, Knowledge, Truth and Learning
  3. ICS Pathway(s):        
  4. ICS Course Code:        (New course codes to be assigned by ICS Registrar)
  5. TST Course Code:        (New course codes to be assigned by TST Registrar)
  6. TST Department:                TBD        
  7. Instructor: Robert Sweetman, Nik Ansell                

  1. Course Description:  

This course is designed to consider the living legacy of the thought of Calvin Seerveld, Hendrik Hart and James Olthuis.  It does so in dialogue with writings they have chosen as together close to the very heart of their concerns as Christian scholars.  The goal is to read them with a view to one's own vocation as Christian scholar in a posture of critical appreciation and with a view to critical appropriation.

  1. Keywords:  hermeneutics, historiographical method, aesthetics, faith and reason, integral ontology, ways of knowing, interdisciplinarity, philosophical critique,

  1. Course Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

1. identify those problem-historical foci that seem must pertinent to the texts they are most interested in and write a defensible 4000-6000 word paper on the implications of decisions made by a thinker as to those foci.

2. mark the presence of deep philosophical thematics within their own disciplinary terrain and use that marking to speak of the relationship between philosophy and their own discipline in a 20 minute lecture.

3. take a position on the opportunities and limits of the thought of Seerveld, Hart or Olthuis and be able to speak intelligently about their position in a 5 minute interview for posting on social medium.

  1. Course Requirements

1. Weekly reading (# of pages):              50 pages plusminusque per week

2. In-seminar leadership:        1 seminar presentations of 1200-1800 words         

3. Description of course project:        4000-6000 word paper

               4. Exit interview for posting

  1. Description and weighting of elements to be evaluated:
  1. Class participation:         20%
  2. In-Seminar Leadership:         30%
  3. Research Project/Paper:         50%

  1. Required Readings: (bibliographic listing)

Syllabus of Readings to be assembled for the class from the opera of Seerveld, Hart, and Olthuis

  1. Recommended Readings:  (bibliographic listing)

C. Seerveld,  Art History Revisited. (Sioux Center: Dordt College Press, 2014). [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: N5311 .S44 2014]

C. Seerveld, Normative Aesthetics. (Sioux Center: Dordt College Press, 2014). [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: N72.S6 S44 2014]

C. Seerveld, Redemptive Art in Society. (Sioux Center: Dordt College Press, 2014). [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: NX180.S6 S45 2014]

C. Seerveld, Biblical Studies and Wisdom For Living. (Sioux Center: Dordt College Press, 2014). [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BS680.W6 S44 2014]

C. Seerveld, Cultural Problems in Western Society. (Sioux Center: Dordt College Press, 2014). [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: NX180.S6 S44 2014]

C. Seerveld, Cultural Education and History Writing. (Sioux Center: Dordt College Press, 2014). [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: LC538 .S44 2014]

Cf. Bibliographical section in Philosophy as Responsibility: A Celebration of Hendrik Hart's Contribution to the Discipline.  Eds. Ronald A. Kuipers and Janet Catherina Wesselius. Lanham MD: University Press of America).  241-250. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BR100 .P535 2002]

Cf. Bibliographical section in The Hermeneutics of Charity: Interpretation, Selfhood, and Postmodern Faith.  Eds. James K.A. Smith and Henry Isaac Venema. (Grand Rapids MI: Brazos Press, 2004). 265-272. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BT83.597 .H47 2004]

  1. Other Resources

Website of AllofLifeRedeemed

  1. Sample Course Outline

Week One:

Systematic Aesthetics: Seerveld

Readings:

C. Seerveld, “Obedient Aesthetic Life,” in Rainbows for the Fallen World.  Aesthetic Life and Artistic Task  (Toronto:  Tuppence Press, 1980/2005), 42-76. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BH39 .S432 1980]

C. Seerveld, “Imaginativity,” in Faith and Philosophy 4:1 (1987), 43-58;  reprinted in Normative Aesthetics, ed. John Kok (Sioux Center:  Dordt College Press, 2014), 27-44. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: N72.S6 S44 2014]

C. Seerveld, “Christian Aesthetic Bread for the World,” in Philosophia Reformata 66:2 (2001), 155-177;  reprinted in Normative Aesthetics, 145-168. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: N72.S6 S44 2014]

        Week Two:

History of Aesthetic Theory: Seerveld

Readings:

C. Seerveld, “Footprints in the Snow,” Philosophia Reformata 56:1 (1991):1-34;  reprinted in Cultural Education & History Writing (Sioux Center: Dordt College Peress, 2014), 235-276. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: LC538 .S44 2014]

C. Seerveld, “Early Kant and a Rococo Spirit, Setting for The Critique of Judgment,” Philosophia Reformata 43:3/4 (1978): 145-167;  reprinted in  Cultural Education & History Writing, 317-342. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: LC538 .S44 2014]

Week Three

Theory of Art History: Seerveld

Readings:

C. Seerveld, “Towards a Cartographic Methodology for Art Historiography,” in Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 39:2 (1980): 143-154;   reprinted in Art History Revisited, ed. J. Kok (Sioux Center:  Dordt College Press, 2014), 61-78. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: N5311 .S44 2014]

C. Seerveld, “Telltale Statues in Watteau’s Painting,” in Eighteenth Century Studies 14:2 (1980-81): 145-180;  reprinted in Art History Revisited, 171-195. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: N5311 .S44 2014]

C. Seerveld, “God’s Ordinance for Artistry and Hogarth’s “Wanton Chace,” in Marginal Resistance:  Essays dedicated to John  C. Vander Stelt (Sioux Center:  Dordt College Press, 2001), 311-336;  reprinted in Art History Revisited, 197-221. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: N5311 .S44 2014]

Week Four

Biblical Literary Criticism/Hermeneutics: Seerveld

Readings:

C. Seerveld, “Proverbs 10:1-22:  From Poetic Paragraphs to Preaching,” in Reading and Hearing the Word from Text to Sermon:  Essays in honor of John H. Stek, ed.  Arie C. Leder (Grand Rapids:  Calvin Theological Seminary and CRC Publications, 1998), 181-200; reprinted in Biblical Studies & Wisdom for Living, ed. J. Kok (Sioux Center:  Dordt College Press, 2014), 101-123. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BS680.W6 S44 2014]

C.Seerveld, “Overlooked Herder, and the Performative Nature of  שׁיר השׁרים  as Biblical Wisdom Literature,” Southeastern Theological Review, 4/2 (Winter 2013), 197-222.

C. Seerveld, “Reading the Bible like a grown-up child,” The Banner 130 (26 June 1995), 12-14; reprinted in C. Seerveld, Biblical Studies & Wisdom for Living, 403-407. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BS680.W6 S44 2014]

Week Five

        Ontology: Hart

        Readings:

        H. Hart, “The Problem of Universals and the Nature of Things,” Understanding Our World: An Integral         Ontology.  Lanham MD: University Press of America, 1984.  1-35. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BD311 .H28]

        H. Hart, “Creation Order in Our Philosophical Tradition: Critique and Refinement,” An Ethos of         Compassion and the Integrity of Creation  (Lanham MD: University Press of America, 1995), 67-96. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BT78 .E74]

        Week Six

        Epistemology: Reason: Hart

        Readings:

        H. Hart, “The Impasse of Rationality Today: Revised Edition,” Wetenschap, Wijsheid, Filosoferen:         opstellen aangeboden aan Hendrik van Riessen bij zijn ofscheid als hoogleraar in de wijsbegeerte aan de         Vrije Universiteit te Amsterdam  (Assen: Van Gorcum, 1981), 174-2000.

        H. Hart, “Sorting out Reason,” Responses to the Enlightenment: An Exchange on Foundations, Faith, and         Community  (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2012), 152-180. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BL51 .S935 2012]

        Week Seven

        Epistemology: Faith: Hart

        Readings:

        H. Hart, “Conceptual Understanding and Knowing Other-wise: Reflections on Rationality and Spirituality         in Philosophy,”  Knowing Other-wise: Philosophy at the Threshold of Spirituality  (New York: Fordham         University Press, 1997),  24-53. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: B831.2 .K66]

        H. Hart, “Focused in Faith: The Epistemology of Faith as a Way of Knowing,” Responses to the         Enlightenment: An Exchange on Foundations, Faith, and Community  (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2012),  181-213. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BL51 .S935 2012]

        Week Eight

        Living Faith: Hart

        Readings:

        H. Hart, “The Just Shall Live: Reformational Reflections on Public Justice and Racist Attitudes,” The         Christian Scholar's Review  16 (1987): 265-282. [Knox College Periodical Stacks]

        H. Hart, “Autonomy, Arrogance, Agape”  Promethean Love: Paul Kurz and the Humanistic Perspective on         Love (Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Press, 2006), ?-?

        Week Nine

        Ethics: Olthuis

        Readings:

        James H. Olthuis, “A vision of and for love: Towards a Christian post-postmodern worldview,”  Koers –         Bulletin for Christian Scholarship, 77(1) art. 28, 7 pp., 2012. [Available as a digital resource through the UTL catalogue]

         James H. Olhuis, "Face-to-Face: Ethical Asymmetry or the Symmetry of Mutuality? In Knowing Other-        wise: Philosophy at the Threshold of Spirituality  ed. James H. Olthuis  New  York:  Fordham University Press, 1997,  p. 131–158. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: B831.2 .K66]

        Week Ten

        Creation: Olthuis

        Readings:

        James H. Olthuis, “Creatio Ex Amore“, in  Transforming Philosophy and Religion, eds. Norman         Wirzba,  Bruce Benson Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008.  155-170. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: BD436 .T73 2008]

        James H. Olthuis, “Theopoetics: Love on a Cosmic Scale”  Recent Essay in MS.

        

        Week Eleven

        Hermeneutics: Olthuis

        Readings:

        James H. Olthuis, "Otherwise than Violence: Towards a Hermeneutics of Connection," in The Arts,         Community, and Cultural Democracy,  ed. Lambert Zuidervaart  London: Macmillan, 1999.  137-164. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: NX180 .S6 A773]

         James H. Olthuis, "Crossing the Threshold: Sojourning Together in the Wild Spaces of Love,"         in  Knowing  Other-wise  Philosophy at the Threshold of Spirituality  ed. James H.         Olthuis  New  York:  Fordham University Press, 1997,  235-257. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf: B831.2 .K66]

        Week Twelve

        Anthropology/Foundations of Psychotherapy: Olthuis

        Readings:

        James H. Olthuis, "Be(com)ing: Humankind as Gift and Call," Philosophia Reformata  58/2: 153–172,         1993. Now in lengthened version. [ICS Library Reserve Shelf]

        James H. Olthuis, “’With-ing’: A Psychotherapy of Love”  Journal of Psychology and Theology,  34         (Spring 2006): 66-77. [Available as a digital resource through the UTL catalogue and in Knox College Periodical Stacks]

        Week Thirteen

        Taking Stock of the Gift of Seerveld, Hart, and Olthuis

Template revision: March 2015

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