Pre-Public Examinations 2

Subject Checklists Year 13

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/o7fQU0Y-BBMicBdTN1uPZLxfiOM6mocKxdVA2Di18ICAktccOm-nE5z69aIGWCgJxAX-rPFTbpQQkwy7H3LFsO1jgxCRK3VDepsR2NPwIDqbo2sGSIAAfklSuFd9-JR5xcigaZkB

 

PPE’s 19 February - 23 February.

Please use the checklists as a guide to support you when you are preparing for your PPE’s.

BIOLOGY Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper – Biology Paper 2

Length of Paper – 2 Hours

Specification reference

Checklist
questions

3.5.1

Can you explain how the plant leaf is adapted to carry out photosynthesis?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s8I0T2tKsIoJV4_QlI9RqKA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.1

Can you describe the main stages of photosynthesis?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sIc7lU96VwycCMa_946Hdyw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.1

Can you explain the processes of oxidation and reduction?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/siYxqb6ZaE7W85t6hU2r7Mw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.1

Can you explain how ATP is made during the light-dependent reaction?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s_w2I-uKStReOYbILx0_c0A/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.1

Can you describe the role of photolysis in the light-dependent reaction?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/so47nB8pm7LYhTTOYnI4aBQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.1

Can you explain how chloroplasts are adapted to carry out the light-dependent reaction?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sDyNkwz9kOSSU6RTzHJn8qA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.1

Can you explain how carbon dioxide absorbed by plants is incorporated into organic molecules?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sGFkRuW9h2nodsbBfZdh1Mw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.1

Can you describe the roles of ATP and reduced NADP in the light-independent reaction?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/slF_2mdTQ9XjRxRWZaJF5HA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.1

Can you describe the events of the Calvin cycle?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s2jtVS4Z-C85NQhBz_BcMqA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

Specification reference

Checklist
questions

3.5.2

Can you outline where glycolysis fits into the overall process of respiration?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sWEuVx2JzKKRIOkxRVa7jlw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.2

Can you describe the main stages of glycolysis and its products?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sMwEX_10BNSSrd0hzIyo44Q/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.2

Can you outline the nature of the link reaction?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/swtT0QnAB8K5Eo13xDAB7MA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.2

Can you explain what happens during the Krebs cycle?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/slEDJwc8NE2hrGypY-xDb7g/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.2

Can you describe the nature of hydrogen carrier molecules and explain their role in the Krebs cycle?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s2B9v76RHPiJt__lTDjCD8Q/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.2

Can you describe where oxidative phosphorylation takes place?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sCGZ-kD_js7jE--Et5woBnA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.2

Can you explain how ATP is synthesised during oxidative phosphorylation?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s7Y8OF-s-lvgkx9M6M6nJeg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.2

Can you explain the role of oxygen in aerobic respiration?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sEK0zfVdCVKk2Ay-Obki9xQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.2

Can you explain how energy is released by respiration in the absence of oxygen?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sPCRcFJtddjy0IVhqUdt0DA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.2

Can you explain how ethanol is produced by anaerobic respiration?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sOraPp3DwfUvThXP-o445Eg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.2

Can you explain how lactate is produced by anaerobic respiration?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sRG9bqfQMsD8OYaJfeTRJkQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

Specification reference

Checklist
questions

3.5.3

Can you explain how energy enters an ecosystem?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sD2RszfyoLf3H2b-nNmCDdA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.3

Can you explain how energy is transferred between the organisms in the ecosystem?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s3HmW75nDroW7l-wozDDz8g/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.3

Can you define the terms: trophic level, food chain, food web, producer, consumer, and decomposer?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s5b1QjAG7PU48kxITE_I2bg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.3

Can you define biomass and explain how it is measured?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s9nYf5_2mu2-JbQ8KPRQBjA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.3

Can you calculate the percentage of energy that is transferred from one trophic level to the next?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/snpQamtI3OrLzb9dGRoTEaQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.3

Can you explain how energy is lost along a food chain?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s6g93mn3_thhraGJI2LcXCQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.3

Can you explain what is meant by gross primary productivity and net primary productivity?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sRoaYYAVl1IjIBjwMHZeBCg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.3

Can you summarise the common features of all nutrient cycles?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sQqEAOW06Vfgc1EX269OKFw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.3

Can you describe the features of the phosphorous cycle?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sn1_nNdLWKSgMKlJ5kirUQQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.3

Can you describe the features of the nitrogen cycle?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sjh02XgZIYGiSbiQKeua7Qg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.3

Can you define the terms ammonification, nitrification, nitrogen fixation, and denitrification?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sXLDGAbA86R4K6_hL-1HR2w/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.4

Can you explain the roles of saprobiotic organisms in nutrient recycling?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/st2lx_eviHiWhTCEAXRsy7Q/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.4

Can you explain why fertilisers are needed in agricultural ecosystems?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/slA2LgfDVb-P4Z59xjxaTAA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.4

Can you distinguish between natural and artificial fertilisers?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/si8ICGQ3sqbaIjQOkTx_uUA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.4

Can you explain how fertilisers increase productivity?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sPmw_-XT68FwpiciSLSmrCA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.4

Can you describe the main environmental effects of using nitrogen-containing fertilisers?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/spaxmCWfcNYGnhqSEB2VrJQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.4

Can you state the meaning of leaching eutrophication?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sjumtmckxgW0cQ6FeSnPQVw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.5.4

Can you explain how leaching and eutrophication affect the environment?


Specification reference

Checklist
questions

3.6.1.1

Can you define a stimulus and a response?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sGtyzn83us1dUPkp0MiLYcw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.1

Can you examine the advantage to organisms of being able to respond to stimuli?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/swslHx8VApTddLzKO77Rvlg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.1

Can you describe taxes, kineses, and tropisms?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sbNYuSW1KsuBRPj0jvFOKoQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.1

Can you explain how each type of response increases an organism’s chances of survival?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sdByXo9FnosD4i_acubRW5Q/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.1

Can you describe the stimuli that plants respond to?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sXm8kUVn4mVj1Kwz6KovZ6Q/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.1

Can you describe plant growth factors such as IAA?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s1s7fhujyIqSY_-TraleSHQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.1

Can you explain phototropism in flowering plants?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s61w5PoSEoy8yow8tKLdA-g/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.1

Can you explain gravitropism in flowering plants?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sL-CZt7f-cZhrMwg5Tal4tQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.1

Can you explain how a simple reflex arc works?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sbZl1i_PRMNSq1yGG0VC34A/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.1

Can you explain the roles of sensory, intermediate, and motor neurones play in a reflex arc?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sBaxe5LQ7oBJ4D4LGT_tbgQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.1

Can you outline the importance of reflex arcs?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sBteFKej-Wwz5GiuRs0UazA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.2

Can you describe the main features of sensory reception?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sH9JrN9TNWS-7IDou4yz4vQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.2

Can you describe the structure of a Pacinian copruscule and explain how it works?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sjgeqCvJJ8HoFSlxrTTN1WQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.2

Can you explain how receptors work together in the eye?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/shL9KrLCtRan6Nc4cuUFxzQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.2

Can you describe the autonomic nervous system?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sAfx90SCDyhDNuLthH3PPgg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.2

Can you explain how the autonomic nervous system controls heart rate?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sOocD9C7jlAz3-MiDMrWUdA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.1.2

Can you explain the role chemical and pressure receptors play in the processes controlling the heart rate?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sDE0Mtb18dYtllJgtfLm3qg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

Specification reference

Checklist
questions

3.6.2.1

Can you distinguish between nervous and hormonal coordination?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/srp5QqzFeA93nKrlYNRz4bQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you describe the structure of a myelinated motor neurone?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sW5krBecSBEv5OvGM2QNOtQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you describe the different types of neurone?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sxcKpvsMMZTmifQ7xtyR5Yg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you describe the nature of the resting potential?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/ss7HsriDScS1Oz8cDoUM0iQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you explain how a resting potential is established in a neurone?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sCzq0xH6ys8MhzHY9iBvyIQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you explain what an action potential is?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s7ZDiFyuR5HyeteJBVOr1Vg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you explain how an action potential passes along an unmyelinated axon?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sUwUqxdjmkxZqj6Dl67VI3w/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you explain how an action potential passes along a myelinated axon?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sTUv4UlTe-xxmk-r8sMMDqw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you describe the factors that affect the speed of conductance of an action potential?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/skXiS26yVLChNCEQotoOyRQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you explain what is meant by the refractory period?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s8f_xKsUF5VJIEkmk8qaevQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you explain the role of the refractory period in separating one impulse the next?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s9QHPsdIPE4WQMsbgHl4A_w/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.1

Can you explain the meaning of the all-or-nothing principle?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sokF8eHZBR2Ix1VZMYQFVmA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.2

Can you describe the structure of a synapse?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s6-djfHdpCbTP2sNkXRbJvQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.2

Can you describe the functions that synapses perform?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/siE8nJzcoKcCLxxCahV8cJw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.2.2

Can you explain how information is transmitted across a synapse?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/shY5uzzzzJlYJ5HCUQ3_ffQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.3

Can you describe the gross and microscopic structure of a skeletal muscle?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sVZQ27UJq1wmYduu3WlBf_Q/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.3

Can you describe the ultrastructure of a myofibril?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sLZVSKbd_MPyVCoMHPB0VLg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.3

Can you explain how actin and myosin are arranged within a myofibril?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sE4jXqm8eaxYUbCi59rarHA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.3

Can you explain what is meant by antagonistic muscles and how they operate?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sCpVrPqdKEPYtjo2OhScxbg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.3

Can you summarise the evidence that support the sliding filament mechanism of muscle contraction?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sC0T_lvIZNmmNUB6Kv50_GQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.3

Can you explain how the sliding filament mechanism causes a muscle to contract and relax?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/skCfjs_XxK17WwSnMJCuGiA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.6.3

Can you state where the energy for muscle contraction comes from?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sM4SlEi0zGWPZX4KtCylewA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

Specification reference

Checklist
questions

3.7.1

Can you define the meaning of the terms genotype and phenotype?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/slVjYqK8zFrbWyUscIAyR-Q/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you define the terms dominant, recessive, and codominant alleles?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/snKAP6Hmejgrd1ymdmySX3Q/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain the nature of multiple alleles?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s5R5VmJTL9AoSThR9M15rMg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain how to make labelled genetic diagrams?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/ssOG4HnWgRqx8mnwZQjWpsw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain how a single gene is inherited?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/szFzq_SQMg8IwBs4wQs6FRg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain why results of genetic crosses often differ from predicted results?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sOrEiFg_vJ9xXtbruGy09nw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain dihybrid inheritance?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/svWKG4Nq8VXYnkBjhqnQJPA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain how codominance affects the inheritance of characteristics?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s0sx0W0JZQeX5OqcVQhdq1Q/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain how multiple alleles affect inheritance?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sLcyuK9yPW2BPqJplkVdRuA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain how blood groups in humans are inherited?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s7F6apvKmQu8w1cLjRxNG-g/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain how sex is determined genetically?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/skxoyKRtfcOnU-MItv-H5TA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you state what is meant by sex-linkage?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sBLXlARHuDKsdPt8EBferYA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain how sex-linked diseases such as haemophilia are inherited?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sqeM4cV1aFANsSiQ8XPLj8w/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you describe autosomal linkage?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s0ONXEoM-_gI3kHAB3D6BQQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain how autosomal linkage affects the combinations of alleles in gametes?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s8UVJdjJ4ByOEkkFm-h6YGw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain what is meant by epistasis?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sxpx3okjiu7YKDlquQ2oQ9w/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain the effects of epistasis?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s-YP3s35IazFuGUHuWcPtVQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you explain what the chi-squared test is?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sCixMrGYRN6RzZcWYaqgmLA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you calculate values for chi-squared?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sh5yGguATnn0x8oRkJsRuMw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.1

Can you demonstrate how the chi-squared test is used in genetics?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s5ofx6kY1kqqAiVeTzZPkLA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

Specification reference

Checklist
questions

3.7.2

Can you define the terms gene pool and allelic frequency?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/soJjQb8bm9auzOCkgFZ-12Q/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.2

Can you define the Hardy-Weinberg principle?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sf2x4_197j70cIIdQAwx1XQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.2

Can you use the Hardy-Weinberg principle to calculate allele, genotype, and phenotype frequencies?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/spUESmsFCiVB5f-nTUrRWVA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you describe variation due to genetic factors?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sLlnVE_hMiARLM4xKNtqBEg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you describe variation due to environmental influences?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s0Pq4CiNzJmIjQQqjJuZQ-g/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you define a gene pool?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sE2_cFfhbyeoPZXzAKlY5Kw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you explain the role of overproduction of offspring in natural selection?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sJHJUwWsmGtj9zTCWqM0x_A/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you explain the role of variation in natural selection?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s4_b1Zrv9NhV3qZ37J5iCFA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you describe stabilising selection?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sCdgJHkvmKac5Z9iKny6UoA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you describe directional selection?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/seLlnCM1WkhR1ROnojjh8uA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you describe disruptive selection?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sPe4Bq9MEPM1IBWj9GRb_Xg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you explain the effects of each form of selection on evolution?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s2PWUn4ly8w5uQKCzapWBGQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you explain how selection affects allelic frequencies?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/spQy3m9zhysMoWvA46qjCSw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you explain how new species are formed?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s66C79x_Mmlf9AWY1scLHmg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you explain how populations can become geographically isolated?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sVWsgZPu4a5-7d5H1aJ4MtA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.3

Can you describe allopatric and sympatric speciation?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sR24C031sIOYOid5tb6fPDg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

Specification reference

Checklist
questions

3.7.4

Can you define the terms environment, biotic, abiotic, and biosphere?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sbN2mns_6CipFaAlfdfl3_w/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain what is meant by an ecosystem?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sYayO0J081jzT7mGcrwmb6A/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain what is meant by the terms population, community, and habitat?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sUPTQ-eDmqrX_JTh5KtOIYA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain what a niche is?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/squfVG07jhkUecR6PAuWQ-A/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you describe the factors that determine the size of a population?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/seANnm4o4um7U_N57zYXL8g/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you describe the abiotic factors that affect the size of a population?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sgI5g7fvCa0gfWhQC3vYOBw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain how each of these factors influence population size?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sUpV_DSvd-mq-v7cQWPOGKg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you describe what is meant by intraspecific competition?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sfYubvr9-f5vHjD8VpzEfew/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you summarise the factors that different species compete for?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sDOl1Qw1UTpnA3WbYUNC9Jw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you describe interspecific competition?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sQUxkn6BGMPSI1bZbWgn1lA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain how interspecific competition influences population size?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s0r9FJW5WILFYEsS88ircqA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain what is meant by predation?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sTDBcOgUVi_lV9vE9z2JpWA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain how the predator–prey relationship affects the population size of predator and prey?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s10KsEpk6F4nTwzumzvhPww/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you name the factors to be considered when using a quadrat?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sP1EMMbHlxyujioxEpqG2_g/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain how a transect is used to obtain quantitative data about changes in communities along a line?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/s4NgDmu0BNWljC01gtqqYLA/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you describe how the abundance of different species is measured?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/stSmYeZQl-gFP_Z7wSTWkvg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain how the mark-release-recapture method can be used to measure the abundance of motile species?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sNV3fqSsac9tZ-aljTSqz8A/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you describe changes that occur in the variety of species that occupy an area over time?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sAV7sZB4kbhR5jd_oqqFspg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you define the terms succession and climax community?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sd31euzAUWKFacaHXlOkD1g/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain how managing succession can help to conserve habitats?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sy5hRit7qm48CR8gO43vukg/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you describe what is meant by conservation?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/sxfYiHo9ELsU3BqocG6jCqw/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

3.7.4

Can you explain how managing succession can help to conserve habitats?


https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/svp7P_jUfirroiRhL5bbSAQ/image?w=25&h=26&rev=1&ac=1

BUSINESS STUDIES Y13 PPE2 (A Level)

Name of Paper - Paper 1 and Paper 2 (parts of each)

Length of Paper - 2 hours

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

Business objectives and calculations of Market size, growth.

Change; Kotter and Schelsigner’s ideas/ theories

Income Elasticity of Demand

Leadership styles and theories eg Tannenbaum-Schmidt, Blake Mouton etc

Budgeting, understanding and calculations including variance analysis

Organisational culture

Strategy - Porter’s 5 forces and Ansoff’s matrix

Financial calculations - including percentage change, market share,

Operations, including lead production. capacity utilisation

Final accounts including Statement of financial position and  Income statement (purpose, layout, sections, calculations), Ratio analysis including ROCE

Organisation structure and hierarchy.

CSR - Corporate social responsibility including Elkington’s Triple Bottom Line and Carroll’s social responsibility pyramid.

Decision trees

Investment appraisal - payback and ARR (Average rate of return)

Marketing including effective use of market research, product launch, USP, product.

Human resource plan, also  Motivation methods including Maslow

CHEMISTRY Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper – Inorganic and Physical Chemistry

Length of Paper – 2 hours

Areas of Focus/Review

3.1.1 Atomic Structure

Covered (Tick)

Determine the number of fundamental particles in atoms and ions using mass number, atomic number and charge

Explain the existence of  isotopes

Interpret simple mass spectra of elements

Calculate the relative atomic mass from isotopic abundance, limited to mononuclear ions

Define first ionisation energy

Write equations for first and successive ionisation energies

Explain how first and successive ionisation energies in period 3 (Na-Ar) and in group 2 (Be-Ba) give evidence for electron configuration in sub-shells and in shells



Areas of Focus/Review

3.1.2 Amount of Substance

Covered (Tick)

Define relative atomic mass (Ar) and relative molecular mass (Mr)

Carry out calculations using the Avogadro constant

Carry out calculations using mass of substance, Mr and amount in moles

Carry out calculations using concentration, volume and amount of substance in a solution

Use the ideal gas equation pV = nRT in calculations (variables in SI units)        

Calculate empirical formula from data giving composition by mass or percentage mass

Calculate molecular formula from the empirical formula and relative molecular mass

Write balanced equations (full and ionic) for reactions studied

Balance equations for unfamiliar reactions when reactants and products are specified

State the economic, ethical and environmental advantages for society amd for industry for developing chemical reatcions with high atom economy

Use balanced equations to calculate: Masses, volumes of gases, percentage yield, atom economies; and concentrations & volumes for liquids

REQUIRED PRACTICAL 1: make up a volumetric solution and carry out simple acid-base titration


Areas of Focus/Review

3.1.3 Bonding

Covered (Tick)

Ionic bonding involves electrostatic attraction between oppositely charges ions in a lattice

Predict the charge on a simple ion using the position of the element in the periodic table

Construct formulas for ionic compounds (e.g sulfate, hydroxide, nitrate, carbonate and ammonium)

Single covalent bond contains a shared pair of electrons; multiple bonds contain multiple pairs of electrons; co-ordinate (dative covalent) bond shares a pair of electrons, both supplied by 1 atom

Represent a covalent bond using a line; co-ordinate bond using an arrow

Represent a covalent bond using a line; co-ordinate bond using an arrow

Metallic bonding involves attraction between delocalised electrons and positive ions arranged in a lattice

The structures of: diamond, graphite, ice, iodine, magnesium and sodium chloride as examples of one of these 4 crystal structures: ionic, metallic, macromolecular, molecular

Relate the melting point and conductivity of materials to the type of structure and bonding present        

Explain the energy changes associated with changes of state

Draw diagrams to represent these structures involving specified numbers of particles

Explain the shapes of, and bond angles in, simple molecules and ions with up to six electron pairs (including lone pairs) surrounding the central atom

Pairs of electrons as clouds that reel each other, arranging themselves as far apart as possible; with lone pair lone pair repulsion being greater than pair bond, pair bond repulsion

Define electronegativity

Use partial charges to show that a bond is polar

Explain why some molecules with polar bonds do not have a permanent dipole

Explain the existence of: permanent dipole-dipole forces; induced dipole-dipole (van der Waals, dispersion, London) forces; hydrogen bonding; between familiar and unfamilar molecules

Explain how melting and boiling points are influenced by these intermolecular forces.



Areas of Focus/Review

3.1.4 Energetics

Covered (Tick)

Understand reactions can be exothermic or endothermic and that enthalpy change (ΔH) is the heat energy change measured under conditions of constant pressure        

Understand the term standard conditions.

Define standard entahlpy change of combustion (ΔcHθ) and standard enthalpy change of formation (ΔfHθ)

Use the equation q=mcΔT to calculate the molar enthalpy change for a reaction and in related calculations

REQUIRED PRACTICAL 2: Measurement of an enthalpy change        

Use Hess's law to perform calculations, including calculation of enthalpy changes for reactions from enthalpies of combustion or from enthapies of formation

Define the term mean bond enthalpy

Use mean bond enthalpies to calculate an approximate value of ΔH for reactions in the gaseous state

Explain why values from mean bond enthalpy calculations differ from those determined using Hess's law        




Areas of Focus/Review

3.1.5 Kinetics and 3.1.7 Redox

Covered (Tick)

Define the term activation energy

Explain why most collisions do not lead to a reaction        

Draw and explain Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution curves for differnet temperatures

Define the term: rate of reaction

Use the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution curve to explain why a small increase in temperature can lead to a large increase in rate

REQUIRED PRACTICAL 3: Investigation of how the rate of a reaction changes with temperature

Explain how a change in concentration or a change in pressure influences the rate of a reaction (collision frequency)

Define the term catalyst and explain how they work (activation energy; alternative pathway)

Use a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution to help explain how a catalyst increases the rate of a reaction involving a gas

Understand the terms oxidation and reduction in terms of electrons        

Work out the oxidation state of an element in a compound or ion from the formula

Write half equations identifying the oxidation and reduction processes in redox reactions

Combine half equations to give an overall redox equation



Areas of Focus/Review

3.1.6 Chemical equilibria, Le Chatalier’s Principle and Kc

Covered (Tick)

Explain what is happening in a reversible reaction at equilibrium

Use Le Chatelier's principle to predict qualitatively the effect of changes in temperature, pressure and concentration on the position of equilibrium (Catalysts do not affect it)

Explain why, for a reversible reaction used in an industrial process, a compromise temperature and pressure may be used

Construct an expression for Kc for a homogeneous system in equilibrium (using [X] for a species X of mol dm-3 concentration)

Calculate a value for Kc from the equilibrium concentrations for a homogeneous system at constant temperature

Perform calculations involving Kc

Predict the qualitative effects of changes of temperature on the value of Kc


Areas of Focus/Review

3.2.1 Periodicity

Covered (Tick)

Understand that an element is classified as s, p, d or f block and why

Explain the trends in atomic radius and first ionisation energy (Na-Ar)

Explain the melting points of the elements in terms of their structure and bonding (Na-Ar)

Areas of Focus/Review

3.2.2 Group 2, the Alkaline Earth Metals

Covered (Tick)

Explain the trends in atomic radius and first ionisation energy (Mg-Ba)

Explain the melting points of the elements in terms of their structure and bonding (Mg-Ba)

The reactions of elements Mg-Ba with water

Relative solubilities of the hydroxides of the elements Mg-Ba in water

Relative solubilities of the sulfates of the elements Mg-Ba in water

The uses of Mg- extracting Ti; Mg(OH)2- medicine; Ca(OH)2- agriculture; CaO or CaCO3 - remove SO2 from flue gases; acidified BaCl2 - test for sulfate ions; BaSO4 - medicine        

Explain why BaCl2 solution is used to test for sulfate ions and why it is acidified

Areas of Focus/Review

3.2.3 Group 7, The Halogens

Covered (Tick)

Explain the trend in electronegativity

Explain the trend in the boiling point of the elements in terms of their structure and bonding

Trend in oxidising ability of the halogens down the group, including displacement reactions of halide ions in aqueous solution

Trend in reducing ability of the halide ions, including the reactions of solid sodium halides with concentrated sulfuric acid

Explain why silver nitrate solution is used to identify and distinguish between halide ions.

Explain why the silver nitrate solution is acidified        

Explain why ammonia solution is added (trend in solubility of the silver halides in ammonia)

Reaction of chlorine with water to form chloride ions and chlorate(l) ions; chloride ions and oxygen

Use of Chlorine in water treatment; benefits vs toxic effects; advantages and disadvantages        

Reaction of chlorine with cold, dilute, aqueous NaOH and the uses of the solution formed

REQUIRED PRACTICAL 4: Carry out simple test-tube reactions to identify: cations - group 2, NH4+; anions - Group 7, OH-, CO32-, SO42-        

Areas of Focus/Review

3.2.4. Properties of Period 3 Elements and their Oxides

Covered (Tick)

Describe the reactions of Na and Mg with water        

Describe trends in the reactions of the elements Na, Mg, Al, Si, P and S with oxygen

Explain the trend in the melting point of the oxides of the elements Na-S in terms of their structure and bonding        

Explain the trends in the reactions of the oxides (of the elements Na-S) with water in terms of the type of bonding present in each oxide; to include pH

Describe structures of the acids and the anions formed when P4O10, SO2 and SO3 react with water

Write equations for the reactions that occur between the oxides of the elements Na-S and given acids and bases

Areas of Focus/Review

3.2.5 Transition Metals

Covered (Tick)

Describe the characteristic properties (complex formation, coloured ions, variable oxidation state, catalytic activity) of elements Ti-Cu and their cause (incomplete d sub-level in atoms or ions)

Define ligand, complex and co-ordination number

Explain that ligands can be monodentate (H2O, NH3 and Cl-); Bidentate (H2NCH2CH2NH2 and C2O42-) and multidentate (EDTA4-)        

Explain that ligands NH3 and H2O are similar in size, uncharged and can exchange without change of co-ordination number; but substitution may be incomplete

State the Cl- ligand is larger than the uncharged ligands NH3 and H2O

State carbon monoxide is toxic because it replaces oxygen co-ordinately bonded to Fe(II) in haemoglobin

Explain the chelate effect, in terms of the balance between the entropy and enthalpy change in these reactions

State transition metals commonly form octohedral complexes with small ligands; tetrahedral with larger ligands; square planar complexes

State octahedral complexes can display cis trans isomerism with monodentate ligands and optical isomerism with bidentate ligands

State square planar complexes can display cis-trans isomerism

State cisplatin is the cis isomer

State Ag+ forms the linear complex [Ag(NH3)2]+ as used in Tollens' reagent

Understand transition metals can be identified by their colour which arises when some wavelengths of visible light are absorbed and remainder are transmitted or reflected

Understand that d-electrons move from the ground state to an excited state when light is absorbed. The energy difference is given by: ΔE = hν = hc/λ

Understand that changes in oxidation state, co-ordination number and ligand alter ΔE leading to colour change

State that the absorption of visible light is used in spectroscopy; simple colorimeter can be used to determine the concentration of coloured ions in solution

State transition elements show variable oxidation states

Describe how the vanadium species in oxidation states IV, III and II are formed

Describe how the pH and Ligand influence the redox potential for a transition metal ion

Describe how the reduction of [Ag(NH3)2]+ to metallic silver is used to distinguish between aldehydes and ketones        

Explain transition metals and their compounds can act as heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts

Describe how heterogeneous catalysts are in a different phase from the reactants and the reaction occurs at active sites on the surface

Describe how homogeneous catalysts are in the same phase as the reactants so the reaction proceeds through an intermediate species

Explain how heterogeneous catalysts can become poisoned by impurities

Describe how a support medium can be used to maximise the surface area of a heterogeneous catalyst and minimise the cost

Explain the importance of variable oxidation states in catalysis

Explain, with the aid of equations, how V2O5 acts as a catalyst in the Contact process

Explain, with the aid of equations, how Fe2+ ions catalyse the reaction between I- and S2O82-

Explain, with the aid of equations, how Mn2+ ions autocatalyse the reaction between C2O42- and MnO4-


Areas of Focus/Review

3.2.6. Reactions of ions in aqueous solution

Covered (Tick)

Explain, in terms of the charge/size ratio of the metal ion, why the acidity of [M(H2O)6]3+ is greater than that of [M(H2O)6]2+        

Describe and explain the simple test-tube reactions of M2+(aq) ions (Fe and Cu), and of M3+ ions (Al and Fe), with the bases OH-, NH3 and CO32-

Describe the amphoteric charatcer of some metal oxides        

REQUIRED PRACTICAL 11: Carry out simple test-tube reactions to identify transition metal ions in aqueous solution        



Areas of Focus/Review

3.1.10 Equilibrium constant Kp

Covered (Tick)

Derive partial pressure from mole fraction and total pressure

Construct an expression for Kp for a homogeneous system in equilibrium        

Perform calculations involving Kp

Predict the qualitative effects of changes in temperature and pressure on the position of equilibrium

Predict the qualitative effects of changes in temperature on the value of Kp

Understand that, whilst a catalyst can affect the rate of attainment at equilibrium, it does not affect the value of the equilibrium constant

3.1.11 Electrode potentials

Use Eθ values (standard conditions: 298K, 100 kPa, 1.00 mol dm-3) to predict the direction of simple redox reactions; and the importance of the conditions

Calculate the EMF of a cell        

Write and apply the conventional representation of a cell; including half equations        

REQUIRED PRACTICAL 8: Measuring the EMF of an electrochemical cell

Understand that cells can be reachrgeable, non-rechargeable or fuel cells; the simplified electrode reactions in a lithium cell and an alkaline hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell

Benefits and risks to society of using these cells

Use given electrode data to deduce the reactions occuring in non-rechargeable and rechargeable cells

Deduce the EMF of a cell

Explain how the electrode reactions can be used to generate an electric current

Areas of Focus/Review

3.1.12 Acids and Bases

Covered (Tick)

Define acids, bases and acid-base equilibria

Convert concentration of hydrogen ions into pH and vice versa using pH = –log10[H+]

Calculate the pH of a solution of a strong acid from its concentration

Understand Kw is derived from the equilibrium constant for the slight dissociation of water and that it varies with temperature. KW = [H+][OH–]

Use Kw to calculate the pH of a strong base from its concentration

Understand Ka is the dissociation constant for a weak acid and that weak acids and bases dissociate on slightly in aqueous solution. pKa = –log10 Ka

Perform calculations relating the pH of weak acid to the concentraion of the acid and the dissociation constant Ka

Convert Ka into pKa and vice versa

Perform calculations for titrations of acids and bases based on experimental results

Sketch and explain the shapes of typical pH curves

Use pH cuves to select an appropriate indicator

REQUIRED PRACTICAL 9: Investigate how pH changes when a weak acid reacts with a strong base and when a strong base reacts with a weak acid

Understand what a buffer solution is; its applications and what acidic and basic buffers contain

Explain qualitatively the action of acidic and basic buffers

Calculate the pH of acidic buffer solutions


Areas of Focus/Review

3.1.8 Thermodynamics/Born-Haber Cycles

Covered (Tick)

Define the terms: Enthalpy of formation, ionisation energy, enthalpy of atomisation, bond enthalpy, electron affinity and lattice enthalpy

Construct Born - Haber cycles to calculate lattice enthalpies using these enthalpy changes

Construct Born-Haber cycles to calculate one of the other enthalpy changes

Compare lattice enthalpies from Born-Haber cycles with those from calculations based on a perfect ionic model to provide evidence for covalent character in ionic compounds

Define the term enthalpy of hydration

Perform calculations of an enthalpy change using these cycles

Understand ΔS as the concept of increasing disorder and a means of accounting for the deficiencies of ΔH to explain feasible change

Calculate entropy changes from absolute entropy values

Use the relationship ΔG = ΔH - TΔS to determine how ΔG varies with temperature

Use the relationship ΔG = ΔH - TΔS to determine the temperature at which a reaction becomes feasible

ECONOMICS Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper - Year 13 Economics PPE2

Length of Paper - 1 HOUR

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

- Revisiting and developing macroeconomic theory

Understand the macroeconomic objectives and how they are measured

Be able to calculate and interpret index numbers

Understand the injections and withdrawals from the circular flow of income

Be able to explain the multiplier effect in terms of injections and withdrawals

Be able to define aggregate demand and draw an AD curve

Learn the components of aggregate demand and how they are determined

Understand how the components of aggregate demand shift the AD curve to the left and right

Be able to define aggregate supply and draw an AS curve

Understand the determinants of (short run) aggregate supply

Understand how determinants of aggregate supply shift the AS curve to the left and right

Be able to define long run aggregate supply and draw an LRAS curve

Understand how shifts in AD, SRAS and LRAS can affect the macroeconomic objectives (equilibrium)

-Economic performance (economic growth)

Be able to define economic growth and draw and interpret an economic cycle diagram

Know the difference between short run and long run economic growth (show on diagrams)

Be able to use AD/AS, PPF and economic cycle diagrams to illustrate economic growth

Be able to define and characterise positive and negative output gaps

Be able to explain the characteristics of the different stages of the economic cycle

Be able to analyse and evaluate the costs and benefits of economic growth

-Economic performance (Unemployment)

Be able to define unemployment and explain how it is measured

Identify and evaluate different types of unemployment

Be able to analyse the different causes/types of unemployment

Be able to analyse and evaluate the macroeconomic effects of unemployment

Be able to suggest and analyse solutions to rising unemployment

-Economic performance (inflation/deflation)

Be able to define inflation and explain how it is measured

Be able to analyse the different causes of inflation and show them on an AD/AS diagram (cost-push and demand pull)

Be able to understand and interpret the quantity theory of money

Be able to analyse the effects that inflation has on the macroeconomy

Be able to define deflation and analyse its effects on the macroeconomy using an AD/AS diagram

Distinguish between a fall in the rate of inflation and deflation

Be able to draw, analyse and evaluate both short-run and long-run Phillips curves to illustrate the relationship between inflation and unemployment

-Conflicts between the macroeconomic objectives

Be able to understand and analyse the conflicts between full employment, sustained and increasing economic growth, low/stable inflation and a satisfactory balance of payments.

Be able to use the Phillips curve to analyse the trade-off between inflation and unemployment.

Be able to explain policy conflicts in the short and long term

PPE LAYOUT

ð        One calculation question (2 marks)

ð        One data question (4 marks)

ð        One 9 mark question

ð        One 25 mark question

 

TOTAL MARKS – 40 MARKS

ENGLISH LITERATURE Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper – Poetry Paper Chaucer The Wife of Bath Prologue and Tale

Length of Paper – 1hour

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

You need to be able to understand and translate  Chaucer’s Wife of Bath Prologue and Tale

You need to understand the format and the requirements of the question.

Example: How has Chaucer explored anti-feminism in lines 257-272 and one other passage of a similar length?

You need to explicitly explain and write about what happens in the given lines first.

You need to be able to Identify and explore rhetorical techniques. Patterns or break in patterns of the given lines.

You need to explain how context might affect the reception of and telling of the events on the readers and listeners.

You need to find a comparative passage of 14 to 16 lines that pertains to the questions.

You need to talk about the similarities / differences between the two sections that reinforce or undermine the presentation.

You need to be planning and writing essays for themes such as: religion, maistrie or sovereignty, sexuality, deception or manipulation, masculinity.

To be able to identify and explore how attitudes and values are expressed in texts

To be able to use literary critical concepts and terminology with understanding and discrimination: irony, satire, hypocrisy, literary construct, anti-feminism, misogyny.

To be able to show knowledge and understanding of The Canterbury Tales and the times it was set in. (social, historical, cultural, religious, literary context)

To be able to understand the intentions of the author, Geoffrey Chaucer, and the reasons of creating a literary construct: ‘The Wife of Bath’.

ENGLISH LITERATURE Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper – Poetry Paper Chaucer The Wife of Bath Prologue and Tale

Length of Paper – 1hour

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

You need to be able to understand and translate  Chaucer’s Wife of Bath Prologue and Tale

You need to understand the format and the requirements of the question.

Example: How has Chaucer explored anti-feminism in lines 257-272 and one other passage of a similar length?

You need to explicitly explain and write about what happens in the given lines first.

You need to be able to Identify and explore rhetorical techniques. Patterns or break in patterns of the given lines.

You need to explain how context might affect the reception of and telling of the events on the readers and listeners.

You need to find a comparative passage of 14 to 16 lines that pertains to the questions.

You need to talk about the similarities / differences between the two sections that reinforce or undermine the presentation.

You need to be planning and writing essays for themes such as: religion, maistrie or sovereignty, sexuality, deception or manipulation, masculinity.

To be able to identify and explore how attitudes and values are expressed in texts

To be able to use literary critical concepts and terminology with understanding and discrimination: irony, satire, hypocrisy, literary construct, anti-feminism, misogyny.

To be able to show knowledge and understanding of The Canterbury Tales and the times it was set in. (social, historical, cultural, religious, literary context)

To be able to understand the intentions of the author, Geoffrey Chaucer, and the reasons of creating a literary construct: ‘The Wife of Bath’.

FILM  STUDIES Y13 PPE2

Name of Paper – F633 Global cinema and critical perspectives

Length of Paper – 2 hours

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered

Section A: Non-English Language films

Genre

Messages & Values

Style

Context of the film

Narrative

Impact on Authorship

Ideologies

Section B: Authorship in Contemporary Cinema

Impact of film talent

Changing role of authorship/stardom

Mainstream & Independent films

Historical & Contemporary examples from films

Theories

FRENCH Y13 PPE 2

·        The units in the table will be in paper 1.

·        The two cultural topics must also be revised.

·        General consolidation of all modules is required as stimulus cards for paper 3 are unknown to students.

Name of Paper - Paper 1 (listening, reading, writing)

Paper 2 (writing)

Paper 3 (speaking)

Length of Paper - Paper 1: 2 hours 30 minutes

Paper 2: 2 hours

Paper 3: 23 minutes per candidate

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

Revise immigration unit

Revise technology unit

Revise strikes unit

Revise family unit

Revise young people and politics

Revise voluntary work unit

Revise immigration unit

FURTHER MATHS Y13 PPE2

Name of Paper – FP2

Length of Paper – 1hr 15 mins

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

Polar coordinates

1.Understand the meaning of polar coordinates (r, ) θ and be able to convert from polar to Cartesian coordinates and vice-versa.

2 Be able to sketch curves with simple polar equations.

3 Be able to find the area enclosed by a polar curve.

Calculus

The inverse functions of sine, cosine and tangent.

FP2c1 Understand the definitions of inverse trigonometric functions.

Differentiation of arcsinx, arccosx and arctanx.

2 Be able to differentiate inverse trigonometric functions.

Use of trigonometrical substitutions in integration.

3 Recognise integrals of functions of the form (a2-x2)-12  and (a2+x2)-1 and be able to integrate associated functions by using trigonometrical substitutions.

4 Use trigonometric identities to integrate functions.

Series

Maclaurin series. Approximate evaluation of a function.

FP2s1 Be able to find the Maclaurin series of a function, including the general term in

simple cases.

2 Appreciate that the series may converge only for a restricted set of values of x.

3 Identify and be able to use the Maclaurin series of standard functions.

Complex numbers

Modulus- argument form.

FP2j1 Understand the polar (modulus-argument) form of a complex number, and the definition of modulus, argument.

2 Be able to multiply and divide complex number in polar form.

De Moivre's theorem and simple applications.

3 Understand de Moivre's theorem.

4 Be able to apply de Moivre's theorem to finding multiple angle formulae and to summing suitable series.

Expression of complex numbers in the form z=rejθ
5 Understand the definition cos θ +jsin θ =ejθand hence the form z=rejθ.
The nth roots of a complex number.
6 Know that every non-zero complex number has n nth roots, and that in the Argand diagram these are the vertices of a regular n-gon.
7 Know the distinct nth roots of z=rejθ
8 Be able to explain why the sum of all the n th roots is zero.

Applications of complex numbers in Geometry.

9 Appreciate the effect in the Argand diagram of multiplication by a complex number.

10 Be able to represent complex roots of unity on an Argand diagram.

11 Be able to apply complex numbers to geometrical problems.

Matrices

Determinant and inverse of a 3x3 matrix.

FP2m1 Be able to find the determinant of any 3x3 matrix and the inverse of a nonsingular 3x3 matrix.

Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of 2x2 and 3x3 matrices.

2 Understand the meaning of eigenvalue and eigenvector, and be able to find these for 2x2 or 3x3 matrices whenever this is possible.

Diagonalisation and powers of 2x2 and 3x3 matrices

3 Be able to form the matrix of eigenvectors and use this to reduce a matrix to diagonal form.

4 Be able to find powers of a 2x2 or 3x3 matrix.

Solution of equations.

5 Be able to solve a matrix equation or the equivalent simultaneous equations, and to interpret the solution geometrically.

The use of the Cayley-Hamilton Theorem.

6 Understand the term characteristic equation of a 2x2 or 3x3 matrix.

7 Understand that every 2x2 or 3x3 matrix satisfies its own characteristic equation, and be able to use this.

FURTHER MATHS Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper – Mechanics 1

Length of Paper – 90 minutes

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

Be able to use vocabulary of motion – speed, velocity, distance, displacement, acceleration

Be able to use distance-time and velocity-time graphs, including areas and gradients

Use the suvat equations to find missing measurements

Be able to draw a force diagram to represent a situation

Use Newton’s second law of motion in one dimension, with connected or unconnected objects

Understand vector notation, including resolving

Be able to use vectors to solve problems, including relative velocity

Use suvat equations in two dimensions with projectiles

Use Newton’s second law of motion in two dimensions

Understand the link between acceleration, velocity and displacement when acceleration is not constant

GEOGRAPHY Y13 PPE2

TOPIC: Human Rights & Intervention

Pre-Reading Notes

https://docs.google.com/a/oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk/drawings/d/svbZ8A1yW1D6itrRo6eydRg/image?w=603&h=29&rev=1&ac=1

Length of Paper (with superpowers) – 1 hour 30

KQ1: What is human development and why do levels vary from place to place?

8.1 Concepts of human development are complex and contested

  • Human development has traditionally been measured using the growth of GDP as an end in itself but the relationship between human contentment and levels of wealth and income is complex (Happy Planet Index) and many dominant models are contested ( Sharia law or Bolivia under Evo Morales).
  • Improvements in environmental quality, health, life expectancy and human rights are seen by some (Rosling) as more significant goals for development while economic growth is often the best means of delivering them.
  • Education is central to economic development (human capital) and to the understanding and assertion of human rights; this view is, however, not universally shared (attitudes to gender equality in education) as both access to education and standards of achievement vary greatly among countries (The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO)

KQ1: What is human development and why do levels vary from place to place?

8.2 There are notable variations in human health and life expectancy

  • There are considerable variations in health and life expectancy in the developing world that are explained by differential access to basic needs such as food, water supply and sanitation, and which impact particularly on levels of infant and maternal mortality.
  • Variations in health and life expectancy in the developed world are largely a function of differences in lifestyles, levels of deprivation and the availability, cost and effectiveness of medical care.
  • There are significant variations in health and life expectancy within countries ( UK or Brazil) that are related to ethnic variations ( Aboriginal peoples in Australia) and income levels and inequalities, which, in turn, impact on lifestyles

KQ1: What is human development and why do levels vary from place to place?

8.3 Governments and international government organisations play a significant role in defining development targets and policies.

The relationship between economic and social development is complex and dependent on decisions made by governments on the importance of social progress; this ranges from welfare states with high levels of social spending to totalitarian regimes run by elites with low levels of spending on health and education.

The dominant IGOs (World Bank, IMF, WTO) have traditionally promoted neo-liberal views of development based on the adoption of free trade, privatisation and deregulation of financial markets but also, recent programmes have been aimed at improving environmental quality, health, education and human rights.

Progress against the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) has been mixed in terms of individual countries, global regions and targets; the UN post-2015 development agenda expands on the MDGs, setting new goals to include sustainable development.

KQ2: Why do human rights vary from place to place?

8.4 Human rights have become important aspects of both international law and international agreements

  • The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a statement of intent and a framework for foreign policy statements to explain economic or military intervention but not all states have signed the Declaration.
  • The European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) was drafted by the nations of the Council of Europe to help prevent conflict and integrated into the UK by the Human Rights Act of 1998; the ECHR remains controversial as some see it as an erosion of national sovereignty.
  • The Geneva Convention forms a basis in international law for prosecuting individuals and organisations who commit war crimes and is endorsed by 196 countries; however few cases come to trial and over 150 countries continue to engage in torture.

KQ2: Why do human rights vary from place to place?

8.5 There are significant differences between countries in both their definitions and protection of human rights

  • Some states () frequently invoke human rights in international forums and debates whilst others prioritise economic development over human rights and defend this approach ().
  • Some superpowers and emerging powers have transitioned to more democratic governments but the degree of democratic freedom varies ( comparison of an authoritarian and a democratic system); the protection of human rights and degree of freedom of speech varies.
  • Levels of political corruption vary and can be measured (Index of Corruption); high levels of corruption are a threat to human rights as the rule of law can be subverted

KQ2: Why do human rights vary from place to place?

8.6 There are significant variations in human rights within countries which are reflected in different levels of social development

  • In some states (post-colonial states) there are significant groups, defined by gender and/or ethnicity that have had fewer rights than the dominant group.
  • Differences in rights are frequently reflected in differences in levels of health and education ( indigenous populations in both North and South America).
  • A demand for equality from both women and ethnic groups has been an important part of the history of many states in recent years ( Afghanistan, Australia, Bolivia) with progress taking place at different rates.

KQ3: How are human rights used as arguments for political and military intervention?

8.7 There are different forms of geopolitical interventions in defence of human rights

a. There is a wide range of geopolitical interventions to address development and human rights issues: development aid, trade embargoes, military aid, indirect and direct military action

Interventions are promoted by IGOs, national governments and NGOs (Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch) but there is seldom consensus about the validity of these interventions.

Some Western governments frequently condemn human rights violations and use them as conditions for offering aid, negotiating trade agreements, and as a reason for military intervention, which challenge ideas of national sovereignty ().

KQ3: How are human rights used as arguments for political and military intervention?

8.8 Some development is focused on improving both human rights and human welfare, but other development has very negative environmental and cultural impacts

  • Development aid takes many forms from charitable gifts to address the impacts of hazards ( Haiti) administered both by NGOs ( Oxfam or Christian Aid) and national governments, to IGOs offering loans.
  • The impact of development aid is contested, successes include progress in dealing with life-threatening conditions (malaria) and improvements in some aspects of human rights (gender equality) but critics suggest that it encourages dependency, and promotes corruption and the role of the elite at the expense of human rights and minority groups.
  • Some economic development, both by superpowers and TNCs, has very serious impacts on the environment in which minority groups live and disregards their human rights to their land and culture ( oil in the Niger Delta or Peruvian Amazon, and land grabs in East Africa)

KQ3: How are human rights used as arguments for political and military intervention?

8.9 Military aid and both direct and indirect military intervention are frequently justified in terms of human rights

  • Global strategic interests might drive military interventions but are often justified by the protagonists in terms of human rights ().
  • Military aid, both in terms of training personnel and weapons sales, is sometimes used to support countries that themselves have questionable human rights records ().
  • Direct military intervention is increasingly part of a ’war on terror’, which is partially justified as promoting human rights of minority communities () but is compromised by the use of torture by combatant states that have signed the Declaration of Human Rights ()

KQ4: What are the outcomes of geopolitical interventions in terms of human development human rights?

8.10 There are several ways of measuring the success of geopolitical interventions

  • Measurements of success comprise a wide range of variables, including improvements in health, life expectancy, educational levels, gender equality, freedom of speech and successful management of refugees as well as increases in GDP per capita.
  • For some governments and IGOs, the introduction of democratic institutions is deemed important and freedom of expression is seen as central to the development of democratic and capitalist societies.
  • For other countries, () success is measured in terms of economic growth with less attention to holistic development (human wellbeing) or human rights and the development of democratic institutions.

KQ4: What are the outcomes of geopolitical interventions in terms of human development human rights?

8.11 Development aid has a mixed record of success

  • The relationship of aid, development, health and human rights is unclear, with relative success stories in some states ( Botswana or Ebola in West Africa) contrasted with relative failure in other states ( Haiti, Iraq). b
  • In some states that receive substantial development aid, economic inequalities have increased while in other states economic inequalities have decreased; this in turn impacts on health and life expectancy.
  • The extent to which superpowers use development aid as an extension of their foreign policies and judge success in terms of access to resources, political support in IGOs and military alliances and formation of military alliances

KQ4: What are the outcomes of geopolitical interventions in terms of human development human rights?

8.12 Military interventions both direct and indirect, have a mixed record of success

  • The recent history of military interventions, both direct and indirect, suggest that there are significant costs, including loss of sovereignty and human rights () and contrasts between short-term gains with long-term costs ().
  • Other non-military interventions may have a stronger record of improving both human rights and development  ( Cote d’Ivoire 2011).
  • Lack of action also has global consequences () which may impact negatively on progress in environmental, political and social development (human wellbeing and human rights).

GEOGRAPHY Y13 PPE2

TOPIC 7 : SUPERPOWERS

PRE-READING NOTES

Length of Paper (with Human Rights) – 1 hour 30

KQ1: What are superpowers and how have they changed over time?

7.1 Geopolitical power stems from a range of human physical characteristics of superpowers

  • Superpowers, emerging and regional powers can be defined using contrasting characteristics (economic, political, military, cultural, demographic and access to natural resources)
  • Mechanisms of maintaining power sit on a spectrum from hard to soft power, which vary in their effectiveness
  • The relative importance of these characteristics and mechanisms for maintaining power has changed over time (Mackinder’s)

KQ1: What are superpowers and how have they changed over time?

7.2 Patterns of power change over time and can be uni-bi or mult-polar

  • The maintenance of power during the imperial era by direct colonial control
  • Control during the post-colonial era through neo colonialism and the emergence of China
  • How do patterns of power affects levels of stability?

KQ1: What are superpowers and how have they changed over time?

7.3 Emerging powers vary in their influence on people the [physical environment, which can change rapidly over time

  • Who are the BRIC nations and why are they considered increasingly important?
  • What are the varying strengths and weaknesses of the BRIC nations
  • What theories explain changing patterns of power

KQ2: What are the impacts of superpowers on the global economy, political systems and physical environment

7.4 Superpowers have a significant influence over the global economic system

  • How do superpowers influence the global economy through IGOs
  • How do TNCs influence trade through technology?
  • How do TNCs influence trade through cultural influence

KQ2: What are the impacts of superpowers on the global economy, political systems and physical environment

7.5 Superpowers have a significant influence over the global economic system

  • Superpowers and emerging countries play a role in global actions (crisis response, climate change, conflict)
  • Alliances, both militarily and economically increase interdependence and are important to geostrategy and global influence
  • Th UN are important to

KQ2: What are the impacts of superpowers on the global economy, political systems and physical environment

7.6 Global concerns about the physical environment are disproportionally influence by superpower actions

  • Superpower resources demands and cause environmental degradation and their carbon emissions contribute disproportionately to global warming
  • There are differences in the willingness to act to reduce carbon emissions and reach global agreements on environmental issues.
  • Future growth in middle-class consumption in emerging superpowers has implications for the availability and cost of key resources as well as the physical environment


KQ3: What spheres of influence are contested by superpowers and what are the implications of this?

7.7 Global influence is contested in a number of different economic, environmental and political spheres.

  • Tensions can arise over the acquisition of physical resources where ownership is disputed and agreements exists over exploitation
  • The global system of influence can be contested leading to tensions over territory and physical resources and in some cases results in open conflict with implications for people and physical environment
  • Political spheres of influence can be contested leading to tensions over territory and physical resources and some cases results in open conflict with implication for people and physical environments

KQ3: What spheres of influence are contested by superpowers and what are the implications of this?

7.8 Developing nationals have changing relationships with superpowers with consequences for people and the physical environment

  • Developing economic ties between emerging powers and the developing world increase interdependence, generate environmental impacts and bring opportunities and challenges
  • The rising economic importance of certain Asian countries on the global stage increases the geopolitical influence of the region but also creates economic and political tensions within the region.
  • Cultural, political, economic and environmental tensions in the middle East represent ongoing challenges to superpowers and emerging powers due to complex geopolitical relations combined with the supply of vital energy resources.

KQ3: What spheres of influence are contested by superpowers and what are the implications of this?

7.9 Existing superpowers face ongoing economic restructuring, which challenges their power.

  • Economic problems represent an ongoing challenge to the USA and EU
  • The economic costs of maintaining global military power and space exploration are questioned in some existing powers.
  • The future balance of global power in 2030 and 2050 is uncertain and there are a range of possible outcomes.

GOVT & POLITICS Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper – Unit 4

Length of Paper – One hour and thirty minutes

Areas of Focus/Review

Covered (Tick)

Nationalism

Nations — nation definition, national identity definition, differences between cultural nationalism and political nationalism, distinction between nations and states cultural dimension of national identity, political dimension of national identity, psychological dimension of national identity

Liberal nationalism — nations as moral entities, national self-determination, nation-state ideal liberal objections to nationalism

Conservative nationalism — national patriotism as basis for political order and stability, nations as historical communities, insular and inward-looking nationalism, defence of organic unity/identity, implicit racialism/xenophobia

Expansionist nationalism — national chauvinism, explicit racialism, reactionary character, myths of past national greatness, militarism and aggression, social Darwinian view of international politics, parallels between expansionist nationalism and fascism (integral nationalism, ‘palingenetic ultranationalism’

Anticolonial/postcolonial nationalism — nationalism as a vehicle for political liberation and social development, Marxism–Leninism as guide for developing countries’ nationalism movements postcolonial nationalism (anti–Westernism, religious fundamentalism); links to conservative nationalism.

Feminism

Sex and gender — biological and social/cultural distinctions between men and women, patriarchy as systematic subordination of women, the public/private divide, exclusion from public/political life and therefore from power

Patriarchy — emphasis placed on gender divisions, gender inequalities are rooted in, and reflect, sexual division of labour/power within the family; radical feminists’ view of patriarchy (systematic, institutionalised and pervasive oppression); liberal feminism and patriarchy (unequal access to public realm); socialist feminism and patriarchy (links between gender and class oppression).

Liberal feminism — individualism as basis for gender equality, concern with the equal distribution of rights and entitlements, equal access to the public realm, reformist approach

Socialist feminism — economic basis of gender inequality, reproducing next generation of capitalist workers, training and incentivising male workers, orthodox Marxism, priority of class over gender, patriarchy is a consequence of private property, socialism/social revolution, modern Marxism patriarchy and capitalism as interlocking systems of oppression

Radical feminism — gender as the most politically significant of political divisions, patriarchy as a systematic and pervasive form of oppression (operating in all spheres of society and all societies); ‘the personal is the political’, sexual revolution, pro-woman feminism (essential differences between women and men, feminist separatism, political lesbianism).

Antifeminism — an organic critique of feminism, sex is destiny – women are naturally designed for domestic, family-based role); traditionalist critique of feminism, patriarchal structures have been tried and tested by history); different but equal, social cohesion

Multiculturalism

Culture — post-colonialism and the recognition of the legitimacy of non-Western political traditions; identity politics, communitarian roots of multiculturalism, cultural embeddedness, particularism

Minority rights — nature of minority/multicultural rights, criticisms of minority rights, drawbacks of positive discrimination, implications for freedom of speech, tensions between group v individual rights

Diversity — nature and extent of diversity; compatibility between cultural diversity and political unity; benefits of diversity, cultural exchange and cultural mixing

Liberal multiculturalism — toleration and forbearance, liberal justifications for toleration, social progress, truth prevails in free market of ideas, features of liberal multiculturalism, diversity confined to ‘private’ sphere; republican multiculturalism.

Pluralist multiculturalism — pluralism as post-liberalism; value pluralism and its political implications; pluralist multiculturalism and liberation politics; pluralist multiculturalism as a critique of liberalism, tainted by colonialism, racialism, particularist multiculturalism.

Cosmopolitan multiculturalism — cosmopolitanism and cultural diversity, global consciousnesses, endorsement of cultural mixing, contrasts with liberal multiculturalism and pluralist multiculturalism.

Criticisms of multiculturalism — universalist liberalist critique, conservative critique, feminist critique, social reformist critique

HISTORY Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper – British Warfare

Length of Paper – Two hours and fifteen minutes

Areas of Focus/Review

Covered (Tick)

The French Wars

Explain why Britain opposed France

Explain the strengths and weaknesses of the British Navy from 1793 to 1815

Explain technological advances and improvements in the British Navy

Explain the role of Nelson in battles such as the Battle of the Nile and the Battle of Trafalgar

Assess the importance of Nelson against other factors

Explain the strengths and weaknesses of the British Army from 1793 to 1815

Explain technological advances and improvements in the British Army

Explain the role of Wellington in the Peninsular War and the Battle of Waterloo

Assess the importance of Wellington against other factors

Explain how the British and French used economic blockades

Explain how the British Navy went to war on French trade

Explain the impact of the French wars on the British society, politics and the economy

Assess how far the British economy was negatively impacted by the French wars

Assess the impact of the French wars on British civilians

The Crimean War

Explain why Britain opposed Russia

Explain what happened during the Battle of Alma

Explain what happened during the Battle of Balaclava

Explain what happened during the siege of Sevastopol

Explain the role of Lord Raglan

Assess the significance of Lord Raglan

Explain the strengths and weaknesses of the British Army and the role of the Navy from 1854-6

Explain why there were problems of supply and medical care

Explain the effectiveness of the Florence Nightingale

Explain the effectiveness of Mary Seacole

Compare the importance of Nightingale and Seacole

Assess the impact of Fenton’s photography

Assess the impact of Russell’s reportage

Assess the impact of the battles on public opinion

Assess the impact of the Crimean War on British civilians

The Breadth Section

The role of science and technology in improving weaponry

The development, use and degree of success of carronades and the navy in the 1790s

The development, use and degree of success of Congreve's rockets 1806

The development, use and degree of success of William Armstrong's new artillery 1859-60

The development, use and degree of success of the Vickers machine gun 1914-18

The development, use and degree of success of the tank 1915-18

The support of the population providing finance – taxation, bonds, consols and war loans

The changing civilian roles from 1790 to 1918

How the populace changes from camp followers to an organised home front

MATHS Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper - C3

Length of Paper - 1hr 30 mins

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

Algebraic fractions

Simplify algebraic fractions

Multiply and divide algebraic fractions

Add and subtract algebraic fractions

Be able to use the remainder theorem

Functions

Be able to use function notation

Understand and calculate the range and domain of fuctions

Be able to use composite functions

Be able to calculate inverse functions

Exponential and log functions

Understand functions given in the form y=a^x

Be able to graph functions given in the form y=a^x

Be able to solve problems involving e^x

Understand that lnx is the inverse of e^x

Numerical methods

Find approximate roots of f(x)=0 graphically

Use iterative methods to find approximate roots of f(x)=0

Transforming graphs of functions

Be able to sketch graphs involving the modulus function

Solve equations involving the modulus function

Apply a combination of transformations to graphs

Trigonometry

Understand and graph the functions secant, cosecant and cotangent

Be able to simplify expressions, prove identities and solve equations using these functions

Use the identies 1+tan^2=sec^2 and 1+cot^2=cosec^2

Understand and graph the inverse trigonometric functions

Further Trigonometry

Use the addition trigonometrical formulae

Use the double angle trig formulae

Solve equations using the formulae

Be able to use the form acosx+bsinx to solve problems

Be able to apply the factor theorem

Differentiation

Understand and use the chain rule

Understand and use the product rule

Understand and use the quotient rule

Be able to differentiate ae^x

Be able to differentiate lnx

Be able to differentiate the trig functions

MATHS Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper - D1

Length of Paper - 1hr 30 mins

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

Algorithms

Understand and use an algorithm given in words

Implement an algorithm given in the form of a flow chart

Carry out a bubble sort

Carry out a quick sort

Implement a binary search

Implement the three bin packing algorithms and be aware of their limitations

Graphs and networks

Know how graphs and networks can create mathematical models

Be familiar with terminology used in graph theory

Know some special types of graphs

Understand how matrices can be used to represent graphs

Algorithms on networks

Use Kruskal’s algorithm to find a minimum spanning tree

Use Prim’s algorithm to find a minimum spanning tree (both on a network and in matrix form)

Use Dijkstra’s algorithm to find the shortest path

Route inspection

Be able to determine if a graph is traversable

Use the route inspection algorithm to find the shortest path in a network

Critical path analysis

Model a project from a precedence table

Understand dummies

Carry out forward and backward passes

Determine float of activities

Construct Gantt charts

Construct scheduling diagrams

Linear programming

Formulate a problem as a LP problem

Draw a 2 variable LP problem graphically

Locate the optimal point using a) the objective line b) vertex testing method

Determine solutions that need integer values

Matchings

Model problems using a bipartite graph

Use the maximum matching algorithm

MEDIA STUDIES Y13 PPE2

Name of Paper – G325 Critical perspectives in Media

Length of Paper – 2 hours

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

Narrative

Media Language

Audience   

Representation

Genre

Creativity

Post Production

Research and Planning

Using conventions from real media text

Digital technology

Collective identity – Youth Representation

Theories

PRODUCT DESIGN Y13 PPE2

Name of Paper - A Level Product Design F524

Length of Paper - 2.5hrs

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

Be able to identify a range of design requirements for different objects

Know and understand different manufacturing systems

Smart materials and their uses

Materials and their characteristics

To be able to create flowcharts and diagrams to show how something could be manufactured

Different manufacturing techniques

Environmental issues

and just practice drawing and designing!!!..And remember to explain your work with annotation!!!!

PHYSICS Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper -  Physics

Length of Paper – 2 hours

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

Circular Motion

Simple Harmonic Motion

Gravitational Fields

Electric Fields

Capacitors

Magnetic Fields

Electromagnetic Induction

Radioactivity

Nuclear Energy

Thermal Physics

PSYCHOLOGY Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper – Paper 1 Foundations in Psychology

                             Paper 2 Applications of Psychology

Length of Paper – 2 x 2 hours

Areas of Focus/Review.

Covered (Tick)

Paper 1

  • Social Psychology

  • Cognitive Psychology

  • Biological Psychology

  • Learning Theories

Paper 2

  • Clinical Psychology

  • Child Psychology

You must know ALL the content for the above topics, including methodology, practical and issues and debates.

Both papers will have a mixture of data response, short mark questions and extended response.

Paper 1 will have a maximum of 12 marks for a question.

Paper 2 will contain 16 and 20 mark questions too.

Please see MyPLC for full details of what you must learn.

SOCIOLOGY Y13 PPE 2

Name of Paper – Sociology PPE 2 – Y13

Length of Paper – 2 hrs

Areas of Focus/Review

Covered (Tick)

Education (all sections on myPLC)

Family (all sections on myPLC)

Methods in Context (all sections and skills on myPLC)

Beliefs in Society (topics 1 and 2)

Crime and Deviance (topics 1-8)

Exam Skills – PERCAL structure

Exam Skills – 10 mark outline and explain

Exam Skills – 10 mark applying material from the item

Exam Skills – 4 & 6 mark questions

Exam Skills – MiC structure (statements)

SPANISH Y13 PPE 2

·        The units in the table will be in paper 1.

·        The two cultural topics must also be revised.

·        General consolidation of all modules is required as stimulus cards for paper 3 are unknown to students.

Name of Paper - Paper 1 (listening, reading, writing)

Paper 2 (writing)

Paper 3 (speaking)

Length of Paper - Paper 1: 2 hours 30 minutes

Paper 2: 2 hours

Paper 3: 23 minutes per candidate

Areas of Focus/Review - Please be as descriptive as possible.

Covered (Tick)

Revise protest unit

Revise bullfighting unit

Revise racism unit

Revise gender equality unit

Revise technology unit

Revise gay rights unit

Revise immigration unit

Revise dictatorships unit