GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Content Area:

Visual & Performing Arts

    Grade Level:

1

Module Title:

Visual Art

     

LEARNING TARGETS

NJ STUDENT LEARNING STANDARDS

1.1  The Creative Process:  All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and

       principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

1.2 History of the Arts and Culture: All students will understand the role,

      development, and influence of the arts throughout history and across cultures.

1.3  Performance:  All students will synthesize those skills, media, methods, and technologies

       appropriate to creating, performing, and/or presenting works of art in dance, music, theatre, and

       visual art.

1.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies pertains to all four arts

      disciplines, and is comprised of two strands related to the mode of response: A. Aesthetic

      Responses and B. Critique Methodologies. This standard addresses two ways students may

      respond to the arts, including (1) the study of aesthetics and (2) the application of

      methodologies for critique

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

The basic elements of art and principles of design govern art creation and composition.

1.1.2.D.1

Identify the basic elements of art and principles of design in diverse types of artwork.  

Recognizing the elements of art and principles of design in artworks of known and emerging artists, as well as peers, is an initial step toward visual literacy.

1.1.2.D.2

Identify elements of art and principles of design in specific works of art and explain how they are used.  

Dance, music, theatre, and visual artwork from diverse cultures and historical eras have distinct

characteristics and common themes that are revealed by contextual clues within the works of art.

1.2.2.A.1

Identify characteristic theme-based works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art, such as

artworks based on the themes of family and community, from various historical periods and world cultures.

The function and purpose of art-making across cultures is a reflection of societal values and beliefs.

1.2.2.A.2

Identify how artists and specific works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art reflect, and are affected by, past and present cultures.

Visual statements in art are derived from the basic elements of art regardless of the format and medium used to create the art. There are also a wide variety of art media, each having its own materials, processes, and technical application methods for exploring solutions to creative problems.

1.3.2.D.1

Create two- and three-dimensional works of art using the basic elements of color, line, shape, form, texture, and space, as well as a variety of art mediums and application methods.

Symbols convey meaning agreed upon by a group or culture. Manipulation of the basic elements of art and principles of design for personal expression results in visual communication that may be relevant in a variety of settings.

1.3.2.D.2

Use symbols to create personal works of art based on selected age-appropriate themes, using oral stories as a basis for pictorial representation.

Each of the visual art forms uses various materials, tools, and techniques that are associated with unique verbal and visual vocabularies.

1.3.2.D.3

Employ basic verbal and visual art vocabulary to demonstrate knowledge of the materials, tools, and methodologies used to create and tell visual stories.

Knowledge of visual art media necessitates an understanding of a variety of traditional and nontraditional tools, applications, possibilities, and limitations.

1.3.2.D.4

Explore the use of a wide array of art mediums and select tools that are appropriate to the production of works of art in a variety of art media.

Visual awareness stems from acute observational skills and interest in visual objects, spaces, and the relationship of objects to the world.

1.3.2.D.5

Create works of art that are based on observations of the physical world and that illustrate how art is part of everyday life, using a variety of art mediums and art media.

Each arts discipline (dance, music, theatre, and visual art) has distinct characteristics, as do the artists who create them.

1.4.2.A.2

Compare and contrast culturally and historically diverse works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art that evoke emotion and that communicate cultural meaning.

Each arts discipline (dance, music, theatre, and visual art) has distinct characteristics, as do the artists

who create them.

1.4.2.A.3

Use imagination to create a story based on an arts experience that communicated an emotion

or feeling, and tell the story through each of the four arts disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual art).

Relative merits of works of art can be qualitatively and quantitatively assessed using observable criteria.

1.4.2.B.1

Observe the basic arts elements in performances and exhibitions and use them to formulate objective assessments of artworks in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

Constructive criticism is an important evaluative tool that enables artists to communicate more effectively.

1.4.2.B.2

Apply the principles of positive critique in giving and receiving responses to performances.

Contextual clues are embedded in works of art and provide insight into artistic intent.

1.4.2.B.3

Recognize the making subject or theme in works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

Grade 1 Students will…

  • Categorize applications of line (i.e., horizontal, vertical, diagonal, curvilinear, wide, thin, short, long and broken line) in artworks of diverse artists (e.g., Robert Motherwell’s Lines for St. Gallen or his Black Series, Raoul Dufy’s Bouquet d’Arums or Birdcage, Henri Matisse’s Red Interior Still Life on a Blue Table, Roy Lichtenstein’s Seascape From the Landscape Series etc.).  Apply similar usage of line in original works of art.
  • Explain the use of shape (i.e., circle, square, triangle, ovals and rectangles) in artworks of known and emerging artists (e.g., Romare Bearden’s The Block, Pablo Picasso’s Three Musicians, paintings of Marsden Hartley etc.) and apply similar conventions in original works of art.
  • Name primary colors in notable artworks (e.g., paintings by Piet Mondrian’s Composition Red Blue and Yellow, prints and sculpture by Robert Indiana including his classic Love Series, Sam Francis’s untitled splatter paintings, mixed media works by Faith Ringgold’s The Sunflower Quilting Bee at Arles etc.) and apply similar applications of primary color in original works of art.
  • Recognize texture in two-dimensional works of art (e.g., paintings by Vincent Van Gogh’s Starry Night, Jackson Pollock’s Number 8 etc.) and create textural works of art.
  • Observe instances where radial balance is utilized in art and architecture by known and emerging artists (e.g., Gothic architecture Rose Windows, Mandalas of Tibet, Hawaiian quilt patterns, installations by Polly Apfelbaum such as her work Blossom, etc.).  Demonstrate understanding of radial balance through the creation of original artwork.
  • Identify instances where rhythm/repetition is used as a compositional tool by known artists (e.g., Piet Mondrian’s’ Broadway Boogie Woogie, paintings by Wayne Thiebaud such as Cakes, installations by Yayoi Kusama including Ascension of Polkadots on the Trees or any of her dot obsession series, the prints and paintings of Trenton Doyle Hancock such as Wow That ‘s Mean and Other Vegan Cuisine etc.) and produce original works emphasizing rhythm through repetition.
  • Identify how various types of line can be found in every environment, picture or artwork.  Demonstrate how these lines form shapes, can be expressive, and/or be used to imply motion throughout a piece of art.
  • Identify primary and secondary colors; describe the principles behind color theory using basic art vocabulary, and use color as a tool for expressive purpose in the creation and evaluation of art.
  • Demonstrate how lines, color, and media manipulation can be combined to make a texture or pattern through the creation of original artwork.  Identify how artists use line to suggest texture and describe how the appearance of texture changes depending on the different surfaces employed in or suggested by the artwork (e.g., cloth such as velvet of lace vs. wood, glass, cement, or metal).  
  • Manipulate lines to create shapes, forms, and other visual elements which aid in the creation of visual stories and describe ways that known artists use shape and form to tell stories.  
  • Describe the difference between shape and form in basic art vocabulary (i.e., space has height and width while form is a three-dimensional object that has volume); and create original three-dimensional art through the physical manipulation of materials such as clay (pinch, pull or wheel), cardboard etc.
  • Examine three-dimensional art by artists.  Use age-appropriate vocabulary to describe the methods and materials used to make their art and employ an array of art mediums and appropriate tools in the production of original works of art.
  • Use color and line to create a two-dimensional artwork that depicts an age-appropriate theme, based topic or oral story and describe the materials, tools, and methodologies used to tell the visual story using basic verbal and visual art vocabulary.
  • Use lines and color to create textures and/or patterns in two and three-dimensional artwork that is based on observation of everyday life.
  • Using common materials found in the environment (e.g., toilet paper rolls, Popsicle sticks, bottle caps, drink cartons, boxes etc.), apply knowledge of shape, space, texture and color to create a three- dimensional artwork based on the culture of everyday life.
  • Create two and three-dimensional art works, using age-appropriate themes drawn from oral stories as a basis for pictorial representation.  Apply knowledge of visual communication by using existing symbols and/or invented symbols within the pictorial narrative.
  • Identify how artists' works are reflections of their culture (e.g., The Declaration of Independence by John Tumball, Albert Bierstadr's The Oregon Trail, Walk, Don't Walk by George Segal etc.).
  • Describe visual similarities and differences (e.g., the use of types of line, similarity of shapes, texture etc.) in art work from diverse cultures and historical eras (e.g., Horace Pippin, Grandma Moses, Norman Rockwell, Edouard Manet, George Seurat).
  • Categorize the visual elements of line, use of shapes, color found in the artworks of past and present cultures (e.g., Pablo Picasso, Diego Rivera, Red Grooms, Grant Wood, Piet Mondrian).
  • Trace a shape that is similar to visual elements found in artworks influenced by their culture (e.g., Maple Leaves at the Tekana Shrin by Ando Hiroshige, The Red Tree by Piet Mondrain, Broadway Boogie-Woogie by Piet Mondrian).

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment:  

  • Formative Assessment strategies
  • Rubrics
  • Unit Assessments
  • Performance Assessments 

Equipment Needed:

  • Color Wheel poster, or printout  
  • School and town libraries  
  • Various internet websites for art education.
  • ART Supplies

  • Pinterest, Pinterest.com  
  • Artsonia, Artsonia.com  
  • The Getty Institute, getty.edu  
  • WebArt, webart.com  
  • Internet,
  • Virtual Museum Tours
  • Hand-outs  
  • YouTube videos related to art history, artists, or art creation.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities

504s

  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.

At-Risk Failure

  • Projects designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student need
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities and support
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills based on student needs
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Directions written and read/explained thoroughly and in chunks
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers and other organizational aides
  • Student Success Team and implementation of RTI Interventions
  • Set goal plan with reachable goals and pathways and collaboration with parents
  • One-on-one conference with teacher to include feedback on work and progress toward meeting goals

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaborate and to create and communicate knowledge.

HPE.2.1.2.D.CS1 Using personal safety strategies reduces the number of injuries to self and others. HPE.2.1.2.D.1 Identify ways to prevent injuries at home, school, and in the community (e.g., fire safety, poison safety, accident prevention). MA.1.1.G.A.1 Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes. MA.1.1.G.A.2 Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape. LA.1.SL.1.1 Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. LA.1.RL.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. HPE.2.1.2.A.2 Use correct terminology to identify body parts, and explain how body parts work together to support wellness.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 4th grade,

  • 9.2.4.A.1 Identify reasons why people work, different types of work, and how work can help a person achieve personal and professional goals.  
  • 9.2.4.A.2 Identify various life roles and civic and work‐related activities in the school, home, and community.
  • 9.2.4.A.3 Investigate both traditional and nontraditional careers and relate information to personal likes and dislikes.
  • 9.2.4.A.4 Explain why knowledge and skills acquired in the elementary grades lay the foundation for future academic and career success.

Unit 1 Overview (8 WEEKS)

Unit one focuses on four Elements of Art: line, shape, color and form.


Line  

Shape  

Color  

Form  

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 1:  

All students will demonstrate an understanding of line by:

o Defining what a line is.

o Drawing various types of lines in different directions.  

All students will demonstrate an understanding of shape by:

o Defining what a shape is.

o Naming various geometric shapes.

o Drawing various geometric shapes.

o Ability to state the number of sides each shape has.  

All students will demonstrate an understanding of color by:

o Naming the primary colors.

o Naming the secondary colors.

o Locating the colors on the color wheel.

o Using the acronym ROYGBIV to name the colors of the rainbow in order.

o Explain what primary colors are used to create each secondary color.  

All students will demonstrate an understanding of form by:

o Defining what a form is.

o Naming various forms.

o Drawing various forms.

o Ability to state the difference between a shape and a form.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives After completing line, shape, color, and form students will be able to:

o Recite the shapes, lines, forms, and colors reviewed.         

o Demonstrate the difference between a shape and a form.

o Use lines, shapes, forms and color in their artwork.

o Develop a strong foundation for artistic endeavors.

Unit 2 Overview (8 Weeks)

Unit two focuses on the art of still-life 


 

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 2:  

o Defining what a still-life is. o Using lines, shapes, and forms to create a still-life drawing of inanimate objects they see. o Properly adding color to their still-life to depict a light source.

o Using a medium properly to add depth with color.

o Correctly placing a shadow underneath the objects in their drawing.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing still-life drawing students will be able to:

o Draw a still-life depicting the objects in front of them.

o Show an understanding of shapes and forms through drawing them.

o Sketch forms they see around them with ease.

Unit 3 Overview (8 Weeks)

Unit three focuses on symmetry.  


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 3:  

All students will demonstrate an understanding of symmetry by:

o Defining what symmetry is.

o Name various symmetrical geometric shapes.

o Name some symmetrical objects in nature.

o Depict symmetrical images.

o Add color to their images using symmetry as a basis for their design.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

 Learning Objectives

After completing symmetry students will be able to:

o Recognize shapes and images that are symmetrical.

o Classify shapes into symmetrical and asymmetrical.

o Generate images that are symmetrical both in their outline, and design.

Unit 4 Overview (8 Weeks)

Unit four focuses on motor skills through the art of collage.  


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 4:  

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing collage students will be able to:

o Describe how a collage is created.

o Complete a collage artwork.

o Demonstrate their level of competency with scissors and glue sticks.

Unit 5 Overview (8 Weeks)

Unit five focuses on painting. 


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 5:  

o Selecting an appropriate paintbrush for their project, and handling it correctly.

o Being able to explain the anatomy of a paintbrush.

o Demonstrating proper cleaning of their brush, both during and after painting.

o Depicting an image on their paper (board, canvas, etc.) according to the assignment given.

o Placing their artwork in the correct area of the room for drying.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Is paint better than other mediums for creating art?  

What are the important ideas to remember about brushes and how to use them?  

Does faster mean better?  

How do artists use paint to express their ideas?

Learning Objectives

o Locate and Name different parts of a paintbrush.

o Demonstrate their understanding of painting by following rules established.

o Paint images onto a surface.

o Develop strong basis skills for further painting endeavors.

                                                                                                       

 Grade 1