Course Number: SOC 103

Course Title: Sociology

Instructor: Marc Tumeinski, PhD

Contact: mtumeinski@holyapostles.edu

1. Course description

This course surveys the methods of sociology and their application to contemporary society. Students are encouraged to acquire a broad understanding of the discipline of sociology–its core concepts and methods–and its relevance to contemporary social topics and problems.

2. Envisioned Learning Outcomes

As college students, you bear great responsibility for your own learning. You can each do well in this course. Students who are successful in this course will learn, and demonstrate the ability to

3. Course Schedule

Week 1 Sociology: Theory, Framework, Methods, Perspectives

Readings

• Kelly, James. (1998). Retrieving Aristotle: The journeyman calling of the sociologist. Catholic Social Science Review, Vol. III:7-18. READ PAGES 7-10.

Assignments

• Post introductions

• Syllabus acknowledgment

• Discussion board: initial post plus at least 2 replies to other students

Week 2 Learning From, and With, Key Sociological Thinkers

Readings

• Barilleaux, Ryan J. (1998). Constructing A Catholic Social Science. Catholic Social Science Review, Vol. III:111-124.

Assignments

• Quiz

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 3 Max Weber, Heinrich Pesch, S.J.

Readings

• Max Weber, “What is Politics?”

• Stephen Krason. (2009). Principles of Heinrich Pesch’s Solidarism. Catholic Social Science Review, Vol. XIV:477-483.

Assignments

• Discussion board: initial post plus at least 2 replies to other students

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 4 Jane Addams, Emile Durkheim

Readings

• Jane Addams, “The Settlement as a Factor in the Labor Movement”

• Emile Durkheim, “Anomie and the Modern Division of Labor”

• Emile Durkheim, “Sociology and Social Facts”

Assignments

• Quiz

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 5: Msgr. Paul Furfey, Msgr. John Ryan

Readings

• Paul H. Furfey. (1996). Why a supernatural sociology? Catholic Social Science Review, Vol. I:247-250.

• Christine F. Hinze. (1995). John A. Ryan: Theological ethics and political engagement. CTSA PROCEEDINGS, 50:174-191. READ PAGES 174-176.

• The Bishops’ Program of Social Reconstruction. (1919). READ NUMBERS 24-40.

Assignments

• Discussion board: initial post plus at least 2 replies to other students

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 6 Talcott Parsons, Robert Merton

Readings

• Talcott Parsons, “Sex Roles in the American Kinship System”

• Robert Merton, “Manifest and Latent Functions”

Assignments

• Quiz

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 7 David Riesman, Erving Goffman

Readings

• David Riesman, “Character and Society: The Other-Directed Personality”

• Erving Goffman, “Presentation of Self”

Assignments

• Discussion board: initial post plus at least 2 replies to other students

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 8 C. Wright Mills

Readings

• C. Wright Mills, “The Sociological Imagination”

Assignments

• Quiz

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 9 Edwin Sutherland, Howard Becker

Readings

• Edwin Sutherland. (February 1940). White-collar criminality. American Sociological Review, Vol. 5(1):1-12. READ PAGES 1-5.

• Howard Becker. (Winter 1967). Whose side are we on? Social Problems, Vol. 14(3): 239-247. READ PAGES 239-243.

Assignments

• Discussion board: initial post plus at least 2 replies to other students

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 10 Peter Berger, Thomas Luckmann

Readings

• Peter Berger and Thomas Luckmann, “Society as a Human Product”

Assignments

• Quiz

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 11 Jurgen Habermas, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger

Readings

• Jurgen Habermas. (April 2006). Religion in the public sphere. European Journal of Philosophy, 14(1):1-25. READ PAGES 4-6.

• Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger. (Winter 2011). Difficulties confronting the faith in Europe today. Communio, 38:728-737. READ PAGES 734-737.

Assignments

• Discussion board: initial post plus at least 2 replies to other students

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 12: Michel Foucault, Anthony Giddens

Readings

• Michel Foucault, “Biopolitics and the Carceral Society”

• Anthony Giddens, “Post-Modernity or Radicalized Modernity?”

Assignments

• Quiz

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 13 Edward Said

Readings

• Edward Said, “Intellectual Exile: Expatriates and Marginals”

Assignments

• Discussion board: initial post plus at least 2 replies to other students

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 14 Sociology and Catholic social teaching (part 1)

Readings

• Excerpts from the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church (Part I, chapters 2, 3 and 4)

Assignments

• Quiz

• Submit reading journal entry (for this week’s assigned reading)

Week 15 Sociology and Catholic social teaching (part 2)

Readings

• Excerpts from the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church (Part I, chapter 4)

Assignments

• Quiz

• Discussion board: initial post plus at least 2 replies to other students

4. Course requirements

Guidelines for discussion postings with peer responses (25%):

• Post in response to the announced topic or question. To encourage engagement with the course material, deep learning, and dialogue with other students, initial posts should be at least 250 words. Your goal is to ‘dig deeper’ into our topic or question. (Due by 11:59 pm on Wednesday.)

• Each and every post must contain at least one cited reference or quotation to our readings, either assigned or optional. You will not receive full credit for any posts that do not contain a reference to the assigned materials.

• Please post at least one substantive response to the entries of your classmates. Responses to classmates can provide brief follow-up questions, make additional points, or politely offer alternative responses. Responses should be at least around 50 words. (Due by 11:59 pm on Saturday.)

Quizzes (25%):

• Quizzes will cover assigned readings and posted lecture notes.

Academic reading journal entries (50%):

• Identify new vocabulary words in the readings. List and briefly define.

(they say) Identify and describe one or two key points from the reading. Demonstrate that you understand the author’s argument, even if you do not necessarily agree with it.

(I say) Briefly respond to the author’s argument. Do you agree, disagree, or agree and disagree with different pieces of the argument? Explain why. This step of explaining why is an important element of learning and critical thinking.

• What is one follow-up question you have after reading the text? Tell me what makes this follow-up question relevant to our course topic.

• One to two pages, Times New Roman 12, 1.5 spacing, 1 inch margins. (Due by 11:59 pm on Saturday.)

5. Required textbook

Additional required readings, and/or links to videos or podcasts, will regularly be made available.

6. Suggested resources (not required)

7. Evaluation

Students who have difficulty with research and composition are strongly encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab, available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl

Grading scale

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Posting shows no awareness of the concepts addressed in the topic by shifting off-topic

Misunderstanding

Posting demonstrates a misunderstanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic through an inability to re-explain them

Adequate Understanding

Posting demonstrates an adequate understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic by a re-explanation of them

Solid understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic and uses that understanding effectively in the examples it provides

Insightful understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts of the topic through the use of examples and by making connections to other concepts

WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Posting is only partially written or fails to address the topic

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Posting touches only on the surface of the topic and proceeds to talk about something else; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Posting is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment;  satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors

Solid writing with something interesting to say

Posting is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples;  level-appropriate syntax and diction;  mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error

command-level writing, making a clear impression

Posting is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development ; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

COMMUNITY INTERACTION (50-word response)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Poor response

Response misses the point of the original posting or merely summarizes original posting to which it responds.

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds.

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development.

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development.

8. Disabilities accommodations policy

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. Academic honesty policy

Students at Holy Apostles College and Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. Attendance policy

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. Incomplete policy

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. About your professor

My working background is in human services, a field which brought me to consider the ways that our society operates, particularly through social institutions, and the ways these shape the lives of vulnerable people. I am particularly inspired by the lives of Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin, who in the 1930s in New York City started the Catholic Worker, a movement which shelters the homeless and works for peace. Through our connection with a local Catholic Worker house, my wife and I have often shared our home with people who are poor or homeless. These experiences brought me to study my faith in a more rigorous fashion: I received an MA in Dogmatic Theology in 2007 from Holy Apostles College and Seminary, and in 2015 I earned my Phd in Catholic theology at the Maryvale Institute of Liverpool Hope University in the UK. Maryvale traces its roots to Blessed John Henry Newman, who in 1846 started a retreat house at Maryvale after he joined the Catholic Church.

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