English/Language Arts 12

Units:

Unit 1 - Analyzing & Writing Creative Non-Fiction: Exploring  Personal Identity

Unit 2 - Analyzing Fiction & Writing Analysis: Identity and Culture

Unit 3 - Chasing Success: High School to College, Careers, and the Future

Unit 4 - Choosing Your Future & Analyzing the American Dream

Unit 5 - The Individual and the Virtual Community: Digital Technology




Unit Title

Unit 1 - Analyzing & Writing Creative Non-Fiction: Exploring  Personal Identity

Timeframe 

9 weeks

Unit Summary

In this unit, students will interact with creative non-fiction texts on a variety of themes.  They will focus on close reading and in-depth analysis to determine an author’s overall purpose and examine how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance his/her purpose.  Students will write a personal essay.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • INTRO TO CLASS COMMUNITY:

  • What does respect mean to you?  How do competing ideas of respect create conflict?  How can a community create a respectful environment for all members while also acknowledging all members’ differences?

  • ANALYZING & WRITING CREATIVE NON-FICTION:

  • How can authenticity make non-fiction satisfying?

  • How can writers apply formal technique to non-fiction in order to be creative?

  • How can writers use creative formal techniques to lead the non-fiction reader to a meaningful truth?

  • What significant event of your life has shaped who you are today?

  • How can you create a story of that event that will interest a reader?

  • How can you glean meaningful truth from that story that not only reveals an authentic aspect of yourself but also enlightens your reader?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • In this unit, students will understand how to create a respectful, collaborative learning environment while respecting and embracing differences.
  • Students will understand how authors and they can use rhetorical strategies and narrative techniques to create a personal essay that reveals a truth about themselves and/or the larger world.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • how to choose textual evidence to support a claim
  • how to correctly quote a text
  • how to paraphrase and summarize a text
  • theme
  • rhetorical techniques
  • figurative language
  • how to make inferences
  • how to recognize an author’s purpose
  • how to write a narrative
  • how to use techniques such as dialogue, description, and plot in narrative writing to develop experiences, events, characters, tone

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • prepare for and effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • cite evidence and use direct quotes
  • paraphrase and objectively summarize texts
  • analyze how multiple texts examine similar themes or how multiple themes in one text contribute to a larger theme
  • analyze application of formal techniques in text
  • draw inferences using explicit and implicit textual evidence and evaluate how they contribute to the meaning of a text
  • determine an author’s overall purpose
  • analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance his/her purpose
  • write a personal essay that: (1) distinguishes and utilizes narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters, choosing words that create vivid pictures (2) provides a conclusion to the events set out at the beginning of the narrative (3) includes techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Informal Writing
  • Group Work Products
  • Exit Tickets
  • Vocabulary Quizzes
  • Graphic Organizers

Summative/ Benchmark

  • “Leap” Cold-Reading Analysis Test
  • Benchmark Assessment 1 – Quotation Analysis Test

Alternative Assessments

  • Write a Narrative – Personal Essay (Students can use for college applications)
  • Creation of Personal Digital Portfolio - Reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources

Learning Activities

  • Intro to Class Community Exercises:
  • Write informal definition of respect with real-life examples as support
  • Using Google Docs, analyze levels of respect/disrespect in classroom scenarios in small groups (2-3 students) using classroom rules as framework
  • Work productively in teams to discuss group analysis
  • Write informal description of the qualities of a good teacher, how good/bad teachers are represented in pop culture, and how the qualities of a good teacher contribute to student progress
  • Complete cold reading pre-assessment that focuses on synthesis of college-level nonfiction texts in an analytical piece of writing
  • Record in digital flashcard program vocabulary terms from all readings
  • Apply vocabulary words in various contexts in pair activities
  • Read professional examples of creative nonfiction which apply formal techniques while combining genres of informative and narrative writing
  • Close reading strategies and text annotation strategies applied showing critical thinking
  • Create online-based graphic organizers to hold analysis notes
  • Summarizing and critiquing student-selected sections of text for both formal techniques and meaning
  • Writing quotation analysis focusing on both meaning and form
  • Read and analyze the effectiveness of 2-3 student-written college application essays
  • Use critical thinking skills to compare and contrast formal choices of 2 essays and evaluate which writer’s piece is more successful
  • Complete a graphic organizer brainstorming focus of personal essay, outlining topic choice, narrative elements, insight and/or conclusions to be included and formal techniques to be utilized - Use student selected online software (Mindmapping, Google Apps, Padlet, etc.)
  • Write a first draft of personal essay in Google Docs and share with peers and/or teacher for comments
  • Evaluate samples drafts for use of techniques and development of narrative and insight
  • Revise first draft of personal essay after receiving individualized written feedback in Google Docs comments and participating in one-on-one conference with teacher

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

  • (optional text for honors classes: Excerpts from John Dewey’s Democracy and Education)
  • Film clips of teachers represented in popular culture (Recommended:  Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Dead Poets’ Society, Harry Potter Films)
  • Hoover, Eric. "Two, Three Essays? More Can Mean Less." The New York Times. The New York Time Company, 12 Apr. 2013. Web. 26 Aug. 2013.
  • "The Greatest Essay Ever Written?." Literary Cavalcade 57.8 (2005): 38. Academic Search Premier. Web. 26 Aug. 2013.
  • Lopate, Phillip. Introduction. The Art of the Personal Essay: An Anthology from the Classical Era to the Present. New York: Anchor, Doubleday, 1995
  • Brian Doyle, “Leap”
  • Annie Dillard “Living Like Weasels”
  • Amy Tan, “Mother Tongue”
  • (Alternate text for struggling students:  Gary Soto, “Like Mexicans”
  • Text Selections from: This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women (J. Allison, D. Gediman)  http://thisibelieve.org/
  • Selected students written college application essays from:

Boykin Curry, Essays That Worked for College Applications: 50 Essays that Helped Students Get into the Nation's Top Colleges

  • The Harvard Independent, 100 Successful College Application Essays

Equipment

  • Teacher Projector
  • Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

  • HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, ThinkCERCA.com, ABC-CLIO, EBSCOhost and other online sources as needed

Standards

Content Statement

Critical Knowledge and Skills

RI.11-12.1. Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.), to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RI.11-12.2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development and how they interact to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RI.11-12.3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

  • Identify and analyze the structure and sequence (chronological, spatial, compare/contrast, etc) of the text
  • Explain why the structure of the text is ordered as it is
  • Explain how the choices of text structure impact the meaning of the text

RI.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

  • Assess figurative meaning
  • Assess connotative meaning
  • Determine and evaluate technical meaning (jargon)
  • Identify tone of text
  • Explain how specific diction creates tone
  • Explain how the tone supports the themes as well as the overall meaning of the text

RI.11-12.5. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it contribute to the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by the larger text
  • Evaluate and hypothesize how the form effectively follows the function of the text

RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance that purpose.
  • Focus on both how the text is written and what the text is about
  • Explain how and why the author has made those rhetorical decisions and how and why that contributes to the overall effectiveness of the text

W.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.11-12.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.11-12.2.B. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

  • Effectively select, organize, and analyze content
  • Determine how many facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information are needed
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose Supply evidence in order to inform the audience
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Examine and communicate complex ideas, concepts, or information clearly and accurately
  • Develop a topic

W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.11-12.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

W.11-12.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • Convey experiences, real or imagined
  • Use time as the deep structure of the narrative
  • Form or structure based on a progression of events that build and reflect upon each other
  • Use effective details using precise language
  • Form clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation
  • Distinguish and utilize narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures
  • Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative
  • Include techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.9. (*Choice) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.11-12.9.B Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research
  • Analyze in writing how multiple texts examine similar themes or how multiple themes in one text contribute to a larger theme
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.A. Observe hyphenation conventions.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context, cultures, and importance of specific texts and writers.  (See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 2 - Analyzing Fiction & Writing Analysis: Identity and Culture

Timeframe 

9 weeks

(Honors 16 weeks with two extended texts)

Unit Summary

In this unit, students will interact with a variety of literary and nonfiction texts relating to the theme of Identity and Culture.  They will focus on close reading and in-depth analysis to determine how central ideas create overall meaning in a text.  Students will be able to compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in different mediums.  Students will write informative/explanatory texts and conduct short research projects.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How do we become who we are?

  • What forces shape the development of our identity?

  • How can we learn to recognize those forces and choose which ones will shape us?

  • How do you develop your identity as an adult?

  • How does your identity change as you begin to move beyond the community you know?

  • How can you develop a personal morality that helps you make difficult choices?  How o you evaluate if those choices are "right?"

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • how culture and other forces influence our identity and understanding of morality.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • how to choose textual evidence to support a claim
  • how to correctly quote a text
  • how to identify central ideas and themes
  • the impact of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction on a text
  • how to make inferences
  • how to compare, contrast, and assess various accounts of a subject over multiple mediums
  • how to write informative/explanatory texts
  • how to conduct research effectively
  • how to create and implement group discussion skills and norms
  • how to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives
  • how to plan and self-monitor independent reading schedule

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences
  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas to identify and track over the course of a text
  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text (and provides depth and dimension)
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums; Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • Conduct short research projects
  • Present information clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g. student developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed
  • Come to discussions prepared, having read material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from the text to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas
  • Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Informal Writing
  • Group Work Analysis Products (See Learning Activities for Details)
  • Group and Individual Classwork Evaluation of Samples and Revision Plans
  • Exit Tickets
  • Vocabulary Quizzes
  • Graphic Organizers

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Quotation Analysis Writing Assessment 1
  • Cold Reading Analysis Test
  • Benchmark Assessment 2 – Quotation Analysis Writing Assessment 2

Alternative Assessments

  • Informative/Explanatory Writing
  • Creation of Personal Digital Portfolio - Reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources

Learning Activities

Introduction to Unit (2 weeks)

  • Review how authors develop purpose and thematic focus (identity development, transition into adulthood, experiencing the larger world) and identify evidence of such choice in mentor texts and analyze how select passages introduce purpose and themes
  • Develop and implement group discussion skills and norms to be implemented throughout the unit
  • Complete graphic organizer in digital format (Google Docs, Padlet) containing select evidence and analysis notes
  • Analyze author’s choice of language to create tone in selected mentor texts
  • Practice various note taking tools with mentor texts: Post-it annotation, Drawing, Bookmarks (see Daniels & Steinke, Mini-Lessons for Literature Circles)
  • View videos on parenting styles and transition into adulthood and while working in pairs or groups of three develop connections between videos and author’s choices
  • Engage in 4 corners discussion and debate on social issues of becoming an adult raised in videos and Chapter 1 of text
  • Close reading strategies and text annotation strategies
  • Collaborative discussions & written reflections
  • Form student-selected cooperative groups for group analysis of choice text
  • Play a variety of cooperative group games to build team cohesion
  • Meet in groups at least 3 times, selecting a significant passage to analyze for thematic development; each member will focus on a different aspect of analysis: asking questions; selecting key language; developing author’s larger idea and adding reader insight
  • Add group analysis to ongoing graphic organizer tracking significant passages and themes as they develop over the novel

Choice Reading Unit Week 1

  • Whole class reading and annotation of 1-2 selections from mentor texts
  • Whole class modeling and practice of using annotation to create reader-response notes and write discussion questions
  • Using mentor texts, students create definitions of good discussion questions and bad discussion questions
  • In cooperative groups, students will share notes and discussion questions and apply new definition to revising and discussing questions, collaborate to answer student-written questions, and create electronic document synthesizing responses as well as student-chosen favorite passage(s)
  • Students will meet in groups to share annotations, responses and discussion questions on section one of text
  • Students will create electronic document recording discussion, self-assessment and favorite passages

Choice Reading Unit Week 2

  • Using mentor texts, teacher will model creating follow-up questions and “save the last word” discussion activity with whole class (see Daniels & Steinke, Mini-Lessons for Literature Circles)
  • In cooperative groups and individually, students will apply two techniques while evaluating various samples of literary analysis using teacher rubric, with a focus on topic sentence development, analysis of key language, and development of larger idea and insight
  • Students will develop revision plans for samples based on evaluations presented to the whole class discussion (Samples will be based on last week’s analysis of mentor texts)
  • Students will independently write timed quotation analysis on student-selected quotations from choice text
  • Students will meet in groups to share annotations, responses and discussion questions on section one of text
  • Students will create electronic document recording discussion, self-assessment and favorite passages

Choice Reading Unit Week 3

  • Using mentor texts, teacher will model “prove it” and “powerful language” activity focusing on selection of key language from passages (see Daniels & Steinke, Mini-Lessons for Literature Circles)
  • In cooperative groups and individually, students will apply “prove it” and “powerful language” techniques to mentor texts, with a focus on analysis of key language, and development of larger themes (focus may change based on Primary 1 assessment data)
  • Students will review teacher comments on Primary 1 and record in digital portfolio.  Students will revise responses under retake policy if needed, applying “prove it” and “powerful language” techniques.
  • Students will meet in groups to share annotations, responses, and discussion questions on section of text, applying “prove it” and “powerful language” techniques.
  • Students will create electronic document recording discussion, self-assessment and favorite passages, applying “prove it” and “powerful language”

Choice Reading Unit Week 4

  • Using mentor texts, teacher will model “post-discussion journaling” activity focusing on end of book, but using mentor text (could use 11th grade whole class novel The Great Gatsby) (see Daniels & Steinke, Mini-Lessons for Literature Circles)
  • Using mentor texts, teacher will create fishbowl, in which students practice being observers and use self-assessment to evaluate a group’s functionality (see Daniels & Steinke, Mini-Lessons for Literature Circles)
  • In cooperative groups and individually, students will apply “post-reading journaling/discussion” techniques to mentor texts, with a focus on analysis of key language, and development of larger themes (focus may change based on Primary 1 assessment data)
  • Students will post-read journal and then meet in groups to share annotations, journal responses and discussion questions
  • Student-chosen representative from each group will complete assessment of all groups functionality as student observer
  • Students will create electronic document recording discussion and self-assessment (see Daniels & Steinke)

Choice Reading Unit Week 5

  • Teacher will model for whole class mini-research project using mentor texts previously read
  • Students will watch videos on Mayan Genocide and Sanctuary movement and write informal responses to both videos, summarizing argument of video and explaining their own position in relationship to that argument
  • Students will meet in groups and discuss which social issues raised by choice text most interests them, creating an electronic list of topics they can post in Google Classroom.
  • In groups, students will use ABC-CLIO database “Issues: Understanding Controversy and Society” and “Pop Culture Universe: Icons, Idols, and Ideas” to find contemporary nonfiction articles about 1-2 issues listed
  • Students will post articles in classroom that link to article, passage from choice text it connects to, explanation of that connection, and a question for further thinking

Choice Reading Unit Week 6

  • Students will review previously written analysis and identify areas of strengths and weaknesses in writing literary analysis
  • Students will examine various writing samples, evaluate strengths and areas for improvement, and develop revision strategies
  • Students will independently write timed quotation analysis on teacher-selected cold quotations from second half of text

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

  • Mentor Text(s): Short stories selected from micro/flash fiction anthologies:
  • Robert Shapard, Flash Fiction Forward: 80 Very Short Stories
  • Jerome Stern, Micro Fiction: An Anthology of Fifty Really Short Stories

  • Choice Texts for Student Groups:
  • The Iliad (Resource English)
  • Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
  • Barbara Kingsolver, The Bean Trees
  • Jack Gantos, Hole in My Life
  • Jacqueline Woodson, Another Brooklyn
  • Benjamin Alire Saenz, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe
  • (Honors) Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

  • Supplemental Resources below

Equipment

  • Teacher Projector
  • Student Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

  • HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, ThinkCERCA.com, ABC-CLIO, EBSCOhost and other online sources as needed

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

  • Toni Morrison's "This Amazing, Troubling Book"
  • Jane Smiley's "Say it Ain't So Huck"
  • David L. Smith's "Huck, Jim and American Racial Discourse"
  • Claudia Durst Johnson’s “Unfit for Children: Censorship and Race”
  • Other Resources:

http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/27/text-to-text-huckleberry-finn-and-in-defense-of-a-loaded-word/?_r=0

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/cultureshock/teachers/huck

 

The Bean Trees, by Barbara Kingsolver

  • Robert Wuthnow’s “Moral Discourse”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hQ1FAC9z3f8

  • Matas, Kimberly. "Living up to one's faith in Sanctuary Movement." Arizona Daily Star (Tucson, AZ) 02 Jan. 2009: Newspaper Source Plus. Web. 23 July 2012.
  • CLIFFORD, KRAUSS. "The World: The C.I.A. and Guatemala; The Spies Who Never Came In From the Cold War." New York Times 07 Mar. 1999: 3. Newspaper Source Plus. Web. 9 Oct. 2012.
  • Broderick, Richard. "Threatened By Resurrection." America 187.2 (2002): 16. MasterFILE Premier. Web. 9 Oct. 2012.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

  • Other teacher selected Alexie fiction or non-fiction

Standards

Content Statement

Critical Knowledge and Skills

RL.11.12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.11-12.1. Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.), to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.11-12.2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development and how they interact to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

RI.11-12.3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

RL.11-12.3:

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RI.11-12.3:

  • Identify and analyze the structure and sequence (chronological, spatial, compare/contrast, etc) of the text
  • Explain why the structure of the text is ordered as it is
  • Explain how the choices of text structure impact the meaning of the text

RL.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (e.g., Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

RI.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

  • Assess figurative meaning
  • Assess connotative meaning
  • Determine and evaluate technical meaning (jargon)
  • Identify tone of text
  • Explain how specific diction creates tone
  • Explain how the tone supports the themes as well as the overall meaning of the text

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  •  Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

RL.11-12.6:

  • Identify and assess the point of view
  • Determine what the text literally and figuratively states
  • Determine what the text actually means, considering satire, sarcasm, irony, and understatement
  • Explain the difference between the literal and the actual meaning as it pertains to the author’s purpose

RI.11-12.6:

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance that purpose.
  • Focus on both how the text is written and what the text is about
  • Explain how and why the author has made those rhetorical decisions and how and why that contributes to the overall effectiveness of the text

RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

W.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.11-12.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.11-12.2.B. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

W.11-12.2.C. Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.11-12.2.D. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.  

W.11-12.2.E. Establish and maintain a style and tone appropriate to the audience and purpose (e.g. formal and objective for academic writing) while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.11-12.2.F. Provide a concluding paragraph or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

  • Effectively select, organize, and analyze content
  • Determine how many facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information are needed
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose Supply evidence in order to inform the audience
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Examine and communicate complex ideas, concepts, or information clearly and accurately
  • Develop a topic
  • Introduce a topic by arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task Focus on syntax as it creates effective writing
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone                              
  • Choose precise words, domain-specific vocabulary, and figurative language, such as similes, metaphors, and analogies
  • Incorporate analysis of textual evidence to further content
  • Format effectively
  • Organize graphics
  • Provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions and syntax to link together the major sections of the text
  • Write a concluding paragraph or section that supports the information presented

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.7. (*Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information from a variety of sources, achieving a new insight
  • Evaluate multiple sources and their content

W.11-12.9. (*Choice) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.11-12.9.A. Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research
  • Analyze in writing how multiple texts examine similar themes or how multiple themes in one text contribute to a larger theme
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

 

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically.  The content, organization, development, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.

  • Formulate a clear and distinct perspective on a topic or issue and amass evidence to support that perspective
  • Draw information from primary and secondary sources, and provide a conclusion
  • Differentiate and critique opposing viewpoints
  • Organize, develop, and produce a presentation in a style appropriate to my purpose and audience
  • Present information clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Use correct eye contact
  • Adapt volume and tone to audience and purpose
  • Speak with clear pronunciation

SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

  • Consider, determine and apply the most strategic use of digital media
  • Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

  • Adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose
  • Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.A. Observe hyphenation conventions.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

 

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking           
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

L.11-12.6:  Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Acquire general academic words from content-specific written texts
  • Independently integrate general academic words and domain-specific words into reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context, cultures, and importance of specific texts and writers.

Sociology: Students will consider theories of how society members interact and construct difference.

Philosophy: Students will read short texts that offer different philosophies of identity.

Current Events:  Students will relate themes of the extended texts to current issues in the news.  (See Resource List)

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

8.1.12.E.2 Research and evaluate the impact on society of the unethical use of digital tools and present your research to peers.

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.12.F.1 Evaluate the strengths and limitations of emerging technologies and their impact on educational, career, personal and or social needs.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 3 - Chasing Success: High School to College, Careers, and the Future

Timeframe 

7 weeks

(Honors: modified for 3 weeks)

Unit Summary

In this unit, students will interact with non-fiction texts on relating to the theme of Chasing Success and will relate the texts to their own futures.  They will focus on close reading and in-depth analysis to draw conclusions/make logical judgements about the information in a text. Students will be able to compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in different mediums and use references to different texts to answer a question or solve a problem.  Students will write argumentative texts, conduct short research projects, and complete an independent reading project on a book of their choosing.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How do we define and measure success?

  • Why does one sometimes have to make sacrifices in order to be successful?  What types of sacrifices?

  • Why are so many American high school students unprepared to successfully transition from high school to college?

  • How can both high school students and teachers be more proactive in helping students make that transition?

  • Is college the best option for a high school graduate who wants to become a successful adult? Why or why not?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • how they measure success in life and evaluate what sacrifices might need to be made to be successful.
  • how to evaluate post-high school options to achieve goals and how to be best prepared for these opportunities.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • how to choose textual evidence to support a claim
  • how to correctly quote a text
  • how to identify central ideas and themes
  • how to make inferences through use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding thematic development
  • how to compare, contrast, and assess various accounts of a subject over multiple mediums
  • how to synthesize information from multiple sources
  • how to write argumentative texts
  • how to conduct research effectively
  • how to plan and self-monitor independent reading schedule
  • effective presentation tools

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what a text says explicitly as well as inferences
  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas to identify and track over the course of a text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Make strategic use of digital media in presentations to enhance understandings of findings, reasons, and evidence and to add interest
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Cite evidence and use direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions (Prepare for discussions, Read and research materials beforehand, Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion, Refer to evidence from texts and other research)
  • Utilize multiple sources of information in order to make decisions
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Listen to and assess multiple source of information in diverse formats and media
  • Use references to the different texts to answer a question or to solve a problem
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Track Your Thinking Journals
  • Informal Writing
  • Individual Analysis Results
  • Group Work Analysis Products (See Learning Activities for Details)
  • Presentation of Evidence
  • Vocabulary Quizzes
  • Video Critique
  • Presentation Slides
  • Graphic Organizer

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Cold Reading Test on Article (2)
  • Argumentative Essay

Alternative Assessments

  • Individual Choice Reading Project

Learning Activities

  • Individual Choice Reading Project (7 Fridays during Chasing Success Unit)
  • Day 1
  • Teacher will book-talk 4-5 texts and model how to choose a book: reading first pages, using goodreads.com, www.amazon.com, etc.
  • Students will use Chromebooks to peruse reviews and examine classroom library while conferencing with teacher through book-selection process
  • Teacher will model how to use “Track Your Thinking” electronic/paper journal (based on Kelly Gallagher text) using mentor texts from previous unit
  • Students will use 20 minutes to begin reading text and journal
  • Final ten minutes will be devoted to whole class discussion of journal issues, text issues, or words that move.
  • Day 2-5
  • Teacher will open with reading warm-up based on words that move in teacher’s independent reading text
  • Students will read and continue track your thinking journals for 20 minutes
  • Teacher will begin reading conferences with individual students during 20- minute reading period
  • Final ten minutes will be devoted to whole class discussion of journal issues, text issues, or words that move
  • Day 6
  • Teacher will model reading project choices: padlet review, classroom post with links, poster review, etc.
  • Student will choose project form and begin making project
  • Day 7
  • Students will complete project
  • Chasing Success
  • Part 1
  • Students read articles and select evidence to address unit’s essential questions
  • Collaborative discussions of evidence selected and essential questions
  • Individual analysis of semester 1 grades and comparison to college grading structure
  • Student-selected cooperative group analysis of college syllabi, writing assignment expectations and composition textbook table of contents
  • Presentation of finding to whole class for collaborative discussion of the difference between high school and college expectations
  • Vocabulary practice using TIP and other visualization devices
  • Write summaries of evidence selected and explanation of how evidence both answers essential questions and connects with previously cited evidence
  • In cooperative groups, share written responses, synthesize ideas and present evidence collected and connection made using Google Slides
  • Record evidence and connections into ongoing student-created graphic organizer for unit in Google Docs
  • Engage in collaborative discussion of evidence and units essential questions
  • Part 2
  • View video and write critique of statements from various participants in news story, make connections between argument in news story and student’s own post-high school plans
  • Collaborative discussion of video
  • Read articles, select evidence from each that establishes author’s argument for alternatives to college, and summarize evidence
  • In cooperative groups, collect evidence from each article and explain connection and larger point
  • Present connections to whole class using Google Slides or other tech tool of student choice: Padlet, etc.
  • Record evidence and connections into ongoing student-created graphic organizer for unit in Google Docs
  • Part 3
  • Using EBSCOhost or teacher recommendations, select at least one additional article to complete summary and critique of
  • Using previous reading/writing assignments and ongoing graphic organizer, complete essay planning graphic organizer with evidence for three body paragraphs, two of which must contain two or more sources
  • Write draft of argumentative essay that addresses one of the unit’s essential questions or student-created inquiry question related to the unit theme; meet with teacher one-on-one for feedback in Google Docs
  • Evaluate sample drafts and develop possible revision plans
  • Revise essay into final draft

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

  • Essay by Malcolm Gladwell, “Marita’s Bargain” (Collections Unit 1)
  • Nonfiction by Paul Tough, “Kewauna’s Ambition” (Collections Unit 1)
  • Graduation Speech by Michael Lewis, “Don’t Eat Fortune’s Cookie” (Collections Unit 1)
  • Science Article by Carol S. Dweck, “The Secret to Raising Smart Kids” (Collections Unit 1)
  • Novel Excerpt by Jamaica Kincaid, “A Walk to the Jetty” from Annie John (Collections Unit 1)
  • Informational texts on unit theme found at: www.hmhfyi.com
  • "Most College-Bound Students Underprepared, Studies Say." Recruitment & Retention In Higher Education 19.11 (2005): 6. Academic Search Premier. Web. 4 Feb. 2013
  • Rodrigues, Donna, and Cecilia Le. "Turning Seniors Into Freshmen." Educational Leadership 68.7 (2011): 79-83. ERIC. Web. 4 Feb. 2013.
  • Arnold, Chris. "Economists Say Millennials Should Consider Careers in the Trades." National Public Radio. 2 Feb. 2015. Web. 6 Feb. 2015.
  • Weider, Ben.  “Theil Fellowship Pays 24 Talented Students $100,000 Not to Attend College.”  The Chronicle of Higher Education.  The Chronicle of Higher Education. 25 May 2011. Web. 20 Dec. 2011.
  • Video: 60 Minutes, “Dropping Out:  Is College Worth the Cost?”  http://www.cbsnews.com/news/dropping-out-is-college-worth-the-cost/
  • Hirsch, Deborah. "The High School To College Transition: Minding The Gap." New England Journal Of Higher Education (2010): ERIC. Web. 5 Feb. 2014.
  • Kirp, David L. "How to Help College Students Graduate." New York Times [New York] 8 Jan. 2014, Op-Ed sec.: 1-2. Print.
  • Montgomery, Rick. “Military Gets Picky in Recruiting.”  South Florida Sun-Sentinal  25 May  2014.  ProQuest Central. Web. 9 Mar. 2015.
  • Pew Social & Demographic Trends.  “Executive Summary.” Is College Worth It? Pew Research Center. 15 May 2011. Web. 20 Dec 2011.
  • Selingo, Jeff. "On Students' Paths To College, Some Detours Are Desirable." Chronicle Of Higher Education (2012): ERIC. Web. 5 Feb. 2014.
  • Singletary, Michelle. "Not All College Majors Are Created Equal." Washington Post 14 Jan. 2012. Web. 6 Feb. 2015. <www.washingtonpost.com>.
  • Jacobs, Joanne. “Engagement is Key to Community College Success, Author Says.” US News & World Report: Education. 30 Mar 2012. Web. http://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/2012/03/30/engagement-is-key-to-community-college-success-author-says
  • Jacobs, Joanne. “7 Steps to Success at Community College.” US News & World Report: Education. 3 Feb 2012. Web.http://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/2012/02/03/7-steps-to-success-at-community-college
  • Boyington, Briana. “Explore Career Programs at Trade Schools,Community Colleges.” US News & World Report: Education. 4 Feb 2016. Web. http://www.usnews.com/education/community-colleges/articles/2016-02-04/explore-career-programs-at-trade-schools-community-colleges

 

Equipment

  • Teacher Projector
  • Student Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

  • HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, ThinkCERCA.com, ABC-CLIO, EBSCOhost and other online sources as needed

Standards

Content Statement

Critical Knowledge and Skills

RL.11.12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.11-12.1. Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.), to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.11-12.2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development and how they interact to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

RL.11-12.3:

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RL.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (e.g., Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

RI.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

  • Assess figurative meaning
  • Assess connotative meaning
  • Determine and evaluate technical meaning (jargon)
  • Identify tone of text
  • Explain how specific diction creates tone
  • Explain how the tone supports the themes as well as the overall meaning of the text

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  •  Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

RL.11-12.6:

  • Identify and assess the point of view
  • Determine what the text literally and figuratively states
  • Determine what the text actually means, considering satire, sarcasm, irony, and understatement
  • Explain the difference between the literal and the actual meaning as it pertains to the author’s purpose

RI.11-12.6:

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance that purpose.
  • Focus on both how the text is written and what the text is about
  • Explain how and why the author has made those rhetorical decisions and how and why that contributes to the overall effectiveness of the text

RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

W.11-12.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.11-12.1.A. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

W.11-12.1.B. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

W.11-12.1.C. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

W.11-12.1. D. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.11-12.E. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

  • Effectively select, organize, and analyze content
  • Use the most relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes Examine and communicate complex ideas, concepts, or information clearly and accurately
  • Determine how many facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information are needed to effectively craft an argument
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose
  • Understand how much evidence is needed to satisfactorily support a point
  • Develop a topic
  • Learn how to introduce argument(s) clearly and accurately with regard to counterclaims
  • Understand and establish why the claim is important
  • Structure arguments so that there is an association and correlation between the claim(s), counterclaim(s), reasons, and evidence
  • Treat claims and counterclaims equitably taking into account what their audience knows as well as what concerns they might have
  • Develop unity and consistency in writing with words and structure, paying attention to the relationships created between the claims, counterclaims, evidence, and reason
  • Maintain an appropriate style and tone for the task,  omitting personal bias
  • Consider and anticipate the audience’s education, beliefs, and feelings about the subject
  • Choose precise words and domain-specific vocabulary
  • Introduce a topic arranging ideas, concepts, and information to show interrelationships
  • Format effectively
  • Organize graphics and provide multimedia when useful
  • Use transitions to link together the major sections of the text
  • Use varied syntax
  • Choose a formal style and objective tone
  • Decide what organization is most effective for purpose, audience, and task
  • Write a concluding statement that supports the information presented

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style),focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

  • Create and utilize appropriate planning templates
  • Understand and practice revision techniques
  • Comprehend writing as a process
  • Plan, revise, edit, rewrite, or try a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose or audience
  • Determine what details and/or information is most appropriate for a specific purpose
  • Understand writing as a process rather than a product

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.7. (*Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information from a variety of sources, achieving a new insight
  • Evaluate multiple sources and their content

W.11-12.9. (*Choice) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.11-12.9.B Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research
  • Analyze in writing how multiple texts examine similar themes or how multiple themes in one text contribute to a larger theme
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

 

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, qualitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.        

  • Listen to and assess multiple sources of information in diverse formats and media
  • Utilize multiple sources of information in order to make decisions
  • Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Correlate the speaker’s argument with the student’s own
  • Identify logical fallacies, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Engage as an active listener and participant
  • Consider and assess the speaker, argument, organization, diction, and tone.
  • Use evidence from sources/text to prove fallibility in speaker’s reasoning

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Science/Current Events:  Students will examine a variety of current issues in the news, including science articles.  (See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.
  • 9.2.12.C.4 Analyze how economic conditions and societal changes influence employment trends and future education.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.12.C.1 Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.12.F.1 Evaluate the strengths and limitations of emerging technologies and their impact on educational, career, personal and or social needs.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 4 - Choosing Your Future & Analyzing the American Dream

Timeframe 

11 weeks

(Level 1&2 only; runs concurrently with unit 5 for Level 3)

Unit Summary

In this unit, students will interact with fiction and non-fiction texts on the theme of the American Dream and will relate the texts to their own futures.  They will focus on close reading and in-depth analysis of a play and influential US documents with a focus on rhetorical features. Students will analyze a documentary film, write a narrative, and conduct short research projects.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What do you dream for your future 10 years from now?

  • Why is this your dream? What will inspire you to pursue this dream?

  • What challenges do you anticipate as your pursue this dream, and how will you meet them?

  • What is the American Dream?  Has it changed over time?  Is it achievable?

A Raisin in the Sun

  • What happens to a dream deferred?

  • Why is that dream deferred?

  • How can art let the world know that a dream is being deferred? Why should it?

The Queen of Versailles & Undefeated (Optional)

  • How can film be used to construct an argument?

  • How do documentary filmmakers use techniques to build an argument and persuade an audience?

  • How can documentary film be used to spark public conversation about important social issues?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • the American Dream and analyze whether it is achievable
  • how the definition of the American Dream has changed over time
  • how the definition of the American Dream applies to their own lives
  • social issues surrounding the American Dream

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • How to identify the themes and purposes of influential U.S. documents
  • How to identify rhetorical features and their influence on a text
  • How to assess and synthesize information from multiple sources
  • How to write a narrative
  • Various text structures and purposes
  • Themes and central ideas
  • The impacts of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • How to identify author’s purpose
  • Rhetorical strategies and their effects
  • How to effectively research and present information
  • How to evaluate credibility and accuracy of sources

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Identify and explain the themes and purposes of influential U.S. documents, particularly how they connect
  • Identify and explain rhetorical features such as diction, imagery, details, figurative language, and syntax
  • Listen to and assess multiple sources of information in diverse formats and media
  • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole
  • Generate connections among ideas and between texts
  • Evaluate the rationale used in a text
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text and provides depth and dimension
  • Identify and evaluate the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how these choices impact the overall story and the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance that purpose.
  • Evaluate the differences between multiple versions of the same text, recordings, film, and/or live performances
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources, Understand steps of an investigation, Develop an inquiry question, Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry, Synthesize and summarize information from a variety of sources, achieving a new insight
  • Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of documentary film
  • Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Quizzes
  • Group Visual Presentation/Infographic
  • Visual Project
  • Journal Entries
  • Independent Annotations and Group Analysis Notes
  • Graphic Organizers

Summative/ Benchmark

  • A Raisin in the Sun Analysis Assessment
  • Cold Reading Assessment (Speech Analysis)
  • Documentary Film Analysis Assessment

Alternative Assessments

  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Narrative Writing
  • Visual Multi-Media Project

Learning Activities

  • Intro to Unit
  • View video - “Defining the American Dream: The New York Times”
  • Independently and in pairs/small groups, identify different ideas Americans use to categorize their ideal life, and how they make economic and social decisions to reach that ideal
  • Present findings to whole class to catalyze collaborative discussion
  • View teacher presentation of “American Dream in Quotation” and take notes on how meaning of dream changes in seminal U.S. documents
  • In student selected cooperative groups create digital visual presentation of one quotation from teacher presentation that summarizes and critiques quotation and connects its meaning to contemporary times
  • A Raisin in the Sun
  • Create a visual/text project using Google Slides, Prezi, or Ease.ly that includes a creative description of what student wants in two areas of students’s life 10 years from now, why those desires are important to student, and what quotation will inspire them to achieve those goals
  • Use internet search to find quotations and images for project as well as an internet-based presentation template to make project
  • Conference with teacher one-on-one throughout project using specific feedback to revise
  • Engage in evaluation of sample projects, develop revision plans, and apply those plans to their own project
  • Review essential questions of unit and Hansberry’s thematic focus of play
  • Read Langston Hughes’ “Harlem,” and analyze the different results of having a “dream deferred” in jigsaw groups
  • Read “Remembering Hansberry vs. Lee” and annotate for argument behind Supreme Court decision
  • In student-selected groups, discuss question regarding whether or not court decision represented an advancement in civil rights
  • Present findings to class and debate
  • Write journal entry about connection between Supreme Court case and Hansberry’s selected themes
  • View 2008 film broken down by act
  • After viewing, read and annotate selected scene from act with specific thematic focus
  • Share annotations in small groups (pair or group of 3) and use evidence to 1) analyze how Hansberry’s character development connects to Hughes’ poem “Harlem” (Act 1), 2) analyze how Hansberry develops complex, contradictory motivations for each character, leading to debate in the audience (Act 2), 3) analyze how Hansberry structures Act 3 to reveal competing “truths” to argue for or against
  • Compare and contrast the different film depictions of Walter (“taken and tooken” speech), and explain the different conceptions of the character based on the different interpretations
  • Informational Texts
  • Read/view digital recording of Obama speech and select key quotations to write written summaries and critique
  • Whole class discussion of speech focusing on largest challenges students anticipate as they begin to work toward their future
  • Independent research of student-selected topic (focus on a future goal they they have such as: college degree, home ownership, particular field of work, military service, etc.) using EBSCOhost databases to find most current and relevant information
  • Write 5 entry, correctly formatted annotated bibliography on topic, with a focus on student-written essential questions about their chosen topic
  • Documentaries
  • Review history of documentary film and formal techniques used in documentary film
  • Analyze how techniques are applied in select scenes from Michael Moore’s Bowling for Columbine
  • View The Queen of Versailles and write daily individual analysis notes on how formal techniques are applied to build a specific message about the choice made by the subjects of the film
  • Record analysis notes into larger online graphic organizer that present overall analysis of the film
  • View Undefeated and write daily individual analysis notes on how formal techniques are applied to build a specific message about the choice made by the subjects of the film
  • Record analysis notes into larger online graphic organizer that present overall analysis of the film

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

  • Video: “Defining the American Dream:  The New York Times.”  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C48aGtPIuZo
  • Teacher presentation:  “The American Dream in Quotations”
  • Langston Hughes, “Harlem”
  • “The Long Civil Rights Movement:  Remembering Hansberry vs. Lee” https://lcrm.lib.unc.edu/blog/index.php/tag/hansberry-v-lee/
  • Text:  Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry   (Possible alternate text: Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller)
  • Film:  A Raisin in the Sun (2008), Film:  A Raisin in the Sun  (1961)
  • President Barack Obama, “A Fundamental Threat to the American Dream”
  • EBSCOhost Databases
  • Bureau of Labor & Statistics: Career Outlook: Career Planning for High Schoolers
  • http://www.bls.gov/careeroutlook/2015/article/career-planning-for-high-schoolers.htm
  • (Optional) Documentary Films: The Queen of Versailles, Undefeated

Equipment

  • Teacher Projector
  • Student Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

  • HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, ThinkCERCA.com, ABC-CLIO, EBSCOhost and other online sources as needed

Standards

Content Statement

Critical Knowledge and Skills

RL.11.12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence and make relevant connections to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.11-12.1. Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.), to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account, and provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.11-12.2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development and how they interact to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

RI.11-12.3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

RL.11-12.3:

  • Identify and analyze the choices made by the author including the choice of setting, plot organization and development, characterization and character interaction
  • Explain how the order in which each is presented in the text impacts the overall text
  • Analyze those choices as they pertain to the overall story

RI.11-12.3:

  • Identify and analyze the structure and sequence (chronological, spatial, compare/contrast, etc) of the text
  • Explain why the structure of the text is ordered as it is
  • Explain how the choices of text structure impact the meaning of the text

RL.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (e.g., Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

  • Assess figurative meaning
  • Assess connotative meaning
  • Determine and evaluate technical meaning (jargon)
  • Identify tone of text
  • Explain how specific diction creates tone
  • Explain how the tone supports the themes as well as the overall meaning of the text

RL.11-12.5:  Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

  •  Evaluate the structure of the text (ex. en media res, flashbacks, tragic elements)
  • Analyze how an author has chosen to structure a text and order events within it
  • Conclude why the author chose that structure and how it enhances the work as a whole

RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

RL.11-12.6:

  • Identify and assess the point of view
  • Determine what the text literally and figuratively states
  • Determine what the text actually means, considering satire, sarcasm, irony, and understatement
  • Explain the difference between the literal and the actual meaning as it pertains to the author’s purpose

RI.11-12.6:

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance that purpose.
  • Focus on both how the text is written and what the text is about
  • Explain how and why the author has made those rhetorical decisions and how and why that contributes to the overall effectiveness of the text

RL.11-12.7:  Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

  • Read and/or view different versions of the same text, recordings, film, and/or live performances
  • Compare and contrast the multiple versions
  • Evaluate the significant the differences between the multiple versions
  • Focus on significant changes to structure, order, plot, and/or character
  • Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums
  • Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message
  • Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

RI.11-12.8. Describe and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. and global texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses).

•        Evaluate the rationale used in a text

•        Understand and explain how to connects to the principles determined by the Constitution

•        Understand and explain how text connects to established laws and practices

•        Determine and explain the idea, reason, and logic behind public advocacy texts (like a presidential address)

•        Express the rationale, content and principles expressed in each text

RL.11-12.9:  Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.

RI.11-12.9. Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features, including primary source documents relevant to U.S. and/or global history.

•        Identify when an author draws on and then transforms source material (such as a theme or topic) from another text

•        Identify foundational and canonical American texts

•        Identify and examine how different texts from the same era/genre approach the same theme/topics

•        Study and evaluate influential U.S. documents

•        Identify and explain the themes and purposes, particularly how they connect

•        Identify and explain their rhetorical features such as diction, imagery, details, figurative language, and syntax

RL.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 12–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently

RI.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 12–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.

•        Closely read various forms of literature and literary nonfiction independently, proficiently, and, fluently

•        Demonstrate comprehension of various forms of literary text by showing a steadily growing ability to discern more and make fuller use of text

•        Generate connections among ideas and between texts

•        Consider and evaluate a wider range of textual evidence

W.11-12.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.11-12.3.A. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

W.11-12.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).

W.11-12.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

W.11-12.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

  • Convey experiences, real or imagined
  • Use time as the deep structure of the narrative
  • Form or structure based on a progression of events that build and reflect upon each other
  • Use effective details using precise language
  • Form clear point(s) of view established through a narrator, provide characters, and present a situation
  • Distinguish and utilize narrative techniques including dialogue, description, and plot in order to develop experiences, events, and/or characters choosing words that create vivid pictures
  • Provide a conclusion to the events they set out at the beginning of their narrative
  • Include techniques for rhetorical effectiveness like the creation of tone, the plot of the narrative, and the overall coherence of the text

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.7. (*Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information from a variety of sources, achieving a new insight
  • Evaluate multiple sources and their content

W.11-12.8. (*Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).

•        Gather grade level appropriate print and digital information

•        Consider the sources in terms of task, audience, and purpose

•        Assess the validity of each source as it pertains to the specific task, purpose and audience

•        Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant

•        Utilize a variety of sources, not depending on one specific source

•        Consider how the use of sources contributes to the overall flow of the piece

•        Paraphrase correctly

•        Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.11-12.9. (*Choice) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.11-12.9.B Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research
  • Analyze in writing how multiple texts examine similar themes or how multiple themes in one text contribute to a larger theme
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

 

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, qualitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.        

  • Listen to and assess multiple sources of information in diverse formats and media
  • Utilize multiple sources of information in order to make decisions
  • Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

  • Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant
  • Correlate the speaker’s argument with the student’s own
  • Identify logical fallacies, judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading
  • Engage as an active listener and participant
  • Consider and assess the speaker, argument, organization, diction, and tone.
  • Use evidence from sources/text to prove fallibility in speaker’s reasoning

SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

•        Consider, determine and apply the most strategic use of digital media

•        Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking        
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.11-12.5.A. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

L.11-12.5.B. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  • Analyze and evaluate the use of figurative language within a text, particularly hyperbole and paradox
  • Analyze and validate slight differences in the meanings of words with similar definitions (ex: saunter and walk)

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

History:  Students will discuss and investigate the historical context and importance of specific texts and writers, especially in terms of tracking the American Dream.  (See Resource List)

  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.
  • 9.2.12.C.4 Analyze how economic conditions and societal changes influence employment trends and future education.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.12.C.1 Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.12.D.1 Demonstrate appropriate application of copyright, fair use and/or Creative Commons to an original work.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel


Unit Title

Unit 5 - The Individual and the Virtual Community: Digital Technology

Timeframe 

8 weeks

(Honors only; Level 1&2 may complete a modified version of this unit)

Unit Summary

In this unit, students will interact with non-fiction texts and films on the theme of Digital Technology and will relate the texts to their own futures.  They will focus on close reading and in-depth analysis to determine how central ideas create overall meaning in a text.  Students will be able to compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in different mediums.  Students will write informative/explanatory texts and conduct short research projects.  Students are provided a mock syllabus to mirror a college course.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How have we become a digital nation?

  • What choices are the creators of this technology making, and how do their choices affect us?

  • How does digital technology change the way we experience the world?

  • How does digital technology change the way we relate to each other?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • the effects of technology in their lives and in the larger world, such as how it impacts relationships.
  • how technology will impact their future and moral implications that arise with living in a “digital nation.”

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • how to choose textual evidence to support a claim
  • how to correctly quote a text, paraphrase, and summarize a text
  • how to determine an author’s purpose
  • rhetorical strategies and their impact on author’s purpose
  • how to make inferences
  • how to compare, contrast, and assess various accounts of a subject over multiple mediums
  • how to write informative/explanatory texts
  • how to conduct research effectively

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Cite evidence and use direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance that purpose
  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions (Prepare for discussions, Read and research materials beforehand, Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion, Refer to evidence from texts and other research)
  • Listen to and assess multiple source of information in diverse formats and media
  • Use references to the different texts to answer a question or to solve a problem
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content
  • Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Informal Writing
  • Individual Analysis Results
  • Group Work Analysis Products (See Learning Activities for Details)
  • Presentation of Evidence
  • Vocabulary Quizzes
  • Graphic Organizer

Summative/ Benchmark

  • In-Class Timed Writing Assignments (How do scientists choose to construct digital technology and why? How has digital technology changed the way young people experience the larger world?  How does digital technology change the way we relate to each other?)

Alternative Assessments

  • Annotated Bibliography

Learning Activities

  • Research/Annotate Bibliography frame/case analysis of The Social Network using various writings about technologists motivations
  • Frame/case analysis of Wall-E using various writings about technologies and their impact on human relationships
  • Mock Syllabus provided to mirror a college course

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

  • Texts
  • “Growing Up Tethered” by Sherry Turkle
  • “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” by Nicholas Carr
  • “Joyas Volardores” by Brian Doyle
  • “The First Church of Robotics” by Jaron Lanier
  • “Get Smarter” by Jamais Cascio
  • You Are Not a Gadget (selections) by Jaron Lanier

  • Films
  • Digital Nation:  Life on the Digital Frontier (PBS Frontline)
  • Generation Like (PBS Frontline)
  • The Social Network
  • Wall-E

  • Short Films
  • “Artificial Intelligence?” Can Machines Think Like Us? NovaScienceNOW
  • “Putting Hal to Sleep” 2001:  A Space Odyssey
  • “What is Google Glass?” The Google Corporation

Equipment

  • Teacher Projector
  • Student Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

  • HMH FYI Site for Informational Texts, Newsela.com, Readworks.org, Tweentribune.com, ThinkCERCA.com, ABC-CLIO, EBSCOhost and other online sources as needed

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

RI.11-12.1. Accurately cite strong and thorough textual evidence, (e.g., via discussion, written response, etc.), to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

  • Make personal connections, connections to other texts, and/or global/historical connections when relevant
  • Analyze the text and identify explicit and implicit textual evidence
  • Determine the difference between strong and insufficient (unreliable) details
  • Cite evidence and use  direct quotes, paraphrase, objectively summarize (free of personal bias)
  • Draw inferences using implicit and explicit text evidence
  • Draw conclusions/make logical judgments about the information within the text on the basis of evidence and prior conclusions/prior experience
  • Support inference using several examples from the text
  • Evaluate the relationship between explicit and implicit details and how they contribute to the meaning of the text
  • Identify the moments where the author is inconclusive  or uncertain and allows the reader to draw conclusions based on textual evidence

RI.11-12.2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development and how they interact to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas in a text
  • Recognize supporting details for themes/central ideas
  • Analyze themes/central ideas as it develops over the course of the text
  • Make inferences through the use of details, word choice, and literary elements regarding the thematic development
  • Use the text to draw conclusions
  • Examine how the interaction of themes/central ideas create the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension)
  • Construct an objective summary of the text
  • Examine how the interaction of themes creates the overall meaning of the text ( and provides depth and dimension and complexity)

RI.11-12.3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

  • Identify and analyze the structure and sequence (chronological, spatial, compare/contrast, etc) of the text
  • Explain why the structure of the text is ordered as it is
  • Explain how the choices of text structure impact the meaning of the text

RI.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

  • Assess figurative meaning
  • Assess connotative meaning
  • Determine and evaluate technical meaning (jargon)
  • Identify tone of text
  • Explain how specific diction creates tone
  • Explain how the tone supports the themes as well as the overall meaning of the text

RI.11-12.5. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.

  • Investigate how an author structures the text and develops ideas
  • Analyze how the structure of a text and order of ideas or claims within it contribute to the overall purpose of the text and how they are developed and shaped by the larger text
  • Evaluate and hypothesize how the form effectively follows the function of the text

RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

  • Determine the author’s overall purpose
  • Analyze how an author uses various rhetorical strategies to advance that purpose.
  • Focus on both how the text is written and what the text is about
  • Explain how and why the author has made those rhetorical decisions and how and why that contributes to the overall effectiveness of the text

RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem

•        Compare, contrast, and assess how various accounts of a subject are told in multiple mediums

•        Analyze how the details emphasized in each account of a subject told in different mediums affect the overall message

•        Use references to the different media to answer a question or to solve a problem

RI.11-12.10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 12–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.

•        Closely read various forms of literature and literary nonfiction independently, proficiently, and, fluently

•        Demonstrate comprehension of various forms of literary text by showing a steadily growing ability to discern more and make fuller use of text

•        Generate connections among ideas and between texts

•        Consider and evaluate a wider range of textual evidence

•        Become more sensitive to inconsistencies, ambiguities, and poor reasoning in texts

•        Determine when comprehension is not occurring, and subsequently employ appropriate reading and note-taking strategies and/or ask for help in order to understand portions of a difficult text

W.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.11-12.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.11-12.2.B. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

  • Effectively select, organize, and analyze content
  • Determine how many facts, definitions, details, quotations and other information are needed
  • Use sources that are appropriate to task, audience, and purpose Supply evidence in order to inform the audience
  • Use relevant and sufficient facts, definitions, details, and quotes
  • Examine and communicate complex ideas, concepts, or information clearly and accurately
  • Develop a topic

W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • Determine writing task type and its appropriate organizational structure
  • Identify and understand the writing purpose
  • Determine and address the audience (intended reader) appropriately
  • Understand and utilize appropriate style
  • Understand how structure, style and rhetorical devices convey the purpose of writing

W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, share, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

  • Use technology proficiently for production, publication, and collaboration
  • Link and cite sources
  • Create shared writing products for feedback
  • Assess feedback from peers
  • Adapt writing according to feedback
  • Respond to ongoing feedback utilizing digital software

W.11-12.7. (*Choice) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

  • Conduct short and more sustained research projects
  • Conduct research drawing on multiple sources
  • Understand steps of an investigation
  • Develop an inquiry question
  • Refocus inquiry/generate additional questions when appropriate
  • Know how to broaden or narrow an inquiry
  • Synthesize and summarize information from a variety of sources, achieving a new insight
  • Evaluate multiple sources and their content

W.11-12.8. (*Choice) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation (MLA or APA Style Manuals).

  • Gather grade level appropriate print and digital information
  • Consider the sources in terms of task, audience, and purpose
  • Assess the validity of each source as it pertains to the specific task, purpose and audience
  • Assess whether information from reliable and authoritative sources is relevant
  • Utilize a variety of sources, not depending on one specific source
  • Consider how the use of sources contributes to the overall flow of the piece
  • Paraphrase correctly
  • Follow a standard format for citation (MLA, APA, etc.)

W.11-12.9. (*Choice) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.11-12.9.B Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]").

  • Assess soundness of reasoning and relevance of textual evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research
  • Analyze in writing how multiple texts examine similar themes or how multiple themes in one text contribute to a larger theme
  • Utilize evidence to support analysis, reflection, and research

W.11-12.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • Design a plan to appropriately match the task, purpose, and audience that incorporates research, reflection, and revision
  • Write routinely over shorter and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  • Synthesize research gathered over shorter time frames into a long-term research project
  • Manage a long-term research project that incorporates research, reflection, and revision

SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with peers on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1.B. Collaborate with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and assessments (e.g., student-developed rubrics), and establish individual roles as needed.

SL.11-12.1.C. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11.12.1.D. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

  • Effectively participate in one-on-one, group, and teacher-led discussions
  • Prepare for discussions
  • Read and research materials beforehand
  • Articulate ideas clearly and persuasively in a discussion
  • Refer to evidence from texts and other research
  • Draw from and build on the ideas of others in a discussion
  • Clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Set guidelines for class discussions
  • Establish goals and roles for group members and adhere to assigned roles
  • Participate in polite and democratic discussions and decision-making activities.
  • Self monitor the work and assign specific tasks as needed
  • Respect and promote diverse perspectives in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • Encourage others to participate in a discussion or collaborative activity
  • discuss and question the argument and evidence
  • Make certain that a variety of possible arguments have been heard
  • Respond thoughtfully
  • Summarize where others agree and disagree with ideas and perspectives
  • Continue to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that connect to broader ideas as well as through reflection and evaluation of others’ comments
  • Incorporate new synthesized ideas into discussion

SL.11-12.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, qualitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.

•        Listen to and assess multiple sources of information in diverse formats and media

•        Utilize multiple sources of information in order to make decisions

•        Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source

SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

•        Evaluate whether the reasoning a speaker uses is logical/legitimate and if the evidence is relevant

•        Correlate the speaker’s argument with the student’s own

•        Identify logical fallacies; judging if any of the speaker’s reasoning is misleading.

•        Move from passive listener to active participant

•        Consider and assess the speaker, argument, organization, diction, and tone.

•        Use evidence from sources/text to prove fallibility in speaker’s reasoning

SL.11-12.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically.  The content, organization, development, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.

•        Formulate a clear and distinct perspective on a topic or issue and amass evidence to support that perspective

•        Draw information from primary and secondary sources, and provide a conclusion

•        Differentiate and critique opposing viewpoints

•        Organize, develop, and produce a presentation in a style appropriate to my purpose and audience

•        Present information clearly, concisely, and logically

•        Use correct eye contact

•        Adapt volume and tone to audience and purpose

•        Speak with clear pronunciation

SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

•        Consider, determine and apply the most strategic use of digital media

•        Engage audience and enhance their understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence by incorporating digital media such as textual, graphical, audio, visual, or interactive elements

SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

•        Assess and adapt speech delivery to audience and purpose

•        Understand the difference between formal and informal presentations and demonstrate a command of formal English

L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.11-12.1. A. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

  • Utilize and incorporate appropriate grammar and usage in writing and speaking
  • Understand that language and appropriate usage changes
  • Utilize reference materials to help maintain appropriate grammar and usage dependent on the audience and situation

L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.11-12.2.A. Observe hyphenation conventions.

L.11-12.2.B. Spell correctly.

  • Adhere to appropriate writing conventions including capitalization, punctuation including hyphens, and spelling

L.11-12.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

L.11-12.3.A. Vary syntax for effect; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts.

  • Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different situations
  • Apply knowledge of language to make effective choices to shape the meaning and style
  • Apply knowledge of language to comprehend more fully when reading, listening, or speaking
  • Consult a style manual, which conforms to discipline-specific guidelines, while writing and editing a work
  • Write using a variety of task-appropriate syntaxes

L.11-12.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.11-12.4.A. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.11-12.4.B. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

L.11-12.4.C. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

L.11-12.4.D. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

  • Use context clues to derive word meaning
  • Use knowledge of Greek and Latin affixes and roots to understand variations of word forms and patterns
  • Consult reference materials to derive word meanings and correct pronunciation of words
  • Trace the etymology of words

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Science/Technology:  Students will examine a variety of informational texts relating to technology and the role of digital tools in our world.  

Information Technology: Students study the development and impact of different online social media.

Sociology: Students explore the impact new media has on the individual and community.

Philosophy: Students debate the appropriate role of online social media in our society.  (See Resource List)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 12th grade,

  • 9.2.12.C.1 Review career goals and determine steps necessary for attainment.
  • 9.2.12.C.2 Modify Personalized Student Learning Plans to support declared career goals.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.
  • 9.2.12.C.4 Analyze how economic conditions and societal changes influence employment trends and future education.

Technology Standards - 8.1

9-12th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.12.C.1 Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.12.D.4 Research and understand the positive and negative impact of one’s digital footprint.

8.1.12.D.5 Analyze the capabilities and limitations of current and emerging technology resources and assess their potential to address personal, social, lifelong learning, and career needs.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

8.1.12.E.2 Research and evaluate the impact on society of the unethical use of digital tools and present your research to peers.

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.12.F.1 Evaluate the strengths and limitations of emerging technologies and their impact on educational, career, personal and or social needs.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs
  • Restructure lesson using UDL principles http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.VXmoXcD_UA
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g multisensory techniques- auditory/visual aids, pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mneumonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills
  • Use of leveled texts or www.rewordify.com

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Based on student needs various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc. to encourage students to expand or move ahead
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities
  • Various online learning opportunities to excel

Suggested Open Educational Resources

Reading

·       A Guide to Close Reading at the AP and College Level

·           ACT: Reading Between the Lines (on reading)

·           Multiple Perspectives on Theme

·           Rhetorical Devices

·           DIDLS guide for rhetorical analysis

·           Comparing multiple interpretations of a text

·           Analyzing language structure, choices and conventions

·           Reading Your Textbooks Effectively and Efficiently

·           Distinguishing types of satire; distinguishing author’s purpose

·     Analyzing stylistic choices in political cartoons

Writing/Language

·           Writing Argumentative Essays

·           Analyzing, evaluating and synthesizing multiple sources

·           Improving Student Writing Through Critical Thinking

·           Evaluating a source: survey

·           Analyzing style: formal and informal language

·           The Passion of Punctuation

·           Developing Persuasive Arguments Through Ethical Inquiry: Two Pre-Writing Strategies

·           Spend a Day in My Shoes: Exploring the Role of Perspective in Narrative

·           PARCC Scoring Rubric for Prose Constructed Response Items

·           Purdue Online Writing Lab

Speaking & Listening

·           Taking Lecture and Class Notes

·           Conver-Stations: A Discussion Strategy

·           Using Debate to Develop Thinking and Speaking

·           Developing Core Proficiencies from Engage New York

·           Lessons to Use with Popular Stories

·           Lessons to Use with Anthologies

·           English Language Arts Methods: Grades 9-12 Model Lessons

·           For Arguments Sake: Playing “Devil’s Advocate” with Non Fiction Texts

·           The Pros and Cons of Discussion

·    PVLEGS:  A Public Speaking Acronym that Transforms Students 

Critical Thinking

·           College Board: SAT Critical Thinking

·           Critical Thinking: A Path to College and Career

·           Critical thinking through whole class dialogue

·           Developing Critical and Analytical Thinking about Literary Characters

·           Teaching Channel Presents: Inquiry-Based Teaching

·           Inquiry Graphic Organizer

·           Assessing Cultural Relevance: Exploring Personal Connections to a Text

·           How to Encourage Higher Order Thinking

·           Handbook of Critical Thinking

·           How to Mark a Book 

Technology Tools for Differentiation: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ihsTwYr1kFx9Jb08Z2w5i1MWoxYkRXZbTP4Gcbodp6I/htmlview?pli=1#gid=0

www.rewordify.com

 

Other Helpful Resources:

www.teachingchannel.org

www.theteachertoolkit.com