Published using Google Docs
Call for global day of action against UPOV/Llamado a un día de acción mundial contra UPOV/Appel à une journée mondiale d'action contre l'UPOV
Updated automatically every 5 minutes

Call for global week of

action against UPOV

2 - 8 December 2021

Haga clic aquí para el español

Cliquer ici pour le français

Without seeds and without peasants, agriculture would not be possible. Ever since farming and livestock rearing began, peasants and farmers have freely developed, shared and preserved millions of different crop varieties, adapted to new and different socio-environment conditions. But today, peasants and farmers are facing extreme threats from the privatisation of seeds by intellectual property laws. In addition, seed marketing laws ban local and indigenous varieties which don’t fit the industrial model, restricting access and circulation.

One institution is at the heart of this: the International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV). UPOV was initiated in 1961 by a few European countries to allow plant breeders to impose a patent-like intellectual property rights over seeds. This regime is called plant variety protection and trade agreements often require countries to adopt or mimic UPOV’s rules.

UPOV requires and promotes uniformity in seeds, and therefore in the food supply. It grants a small group of transnational corporations the means to appropriate and control seeds without taking into account people’s and communities historical socio-cultural relationships with seeds. This serves the industrial food system, which feeds 30% of humanity. But it promotes genetic erosion, economic vulnerability and loss of autonomy for small scale farmers and peasants who feed 70% of the world.

Not only do smallholder farmers, producers and fishers feed most of the world, but women in particular are main custodians of seed and life. Often existing under already precarious circumstances, the weight of patriarchy and economic subordination, UPOV adds further to their burden by criminalising their practices. In addition to serving corporate interests, UPOV is therefore anti-women. For the poor living on the margins of urban areas, it is most often women who carry the burden of care for their families, such as providing food. This shows that seed is more than an act of farming; it is social relationships of care and solidarity that are crucial for wider progressive action. UPOV is therefore a direct attack on care, solidarity, community, and on our ability to work together in solidarity for a better future.

As an intergovernmental body, UPOV’s sole purpose is to oblige countries to operate laws that privatise seeds worldwide, enabling corporations to capture the world’s farmers who are currently using their own seeds with dignity and for free. Under these laws, companies get the right to extract hefty royalty payments from people and communities that grow or save protected seeds – often at a 10-12% mark-up. Governments especially in the developing countries are often under strong pressure to internalize UPOV into their legal systems either through trade agreements or direct pressure from the seed industry lobbies. When a country become a member of UPOV, it must comply to its strict rules which are regularly revised to protect even more the interests of the seed industry and undermine policy and regulation that protect and guarantee the rights and interests of farmer and peasant communities e.g. by preventing loopholes and making it a crime to save and share seeds.

Free exchange of seeds being the basis of community seed management at present and for thousands of years, joining UPOV will be catastrophic as it leads to the criminalisation of farmers and peasants for simply doing their daily practices: saving, breeding and sharing or distributing seeds. It also boosts the concentration of the seed industry. People in many countries call seed laws “Monsanto laws” because they help companies like Monsanto (now Bayer) or Syngenta merge their interests in chemicals, farm technology, GMOs and seeds. There are a few countries, like Venezuela, that have laws that defend peasant seeds, and the freedom to save them and exchange them, as well as peasant life. But right now, even the UN Food Systems Summit, led by the FAO and private entities, is giving UPOV a central role to provide farmers with so-called “improved” seeds.

Instead of adopting UPOV-based seed laws, governments should put in place legally binding and discrete measures to recognise and support farmers’ rights and seed systems. Such measures would ensure the right of farmers to save, exchange and sell seed unrestricted by commercial imperatives of transnational corporations. To rise to the challenge of our ecological and social crises, farmers’ rights should not simply be defended, but actively deepened and widened as a core organising principle of our food systems. UPOV-based laws cannot do this, and only seek to support a narrow set of interests, and decreased diversity. Diversity is life, and core to a shared and just ecological future.

Sovereignty over seed is a prerequisite and core component of the exercise of rights by family and community farmers and peasants. Protections are needed against patents, seed and plant variety protection laws, digital sequence information and the like which erode the exercise of farmers’ rights. In an already fractured world, UPOV only attempts to further fracture life, seed, community and ecologies.

The freedom, right and capacity of communities to save, use and exchange their own seeds are central pillars of people’s Food Sovereignty. To this, we respond with wholeness, because this is the nature of life, and therefore of a just and harmonious future and why we must defend them. After decades of campaigning in different parts of the world, we would like to propose a global week of action against UPOV starting on 2 December 2021, UPOV’s 60th birthday. We extend it to a week of action to include December 3rd, the global Day of Action Against Agri-Chemicals. The purpose would be to draw attention to the role that UPOV plays in privatising seeds and threatening food sovereignty and to call for it to be dismantled. It would allow groups to heighten their resistance to national or regional seed laws, highlight examples of pro-peasant seed legislation, in whatever form they take, and expose the role of free trade agreements in pushing seed laws all over the planet. It could be a week  of education and mobilisation, allowing peasants, farmers and allies to stand up in unity to stop UPOV and seed privatisation.

How to get involved?

- Get informed, join or organise trainings, discussions and debates about UPOV and seed laws in your communities/countries. Resources to check out: UPOV the great seed robbery;  how UPOV is misleading developing countries; UPOV animation

- Join struggles against UPOV and related laws currently taking place at national level (e.g. Nigeria, Ghana, Japan, Thailand). Contact groups in your country/region and join forces.

-  Support movements against FTAs that are promoting UPOV and other seed laws that criminalise peasant seeds , call for pro-peasant seed legislation.

-  Participate in the global week of action in December 2021 which includes the global day of action against UPOV on Dec 2 and the global day of action against agrochemicals on Dec 3.

Launched on 30 July 2021 by:

Convenors (in alphabetical order):

African Centre for Biodiversity

Alianza Biodiversidad

APBREBES

Colectivo de Semillas de América Latina

COPAGEN

ETC

Friends of the Earth International

GRAIN

La Via Campesina

Stop Golden Rice Network

Contacts for further information

GRAIN: Kartini Samon, Indonesia, (kartini@grain.org) ; Carlos Vicente, Argentina, (carlos@grain.org)

African Centre for Biodiversity: Mariam Mayet, South Africa, (mariam@acbio.org.za)

ETC: Veronica Villa, Mexico, (veronica@etcgroup.org)


Llamado a una semana de acción mundial contra UPOV

2 - 8 de diciembre

Sin semillas y sin campesinado no sería posible la agricultura. Desde que comenzaron la agricultura y la crianza de animales, campesinas y campesinos, agricultores, han desarrollado, compartido y conservado cuidadosa y libremente millones de variedades de cultivos diferentes, adaptadas a nuevas y diferentes condiciones socioambientales. Hoy la gente del campo se enfrenta a amenazas extremas por la privatización de sus semillas mediante leyes que prohíben las variedades locales y originarias que no se ajustan al modelo industrial, restringiendo el acceso y la circulación.

Una institución está en el centro de todo esto: la Unión Internacional para la Protección de las Obtenciones Vegetales (UPOV). La UPOV fue iniciada en 1961 por unos pocos países europeos para permitir que los “obtentores de variedades” impusieran derechos de propiedad intelectual, una forma de apropiación sobre sus semillas, paralela a las patentes. Este régimen se denomina protección de las obtenciones vegetales y es frecuente que los acuerdos de comercio exijan a los países que adopten o imiten las normas de la UPOV.

La UPOV exige y promueve uniformidad en las semillas y, por lo tanto, en el suministro de alimentos, permitiendo así que un pequeño grupo de productores internacionales, especialmente empresas transnacionales, mantengan la prerrogativa de facilitar la apropiación y el control de las semillas, sin tener en cuenta que muchos pueblos y comunidades tienen relaciones socioculturales históricas con las semillas. Esto sirve al sistema agroalimentario industrial, que alimenta al 30% de la humanidad. Pero promueve erosión genética, vulnerabilidad económica y la pérdida de autonomía de la gente campesina, agricultoras y agricultores que alimentan al 70% del mundo en estos momentos.

No hablamos solamente de campesinas, campesinos, que producen en pequeña escala o de comunidades pesqueras, que son quienes  alimentan a la mayor parte del mundo: enfatizamos que las mujeres en particular son las principales custodias de las semillas y la vida. Y siendo que a menudo se encuentran en circunstancias ya precarias, con el peso del patriarcado y la subordinación económica, UPOV aumenta su carga al criminalizar sus prácticas. UPOV es por tanto anti-mujeres, además de servir a los intereses corporativos. En el caso de la gente pobre que vive en los márgenes de las zonas urbanas, la mayoría de las veces son las mujeres quienes llevan la carga de cuidar a sus familias, y proporcionarles alimentos. Esto demuestra que las semillas entrañan más que un acto de cultivo: son relaciones sociales de cuidado y solidaridad cruciales para emprender acciones progresistas más amplias. UPOV es, por tanto, un ataque directo contra el cuidado, la comunidad y la solidaridad; un ataque contra nuestra capacidad de trabajar en conjunto y con respeto mutuo por un futuro mejor.

Siendo un organismo intergubernamental, el único objetivo de la UPOV es obligar a que los países en todo el mundo apliquen leyes que privaticen las semillas, permitiendo a las empresas capturar a ese 70% de campesinas y campesinos mundiales que en la actualidad usan sus propias semillas con dignidad y libremente. Bajo estas leyes, las empresas obtienen el derecho de extraer de las personas y las comunidades que cultivan alimentos cuantiosos pagos en concepto de derechos, a menudo con un margen de beneficio del 10-12%. Cuando un país se convierte en miembro de la UPOV, debe cumplir sus estrictas normas, que se revisan periódicamente para proteger aún más los intereses de la industria sobre las semillas, por ejemplo, previniendo cualquier vacío legal y convirtiendo en delito el hecho de guardar y compartir semillas.

Siendo que hoy y desde hace miles de años la base del manejo comunitario de las semillas es su libre intercambio, la adhesión a la UPOV será catastrófica ya que conduce a la criminalización de agricultores y campesinos por el simple hecho de realizar sus prácticas cotidianas y tradicionales: guardar, criar, compartir y distribuir sus semillas. Además, UPOV fomenta la concentración de la industria semillera. En muchos países estas leyes privatizadoras de las semillas son conocidas como “leyes Monsanto” porque ayudan a empresas como Monsanto (ahora Bayer) o Syngenta a fusionar sus intereses en productos químicos, tecnología agrícola, OMG y semillas. Hay algunos países, como Venezuela, que cuentan con leyes que defienden las semillas campesinas, la libertad de guardarlas e intercambiarlas y la vida campesina. Pero ahora mismo, incluso La Cumbre de Sistemas Alimentarios, concebida por el Secretario General de la FAO y entidades privadas, está dando a UPOV un papel central en la “innovación para la agricultura y la alimentación”, como la vía para proveer a los agricultores con “mejores semillas”. La Pre-cumbre ocurre al momento en que hacemos este llamado.

En vez de adoptar leyes de semillas con base en UPOV, los gobiernos deberían establecer medidas legalmente vinculantes y discretas para reconocer y respaldar los derechos campesinos y sus sistemas de semillas. Dichas medidas deben garantizar el derecho de campesinas y campesinos a guardar, intercambiar y vender semillas sin las restricciones de los imperativos comerciales de empresas transnacionales. Si hemos de responder a nuestras crisis ecológicas y sociales, los derechos campesinos no sólo deben ser defendidos, sino que hay que profundizarlos y ampliarlos como el principio organizativo fundamental de nuestros sistemas alimentarios. Las leyes que se basan en UPOV no intentan hacer esto; únicamente impulsan un conjunto estrecho de intereses, y una diversidad disminuida. La diversidad es la vida, y es el núcleo de un futuro ecológico compartido y justo.

La soberanía sobre las semillas es un requisito previo y el componente esencial del ejercicio de los derechos de campesinas y campesinos, agricultores familiares y comunitarios. Son necesarias protecciones contra patentes, leyes de protección de semillas y variedades vegetales, contra el acaparamiento de información digital de secuencias de recursos genéticos y otros elementos similares que erosionan el ejercicio de los derechos campesinos. En un mundo ya fracturado, UPOV intenta fracturar aún más la vida, las semillas, la comunidad y las ecologías.

La libertad, el derecho y la capacidad de las comunidades para guardar, usar e intercambiar semillas son pilares centrales de la soberanía alimentaria de los pueblos. A esto, respondemos con integridad, porque ésta es la naturaleza de la vida, y por lo tanto de un futuro justo y armonioso, y por eso debemos defenderlas. Después de décadas de campaña en diferentes partes del mundo, queremos proponer una semana de acción global contra UPOV comenzando el 2 de diciembre de 2021 cuando UPOV cumple 60 años, e incluyendo el 3 de diciembre, que es el día de lucha contra los agrotóxicos. El objetivo es llamar la atención sobre el papel que desempeña la UPOV en la privatización de las semillas y la amenaza que representa para la soberanía alimentaria, y hacer un llamado para exigir su desmantelamiento. Esto hará posible que los grupos aumenten su resistencia ante leyes de semillas nacionales o regionales, destacar los ejemplos de legislación de semillas a favor de los campesinos, sea cual sea la forma que adopten, y denunciar el papel de los acuerdos de libre comercio en su presión en pos de leyes de privatización de semillas en todo el planeta. Podría ser una semana de movilización muy educativa, que abra un espacio para que campesinas, campesinos, agricultores y gente aliada se levante en unidad para detener a la UPOV y la privatización de las semillas. Defendemos las “Semillas como patrimonio de los pueblos al servicio de la humanidad”.

¿Cómo participar?

- Informarse, unirse y organizar procesos de formación, discusiones y debates sobre UPOV y la legislación sobre semillas en sus comunidades/países. Recursos para consultar: UPOV | el gran robo de las semillas; Cómo la UPOV engaña a los países en desarrollo; Animación UPOV

- Unirse a las luchas contra las leyes relacionadas con UPOV/OMPI que se están llevando a cabo actualmente a nivel nacional (por ejemplo, Nigeria, Ghana, Japón, Tailandia). Contacta con grupos de tu país/región y une fuerzas.

- Apoyar el movimiento contra los TLCs que promueven UPOV y otras leyes de semillas que criminalizan las semillas campesinas, pedir una legislación de semillas pro-campesina.

- Participar en la semana de acción global en diciembre que incluye el día de acción global el 2 de diciembre y el día internacional de acción contra los agrotóxicos el 3 de diciembre.

Lanzado el 30 de julio de 2021 por

Convocantes:

African Centre for Biodiversity

Alianza Biodiversidad

APBREBES

Colectivo de Semillas de América Latina

COPAGEN

ETC

Friends of the Earth International

GRAIN

La Vía Campesina

Stop Golden Rice Network

Contactos para más información

GRAIN: Kartini Samon, Indonesia, (kartini@grain.org) ; Carlos Vicente, Argentina, (carlos@grain.org)

African Centre for Biodiversity: Mariam Mayet, África del Sur, (mariam@acbio.org.za)

ETC: Veronica Villa, Mexico, (veronica@etcgroup.org)


Appel à une semaine mondiale d'action contre l'UPOV

2 - 8 décembre

Sans les semences et sans les paysans, la production agricole ne serait pas possible. Depuis le début de l'agriculture et de l'élevage, les paysans et les agriculteurs ont librement sélectionné, échangé et préservé des millions de variétés de cultures différentes, adaptées à l’évolution des conditions socio-environnementales. Mais aujourd'hui, les paysans et les agriculteurs sont confrontés à des menaces extrêmes dues à la privatisation de leurs semences par des lois de propriété intellectuelle. Par ailleurs, des lois de commercialisation des semences interdisent les variétés locales et autochtones qui ne correspondent pas au modèle industriel, et limitent donc la circulation et l’accès à ses semences.

Une institution est au cœur de cette situation : l'Union internationale pour la protection des obtentions végétales (UPOV). L'UPOV a été créée en 1961 par quelques pays européens pour permettre aux obtenteurs d'imposer des droits de propriété intellectuelle sur leurs semences. Ce régime est appelé protection des obtentions végétales et les accords commerciaux exigent souvent des pays signataires qu'ils adoptent ou imitent les règles de l'UPOV.

L'UPOV exige et promeut l'homogénéité des semences et donc de l'approvisionnement alimentaire. Elle permet à un petit groupe de sociétés transnationales de s'approprier et de contrôler les semences, sans tenir compte des relations socioculturelles historiques que les peuples et communautés entretiennent avec les semences. Cela sert les intérêts du système agroalimentaire industriel, qui nourrit 30% de l'humanité, mais favorise l'érosion génétique, la vulnérabilité économique et la perte d'autonomie des petits paysans et agriculteurs qui nourrissent 70% de la population mondiale.

Non seulement les petits agriculteurs, producteurs et pêcheurs nourrissent la majeure partie de la population mondiale, mais les femmes, tout particulièrement, sont les gardiennes des semences et de la vie. Alors que ces dernières vivent souvent dans des conditions précaires, sous le joug du patriarcat et dans une situation de subordination économique, l’UPOV alourdit le fardeau des femmes en criminalisant leurs pratiques. Ainsi, outre le fait de servir les intérêts des multinationales, l’UPOV s’attaque aux femmes. Chez les pauvres qui vivent en périphérie des zones urbaines, ce sont le plus souvent les femmes qui subviennent aux besoins de leur famille, notamment en termes de nourriture. Aussi, les semences ne relèvent pas seulement de l’agriculture : elles sont un facteur de relations sociales fondées sur le soin et la solidarité, nécessaires à une action progressive à plus grande échelle. L’UPOV 91 constitue donc une attaque directe au soin, à la solidarité, à la communauté et à notre capacité à travailler ensemble, de manière solidaire, en faveur d’un avenir meilleur.

En tant qu'organe intergouvernemental, l'UPOV a pour seul objectif d'obliger les pays à appliquer des lois qui privatisent les semences dans le monde entier, permettant ainsi aux multinationales de s'emparer des agriculteurs qui utilisent actuellement leurs propres semences en toute dignité et gratuitement. En vertu de ces lois, les entreprises obtiennent le droit d’extorquer des redevances importantes des personnes et communautés qui cultivent ou conservent des semences visées par des droits de propriété intellectuelle – souvent à un taux de 10 à 12 %. Les gouvernements, notamment ceux des pays en développement, sont souvent fortement incités à intégrer les règles de l’UPOV à leur législation, soit par le biais d’accords commerciaux, soit via des pressions exercées directement par les lobbies de l’industrie semencière. Lorsqu'un pays devient membre de l'UPOV, il doit se conformer à ses règles strictes qui sont régulièrement révisées pour protéger encore davantage les intérêts de l'industrie des semences et lutter contre les politiques et règlementations qui protègent et garantissent les droits et les intérêts des communautés agricoles et paysannes, par exemple en luttant contre les vides juridiques et en faisant de la conservation et de l’échange des semences un crime.

Étant donné que l’échange des semences est à la base de la gestion communautaire des semences à l'heure actuelle et depuis des milliers d'années, adhérer à l'UPOV sera catastrophique car cela conduit à la criminalisation des agriculteurs et des paysans pour avoir simplement effectué leurs pratiques quotidiennes : conserver, sélectionner et échanger ou distribuer des semences. Elle favorise également la concentration de l'industrie semencière. Dans de nombreux pays, les gens appellent les lois sur les semences des « lois Monsanto » parce qu'elles aident les entreprises comme Monsanto (aujourd'hui Bayer) ou Syngenta à faire fusionner leurs intérêts dans les produits chimiques, la technologie agricole, les OGM et les semences. Il y a quelques pays, comme le Venezuela, dont les lois défendent les semences paysannes, la liberté de les conserver et de les échanger, ainsi que la vie paysanne. Mais à l'heure actuelle, même le sommet sur les systèmes alimentaires, organisé sous la houlette de la FAO et d’entités privées, donne à l'UPOV un rôle central pour fournir aux agriculteurs de « meilleures semences ».

Au lieu d’adopter des lois sur les semences qui soient basées sur les règles UPOV, les gouvernements devraient mettre en place différentes mesures juridiquement contraignantes afin de reconnaître et soutenir les systèmes de semences et les droits des paysans. Ces mesures devraient garantir le droit des paysans à conserver, échanger et vendre des semences sans qu’aucun impératif commercial ne puisse être imposé par les multinationales. Pour surmonter les crises sociales et écologiques auxquelles nous sommes confrontés, les droits des paysans doivent être non seulement défendus, mais aussi renforcés et élargis comme étant à la base de nos systèmes alimentaires. Les lois basées sur l’UPOV n’ont pas cette vocation : elles ne visent qu’à favoriser les intérêts d’une poignée d’individus et à réduire la diversité. Or la diversité est l’essence même de la vie. Elle est essentielle à la construction de notre avenir commun, un avenir écologique et juste.

La souveraineté en matière de semences est une condition sine qua none et un élément clé dans le respect des droits des petits agriculteurs et paysans. Des protections doivent être mises en place face aux brevets, aux lois de protection des semences et obtentions végétales, aux informations de séquençage numérique et à tout ce qui contribue à affaiblir les droits des agriculteurs. Dans un monde déjà divisé, l’UPOV tente de diviser un peu plus la vie, les semences, les communautés et les écologies.

La liberté, le droit et la capacité des communautés à conserver, utiliser et échanger leurs semences sont les piliers centraux de la souveraineté alimentaire des peuples. Notre démarche doit être globale, car la nature est un tout. De même, la construction d’un avenir juste et harmonieux est un tout. C'est pourquoi nous devons les défendre. Après des décennies de campagne dans différentes régions du monde, nous voudrions proposer une semaine mondiale d'action contre l'UPOV qui débutera le 2 décembre 2021, date à laquelle l'UPOV aura 60 ans, et inclura le 3 décembre, journée mondiale d'action contre les pesticides. L'objectif serait d'attirer l'attention sur le rôle que joue l'UPOV dans la privatisation des semences et la mise en péril de la souveraineté alimentaire, et d’appeler à son démantèlement. Elle permettrait aux groupes d'intensifier leur résistance aux lois nationales ou régionales sur les semences, de mettre en évidence des exemples de législations pro-paysannes sur les semences, quelle que soit la forme qu'elles prennent, et de mettre en évidence le rôle des accords de libre-échange dans la promotion des lois sur les semences partout sur la planète. Cela pourrait être une semaine d'éducation et de mobilisation, permettant aux paysans, aux agriculteurs et aux alliés de se réunir pour mettre fin à l'UPOV et à la privatisation des semences.

Comment s’impliquer ?

- Informez-vous, participez ou organisez des formations, des discussions et des débats sur l'UPOV et les lois sur les semences dans vos communautés/pays. Ressources à consulter: UPOV: Hold-up sur les semences; Comment l'UPOV trompe les pays en développement; dessin animé UPOV

- Rejoignez les luttes contre l'UPOV ou les lois similaires qui se déroulent actuellement au niveau national (par exemple au Nigeria, au Ghana, au Japon, en Thaïlande). Contactez les groupes dans votre pays/région et unissez vos forces.

- Soutenez les mouvements contre les accords de libre-échange qui soutiennent les lois UPOV et autres qui criminalisent les semences paysannes ; exigez des législations sur les semences qui soient pro-paysannes.

- Participez à la semaine mondiale d'action en décembre 2021 qui comprendra la journée mondiale d'action contre l’UPOV le 2 décembre et la journée mondiale d'action contre les produits agrochimiques le 3 décembre.

Lancé le 30 juillet 2021 par

Organisateurs :

African Centre for Biodiversity

Alianza Biodiversidad

APBREBES

Colectivo de Semillas de América Latina

COPAGEN

ETC

Amis de la Terre International

GRAIN

La Via Campesina

Stop Golden Rice Network

 

Contactez-nous pour plus d'informations

GRAIN : Kartini Samon, Indonésie, (kartini@grain.org) ; Carlos Vicente, Argentine, (carlos@grain.org)

African Centre for Biodiversity : Mariam Mayet, Afrique du Sud, (mariam@acbio.org.za)

ETC : Veronica Villa, Méxique, (veronica@etcgroup.org)