Course Number: PHH 404
Course Title: History of Contemporary Philosophy

Instructor

David Arias

darias@holyapostles.edu

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines the views of various contemporary philosophers on issues in ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, and other areas of philosophy.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1: Phenomenology I

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Brentano and Husserl)

Readings

(Read Brentano selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Husserl in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 4-12)

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 2: Phenomenology II

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Levinas and Dussel)

Readings

(Read Levinas selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Merleau-Ponty in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 276-285)

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 3: Phenomenology III

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Stein)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Scheler and Von Hildebrand

Readings

(Read Stein selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Scheler selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Von Hildebrand selection [electronic reserve])

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 4: Existentialism I

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Heidegger)

Readings

(Read Heidegger selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Heidegger in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 128-136)

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 5: Existentialism II

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Sartre and De Beauvoir)

Readings

(Read Sartre in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 210-218, 225-238)

(Read De Beauvoir in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 242-253)

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 6: Existentialism III

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Lavelle)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Marcel)

Readings

(Read Lavelle selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Marcel selection [electronic reserve])

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 7: Hermeneutics

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Gadamer and Habermas)

Readings

(Read Gadamer in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 182-205)

(Read Habermas in in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 411-421)

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

(Take Group Midterm Oral Examination)

Week 8: Neo-Thomism

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Gilson)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Maritain)

Readings

(Read Gilson selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Maritain selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Contemporary Thomist selection [electronic reserve])

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 9: Transcendental Thomism

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Marêchal and Rahner)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Lonergan)

Readings

(Read Rahner selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Lonergan selection [electronic reserve])

(Read De Lubac selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Contemporary Critique of Transcendental Thomism selection [electronic reserve])

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 10: Analytic Philosophy I

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Russell)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Ayer)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Modern Logic)

Readings

(Read Russell in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 53-66)

(Read Austin in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 288-298) [optional]

(Read Ayer in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 170-177)

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 11: Analytic Philosophy II

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Wittgenstein)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Quine)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Recent Analytical Philosophy)

Readings

(Read Wittgenstein in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 149-165)

(Read Quine in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 257-271)

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 12: Analytic Philosophy III

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Anscombe)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Taylor)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on MacIntyre)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Recent Catholic Analytical Philosophy)

Readings

(Read Anscombe Selection [link])

(Read Taylor Selection [electronic reserve])

(Read MacIntyre in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 393-408)

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 13: Postmodernism I

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Foucault)

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Derrida)

Readings

(Read Foucault in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 330-342)

(Read Derrida in Twentieth-Century Philosophy: 347-366)

Assignments

(Answer Discussion Board Questions)

Week 14: Postmodernism II

Lectures

(Watch Power Point Lecture on Marion)

Readings

(Read Marion selection [electronic reserve])

(Read Desmond selection [link])

(Read Catholic Postmodernist selection [electronic reserve])

Assignments

 (Answer Discussion Board Questions)

(Take Final Exam)

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Citations in Discussion Posts

[Optional Category for Professors to include in their syllabus. Remove if not interested in using Citation in Discussion Posts]

For the purposes of the Discussions in Populi, please do provide a full footnote for sources at the end of your post. You will have to type a special character (^) at the beginning and end of your numbers to make a superscript in Populi, e.g. ^1^, ^2^, etcetera. Use the special characters for superscript also in your footnote.

Example Footnote

^1^ Vincent Balaguer, Understanding the Gospels (New York, Scepter Publishers, Inc., 2005), 5, [Hereafter UG].

Also, to bold, italicize, or underline words in Populi, please refer to the “Formatting Guide” located below all discussion/comment fields in Populi.

5. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES:

6. SUGGESTED READINGS and RESOURCES:

7. EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

[The grading rubric below is optional for faculty to include or modify. A rubric is a helpful tool for ensuring that students know a professor’s expectations. It’s also an easy way to score any assignment.]

Grading Rubric for the Major Papers and Discussion Board (DB) Postings

0 pts. – Paper
0 pts. – DB Posting;

3 pts. – Paper
2 pts. – DB Posting;

6 pts. – Paper
4 pts. – DB Posting;

9 pts. – Paper
6 pts. – DB Posting;

12 pts. – Paper
8 pts. – DB Posting;

15 pts. – Paper
10 pts. – DB Posting;

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Analysis shows no awareness of the discipline or its methodologies as they relate to the topic.

Lack of Understanding

Analysis seems to misunderstand some basic concepts of the discipline or lacks ability to articulate them.

Inadequate understanding

Analysis is sometimes unclear in understanding or articulating concepts of the discipline.

Adequate understanding

Analysis demonstrates an understanding of basic concepts of the discipline but could express them with greater clarity.

Solid Understanding

Analysis demonstrates a clear understanding and articulation of concepts with some sense of their wider implications.

Insightful understanding

Analysis clearly demonstrates an understanding and articulation of concepts of the discipline as they relate to the topic; highlights connections to other concepts; integrates concepts into wider contexts.

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format.

WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Analysis is only partially written or completely misses the topic.

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Analysis fails to address the topic; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Episodic writing, a mix of strengths and weaknesses.

Analysis noticeably neglects or misinterprets the topic; simplistic or repetitive treatment, only partially-internalized; weak organization and development, some meandering; simple sentences, below-level diction; distracting errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Analysis is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment; satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors.

Solid writing, with something interesting to say.

Analysis is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples; level-appropriate syntax and diction; mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error.

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Analysis is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage.

COMMUNITY INTERACTION (50-word response)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Poor response

Response misses the point of the original posting.

Weak response

Response summarizes original posting to which it responds.

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds.

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development.

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development.

8. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

9. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required to be in class 3 hours a week and prepare for class discussions 4.5 hours a week. Expect to devote at least 7 quality hours a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

NB: An Incomplete may only be awarded to a student who has maintained a passing grade up to the point of the emergency.  Incomplete grades will change to a grade of F unless the requirements stipulated on the incomplete form are met by the date listed.

10. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

 Dr. David Arias holds a Doctorate in Philosophy from the University of St. Thomas (Houston) and Master's degrees in both Theology and Philosophy.  He is a Professor of Philosophy and Theology at Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary in Denton, NE.  Prior to teaching in Nebraska, Dr. Arias taught for eleven years at Thomas Aquinas College in Ojai, CA.