Curricular Requirements

Page(s)

CR1: Students and teachers use a recently published (within the last 10 years)

college-­‐level chemistry textbook.

2

CR2:  The course is structured around the enduring understandings within the big

ideas as described in the AP Chemistry Curriculum Framework.

2, 8

CR3a: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory

environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 1: Structure of matter.

9, 10

CR3b: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 2: Properties of matter-­‐ characteristics, states, and forces of attraction.

10, 13,

14  

CR3c:  The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory

environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 3: Chemical reactions.

10, 12

CR3d:  The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 4: Rates of chemical reactions.

15

CR3e:  The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory

environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 5: Thermodynamics.

11

CR3f:  The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory

environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 6: Equilibrium.

11, 12,

13, 14

CR4: The course provides students with the opportunity to connect their knowledge of chemistry and science to major societal or technological components (e.g., concerns, technological advances, innovations) to help them become scientifically literate citizens.

2, 5, 6, 7

CR5a:  Students are provided the opportunity to engage in investigative laboratory work integrated throughout the course for a minimum of 25 percent of instructional time.

2

CR5b:  Students are provided the opportunity to engage in a minimum of 16 hands-­‐ on laboratory experiments integrated throughout the course while using basic laboratory equipment to support the learning objectives listed within the AP Chemistry Curriculum Framework.

2, 4-­‐7

CR6:  The laboratory investigations used throughout the course allow students to apply the seven science practices defined in the AP Chemistry Curriculum Framework. At minimum, six of the required 16 labs are conducted in a guided-­‐ inquiry format.

4-­‐7

CR7:  The course provides opportunities for students to develop, record, and          maintain evidence of their verbal, written, and graphic communication skills through laboratory reports, summaries of literature or scientific investigations,

and oral, written, and graphic presentations. 

3, 7, 8

1


Course Description:

The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year.  For some students, this course enables them to undertake, as freshmen, second-­‐year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in courses in other fields where general chemistry is a prerequisite.  For students, the AP Chemistry course fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses.  This course meets for one period for five days a week with one double lab period.  A

total of 258 minutes with 86 of those minutes set aside for laboratory work.   Students are active learners and responsible for their own learning, while the instructor facilitates the student’s learning.  Laboratory work has more than 25% of class time since emphasis is on learning through hands on experience and six of the labs are inquiry based. [CR5a].  Students are given study group review time in class prior to unit tests.  Review includes study guides and released AP Chemistry Free Response questions.

Objectives:

Students will:

1.  Learn the inquiry process through a minimum of 16 laboratory experiments.


CR5a: Students are provided the opportunity to engage in investigative laboratory work integrated throughout the course for a minimum of 25 percent of instructional time.

CR5b: Students are provided the opportunity to engage in a minimum of 16 hands-­‐on laboratory experiments integrated throughout the

course while using basic laboratory equipment to support the learning objectives listed within the AP Chemistry Curriculum Framework.

[CR5b]


2.  Gain an understanding of the six big ideas through the AP Chemistry Curriculum

Framework. [CR2]

3.  Solve problems that involve quantitative, qualitative, spatial, and analytic analysis with mathematical and scientific knowledge.

4.  Communicate experimental findings in detailed lab reports.

5.  Design procedures to devise and test hypotheses.

6.  Analyze date with basic statistical concepts to develop inferences and conclusions

7.  Use technological tools including the Pasco probes and Spec20 spectrophotometers.

8.  Collaborate in groups to construct and apply skills through POGIL lessons.

9.  Develop conclusions for laboratory data based on research and analysis.

10.  Apply knowledge and skills gained to think critically and solve problems. [CR4]

Textbook, Laboratory Manual, Study Guides and Resources:

Brown, Theodore E., LeMay H. Eugene, and Bruce E. Bursten. Chemistry: The Central Science.

9th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.  2003.   [CR1]   (Please note, school is budgeting for new textbook for 2014 school year.)

AP Chemistry Guided-­‐Inquiry Experiments: Applying the Science Practices.  New York, NY. The

College Board.  2013.

AP Chem Solutions Software.  www.apchemsoltuions.com.  2013. New Jersey Center for Teaching and Learning. https://njctl.org. Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning.  www.pogil.org

PhET Interactive Simulations. University of Colorado. 2013. www.phet.colorado.edu


CR2: The course is structured around the enduring understandings within the big ideas as described in the AP Chemistry Curriculum Framework.

CR4: The course provides students with the opportunity to connect their knowledge of chemistry and science to major societal or technological components (e.g., concerns, technological advances, innovations) to help them become scientifically literate citizens.

CR1: Students and teachers use a recently published (within the last 10 years) college-­‐level chemistry textbook.

2


Laboratory Work:

Laboratory experiments are hands-­‐on experience.  Students work in cooperative groups of two or by themselves depending on the lab. Students make observations as they collect, analyze and graph data.  Several experiments are inquiry.  Students utilize guided inquiry to design and conduct experiments, analyze data and reflect on the purpose and hypotheses. Students must complete a written laboratory report for all lab experiments hat includes the purpose, procedure, data, calculations, graphs, conclusion, discussion of theory, error analysis and questions. [CR7] All experiments are to be completed in two double period (172 minutes), unless otherwise noted next to the lab activity listed below the expectations.  Prior to lab activities, students are responsible for researching and reviewing safety (MSDS) of chemicals, use of laboratory equipment and answering pre-­‐lab questions.  Below are the

expectation for laboratory reports (lab rubrics will be tailored to each lab, however, a general

foundation will be given for the first lab activity):


CR7: The course provides opportunities for students to develop, record, and maintain evidence of their verbal, written, and graphic communication skills through laboratory

reports, summaries of literature

or scientific investigations, and oral, written, and graphic presentations.

1.  Neatness and

Organization


Far Below

Expectations

0 points

The lab report fails to meet two or more of the expectations for neatness and organization.


Below Expectations

2 points

The lab report fails to meet one of the expectations for neatness and organization.


Meets or Exceeds Expectations 4 points

1. The lab is legibly written in blue or black pen.

2. The lab sections are in correct order.

3. Pages have not been torn from the lab book.

4. Mistakes are “lined through” rather than covered with white-­‐out.

5. No more than three spelling/grammatical errors

2. Title and Date         The lab report fails to meet both of the expectations for Title and Date.

3.  Purpose         Purpose is missing, or is only loosely related to the lab being performed.

4. Procedure         Procedure is missing altogether, or missing important steps.

5. Data         The student has recorded data after completion of the lab, or fails to meet


The lab report fails to meet one of the expectations for Title and Date.

The Purpose/questions addresses the procedural aspects of the lab, but does not accurately summarize the theoretical foundation of the experiment.

Procedure is a mostly copied directly from the lab description, with little attempt at brevity.

The lab report fails to meet either one of the expectations.


1. Title is present and is descriptive of the lab, with full names of all members of the lab group are included, with the author’s name written first.

2. Date is recorded and accurate. Purpose/questions accurately describes the theory that is intended to be reinforced by performing the lab.

Procedure is a brief summary of each of the steps taken in completing the lab. It is written in narrative form and is NOT an exhaustive description containing minute detail, though quantities are given when appropriate.

1.  Data is neatly organized (in tables if appropriate), and is easy to interpret.

2.  All data is correct with regard to significant figures and labels.

3


BOTH expectations.

6. Calculations and

Graphs

The student makes more than 5 errors in graphing, labeling, calculations, error analysis, and significant figures or omits entire graphs

or sets of calculations.

The student makes 3 to

5 errors in graphing, labeling, calculations, error analysis, and significant figures.

1.  The student makes no more than 2 errors in graphing, labeling, calculations, and significant figures.

2.  Relative error, if appropriate, has been calculated.

3.  Specific sources of experimental error are addressed.

7. Conclusion

Conclusion is missing, or is in conflict with the student’s experimental results.

Conclusion is present, and does not conflict with the student’s experimental findings, but fails to address the theoretical basis for the lab.

The Conclusion succinctly describes what can be concluded from the experimental results. It is aligned with a well-­‐written statement of Purpose at the beginning of the lab.

8.  Discussion of

Theory

Discussion of theory is missing, or does not adequately address both of the expectations for this section.

Discussion of theory is present, but fails to correctly address one of the two expectations of this section.

1. Addresses the theory demonstrated by the lab.

2. Explains how the calculations do/do not support the theory and fulfill the purpose of the lab.

9. Error Analysis

The report fails to meet 2 (or all 3) of the expectations for error analysis.

The report fails to meet

1 of the expectations for error analysis.

1. Relative error, if appropriate, has been calculated.

2. Specific sources of experimental error are addressed.

3. Write-­‐up analyzes the effect of errors on the magnitude of calculated quantities.

10. Questions

Post-­‐lab questions contain more than 3 errors, or some answers have been omitted.

Post-­‐lab questions contain 2 to 3 errors.

Post-­‐lab questions contain no more than one error in total.

Laboratory Experiments: below are the labs listed with Big Ideas (BI), Enduring Understandings

(EU), Essential Knowledge (EK), and Learning Objectives (LO).

Measurement Inquiry Lab students are given laboratory equipment and materials and must create a procedure to determine measurements with correct significant figures and communicate to see accuracy, precision and error. (SP 2.3, 5.2, CR5b, CR6) requires one double lab period.

Separation of Mixture Inquiry Lab students are given a set of materials and must devise and communicate a method of successfully separating the mixture in to individual components (SP

4.2, 5.1, CR5b, CR6) requires one double lab period

What Makes Hard Water Hard? students will analyze water samples and utilize gravimetric analysis to determine the amount of calcium carbonate in them. Prior to the lab, students will answer questions pertaining to the PhET simulator, http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/soluble- salts.  They then will watch the video on hard water at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcZSNcaHHN8&feature=youtube_

4


CR6: The laboratory investigations used throughout the course allow students to apply the seven science practices defined in the AP Chemistry Curriculum Framework. At minimum, six of the required 16 labs are conducted in a guided inquiry format.


gdata_player and explain what makes hard water.  Then view the animation at

http://bcs.whfreeman.com/chemcom5e/content/cat_010/Unit1_Media/

CC_5e_U1_SecD.swf  on soap scum and describe what is soap scum.  Students need to research on how water can be softened and suggested sites are http://www.chem1.com/CQ/hardwater.html and

http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/h2oqual/watsys/ae1031w.htm  Lastly research on the potential health risks and first aid for the chemicals used in this lab at http://www.ehso.com/msds.php.  Students will also complete a procedure to practice with the instrumentation and lab procedure.  Post lab, discuss how water softener from common household items can be used when the ion exchange water softener stops removing ions.  [BI 1, EU 1.E, EK 1.E.2, LO 1.19, BI 2, EU 2.A,

EK. 2.A.3, LO 2.10, BI 3, EU 3.A, EK 3.A.1, LO 3.2, BI 3, EU 3.A, EK 3.A.2, LO 3.3, SP 7.1, 1.5, 2.2,

5.1, 6.4, 4.2, 5.3, 6.2, 7.2, CR5b, CR6]

Separating a Synthetic Pain Relief Mixture study the physical properties of ingredients in a synthetic pain relief mixture and determine its percent composition. Students will research safety on http://www.msdsonline.com/msds-search/  or http://www.msds.com/   and answer questions about the chemicals used.  Then they will watch http://www.wonderhowto.com/how-to/video/how- to-do-a-liquid-liquidextraction-in-the-chemistry-lab-259811/view/  to see how liquid to liquid extraction is done and then discuss if they can separate liquids in the same container.  Next watch http://www.wonderhowto.com/how-to/video/how-to-dry-an-organicsolution-

in-the-chemistry-lab-259802/view/  and discuss if water can be removed from a liquid solvent. Additional guided questions will be discussed.  By creating a flow chart of the substances, they can develop their procedure for the separation.  Post lab-­‐ students will develop a report to the pharmaceutical company to deal with chipped or broken pills and lack of sucrose in the pill.  [BI

3, EU 3.C, EK 3.C.1, LO 3.10, SP 4.1, 1.4, 6.1, 4.4 connects to 5.D.2, CR5b, CR6] requires 2 double periods and one single class period

Green Chemistry Analysis of a Mixture students design and carry out an experiment to quantitatively measure the weight percent of solid mixtures containing sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate.  Students will review the 12 principles of Green Chemistry at http://www.epa.gov/sciencematters/june2011/principles.htm, discuss nothing left over and answer guided questions.  They will then view the simulation, http://group.chem.iastate.edu/Greenbowe/sections/projectfolder/percenttutorial.htm  to gain a better understanding of percent yield.  After conducting the experiment, the students will review a lab report and create a lab report to present their findings.  [BI 3, EU 3.A and 3.B, EK 3.A.2 and

3.B.1, LO 3.3 and 3.5, SP 2.1, 2.2, 5.1, 6.1, CR4, CR5b, CR6] requires 2 double periods and one single class period

What is the Relationship Between the Concentration of a Solution and the Amount of Transmitted Light Through the Solution?  Students will have a known concentration of a blue#1 dye and then prepare diluted samples.  Students will use spectrophotometer to analyze the dyes present.  Students will then discuss food dyes and health related research.  [BI 1, EU 1.D, EK

1.D.3, LO 1.15 and 1.16, SP 2.2, 5.1, 4.2, 4.1, 6.4, CR4, CR5b, CR6]

Percent Copper in Brass Advanced Inquiry Lab. students will measure the absorbance of various metal solutions, then design and conduct an experiment to determine concentration of the absorbing species by measuring the absorption of light by a colored solution. Post lab – time permitting, determine the amount of iodine in Potassium Iodide.  If not, discuss how one would find the amount of Iodine in a sample.  Link to Chernobyl of 1986 and high levels of Thyroid Cancer and Japanese attempt to reduce it after Tsunami by utilizing Potassium Iodide pills for protection of the thyroid. [BI 1, EU 1.D, EK 1.D.3, LO 1.16, BI 3, EU 3.A, EK 3.A.2, LO 3.4, SP 5.1,


CR5b: Students are provided the opportunity to engage in a minimum of 16 hands-­‐on laboratory experiments integrated throughout the

course while using basic laboratory equipment to support the learning objectives listed within the AP Chemistry Curriculum Framework.

CR4: The course provides students with the opportunity to connect their knowledge of chemistry and science to major societal or technological components (e.g., concerns, technological advances, innovations) to help them become scientifically literate citizens.


4.1, 6.4, 4.2, 2.2, CR4, CR5b, CR6] – requires 2 double lab periods and one single class period

Analysis of Hydrogen Peroxide students design an experiment to determine the percent composition of a common "drug store" bottle of hydrogen peroxide using an oxidation−reduction titration.  Students will answer guided questions to and will only discuss other species that could be used to reduce permanganate ions on than Iron II ions. They will also view the animation http://group.chem.iastate.edu/Greenbowe/sections/projectfolder/"ash!les/ redoxNew/redox.html  to see the importance of adding minimum amount of titrant. Post lab, students will draw what is happening to potassium permanganate after adding It to the solution.  [BI 1,

EU 1.E, EK 1.E.2, LO 1.20, BI 3, EU 3.A EK 3.A.2, LO 3.3, BI 3, EU 3.B, EK 3.B.3, LO 3.9, SP 2.1, 2.2,

4.2, 6.1, 6.4, CR5b, CR6]

Designing a Hand Warmer students investigate the energy changes accompanying the formations of solutions for common laboratory salts, and then apply the results to design a hand warmer that is reliable, safe, nontoxic, and inexpensive. Students will research the safety of the chemicals used on  http://www.ehso.com/msds.php.  They will also view an animation on the dissolution of an ionic compound on the particulate level at http://group.chem.iastate.edu/Greenbowe/sections/projectfolder/"ash!les/thermochem/solutionSalt.html . Post lab, students will write a paragraph to discuss the factors they considered in choosing their chemical for their hand warmer design.  [BI 5, EU 5.B, EK 5.B.3 and 5.B.4, LO 5.6 and 5.7, SP 1.4,

6.4, 7.2, 4.2, 5.3, 2.2, 2.3, 5.1, CR5b, CR6]

Applications of LeChatelier's Principle -­‐ Advanced Inquiry Lab students investigate six chemical equilibrium systems to analyze patterns and trends in the principles, concepts, and definitions of equilibrium. Animations will be shown in class prior to the lab from the following sites, http://group.chem.iastate.edu/Greenbowe/sections/projectfolder/animationsindex.htm, http://group.chem.iastate.edu/Greenbowe/sections/projectfolder/animations/  CoCl2equilV8.html  , http://group.chem.iastate.edu/Greenbowe/sections/projectfolder/animations/no2n2o4equilV8.html and then answer questions to gain an understanding of Equilibrium.   [BI 6, EU 6.B, EK 6.B.1, LO 6.9, 4.2, 5.1, CR5b, CR6]

Separation of a Dye Mixture Using Chromatography-­‐ Advanced Inquiry Lab (students use two solvents and three FD&C food dyes to study the connection between structure and mobility of food dyes.  Students will use http://www.ehso.com/msds.php to search for the MSDS for the chemicals used. An online simulator,  http://mw.concord.org/modeler/, will be viewed on intermolecular attractions. Students must site specific evidence from the experiment to explain how intermolecular forces and molecular structures helped to determine how to separate them.

[BI 2, EU 2.A, EK 2.B.2 and 2.A.3, LO 2.10 and LO 2.13, SP 4.3, 4.2, 5.2, 6.4, 5.3, 5.1, 1.4, CR5b, CR6]

Qualitative Analysis and Chemical Bonding-­‐ Advanced Inquiry Lab students will design a procedure to identify twelve unknown solids based on systematic testing of their physical and chemical properties. [BI 2, EU 2.D, LO 2.22, SP 4.2, CR5b, CR6]

How Much Acid Is in Fruit Juice and Soft Drinks?  Students will design a produce to determine the molar concentration of acid in fruit juice and soft drinks. Pre-­‐lab – students will answer guided questions to explain why titration is used in this lab.  They will review the proper use of a pipette at  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qorl6rKLmRs.  Students will also conduct a procedure prior to lab to practice titrating.  Post-­‐lab-­‐ after conducting the lab, students will debate on the question – Is there a cause for concern?  Their arguments will be based on data


CR4: The course provides students with the opportunity to connect their knowledge of chemistry and science to major societal or technological components (e.g., concerns, technological advances, innovations) to help them become scientifically literate citizens.


and views of nutritionists, doctors and dentists. [BI 1, EU 1.E.2, LO 1.20, BI 3, EU 3.A, EK 3.A.2, LO 3.3, SP 2.2, 3.1, 4.2, 1.1, 7.1, 5.1, 6.4, 1.4, CR4, CR5b, CR6]

Acid Base Titration-­‐ students will standardize a sodium hydroxide solution and use the standard solution to titrate an unknown solid acid, determine the equivalent mass from the volume NaOH at equivalence point and he equilibrium constant, Ka, of the solid acid will be calculated from

the titration curve obtained by plotting the pH of the solution vs the volume of NaOH added. [BI

6, EU 6.C, EK 6.C.1, LO 6.13, SP 5.1, CR6]

Selecting Indicators for Acid-­‐Base Titrations students will titrate a weak acid solution with a strong base and a weak base with a strong acid solution and add indicators.  Students will then graph pH versus volume of titrant to verify appropriateness of the selected indicators. [BI 6, EU

6.C, EK 6.C.1, LO 6.13, SP 5.1, CR6]

pH of Buffered Solutions – students will study the properties of buffer solutions of a weak acid and its conjugate base, and the other, a weak base and its conjugate

acid, are made. The initial pH of each buffer is determined. Strong acid and strong base are added to each buffer in a series of steps and the pH is determined after each addition. Then, they compare the resulting pH values after each addition to the pH values for each buffer.  [BI 6, EU 6.C, EK 6.C.2, LO 6.18 and 6.20, SP 2.3, 4.2, 6.4, CR6]

Rate of Decomposition of Calcium Carbonate students learn how reaction rates are measured and how concentration affects the rate of a reaction as they design kinetics experiments for the heterogeneous reaction of calcium carbonate with hydrochloric acid . Students will view simulations on http://group.chem.iastate.edu/Greenbowe/sections/projectfolder/"ash!les/ kinetics2/rxnRate01.html , http://group.chem.iastate.edu/Greenbowe/sections/projectfolder/"ash!les/ kinetics2/kinetics.html  , [http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/reactions-and-rates , http://www.chm.davidson.edu/vce/kinetics/BromateBromideReaction.html   to view different catalysts, temperatures variations, movement of molecules with temperature, and orders and rates constant.  Students will communicate their results and whether or not they supported or refuted their hypotheses.  [BI 4, EU 4.A, EK 4.A.1, LO 4.1, 4.2, SP 3.1, 3.2, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2,

5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 7.1, 7.2, 6.4, CR5b, CR6]   requires 2 double periods and one single period

Kinetics of Crystal Violet Fading students use spectroscopy and graphical analysis to determine the rate law for the color-­‐fading reaction of crystal violet with sodium hydroxide Students will discuss and justify their experimental procedure and determine the rate law. [BI 4, EU 4.A, EK

4.A.1 and 2, LO 4.1 and 4.2, SP 1.4, 6.4, 2.1, 2.2, 4.2, 5.1, connects to 4.A.3, CR5b, CR6]  requires

2 double lab periods and one single period

Technology:

Students use Pasco probes and Spec20 spectrophotometers for their individual or group data collection. Graphs are produced using Pasco software, Microsoft Excel or a freeware program that a student has access to through home.  Students will also be using student responders for formative assessment.  Students can also sign up for Remind101 for reminders for assignments and upcoming assessments.


Laboratory Notebook:

Students are required to use a bound laboratory notebook and all data and observations for all lab investigations must be in the journal.   The notebook is checked after the first lab and then every six weeks.  A final check is done at the end of the course. [CR7]

Tests:

Unit tests are given at the end of each unit to assess student skills and understanding regarding the stated Learning Objectives and Enduring Understandings.  A semester exam is given after the first semester that is comprehensive and standardized.  The year-­‐end project is given to assess students’ abilities to create labs/demonstrations and lessons for elementary and middle school students.  AP students are required to teach the students a lesson while completing their demonstration or lab activity. [CR2]

AP Exam Review:

The last full nine classes before the AP Chemistry Exam are utilized for reviewing and practicing for the test.  Students will work collaboratively in groups to solve AP Chemistry released exam questions and exam materials that have been created in collaboration with AP Chemistry teachers.  Students will practice and be assessed on balancing net ionic equations to determine their progress. AP practice exams are administered as part of the review process before the AP Chemistry exam.

Course Outline

The course outline is below.   Bolded is the title of each unit and following the titles are the days in parentheses.  Included is a table that outlines the Big Ideas (BI), Enduring Understandings (EU), Essential Knowledge (EK), and Learning Objectives (LO).  Following the table are the assignments for students including reading, labs and activities with science practices.

Unit 0: Introduction: Matter and Measurement (7 days review of summer assignment)


CR7: The course provides opportunities for students to develop, record, and maintain evidence of their verbal, written, and graphic communication skills through laboratory

reports, summaries of literature

or scientific investigations, and oral, written, and graphic presentations.

CR2: The course is structured around the enduring understandings within the big ideas as described in the AP Chemistry Curriculum Framework.

Topics         BI         EU         EK         LO

A: Study of Chemistry, Classification and Properties of Matter                2         2.A       2.A.3    2.3

B: Measurement                                                                                                    NA     NA       NA        NA C: History of Atomic Theory                                                                                NA     NA       NA        NA D: Nomenclature                                                                                                    NA     NA       NA        NA

Assignments

Reading: Chapter 1 pp. 1-­‐27, Chapter pp. 36-­‐40, 4.4

Activities: Summer Assignment Packet, Measurement/Safety Assessment

Unit 1: Atomic Theory and Quantitative Chemistry (14 days)

Topics         BI         EU         EK         LO


A: History of Atomic Theory/Structure

1

1.A

1-­‐2

1.1, 1.2, 1.3

B: Mass Spectrometry

1

1.D

2

1.14

C: Waves and Light/Quantum Theory

1

1

1.B

1.D

1

3

1.5, 1.6

1.15

D: First Ionization Energy/Shell Model/Photoelectric

Spectra/Shielding Effect

1

1

1.B

1.C

1-­‐2

2

1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8,

1.12

E: The Orbital/Electron Configuration/Atomic and Ionic

Radii/Ionization Energy

1

1

2

1.B

1.C

2.C

2

1-­‐2

1

1.7, 1.8

1.9

2.18

F. The Mole/Stoichiometry/Percent  Yield

1

1

3

1.A

1.E

3.A

3

1-­‐2

2

1.4

1.17, 1.18

3.3, 3.4

G. Mass Percent/Empirical and Molecular Formulas

1

1.A

2

1.2, 1.3

Reading:  35-­‐56, 238-­‐200-­‐227, 239-­‐240, 246-­‐248, 76-­‐102

Activities: Practice Problems Atomic Theory I-­‐III and Quantitative Chemistry I and II Worksheets; Isotopes and Mass Spectrometry Activity (NJCTL) – Students are guided through an inquiry experience to answer questions concerning the following: if all atoms are the same, how to identify elements through mass spectrometry, how data from mass spectrometry also provides evidence of isotopes and atomic mass and explain how mass spectrometry supports or rejects earlier models.  [BI 1, EU 1.A, 1.B, 1.C, 1.D, EK 1.A.1d, 1.A.2.b, 1.B.1.d, 1.C.2.c,

1.D.3.a and 1.D.2.a, LO 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, 1.12, 1.13, 1.14, 1.17, 1.18, 3.1,

3.3, 3.4, 3.6, SP 1.4, 1.5, SP 1.1-­‐5, 2.1-­‐3, 5.1, 4.4, 6.3, CR3a]

Unit 2: Chemical Bonding (14 days)


CR3a: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 1: Structure of matter.

Topics         BI         EU         EK         LO

A: Octet Rule, Ionic Bonding, Covalent Bonding, Lewis Diagrams         1

2

2

5


1.B

1.C

2.C

2.D

5.C


2

1

1, 2, 4

1

2


1.8

1.10

2.17, 2.18, 2.19

2.23, 2.24

5.8

B: Exceptions to Octet Rule/Formal Charge/Bond Energy and Bond         2

Length/Resonance Structures         5


2.C

5.C


4

1, 2


2.21

5.1, 5.8

C: Molecular Shape/VSEPR Theory         2         2.C         4         2.21

C: Valence Bond Theory/Hybrid Orbital Theory/Multiple

Bonds/Polar and Non-­‐Polar Molecules

D: Atomic Emission Spectrums/Molecular Orbital Theory/UV/Vis

Spectroscopy/IR Spectroscopy


2         2.C

1         1.C

1         1.D

2         2.C


1, 4

1

3

4


2.21

1.11

1.15, 1.16

2.21

Assignments

Reading: 206-­‐207, 276-­‐306, 316-­‐354, 532

9

Activities: Practice Problems: Chemical Bonding 1-­‐V Worksheets; Analysis of Spectral Lines (POGIL Activity-­‐ Students work collaboratively on guided inquiry questions and models to describe how bright line spectrum is produced in terms of energy transitions of the electrons in an atom as they move from one energy level to another, relate energy of electronic transitions to the specific color of light observed and accurately identify the presence of an element in an unknown mixture by comparing the emission spectrum of a mixture with the emission spectrum of specific elements.

Students create Lewis diagrams and VSEPR to predict geometry of molecules and make predictions on polarity

Students will construct models of the arrangement of pairs of electrons around a central atom and draw 2D illustrations to predict molecular shape. [BI 1, EU 1.D, EK 1.D, 1.D.3.a-­‐c, BI 2, EK

2.C-­‐D, EK 2.C.4.a and c, 2.C.4.e.1-­‐5, 2.C.4.g -­‐h, 2.D.4.d, BI 5, EU 5.C, EK 5.C.1d-­‐e, LO 1.10,

1.11, 1.15, 1.16, 2.17, 2.18, 2.19, 2.20, 2.21, 2.23, 2.24, 3.1, 5.1, 5.8, SP 1.4, 6.4, CR3a, CR3b]

Unit 3: Chemical Reactions (14 days)


CR3a: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 1: Structure of matter.

CR3b: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 2: Properties of matter-­‐ characteristics, states, and forces of attraction.

Topics         BI         EU         EK         LO

A: Electrolytic Solutions/Solubility/Precipitation

Reactions/REDOX/Oxidation  Numbers


2         2.A         3

2         2.C         2

3         3.A         1

3         3.B         3

3         3.C         1


2.8

2.19

3.2

3.8

3.10

B: The Activity Series/Halogen Displacement Reactions/Hydrogen Displacement Reactions/Disproportionation Reactions/ Combustion Reactions


3         3.B         3         3.8

C: REDOX Reactions in Acid and Basic Solutions         3

3

1


3.A         2

3.B         3

1.E         2


3.4

3.8, 3.9

1.20

Assignments

Reading: 114-­‐133, 778-­‐783

Activities: Practice Problems: Reactions I-­‐III Worksheets; Net Ionic Equations POGIL Activity. Students work collaboratively to correctly predict the products of a double displacement and write net ionic equations [BI 1, EU 1.E, EK 1.E.2.e, BI 2, EU 2.A, EK 2.A.3.h, BI 3, EU 3.A-­‐C, EK

3.A.1.a-­‐b, 3.A.2.c, 3.B.3.b, c, 3.C.1.a, c, d, e, LO 1.20, 2.8, 3.2, 3.4, 3.8, 3.9, 3.10, SP 6.1, CR3c]

Unit 4: Thermodynamics (14 days)


CR3c: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 3: Chemical reactions.

Topics         BI         EU         EK         LO

A: Heat vs. Temperature/Enthalpy and Work/ Endothermic and

Exothermic Reactions/ Average Bond Enthalpy


5         5.A

5         5.B

5         5.C


1-­‐2

1-­‐3

2


5.1, 5.2, 5.3

5.4, 5.6

5.8

10


3

3.C

2

3.11

B: Calorimetry/Hess’s Law/Enthalpy of Formation

5

5

5

3

3

5.A

5.B

5.C

3.A

3.C

2

1-­‐4

2

1

2

5.3

5.4, 5.5, 5.6, 5.7

5.8

3.2

3.11

Entropy/Free Energy

5

2

5.E

2.B

1-­‐2

3

5.12, 5.13, 5.14, 5.15

2.15

Assignments

Reading: 154-­‐187, 736-­‐760

Activities: Thermodynamics Worksheets I-­‐III, Calorimetry POGIL Activity – students view a demonstration and answer guided inquiry questions to: quantify the relationship between heat absorbed or lost and an observed temperature change, calculate the heat required to raise the temperature of a given mass of water, determine the specific heat capacity of a substance other than water and compare the expected temperature changes for a sample of lead with the expected temperature change for a sample of water of equal mass.

Practice Problems: Thermodynamics I-­‐III Worksheets. Students will connect temperature and motion of particles through particulate representations-­‐ with illustrations of particles with arrows indicating velocities or through representations of kinetic energy and distribution of kinetic energies of the particles, as with Maxwell-­‐Boltzmann distribution. [BI 2, EU 2.C, EK

2.C.4.a, BI, 3, EU 3.C, EK 3.C.2.b, LO 2.15, 3.2, 3.11, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.6, 5.7, 5.8, 5.12, 5.13, 5.14,

5.15, SP 2.1-­‐2.3, SP 2.1-­‐2.3, 5.3, 6.3, CR3e]

Unit 5: Equilibrium (16 days)


CR3e: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 5: Thermodynamics.

Topics         BI         EU         EK         LO

A: Equilibrium Constants (Keq, Kc, Kp)/Calculating Equilibrium

Concentrations


6         6.A         1-­‐4         6.3, 6.5, 6.6, 6.7

B: The Reaction Quotient (Q)/Le Chatelier’s Principle/Manipulating         6

Keq and Q         6

5


6.A

6.B

5.E


2-­‐3

1-­‐2

4


6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.6

6.8, 6.10

5.17

Gibbs Free Energy and Equilibrium         5

6


5.E         2

6.D         1


5.18

6.25

Assignments

Reading: 575-­‐600, 761-­‐766

Activities: Equilibrium and Le Chatelier’s Principle POGIL Activity -­‐Students are guided through inquiry questions to: be able to explain the concept of chemical equilibrium, identify factors that disrupt a system that is at chemical equilibrium, determine the direction of the shift in the equilibrium that relieves a stress, determine the effect of a shift in the equilibrium on the initial and final concentrations of the reactants and products in a chemical reaction. [CR3f]

Practice Problems Equilibrium I-­‐III Worksheets;

PhET Simulator Activity – Reactions and Rates Guided Inquiry Learning.  In a series of lessons the students will use the PhET Simulators and answer guided inquiry questions.  In one simulator, students will describe reactions in terms of molecular models with illustrations, use the


CR3f: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 6: Equilibrium

11


molecular model to explain why reactions are not instantaneous, use the molecular model to explain why reactions have less than 100% yields, sketch how the number of reactants and products will change as a reaction proceeds, determine the number of reactants or products from the experiment graph, convert number to concentration and relate changes observed in the rate of reaction for a system of many molecules to changes at the molecular level, such as changes in the energy of molecules, or in the potential energy along the reaction coordinate.  In the third simulator, students will calculate a rate coefficient from concentration and time data, determine how a rate coefficient changes with temperature from concentration vs. time data collected at different temperatures, compare graphs of concentration vs. time to determine which represents the fastest or slowest rate. [BI 5, EU 5.E, 5.E.4, BI 6., EU 6.A, EK 6.A.3.d,

6.A.2.b, LO 2.6, 5.13, 5.14, 5.15, 5.17, 5.18, 6. 6.2, 6.3, 6.4 6.5, 6.6, 6.7, 6.8, 6.9, 6.10, 6.25, SP

6.4, CR3f]

Unit 6: Electrochemistry (16 days)

Topics

BI

EU

EK

LO

A: Voltaic (Galvanic) Cells/Voltage/Standard  Reduction

Potentials/Standard Cell Potentials

3

3

3.A

3.C

1

3

3.2

3.12, 3.13

B: Thermodynamically Favored Redox Reactions/Gibbs Free

Energy/Concentration Cells/Electrolytic Cells

3

6

2

3.C

6.D

2.C

3

1

2

3.12, 3.13

6.25

2.19

Assignments

Reading: 784-­‐819

Activities: Practice Problems Electrochemistry I and II Worksheets;   POGIL Activity: introduction to voltaic cells.  Students are guided through questions and utilize models within the activity and work collaboratively to answer the questions [BI 3, EU 3.B, C, EK 3.B.a,

3.C.3.b, LO 3.2, 3.12, 3.13, 6.25, SP 5.3, 6.1, CR3c]

Unit 7: Intermolecular Forces (10 days)


CR3c: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 3, Chemical reactions.

Topics

BI

EU

EK

LO

A: Types of Intermolecular Forces/Determining Relative Boiling

2

2.B

1-­‐3

2.11, 2.13, 2.14, 2.15, 2.16

Points

5

5A-­‐E

All

5.1

5

5.D

1

5.9

B: Heat of Fusion/Heat of Vaporization/Vapor Pressure/Surface

5

5.D

2,3

5.10, 5.11

Tension and Viscosity/Polymers

5

5.B

3

5.6

2

2.A

1

2.3

2

2.B

3

2.16

2

2.C

2

2.19

2

2.D

1

2.23, 2.24

3

3.B

3

3.8

12


C: The Solid State: Amorphous/Crystalline Solids/Unit

Cells/Molecular Solids/Covalent Network Solids/Metallic Solids

2

2

2

2.A

2.C

2.D

1

3,4

2,3,4

2.3

2.20, 2.21

2.26, 2.27, 2.28, 2.29, 2.30,

2.31, 2.32

Assignments

Reading: 408-­‐440, 456-­‐463

Activities: Practice Problems Intermolecular I and II and Solids Worksheet; When given structures of various compounds, students must explain why they differ in Physical state and different temperatures.  They also must predict the bond type due to where the atom is located on the periodic table. [BI 2, EU 2.D, EK 2.D.3.c.2-­‐4, LO 2.1, 2.3, 2.11, 2.13, 2.15, 2.16,

2.19, 2.20, 2.23, 2.26, 2.27, 2.28, 2.29, 2.30, 2.32, 5.6, 5.9, 5.10, 5.11, SP 1.1, 7.2, CR3b]


CR3b: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 2: Properties of matter – characteristics, states and forces of attractions.

Unit 8: Solutions (14 days)

Topics

BI

EU

EK

LO

A: Types of Solutions/Expressing Concentrations/ and

2

2.A

1-­‐3

2.6, 2.7, 2.8, 2.10, 2.15

Structure/Solubility of Solids and Temperature

2

2.D

2

2.27, 2.28

3

3.C

2

3.11

B: Solubility Product Constant (Ksp)/Predicting

6

6.C

3

6.21, 6.23, 6.24

Precipitates/Solubility  of Gases and Temperature/Solubility  of

6

6.A

1, 3

6.1, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6

Gases and Temperature/Solubility  of Gases and Pressure

6

6.B

1

6.8

Assignments

Reading: 114-­‐127, 486-­‐501, 511-­‐516, 933-­‐934, 678-­‐688

Activities: Practice Problems Solutions I and II Worksheets; Practice Problems Solutions I and II Worksheets; [BI 2, EU 2.A, D, EK 2.A.3.e, 2.D.2, BI 6, EU 6.C, EK 6.C.3, LO 2.2, 2.3, 2.8, 2.9,

2.15, 2.10, 2.27, 3.2, 3.11, 6.1, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.8, 6.21, 6.22, 6.23, 6.24, CR3f]

Unit 9: Gases (10 days)


CR3f: The course provides students with the opportunities outside the lab environment to meet the learning objectives of Big Idea 6: Equillibrium.

Topics         BI         EU         EK         LO

A: Pressure/Gas Laws/Ideal Gas Law         1

2

3

5

B: Partial Pressures/Mole Fractions/Real vs. Ideal Gases         2

2

3

2


1.A         3

2.A         2

3.A         2

5.A         1

2.A         2

2.B         3

3.A         2

2.C         2


1.4

2.4, 2.5, 2.6

3.3, 3.4

5.2

2.5, 2.6

2.16

3.4

2.19

13


Assignments

Reading: 366-­‐396

Activities: Practice Problems: Gases I and II Worksheets; [LO 1.2, 1.4, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.12, 2.16,

3.3, 3.4, SP 7.1, CR3b]

Unit 10: Acids and Bases (16 days)


CR3b: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives for Big Idea

2: Properties of Matter – characteristics, states and forces of attraction.

Topics

BI

EU

EK

LO

A: Defining Acids and Bases/Conjugate Pair/The Strengths of Acids

3

3.B

2

3.7

and Bases/Autoionization of Water/pH of Strong Acids/pOH of

6

6.C

1

6.11, 6.14, 6.15

Strong Bases

2

2.A

1

2.2

B: pH of Strong Acids and Bases/Ka and Kb/pH of Weak Acids and

6

6.A

3

6.5

Bases/Polyprotic Acids

6

6.C

1

6.12, 6.14, 6.15, 6.16, 6.17

2

2.A

1

2.2

C: Acid/Base Reactions/pH and Soluble Salts

6

6.C

1

6.15, 6.16, 6.17

D: Common Ion Effect/Buffered Solutions/Solubility and pH

6

6.B

1

6.8

6

6.C

2-­‐3

6.18, 6.19, 6.20, 6.23

E. Acid Base Titrations

6

6.C

1-­‐2

6.11, 6.12, 6.13, 6.15, 6.17,

6.19

1

E

2

1.20

Assignments

Reading: 139-­‐143, 614-­‐651, 662-­‐695

Activities: Practice Problems Acids and Bases I-­‐V Worksheets; POGIL Activity: Acid Base Neutralization Reactions.  Students are guided through questions and work collaboratively to answer them utilizing models given within the activity. [BI 6, EU 6.B-­‐C, EK 6.B.1.b, 6.C.1.g, n,

LO 1.20, 2.2, 3.2, 3.7, 6.5, 6.8, 6.11, 6.12, 6.13, 6.14, 6.15, 6.16, 6.17, 6.18, 6.19, 6.20. 6.23, SP

2.2, 6.2, CR3f]

Unit 11: Kinetics (20 days)


CR3f: The course provides students with the opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 6: Equilibrium.

Topics         BI         EU         EK         LO

A: Reaction Rates/The Order of Reactions/Rate Laws         4         4.A         1-­‐3         4.1, 4.2

B: Integrated Rate Laws/Half Life of Reactions         4         4.A         1-­‐3         4.1, 4.2, 4.3

C: Factors Affecting Reaction Rates/Activation Energy, Ea/Reaction         4

Mechanisms/Catalysis         4

4


4.A

4.B

4.C


1,2

1-­‐3

1-­‐3


4.1

4.4, 4.5, 4.6

4.7

14


4

3

5

4.D

3.C

5.E

1,2

2

2, 5

4.8, 4.9

3.11

5.18

Assignments

Reading: 525-­‐561 , 840-­‐843,

Activities: Practice Problems Kinetics I-­‐III Worksheets; Students calculate the concentration of either reactant or products using given data.  Then, students use given data to calculate the equilibrium constant.

Kinetics and Graphs Activity – students are given data and must write the rate law, calculate k with proper units, and determine overall rate order.  Students must also graph other sets of data and calculate the reaction time.

PhET Simulator Activity – Reactions and Rates Guided Inquiry Learning.  The students will use the PhET Simulators and answer guided inquiry questions.  In the first simulator on single collisions they will describe reactions in terms of a simple molecular model, explain how the simulation model relates to test tube size experiments, describe on a microscopic level, answer what contributes to a successful reaction. (Include illustrations), Students will describe what would enable a reaction proceed or slow its progress with references to the reaction coordinate, Students will use the potential energy diagram to determine activation energy for the forward and reverse reactions, the difference in energy between reactants and products an the relative potential energies of the molecules at different positions on a reaction coordinate. [BI 6, EU 6.A, EK 6.A.3.f, BI 4., EU 4.A-­‐c, EK 4.A.2.a, 4.B.3.c, 4.C.1.a, b, BI 3, EU 3.C, EK 3.C.2.b, LO 3.11, 4.1,

4.2, 4.3, 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, 4.9, 5.18, SP 3.2, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, CR3d]


CR3d: The course provides students with opportunities outside the laboratory environment to meet the learning objectives within Big Idea 4: Rates of chemical reactions.

15