MS Cycle Principles of Technology                                                                Page  of

Units:

Unit 1 - Safety and OSHA Standards

Unit 2 - The History of Technology & The Design Process

Unit 3 - The Product Life Cycle

Unit 4 - Design Sketching & Engineering Drawings

Online Interactive Isometric Drawing Tool - Isometric Drawing Tool

Unit 5 - Transportation Technology



Unit Title

Unit 1 - Safety and OSHA Standards 

Timeframe 

2 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit is imperative as a building block to safe learning and participation in the lab setting.  Issues to be discussed will include general safety rules, specific machine safety rules, personal safety issues, and working together in a safe class environment.  The student will be acquainted with OSHA guidelines and how they affect the classroom and workplace.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Can you identify workplace/jobsite safety issues?
  • Are there safety issues in the school?
  • What and why is the inspection process by OSHA important to safety?
  • Why is it necessary to be properly trained on workplace/jobsite tools and machinery?
  • What is PPE and why OSHA requires job specific equipment?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Various skills are in demand by employers who require an understanding of both workplace/jobsite tooling and equipment operation.
  • Government regulations are in place to ensure a safe and healthy working environment.
  • Using the appropriate PPE for specific jobs, tooling and machinery.
  • Proper tooling, machine, and equipment operation according to OSHA standards

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Identify situations that require PPE (Personal Protection Equipment)
  • Identify and describe the warning signs posted in the shop.
  • Explain who and what OSHA stands for and is used for.
  • The expectations of the student to maintain a safe working/learning environment.
  • Proper room clean-up procedures.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Describe safety precautions for working with various tools and machines.
  • Safely use the tools and machines
  • Understand their role in the safe operation of the class.
  • Explain the plan for room clean-up.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Safety Test Chunking on each individual machine and power tool

Summative/ Benchmark

Students will create a 3-D puzzle game that will use all of the tools and machinery in the shop safely and  effectively

Alternative Assessments

Tool and Machine Safety Packets

Workplace Safety Action Plan Scenarios Worksheets

Technology Lab Safety Action Plan

OSHA Hazardous Workplace Quiz

Learning Activities

Students will use OSHA’s E-Tools web portal to review health and safety standards (https://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/oshasoft/index.html)

Complete OSHA Safety Checklists for Construction and Woodworking Hazards

"Don't Be a Zombie at Work," an interactive, online computer game designed to help teens stay safe in the workplace.

Design a standard OSHA safety poster for the lab on a specific health/safety topic. http://youngworkers.org/posters/

Technology Lab Safety Action Plan Development

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

NCCER Construction Tech Modules,Acellus Online Modules, OSHA.gov E-Tools & OSHA Young Workers Websites

Equipment

Power tools, machines, hand tools, PPE

Supplemental Resources

Acellus Online Modules,

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Students and teacher discuss the different emergencies and what to do and where to go under various circumstances

Describe safety precautions for working with ladders

Explain the importance of good housekeeping

Discuss safety precautions around moving machinery

Identify conditions that require safety protections

List the common hazardous materials

State reasons for Materials Safety Data Sheet  

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 9.3

ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION CAREER CLUSTER®

Career Cluster Number

ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION (AC)

9.3.12.AC.1

Use vocabulary, symbols and formulas common to architecture and construction.

9.3.12.AC.2

Use architecture and construction skills to create and manage a project.

9.3.12.AC.6

Read, interpret and use technical drawings, documents and specifications to plan a project.

CONSTRUCTION (AC‐CST)

9.3.12.AC-CST.5

Apply practices and procedures required to maintain jobsite safety.

9.3.12.AC-CST.9

Safely use and maintain appropriate tools, machinery, equipment and resources to accomplish construction project goals.

MAINTENANCE/OPERATIONS (AC‐MO)

9.3.12.AC-MO.1

Recognize and employ universal construction signs and symbols to function safely in the workplace.  

MANUFACTURING (MN)

9.3.MN.3

Comply with federal, state and local regulations to ensure worker safety and health and environmental work practices.  

HEALTH, SAFETY, & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSURANCE (MN‐HSE)

9.3.MN-HSE.1

Demonstrate the safe use of manufacturing equipment.

9.3.MN-HSE.2

Develop safety plans for production processes that meet health, safety and environmental standards.  

9.3.MN-HSE.3

Demonstrate a safety inspection process to assure a healthy and safe manufacturing environment.  

9.3.MN-HSE.4

Evaluate a system of health, safety and/or environmental programs, projects, policies or procedures to determine compliance.  

9.3.MN-HSE.5

Evaluate continuous improvement protocols and techniques in health, safety and/or environmental practices.  

9.3.MN-HSE.6

Conduct job safety and health analysis for manufacturing jobs, equipment and processes.

9.3.MN-HSE.7

Develop the components of a training program based on environmental health and safety regulations.  

Technology Education Standards - 8.2

8th Grade

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.8.B.2 - Identify the desired and undesired consequences from the use of a product or system.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.8.C.4 - Identify the steps in the design process that would be used to solve a designated problem.

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems

  • Apply the design process                

8.2.8.D.1 - Design and create a product that addresses a real world problem using a design process under specific constraints.

8.2.8.D.3-  Build a prototype that meets a STEM-based design challenge using science, engineering, and math principles that validate a solution.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.

END OF UNIT



Unit Title

Unit 2 - The History of Technology & The Design Process

Timeframe 

1 Week

Unit Summary

Students will have a better understanding of what it means to be technologically literate. How to make informed choices as an everyday consumer regarding current technologies and trends. Understand that humans have used technology to overcome problems for thousands of years. Look at the historical perspectives on technological development. Identifying technological systems and products from the Industrial to the Information technological eras.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What is the role and significance of technology throughout history?
  • What is the definition of technology?
  • How do you identify positive and negative impacts of technology systems?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Throughout history humans have used and developed technologies to overcome problems to create change.
  • Using resources and finding solutions to problems is part of change caused by technological activity.
  • Technology is the human process of applying knowledge to satisfy our needs and wants to extend our capabilities.
  • No matter what product or system it can be classified under one of the six areas of technology. Transportation, manufacturing, power & energy, communication, biotechnology, construction.
  • Solutions to problems can be divided into three parts, inputs, processes and outputs. Desired and unexpected outputs for technological activity.
  • Technological products and systems are created through the application and appropriate use of technological resources.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Understand the role and significance of technology throughout history.
  • Identify the six areas of technology
  • Identify personally with the nature of technology.
  • Understand that all technologies have positive and negative tradeoffs.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Explain the definition of technology
  • Apply the Engineering Design Loop to solve everyday problems.
  • Give examples of products and/ or systems in each of the six areas of the technological world.
  • Explain the 7 resources in technology

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Illustrate a timeline depicting technological innovations of one product over time
  • Write a help-wanted ad profiling a career from one area of the designed world.
  • Write and present a skit about a group of friends experiencing the positive and negative effects of technology.

Summative/ Benchmark

Identify a real world problem and work through the various steps of the design process to come up with a viable solution.

Alternative Assessments

Learning Activities

History of Technology Timeline Sketch

Engineering Design Loop Diagram Worksheet

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Lessons, presentations, and guided practice relating to:

  • Historical periods of technological evolution
  • Significance of technological advancements
  • Influence of technology on history
  • The exponential growth of technology
  • Writing a Definition for Technology
  • Identifying the Six Areas of the Designed World
  • Needs and Wants
  • Tradeoffs

Equipment

Engineering Design Loop

Projector / Laptop

Computer Lab

Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

How technological development has affected human progress throughout history, and the rise of the Industrial Revolution

Comparing the “Engineering Design Process” to the “Scientific Method” and identifying their similarities and differences.

 

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.

8th Grade - Technology Standards - 8.1

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.8.F.1 Explore a local issue, by using digital tools to collect and analyze data to identify a solution and make an informed decision.

8th Grade - 8.2 Technology Education Standards

A. The Nature of Technology: Creativity and Innovation Technology systems impact every aspect of the world in which we live.

The relationships among technologies and the connections between technology and other fields of study.

8.2.8.A.5 Describe how resources such as material, energy, information, time, tools, people, and capital contribute to a technological product or system.

8th Grade - 9.3 CTE Standards

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.4

Understand the nature and scope of the Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Career Cluster and the role of STEM in society and the economy.  

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐ET)

9.3.ST‐ET.6

Apply the knowledge learned in the study of STEM to provide solutions to human and societal problems in an ethical and legal manner.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.

END OF UNIT



Unit Title

Unit 3 - The Product Life Cycle

Timeframe 

1 Week

Unit Summary

The product life cycle goes through multiple phases, involves many disciplines, and requires many skills, tools

and processes. Product life cycle has to do with the life of a product in the market with respect to business,

commercial,advertising, manufacturing, resources, production, distribution, sales and recycling.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What is form vs function in regards to a technological product or system?
  • Why do we use  Planned Obsolescence?
  • What role do you the consumer play in the lifecycle of a product?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Ergonomic product design and anthropometrics (the study of human measurement. Products and systems are designed not only to function a certain way but to appeal to a variety of audiences and demographic areas.
  • The product life cycle includes includes R&D, marketing, advertising, resources, production, distribution, sales, removal and recycling
  • Products are designed to break and function for a specific amount of time so the consumer can pay to make the necessary repairs or purchase a new product
  • Most used or broken products end up in landfills, products that are broken down into their individual components can be sorted for recycling or reuse. The majority of components cannot be reclaimed

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Students will understand how a product is born, from conception to recycling.
  • They will be able to understand the basic concepts behind ergonomic design and function that fits the wide range of consumers.
  • Why products are designed specifically to fail after a period of usage and how manufacturers get away with doing so. 

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Explain what “Planned Obsolescence” is
  • Identify products that have good ergonomic design, with consumer in mind
  • Explain the 7 resources in technology and how they apply to a given product's lifecycle

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Develop and present a report on the lifecycle of a given product, explaining its impact on society at each part of the cycle.

Summative/ Benchmark

Reverse Engineer and document a mechanical toy or small household item, identifying the 7 resources/materials used in the creation of each component

Alternative Assessments

Learning Activities

Reverse Engineer a Simple LED flashlight, identifying all components and how to document the process.

Resources of Technology Worksheet, “How to Make a Pizza”

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Lessons, presentations, and guided practice relating to:

  • Form vs. Function
  • Materials
  • Process
  • Ergonomics
  • Sketching
  • Public Speaking
  • Powerpoint
  • Story of Stuff Movie
  • You Tube

Equipment

Engineering Design Loop

Projector / Laptop

Computer Lab

Chromebooks

Small toys or household items

Colored Pencils / Markers

Supplemental Resources

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

How technological development has affected human progress throughout history, and the rise of the Industrial Revolution.

Technology products and systems impact every aspect of the world and global economy in which we live.

How the economy has fueled corporations to develop lower quality products to boost overall sales and new product purchasing trends

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.

8th Grade - Technology Standards - 8.1

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.8.F.1 Explore a local issue, by using digital tools to collect and analyze data to identify a solution and make an informed decision.

8th Grade - 8.2 Technology Education Standards

A. The Nature of Technology: Creativity and Innovation Technology systems impact every aspect of the world in which we live.

The relationships among technologies and the connections between technology and other fields of study.

8.2.8.A.5 Describe how resources such as material, energy, information, time, tools, people, and capital contribute to a technological product or system.

9.3 CTE Standards

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS (ST)

9.3.ST.4

Understand the nature and scope of the Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Career Cluster and the role of STEM in society and the economy.  

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐ET)

9.3.ST‐ET.6

Apply the knowledge learned in the study of STEM to provide solutions to human and societal problems in an ethical and legal manner.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.

END OF UNIT


Unit Title

Unit 4 - Design Sketching & Engineering Drawings

Timeframe 

1 Week

Unit Summary

Sketching and drawing form a language that allows an individual to visualize, refine, resolve and communicate ideas to others. Areas of three dimensional sketching will include isometric, oblique and perspective drawings. Engineering drawings or orthographic projections, use three basic views of an object, the top, front and right side views. Engineering drawings will be developed after an idea is brainstormed and several isometric variations are sketched in determining a final design solution to a given problem. The history of drafting and CAD (Computer Aided Design) will be time lined to show the progression of traditional drawing methods to the use of digital tools.

 

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Why do we use isometric and oblique sketches?
  • How do you create an orthographic drawing from a 3-Dimensional sketch?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Isometric drawings show all three sides of a 3-Dimensional object in one complete sketch.
  • Isometric sketches use a 30 degree horizontal axis for determining an object's point of view
  • Orthographic projections are drawings that use three basic views of an object; top, front and side views. This technique is useful for locating specific features with dimensions.
  • C.A.D.is the use of computer software to allow a user to design, modify, and simulate a three-dimensional part or assembly
  • Dimension lines are lines with leaders at each end that extend off of a given edge or feature of an isometric or orthographic drawing.
  • Dimension lines can display the numerical height, width, depth, diameter,and radius

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Engineering Drawing Scale and layout
  • Engineering drawing techniques
  • Isometric sketching
  • Engineering Drawing Dimensioning Line Styles and proper placement
  • They will understand that 3-Dimensional objects have a “natural position” for depicting reference points to begin an isometric sketch.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Isometrically sketch basic 3D objects found around the room
  • Create Orthographic drawings from a 3D object
  • Correctly dimension engineering drawings.
  • Students will be able to display proper isometric sketching techniques in generating design solutions to given problems.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Free sketch cylinders, cubes and spherical objects
  • Create an orthographic engineering drawing freehand

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Using Graph paper to sketch isometric objects
  • Create an isometric drawing with no words, numbers or letters, explaining a process in steps.
  • Using a pencil and ruler to develop orthographic drawings of a 3-Dimensional object

Alternative Assessments

Online Interactive Isometric Drawing Tool - Isometric Drawing Tool

https://sketchometry.org/en/index.html

Learning Activities

Online Interactive Isometric Drawing Tool - Isometric Drawing Tool

Sketchometry Online Tool - https://sketchometry.org/en/index.html

Isometric Sketching - “Connect the Dots” https://www.teachengineering.org/activities/view/cub_spatviz_lesson01_activity1

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Teacher developed drawing tutorials, online videos and interactive drawing tools

Equipment

computers/chromebooks, rulers, ¼” scale graph paper

Supplemental Resources

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Geometry and Measurement (NJCCCS 4.2.8 A)

Units of Measurement (NJCCCS 4.2.8 D)

Measuring Geometric Objects (NJCCCS 4.2.8 E)

Demonstrate a growing ability to represent experiences, thoughts, and ideas through a variety of age-appropriate materials and visual art media using memory, observation, and imagination (NJCCCS 1.3.P.D.4)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.3 Use and/or develop a simulation that provides an environment to solve a real world problem or theory.

8th Grade - 8.2 Technology Education Standards

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, Design, and Computational Thinking - Programming: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, computational thinking and the designed world as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.8.C.5.a  Create a technical sketch of a product with materials and measurements labeled.

9.3 CTE Standards

ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION CAREER CLUSTER

  • ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION (AC)

9.3.12.AC.1 Use vocabulary, symbols and formulas common to architecture and construction.

9.3.12.AC.6 Read, interpret and use technical drawings, documents and specifications to plan a project.

  • DESIGN/PRE‐CONSTRUCTION (AC‐DES)

9.3.12.AC‐DES.6 Apply the techniques and skills of modern drafting, design, engineering and construction to projects.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.



Unit Title

Unit 5 - Transportation Technology

Timeframe 

3 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit introduces students to their first real-world design challenge focusing in the area of transportation technology. You work as designing for a major car company developing safety equipment for high impact crashes. You will Design, Build, Test and Document a Mag-Lev CO2 powered vehicle that can withstand a head-on 60 mph collision.  You must employ three or more safety devices to protect an egg in the crash.  The constraints for this challenge include a Max weight=224g, Max LWH/12”x2.5”x4”; nothing dragging under the car; nothing behind the car; all persons start with the same chassis; egg must be in the car at the time of launch; egg must be easily removed after a crash for inspection; any materials can be used; and wheels must spin freely.

 

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • Why do we use Mag-Lev Technology?
  • What is Aerodynamics?
  • What factors determine if something is a “safety feature?”

Enduring Understandings

  • Magnetic Levitation technology (Mag-Lev) uses powerful electromagnets to suspend vehicles over a magnetic guideway. The magnets are charged with opposing forces that create a small cushion of air between the vehicle and guideway.
  • Aerodynamics comes from two Greek words: aerios, concerning the air, and dynamis, which means force. Aerodynamics is the study of forces and the resulting motion of objects through the air.

The equation for M.P.H. is Velocity (MPH) = Distance (in miles) / Time (in hours). 

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The mathematical equations for MPH
  • What Magnetic Levitation is
  • Magnetic forces and interaction
  • Lenz’s Law
  • EMF - Electromotive Force

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  • Understand how MAG-LEV Technology works and where the technology is currently being implemented.
  • Determine how aerodynamics and friction forces play an important role in the performance of a moving vehicle.
  • Calculate the speed of a moving object by recording distance and time intervals.
  • Use lab tools and machinery to process a variety of materials.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

Design Portfolio Research Step

Thumbnail Sketches of Design Ideas

Morphological Design Charts

Development of 3 viable solutions for Mag-Lev vehicle

Summative/ Benchmark

Isometric and Orthographic design sketches of solution to problem

Vehicle “Floats” correctly on Mag-Lev Tracks

Vehicle launches successfully and design includes at least three effective safety design features

Documentation of Design Process in Digital Portfolio

Alternative Assessments

None

Learning Activities

Morphological Chart “Designing a Bar of Soap”

Mag-Lev Sled Standarized Base Design and Preliminary Testing

Interactive Video “Electricity & Electromagnetics” - http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks3/science/activities/activity04/activity.swf

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

Teacher developed design challenge documentation, project design challenge digital portfolio, acellus online tutorials (any that may apply to magnetic theory), videos of Mag-Lev trains and how Mag-Lev tracks work and are designed

Equipment

computers/chromebooks, rulers, ¼” scale graph paper, Mag-Lev track, launchers, magnets and project consumables

Supplemental Resources

Lessons, presentations, and guided practice relating to:

  • The Design and Problem Solving Process
  • Selecting appropriate materials
  • Material processing
  • Orthographic sketching
  • Isometric sketching
  • Mag-Lev Technology
  • Aerodynamics
  • CO2 Propulsion

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

Energy Transfer & Conservation (NJCCCS 5.2.8.D.1)

Forces & Motion (NJCCCS 5.2.8.E.1)

Newton's Law (NJCCCS 5.2.8.E.2)

Objects in the Universe (NJCCCs 5.4.8.A.3)

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.3 Use and/or develop a simulation that provides an environment to solve a real world problem or theory.

8th Grade - 8.2 Technology Education Standards

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, Design, and Computational Thinking - Programming: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, computational thinking and the designed world as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

A. The Nature of Technology: Creativity and Innovation Technology systems impact every aspect of the world in which we live.

  • The characteristics and scope of technology.

8.2.8.A.1 Research a product that was designed for a specific demand and identify how the product has changed to meet new demands (i.e. telephone for communication - smart phone for mobility needs).

  • The relationships among technologies and the connections between technology and other fields of study.

8.2.8.A.5 Describe how resources such as material, energy, information, time, tools, people, and capital contribute to a technological product or system

B. Technology and Society: Knowledge and understanding of human, cultural and societal values are fundamental when designing technological systems and products in the global society.

  • The cultural, social, economic and political effects of technology

8.2.8.B.2 Identify the desired and undesired consequences from the use of a product or system.

C. Design: The design process is a systematic approach to solving problems.

  • The application of engineering design.

8.2.8.C.5.a  Create a technical sketch of a product with materials and measurements labeled.

  • The role of troubleshooting, research and development, invention and innovation and experimentation in problem solving.

8.2.8.C.8 Develop a proposal for a chosen solution that include models (physical, graphical or mathematical) to communicate the solution to peers.

D. Abilities for a Technological World: The designed world is the product of a design process that provides the means to convert resources into products and systems.

  • Apply the design process

8.2.8.D.1 Design and create a product that addresses a real world problem using a design process under specific constraints.

8.2.8.D.2 Identify the design constraints and trade-offs involved in designing a prototype (e.g., how the prototype might fail and how it might be improved) by completing a design problem and reporting results in a multimedia presentation, design portfolio or engineering notebook.

8.2.8.D.3 Build a prototype that meets a STEM-based design challenge using science, engineering, and math principles that validate a solution.

9.3 CTE Standards

ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION CAREER CLUSTER

  • ARCHITECTURE & CONSTRUCTION (AC)

9.3.12.AC.1 Use vocabulary, symbols and formulas common to architecture and construction.

9.3.12.AC.6 Read, interpret and use technical drawings, documents and specifications to plan a project.

  • DESIGN/PRE‐CONSTRUCTION (AC‐DES)

9.3.12.AC‐DES.6 Apply the techniques and skills of modern drafting, design, engineering and construction

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS CAREER CLUSTER

  • ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY CAREER PATHWAY (ST‐ET)

9.3.ST‐ET.1 Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST‐ET.4 Apply the elements of the design process.   9.3.ST‐ET.5 Apply the knowledge learned in STEM to solve problems.

9.3.ST‐ET.4 Apply the elements of the design process.   9.3.ST‐ET.5 Apply the knowledge learned in STEM to solve problems.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Use concrete examples to introduce concepts.
  • Make learning activities consistent.
  • Use repetition and drills spread over time.
  • Provide work folders for daily assignments.
  • Use behavior management techniques, such as behavior modification, in the area of adaptive behavior.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Encourage students to function independently.
  • Give students extra time to both ask and answer questions while giving hints to answers.
  • Give simple directions and read them over with students.
  • Shorten the number of items on exercises, tests, and quizzes.

504s

  • Assist students in getting organized.
  • Give short directions.
  • Use drill exercises.
  • Give prompt cues during student performance.
  • Let students with poor writing skills use a computer.
  • Break assignments into small segments and assign only one segment at a time.
  • Demonstrate skills and have students model them.
  • Give prompt feedback.
  • Use continuous assessment to mark students’ daily progress.
  • Prepare materials at varying levels of ability.

ELLs

  • Use a slow, but natural rate of speech; speak clearly; use shorter sentences; repeat concepts in several ways.
  • When possible, use pictures, photos, and charts.
  • Corrections should be limited and appropriate.  Do not correct grammar or usage errors in front of the class.
  • Give honest praise and positive feedback through your voice tones and visual articulation whenever possible.
  • Encourage students to use language to communicate, allowing them to use their native language to ask/answer questions when they are unable to do so in English.
  • Integrate students’ cultural background into class discussions.
  • Use cooperative learning where students have opportunities to practice expressing ideas without risking language errors in front of the entire class.

G/T

  • Provide ample opportunities for creative behavior.
  • Create assignments that call for original work, independent learning, critical thinking, problem solving, and experimentation.
  • Show appreciation for creative efforts
  • Respect unusual questions, ideas, and solutions.
  • Encourage students to test their ideas.
  • Provide opportunities and give credit for self-initiated learning.
  • Avoid overly detailed supervision and too much reliance on prescribed curricula.
  • Allow time for reflection.
  • Resist immediate and constant evaluation.
  • Avoid comparisons to other students.

END OF UNIT