Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course: Y3 U1

Unit Title:  Get Ready to Bring Home the Bacon! (Preparing for the interview)

Approximate Length of Unit:  4 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

By junior year, students have had a multitude of experiences in and out of school. Extracurricular activities may range from scouts to volunteer work to actual paying jobs. This unit will begin by listing all of their skills and talents. This can be done from scratch or through a checklist of skills provided by the instructor. Students will be presented with the following task, which they will lead to a job interview:

Individually, prepare a resume, cover letter, and portfolio of work supporting your strengths to use during an interviewing process with peers at the end of this unit.

In order to prepare them with the understandings they will need to develop a resume, students will have to research resumes and look at examples. The school might already have helpful tools in place to help with the resume process such as Naviance. Students will also need to review formal letter writing and follow a letter style to produce a strong letter to send to a possible employer. To support the resume, students will also put a portfolio together to highlight their strengths. Students want to sell their skills, not their degree. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then be engaged in developing the final products, which will be needed to conduct an interview with their peers.

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:  Business Literacy

21st  Century Themes: Communication, Life and Career Skills

Unit Rationale

The more prepared students are to go on an interview, the better they will perform at the interview. Students will benefit from understanding the interviewing process and the components needed for going on an interview. With the sheer number of graduates each year, graduates will have to learn to sell their skills and talents prior to the interview in order to get invited for an interview. The resume, cover letter and sample work has to get noticed first in order for the interview to ever take place.

Students need to learn how to highlight their strengths in their resume so that the reviewer gets a good sense of what the candidate can do. Since this is an activity related to Engineering, students should include their science and math strengths. The cover letter provides some insight for the reviewer as to the cognition of the possible employee, so the letter has to be coherent and also stand out from the rest of the applicants. Usually the portfolio is brought to the interview, but sometimes pieces of work can be sent along with the resume. The reviewer then gets a sneak peak of the work that the candidate has done before even meeting the candidate.

Learning Targets

Standards for Technological Literacy (ITEEA)

  • Standard 17: Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use information and communication technologies.

P. There are many ways to communicate information, such as graphic and electronic means.

Science (NJCCCS 5)


5.1 Science Practices: All students will understand that science is both a body of knowledge and an evidence-based, model-building enterprise that continually extends, refines, and revises knowledge. The four Science Practices strands encompass the knowledge and reasoning skills that students must acquire to be proficient in science.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

5.1.12.D.1

Engage in multiple forms of discussion in order to process, make sense of, and learn from others’ ideas, observations, and experiences.

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge. A.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.1.12.A.2

Produce and edit a multi-page document for a commercial or professional audience using desktop publishing and/or graphics software.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.2.12.G.1

Analyze the interactions among various technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity.

The Career Ready Practices: component of the CCTC provides a framework for the developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be “practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

CRP1

 Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.

CRP2

Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4

Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP8

Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP10

Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.

(Old) 9.3 Career Awareness, Exploration, & Preparation: All students will apply knowledge about and engage in the process of career awareness, exploration, and preparation in order to navigate the globally competitive work environment of the information age.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

(Old)

9.3.12.C.6

Develop job readiness skills by participating in structured learning experiences and employment seeking opportunities.

9.3 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data.

9.3.ST-ET.3

Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

9.3.ST-ET.4

Apply the elements of the design process.

English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)


WHST.11-12.3 Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  1. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task,

purpose, and audience.

  1. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
  2. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

Industry Standards

NOCTI

  • Employability Skills – Workplace Readiness
  • STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology

Unit Essential Questions

  • What job readiness skills do you have that are beneficial to a career in engineering?
  • How can you convey those skills through portfolio entries?
  • How can you prepare for an interview?
  • What are the best techniques for obtaining the interview and how can you prepare for an interview?
  • What is important to do post interview?

Unit Enduring Understandings

  • Different skill sets are needed for different types of engineering.
  • When interviewing for a job, sell your skills, not your degree.
  • Skill sets increase over time through more experience and practicing interviewing techniques is beneficial to the interviewing process.

Unit Learning Targets

Students will . . .

  1.  Identify their own skill sets and strengths that lend themselves to the engineering career fields that utilize a systems engineer, required schooling for an engineer and systems engineer, and skill set of an engineer and systems engineer. (5.1.12.D.1) (CRP10)
  2. Complete a resume and cover letter. (8.1.12.A.2) (CRP2) (CRP10) (WHST.11-12.3.4-6)
  3. Generate or gather work for portfolio. (ITEEA #17) (WHST.11-12.3.4-6) (CRP1) (CRP4)
  4. Take a test on interview techniques. (old 9.3.12.C.6)
  5. Interview as an engineer or systems engineer seeking employment. (5.1.12.D.1) (old 9.3.12.C.6) (CRP1)
  6. Interview as an employer seeking to fill a position for an engineer or systems engineer. (5.1.12.D.1) (old 9.3.12.C.6) (CRP8)
  7. Write a thank you letter after the interview. (8.1.12.A.2)

Project-Based Learning Plan:

Engineering Design Process (Sequence and Assessments)


Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem

Students at this level will soon start to interview for part time jobs and colleges. Preparing for the interview process is beneficial and can build self- confidence.

Lessons/ Topics

  • “Got Skills?” (Have students identify their marketable skills related to engineering since this course is about engineering and design.) 20 minutes
  • “Prove it.” (Have students identify what projects or work they have done that supports the marketable skills that they listed.) 20 minutes

Formative Assessments: (must have feedback)

o        Teacher and peer feedback on listed skills and supporting evidence. (ULT #1)

Summative Assessments:

N/A

Notes:

Day 1 – Coordinate class discussion and activity. Assign homework for students to bring in want ads for engineering positions.

Notes:

Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

Lesson / Topic

Background/Scenario:

  • A resume is the most accepted form for identifying your skills. A portfolio is an accepted means for displaying work related skills.

Problem/Opportunity Statement:

Create a resume and plan to interview for the engineering job of your choice.

Specifications:

  1. Name, address and phone numbers should be centered at the top of the page.

  1. The Objective. is your goal. What you are setting out to accomplish. The one listed is a generic objective, which can be used by anyone.

Formative Assessments:

  • Discuss information found in want ads for engineering positions.
  • Discuss certificates, licenses, and degrees mentioned in the ads.
  • Discussion of topic and project to increase breadth and depth of their understanding while discarding erroneous information and expanding and explicating background knowledge.

Summative Assessments:

N/A


If you have decided what your career goal is, you can be more specific. For example, if your goal is to become a nurse, your objective might be: Seeking a part-time position in the medical field. This lets the reader know that you are interested in only jobs that are related to the medical field.

  1. Education. Include the school address; there are a total of three (3) Woodrow Wilson High Schools in the Los Angeles County area. When you expect to graduate should be the date listed.

  1. Work Experience. Include the address of all former employers. If you have had more than one job, the most recent job should be listed first.  You should include the month and year in which you began and ended your employment.  Current jobs should be listed also, and will include the month and year you began employment, and in place of an end date put the word “present”.

You should also describe what duties and responsibilities you had while employed.

  1. Volunteer Work. Should be listed like Work Experience. All volunteer work should be included even though it may have been for a short period of time.

  1. Skills and Abilities. One of the most important skills you can possess today is being able to use a computer. List all the programs you have experience with.  Microsoft Word will probably be the software program most employers would desire you to possess. In addition, keyboarding is important too. If you have knowledge of your keyboarding speed, list it.

If you speak more than one or more languages list them. Don’t be afraid to list here personal qualities.

  1. Extracurricular Activities. List all activities/clubs/groups/organizations you have been a member of while in high school; include school year (for example, 2005/2006 school year).


  1. Awards Certificates. Think of all the awards and certificates you may have received and list them. You can include these in your senior portfolio.

  1. References.  List the names and phone numbers of at least two (2) individuals who has knowledge of your work, work habits and basically would say something positive about you. You should ask their permission first before you use their name and phone number. It is best to ask a counselor, teacher or supervisor at work. DO NOT use a friend or family member.

Constraints:

The resume must:

  • Be side of a 8 ½” x 11” white paper
  • Have no abbreviations, spell-out words.
  • Have no grammatical errors.

Stakeholders:

  • The target audience would be employers in the engineering field.
  • The student is the intended user for the resume.

Suggested Materials: Newspapers for want ads. Internet sites for posting jobs.

Suggested Tools/Machines:

Computer and Internet access.

Suggested Student Grouping:

Students will need to do this project by themselves and use peer evaluation throughout the process to gain insight to what others may be including in their resume that they might also include.

Students may need to interview people that recruit to gain insight into interviewing techniques.

Notes:

Day 2 – Provide time for students share want ads they found for homework and discuss the information found in the ads.

Notes:


Day 3 – Provide time for students to sort through the requirements of the project and ask questions.

Step Three:  Research  & Brainstorming

Lessons / Topics

  • “ Got Skills?” (Prompt students to make a list of their skills; essentially what they think they are good at.) 20 minutes
  • “Extracurricular Activity.” (Prompt students to list all of the activities they do outside of school and sports.) 20 minutes
  • “What’s Missing?” (Have students identify what careers they are considering. Next, have them identify what skills might be missing from their list that might help them in that field or career. Next, have them identify where they might go for experience and gain the missing skills.) 40 minutes
  • “Want Ads vs. Headhunter” (Have students bring in want ads for engineering jobs. Try to have a headhunter do a conference call with the class.) 40 minutes

Formative Assessments:

  • Peer review of lists of skills and extracurricular activities. (ULT #1)
  • Teacher review of collection of skill related work. (ULT #1)

Summative Assessments

N/A

Notes: Students may need some guidance here to determine who to contact as experts. Teacher may want to line up speakers for the project in order for students to have professionals to talk to. Personnel from public relations of a company might be useful and may be willing to visit with class.

Day 1: Coordinate class discussion. Assign homework to find want ads.

Day 2: Coordinate conference call with headhunter. Assign homework.

Day 3: Coordinate discussion on interviewing techniques.

Notes:

Step Four:  Generation Alternate Solutions

Lesson / Topic

  • Provide examples to Alternate Solutions

Formative Assessments:

o        Teacher conferences with students

Summative Assessments

N/A

Notes:

Day 4: Students need to know the level of expectations you have for end product. Show them some examples or have them find examples

Notes:


of portfolios. Will the portfolio be electronic or a physical set of examples?

Day 5-6: Provide time for students to generate multiple solutions to compare and contrast.

Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

Lesson / Topic

  • “Let’s be Rational” (Have students identify what skills they are trying to focus on for the interview. This should help them sort through all that they gathered to include in the portfolio.)

Formative Assessments:

o        Peer and Teacher assessment to justify portfolio inclusion for various pieces of work.

Summative Assessments

N/A

Notes:

Day 7: Have students write a list or works they will include in their portfolio and write a rationale for the selected works.

Notes:

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Lessons / Topics

  • “Polish” (Have students look over each others resumes, letters, and portfolios for miscellaneous typos and errors.)
  • “File Identification” (Help students name files for future reference by adding year and other indicators to the file name.)
  • “Cover Letter” (Students don’t write many letters anymore. Most of their writing happens online over email. Formal letter writing may have to be covered at this point.)
  • Interview Guide” (Review what students should do prior, during and after the interview.)

Formative Assessments:

  • Peer and Teacher assessment to catch typos and errors.

Summative Assessments

  • Test on Interviewing (ULT #4)

Notes:

Day 8-10: provide time for students to create working drawings and a plan of procedure for the product to be produced.

Notes:

Step Seven: Prototype

Lessons / Topics

  • “Pack it Up, Ship it Out” (Getting the interview is the most important part of the process so the packet mailed to the company has to get noticed. The content then has to stand out to the reviewer. Architectural Drafting students can print and include their best drawing along with the cover letter and

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher feedback for file names.
  • Teacher feedback for letter content.
  • Teacher feedback for Portfolio Content.

Summative Assessments:

  • Resume (ULT #2)


resume. That way a piece of his or her work will be seen in advance; probably more than anyone else sent in.)

  • Cover Letter (ULT #2)
  • Portfolio (ULT #3)

Notes:

Day 11-12: provide time, samples, tools and materials for students to produce resume, cover letter and portfolio.

Notes:

Step Eight:  Testing and Evaluation

Lesson / Topic

  • “Sell Your Skills, Not Your Degree!” (The degree doesn’t always mean you are the best for that position.)

Formative Assessments:

o        Peer and teacher assessment during practice interviews with peers.

Summative Assessments:

N/A

Notes:

Day 13-14: provide time for students to practice interviewing questions and responses. Students will participate in formal interviews with peers. They should dress to impress.

Have peers sit in background of interview and take notes for feedback or questioning.

Students can pin up their resume for peer review also.

If possible, arrange for someone professional to come in and interview the students to increase the integrity the activity for the final interview. Some parents might be able to take on this role. Set a few parents in various spaces to do more than one interview at a time.

Notes:

Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Lesson / Topic

  • “Self Improvement” (Have students identify areas of weakness in their documents and interviewing techniques.)

Formative Assessments:

o        Self and Peer assessment.

Summative Assessments:

N/A

Notes: Day 14-15:

Students will complete an evaluation report to reflect on the interviewing process and portfolio of work used.

Provide time for students to correct resume,

Notes:


cover letter and portfolio pieces.

Step Ten: Communicate

Lesson / Topic

  • “The Interview Format” (Have students come dressed to impress with letter, resume, and portfolio finalized.)
  • “Thank You Letter” (Have students follow up their interview with a thank you letter.)

Formative Assessments:

  • Self and Peer assessment.

Formative Assessments:

  • Interview as an engineer or systems engineer seeking employment. (ULT #5)
  • Interview as an employer seeking to fill a position for an engineer or systems engineer. (ULT #6)
  • Thank you letter post interview. (ULT #7)
  • Test on Interviewing Techniques (ULT #4)

Notes: Day 16-19:

Provide time for students to interview each other for job openings.

Provide the pairing for the interviews in advance or pick out of a hat on the spot to keep it more interesting.)

If parents or professionals are brought in, provide them with rubrics and feedback sheets. Day 20:

Provide time for students to debrief and take a written test on Interviewing Techniques now that they have been through the process.

Notes:

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities

Career Comparison

Curriculum Development Resources

CRITERIA FOR RESUME WRITING. Woodrow Wilson High School. Careers. Criteria. August 18, 2011

<http://www.wilsonmules.org/careers/criteria.htm>.

Job Descriptions and Careers. Net Industries: Education, Knowledge, Information. 13 August 2011 < http://careers.stateuniversity.com/pages/419/Systems-Engineer.html>.

StyleWizard – The Interview Process. EB Communications. 18 August 2011

<www.stylewizard.com/intguide.html>.

Resources Updated Summer 2015

Design Challenge Modifications Recommendations:

-Supplement Unit1 Introduction, Day 1 - “Phone Mate” Design Brief located in iSTEM PPT (by Pilot Teacher, Dave Doyle,  Delsea Regional High School)

-Supplement Unit I Introduction, Week 1 – “Socially Responsible Innovative Device Accessory –

Updated Curriculum Development Resources and Addenda:

Career Readiness Poster Project (PDF)

-Engrave a Map (PDF) Instructables.com

- Removing Duplicate Layers in AI (DOC) (Submitted by Shane Evans, Pilot Teacher, Freehold Regional High School)

Design Challenge Modifications based on Current Trends & Technological Advances:

-Use of LinkedIn website as template for developing a resume

-Use of Career Ready Poster (PDF) Competition

Updated Curriculum Development Resources and Addenda:

-LinkedIn Profile Checklist for Students (PDF), www.linkedin.com, 2015

http://www.nj.gov/education/cte/hl/CRP.pdf

https://www.linkedin.com/job/engineering-internship-jobs/?trk=old_jserp_redirect

https://students.linkedin.com/

-NJDOE Career Curriculum Tools and Materials to Assist Teachers, Students and Guidance (2014)  http://www.nj.gov/education/cte/resources/tools/curriculum.htm


Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course: Y3 U2

Unit Title:  Shedding Light on Scheduling Deadlines! (Scheduling a major project)

Approximate Length of Unit:  5-6 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

Teachers put students in groups or teams to accomplish tasks. Usually a leader rises from the group and takes charge in some fashion. The project continues and bumps along. Systems Engineers however, try to avoid the bumps in the process by scheduling all the tasks that have to get accomplished in order to complete the project. Students will be presented with the following:

In groups of 2-3, design a shed, and prepare a schedule, a material take-off and final cost to construct the shed.

At the beginning of this unit, students will research systems engineering and the process used to solve a problem. They will then be given a project to schedule just like a project manager or systems engineer would. The nature of the project can be adjusted to suit the level of students. The project suggested is the construction of a shed. The students can do a specialized shed for gardening or a general shed for common storage of some other small structure of interest, such as a recording studio, small garage for the racecar enthusiast, or a gazebo.

In order to prepare them with the understanding they will need to develop a viable solution to the problem, which will take the form of a schedule, students must understand the nature of the project and expectations to be scheduled. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then be engaged in developing the bill of materials and schedule.

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:  Architectural Design Field, Mathematics

21st Century Themes: Business, Career Skills

Unit Rationale

Students will benefit from understanding the needs of a project and the demands of a time schedule. Students have to seek out needed information to understand the nature of the project. The internet is a wealth of information for all types of projects. Shed designs and the construction process are readily available online. If a manufacturing project is desired, Instructables.com is a great source for students to see how items are made. With the process made available, students can easily begin scheduling what has to be ordered, delivered, processed, and assembled. Most students can understand shed construction, but a production of a toy might work as well. The insight gained here is that each task would require a different crew to complete the step; concrete person, framer, roofer, electrician, etc. The construction project from Year 2 would be a good source to schedule also.

Systems engineers design and coordinate large and complex projects known as systems. Many kinds of systems exist and vary in their complexity. A system has many parts that interact. Often systems have sub- systems. A jet airliner is a system. All of the airplanes owned by one airline functions as a systems also.

All of the airplanes in a country make up a more extensive system. An even larger and more complex system includes all of a nation's transportation facilities. Some other examples of systems are water distribution networks and sewage collection networks, experimental manned space flights, and military defense programs. Systems engineers also work on telephone systems, electric power systems, and water and sewage systems. Systems engineers work at various levels in the design and coordination of these


systems.

Systems engineers are responsible for coordinating the work of many engineers whom are experts in one part of a system or another. For instance, in the building of a submarine, electronics specialists are responsible for the guidance and control systems. Structural engineers design the hull. Other experts decide on a power source for propulsion. Each specialist concentrates on one area. The systems engineer coordinates all of these specialized efforts in order to produce the submarine. They coordinate the work of many specialists during the development of a system. Sometimes systems engineers are called on to make improvements in existing systems. Systems engineers can also test a possible system by using small- scale or actual-size models of parts of a system. Once a system has been designed, further testing is done.

Systems engineers work for government agencies, computer companies, and many industries that need to solve large and complex engineering problems. Large research projects sponsored by government, industry, or universities also employ teams of scientists and engineers, including systems engineers.

Sometimes these researchers develop new theories that can be used as the basis for systems and analysis. Workers who use systems analysis to solve business problems rather than engineering problems are usually called systems analysts. These workers are often experts in business rather than in engineering. (Job Descriptions and Careers)

Read more: Systems Engineer Job Description, Career as a Systems Engineer, Salary, Employment - Definition and Nature of the Work, Education and Training Requirements, Getting the Job

This unit will provide the students with some insight to a demanding and challenging field that will continue to change and evolve.

Suggested Materials: Computer paper and ink. Plotter paper and ink.

Foam Core to mount larger schedules.

Suggested Tools/Machines:

Students will need access to computers or drafting tables and tools for drawing shed plans. Students will need printers to print out schedules for others to edit before creating larger version. Students will need spreadsheet programs such as Excel for material take-offs.

Students will need large paper and plotters to print large schedules.

Unit Assumptions

Students have been exposed to the problem solving process more than once and that the steps are understood.

Students have been trained in CAD and technical drawing.

Students have been trained on Excel and know how to create graphs. Students have accessed and used the internet, email, and research databases. Students have used MLA and APA report formats.

Students have done some form of letter writing.

Learning Targets

Standards for Technological Literacy (ITEEA)


  • Standard 9: Students will (further) develop an understanding of engineering design.
  • Standard 17: Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use information and communication technologies.
  • Standard 19: Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use manufacturing technologies.

--OR--

  • Standard 20: Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use construction technologies.

Math

N-Q.1. Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

Science (NJCCCS 5)

5.1 Science Practices: All students will understand that science is both a body of knowledge and an evidence-based, model-building enterprise that continually extends, refines, and revises knowledge. The four Science Practices strands encompass the knowledge and reasoning skills that students must acquire to be proficient in science.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

5.1.12.D.1

Engage in multiple forms of discussion in order to process, make sense of, and learn from others’ ideas, observations, and experiences.

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge. A.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.1.12.A.2

Produce and edit a multi-page document for a commercial or professional audience using desktop publishing and/or graphics software.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.2.12.G.1

Analyze the interactions among various technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity.


The Career Ready Practices: component of the CCTC provides a framework for the developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be “practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

CRP9

Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP12

Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

9.3 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST.1

  Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and   quality assurance.

9.3.ST.2

  Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data

9.3.ST.6

  Demonstrate technical skills needed in a chosen STEM field.

9.3.ET.1

  Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ET.2

  Display and communicate STEM information.

 9.3.ET.3

  Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

 9.3.ET.4

  Apply the elements of the design process.

  9.3.ET.5

  Apply the knowledge learned in STEM to solve problems.

 9.3.ET.6

  Apply the knowledge learned in the study of STEM to provide solutions to human and societal problems in an ethical and legal manner.


English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)

WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  • Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

WHST.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Industry Standards

NOCTI

  • Employability Skills – Workplace Readiness
  • STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology

Unit Essential Questions

  • What schooling is required to become a project manager or systems engineer?

  • How does systems engineering differ from other areas of engineering?

  • What is the difference between the design process and systems engineering process?

  • What are scheduling techniques for systems engineering?

Unit Enduring Understandings

  • Skill sets vary for different engineering fields and systems engineering requires even more skills related to managing and scheduling.
  • Stepped processes are necessary to complete large scaled projects.
  • Systems Engineering is an interdisciplinary process that ensures that the customer's needs are satisfied throughout a system's entire life cycle. This process is comprised of the following seven tasks.
  • Systems Engineering is responsible for making sure that all these tasks are performed in a engineering environment. However, the Systems Engineering process must be tailored for each project. Often this means omitting certain tasks, which reduces cost but increases risk.
  • The systems life cycle is different for different industries, products, and customers.

Unit Learning Targets

Students will . . .

  1. Prepare research and source cards to describe engineering career fields that utilize project managers or systems engineers, required schooling and skill. (9.4.12.B.21) (5.1.12.D.1) (ITEEA

#9)(9.3.ST.5)

  1. Differentiate between engineering and systems engineering and the design processes used by each. (5.1.12.D.1) (ITEEA #9)


  1. Prepare research and source cards to describe scheduling techniques, material take-off, and bill of materials used by systems engineers. (5.1.12.D.1) (ITEEA #9)
  2. Analyze a systems engineering diagram to identify, define and provide examples of the various steps of systems engineering. (9.3.ST.1)
  3. Describe systems engineering, scheduling and engineering processes. (8.2.12.G.1) (ITEEA #9)
  4. Locate a shed construction guide using the Internet or equivalent to assist in designing a shed. (9.3.ST.2) (ITEEA #17, #19 or 20)
  5. Plan building and prepare plans and material take-off for shed construction in accordance with contracts to meet a budget and a schedule. (9.3.ST-ET.1) (9.3.ST-ET.2) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (ITEEA #17, #20) (N-Q.1)
  6. Demonstrate Project Scheduling practices and include inspection procedures required for completion of the construction project. (8.2.12.G.1) (CRP9) (9.3.ST.1) (9.3.ST.3) (9.3.ST-ET.5) (ITEEA #17, #19 or 20) (4.3.12 C) (4.5.F.1-4) (WHST.11-12.2) (WHST.11- 12.4)
  7. Assess the purpose for scheduling as it relates to successful completion of construction projects. Describe how design and construction project plans and schedules respond to unexpected events and conditions. (9.3.ST-ET.2) (9.3.ST-ET.5)

Project-Based Learning Plan:

Engineering Design Process (Sequence and Assessments)

Design Brief/Problem/Opportunity Statement:

Individually (or in pairs or teams of 3), design a shed, and prepare a schedule, a material take-off and final cost to construct the shed.

Background/Scenario/Simulation:

Large-scale projects take planning and scheduling to assure accurate and timely completion. A construction project or a manufacturing project may be used for the activity based on the level of the students. Select something that students are familiar with and can understand the steps of the construction or manufacturing process.

Specifications:

The Schedule must:

  • Encompass all aspect of construction or manufacturing.
  • Have the shortest critical path to complete.

Constraints:

The schedule is limited to:

  • A Gantt style chart.
  • Scheduling the construction process or the manufacturing process depending on the project selected by teacher.

Stakeholders:

  • The construction crew or manufacturing plant workers
  • The client

Suggested Materials:

Handouts with project requirements for construction or manufacturing.


Sample Gantt Chart. Sample Flow Chart.

Sample research and source cards. Sample letter formats.

Suggested Tools/Machines: Computer and Internet access. Excel or other spreadsheet program.

Flow chart program if available. (Flow chart symbols are available on drawing features of Word.) Gantt chart program is available.

Suggested Student Grouping:

Students can do this activity by themselves or at the most groups of 2-3 if the grouping encompasses various levels of ability. Individually, students will be more accountable for their work. In pairs, students will be able to have a sounding board and perhaps gain added insight and encouragement.

Suggestions for Grading:

15% Homework/Class Work

20% Quiz/Smaller Assignment

25% Test/Larger Assignment

50% Project

Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 1: Providing overview of the unit and deliverables

  • Background Research to be completed
  • Individual Work or Teams
  • Deliverables documentation format and expectations

Lesson 2: Discovering who coordinates large- scale projects

  • Mind Mapping information
  • Research topic
  • Documentation expectations

Lesson 3: Discovering what methods and techniques are used to coordinate large-scale projects

  • Parts of a Gantt Chart
  • Parts of Critical Path Method (CPM)
  • Symbols, method and computer tools for Flowcharting

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on a student generated:

  • Venn Diagram to differentiate between Engineer and Systems Engineer. (ULT #1,

#2)

  • Mind Map graphic organizer to indicate where project managers and systems engineers are used in industry. (ULT #1)
  • Mind Map to define and provide examples for systems engineering design process. (ULT #2)
  • Outline describing systems engineering, scheduling and engineering processes. (ULT #3)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, the following will be measured by a rubric:

  • Research note cards and Source Cards on engineering career fields that utilize project managers or systems engineers, required schooling and skill. (ULT #1)


  • Computer tools for Material Take-Off
  • Computer tools for Bill of Materials

Lesson 4: Differentiating between the design processes used by engineers and system engineers

  • Engineering Design Process
  • Systems Engineering Design Process

Lesson 5: Summarizing the difference between engineering and systems engineering.

  • Outline format for deliverable
  • Letter format for deliverable
  • Content expectations
  • Research note cards and source cards differentiating between engineering and systems engineering and the design processes used by each. (ULT #2)
  • Research note cards and source cards identifying scheduling techniques, flowcharting, material take-off, and bill of materials used by systems engineers. (ULT 3)
  • Research note cards and source cards for sample Gantt or CPM charts brought to class.
  • Written analysis of a systems engineering diagram to identify, define and provide examples of the various steps of systems engineering.
  • Personal letter to friend describing research as per rubric. (ULT #5)

Notes:

Students have probably worked in teams before or small groups to accomplish a task. Often someone on the team must rise to the occasion and take a leadership role. When large-scaled projects are involved, major scheduling must be used to organize all that must get accomplished. Students must learn to do research on topics related to the situation or problem before researching ideas for solutions. This step includes research activities for students to gain some background information on systems engineering prior to receiving the design task.

Lesson 1:

Have students research the difference between an engineer and a systems engineer and how project managers and systems engineers are used in industry.

Lesson 2:

Have students address the questions and find information and examples related to each, and deduct why these items are used.

Lesson 4:

Have students address the questions and find related information and examples, and deduce why these items are used.

Lesson 5:

Have students write a personal letter to a distant

Notes:

Students can use Word or PowerPoint to create Mind Maps, Venn Diagrams, outlines and letters. Students can use Excel to create Gantt Charts, Material Take-Offs, and Bill of Materials.


friend or relative discussing engineering career fields that utilize project managers or systems engineers, required schooling and skill, the difference between engineering and systems engineering and the design processes used by each, and scheduling techniques or methods used by systems engineers.

Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 6: Framing the design brief for the scheduling project

  • Review of design brief requirements
  • Review of specifications
  • Review of constraints

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on a student generated:

  • Graphic organizer to identify the design brief, specifications and limitations of the shed they want to build. (ULT #7)

Teacher feedback on a student researched:

  • Shed construction guide to use for scheduling. (ULT #6)

Summative Assessments:

N/A

Notes:

This step is to provide information to the students on the project and expectations. Provide students with a scheduling project. Have them play the role of project manager or systems engineer and develop a schedule for the project.

Depending on the level of the students, the project could be simplified to redesigning their bedroom with a budget. Also, if the shed is used for the construction project, this would be the time to define the nature of the shed and intended use.

Students could also create a schedule for the construction project from year 2 to eliminate design time.

Students could also be given time to design a new structure such as a gazebo, small garage, or stand- alone recording studio.

Notes:

Sources could be a wall section, floor plan and Bill of Materials for a shed.

Step Three:  Research  & Brainstorming

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 7: Identifying Project Knowledge

  • Review KWL graphic organizer
  • Review example Material Take-Off from a

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on a student generated:

o        KWL graphic organizer, “know, want to know and learns” to indicate what the students knows, wants to know and


project or product.

  • Review shed construction outline to complete.

Lesson 8: Obtaining Missing Information

  • Website that illustrates the steps to building a shed.
  • Material take-off.
  • Determine how long each step takes.
  • Process Steps.
  • Determine if different steps can be done at the same time so that overlap can occur and save time.

learned. Complete “Learned” portion at a later date. (ULT #7)

  • Material take-off spreadsheet organizer to identify material needs. (ULT #7)
  • Graphic organizer to outline the order of steps for completing with the project. (ULT

#7)

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, the following will be measured by a rubric:

  • Shed construction outline (ULT #7)
  • Material take-off spreadsheet (ULT #7)

Notes:

Building contractors would be a good resource for students to talk to about the process of construction. A local manufacturer might have a senior level employee that could also provide insight to scheduling large-scale projects. Teacher could arrange for site visit or professional to visit classroom for discussion if possible.

Have students create three columns on a paper with two headings; Know and Need to Know and What I Learned. Have students put down as much information as they can in the first two columns.

Have students share their lists with others to compare. Tell them they will complete the third column when they complete the project. Display partially completed charts around room.

Have students outline the order you think the tasks should be.

Notes:

A material take-off is done in the form of a Bill of Materials. This can be used to keep track of the manufacturer for each part and the cost.

Step Four: Alternate Solutions Generation

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 9: Generating Alternate Solutions

  • Review of planning the Project - Examples of scheduled projects, but not for a shed.
  • Review of Planning the Project – Flowchart style, Gantt chart style

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on a student generated individually to later compare:

  • Suggested flow chart style schedule for shed construction. (ULT #7)
  • Suggested Gantt chart style schedule for shed construction. (ULT #7)

Summative Assessments

  • N/A


Notes: If everyone (or more than one student) is doing the same shed design then they can compare and contrast each other’s schedules.

If students are working in groups, have student compare and contrast their method or order to others in the group.

Notes:

Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

Lessons/ Topic

Lesson 10: Writing a Rationale

  • Descriptions of each idea/method
  • Review of Pro/Con graphic organizer and method for completion
  • Final Rationale report

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on a student generated:

  • Pro/Con graphic organizer for comparing different schedule styles. (ULT #7)
  • Written defense with electronic files to peers to justify solution selected. (ULT #7, 8)

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, the following will be measured by a rubric:

  • Final Rationale report (ULT #7)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Lesson/Topics

Lesson 11: Identifying, Defining and Producing Deliverables for Project

  • Working Drawings for structure if necessary
  • Schedule
  • Corrections from peer edit and review

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on a student generated:

  • Peer assessment with electronic files to catch scheduling and design issues. (ULT

#7, 8)

  • Student corrections and peer review. (ULT

#7, 8)

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, the following will be measured by a rubric:

  • Final Master Schedule outline as measured by a rubric provided. (ULT #8)
  • Working drawings of shed. (ULT # 8)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Seven: Prototype

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 12: Printing the Final Product

  • Steps to printing
  • Options for printing

Formative Assessments:

At the end of the step, the following will be measured by a rubric:

o        Teacher corrections. (ULT # 8)


  • Printing expectations/specifications
  • Teacher and peer review prior to printing. (ULT # 8)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, the following will be measured by a rubric:

  • Printed Poster Size Schedule (ULT #8)

Notes:

Have students print their schedules poster size so that they can be shared or have the student project their schedules one at a time with a computer projector. Use this lesson time to demonstrate the expectations of the final product.)

Notes:

Students will be assessed for the final schedule product appearance and content accuracy.

Step Eight:  Communicate/Testing and Evaluation

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 13: Reviewing Peer Work

  • Procedures for reviewing other students’ work
  • Final review of the schedules method
  • Review of Testing and Evaluation Report rubric

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on a student generated:

  • Peer review of other students’ schedules. (ULT #8)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, the following will be measured by a rubric:

  • Final Schedule (ULT #8)
  • Testing and Evaluation Report (ULT # 9)

Notes: To enhance this unit, the instructor may want to arrange for general contractor, project managers or systems engineers or students from such college majors to do a critique of the schedules in their final stage. Explain the method to the students so they know what to expect. If the students are to present one at a time, bring the managers or engineers in one after the other so all students get reviewed. If you are doing a poster session to display all of the student work, bring the professionals in all at the same time or split over two days if necessary.

Have students complete these reports to bring closure to the project.

Notes:

Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Lesson / Topic

Lesson 14: Writing Reflections and Suggestions

  • Review of KWL graphic organizer to complete the “What I Learned” portion.

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on a student generated:

o        KWL graphic organizer, “know, want to know and what I learned” to indicate what the students “Learned” portion. (ULT #7)


  • Student prompts for writing report
  • Purpose for scheduling
  • Construction Success
  • Preparing for Unexpected Events
  • Preparing for Unexpected Conditions

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, the following will be measured by a rubric:

o        Report on the purpose for scheduling as it relates to successful completion of construction projects. Describe how design and construction project plans and schedules respond to unexpected events and conditions. (ULT #9)

Notes:

Notes:

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities

Engineering Design Manufacturing Technology Systems Control Technology

Curriculum Development Resources

Bahill, A. Terry and Frank F. Dean. What Is Systems Engineering?  A C onsensus of Senior System s

Engineers. 24 July 2011 <http://www.sie.arizona.edu/sysengr/whatis/whatis.html>.

Designer Shed Plans. Just Sheds, Inc. 2003. 27 August 2011

<http://www.designer-shed-plans.com/free_construction_guide.htm>.

Details for conventional Wood Frame Construction. American Wood Council. 27 August 2011

<http://www.awc.org/pdf/wcd1-300.pdf>.

How to Build Sheds Construction Guide. Just Sheds, Inc. 2003. 27 August 2011

<http://www.designer-shed-plans.com/0805%20Guide.pdf>.

Making Source Cards. Tip Sheet 4. CRLS Research Guide. Cambridge Rindge & Latin School. 27 August 2011

<http://www.crlsresearchguide.org/04_Making_Source_Cards.asp>.

Organizing Research with Note Cards. Study Guides and Strategies. 27 August 2011

<http://www.studygs.net/wrtstr5.htm>.

Sample Note Cards. Saint Josephs College. 27 August 2001

<http://www.sjc.edu/jarzt/Research_notecard-sample.htm>.


Lesson Plans

Lesson

Timeframe

Lesson 1

Providing overview of the unit and deliverables

Lesson 2

Discovering who coordinates large-scale projects

Lesson 3

Discovering what methods and techniques are used to coordinate large-scale projects

Lesson 4

Differentiating between the design processes used by engineers and system engineers

Lesson 5

Summarizing the difference between engineering and systems engineering

45 minutes / 6 days

1 day to lecture, 4 days to gather background, 1 day to submit work

Lesson 6

Framing the design brief for the scheduling project

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to lecture, 1.5 days to complete

Lesson 7

Identifying Project Knowledge

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to review, 1.5 days to complete

Lesson 8

Obtaining missing information

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to lecture, 1.5 days to complete

Lesson 9

Generating Alternate Solutions

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to lecture, 1.5 days to complete

Lesson 10

Writing a Rationale

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to lecture, 1.5 days to complete

Lesson 11

Identifying, Defining and Producing Deliverables for Project

45 minutes / 5 days without designing structure 45 minutes / 10 days with structure design

½ day to lecture, 4.5 days to complete

Lesson 12

Printing the Final Product

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to lecture, 1.5 days to complete

Lesson 13

Reviewing Peer Work

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to lecture, 1.5 days to complete

Lesson 14

Writing Reflections and Suggestions

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to lecture, 1.5 days to complete

Teacher Notes:

Resources Updated Summer 2015

Updated Curriculum Development Resources and Addenda:

-Architectural Style Guide (PDF) – New Albany Design Guidelines, Styles Residential (2013)

- http://b4ubuild.com/ References for Building Codes, Architectural Design, and Construction Planning (Submitted by Shane Evans, Pilot Teacher, Freehold Regional High School)

-Structural Design Basics of Residential Construction for the Home Inspector,

by Nick Gromicko and Ben Gromicko (2012)(Submitted by Shane Evans, Pilot Teacher, Freehold Regional High School)

Supplemental Reading:

-Citizen Engineer Handbook, Chapter 14, Creativity and Control. citizenengineer.org, 2015

-1959 PROCEEDINGS OF THE WESTERN JOINT COMPUTER CONFERENCE “The Social Responsibility of Engineers and Scientists” by F. B. WOOD http://www.computer.org/csdl/proceedings/afips/1959/5054/00/50540310.pdf

Venn Diagram

Project Manager

Systems Engineer


KWL Chart

What I KNOW

What I WANT to Know

What I LEARNED


Design Brief Organizer

End User

Problem

Specs

 What Why

The schedule must:        End User must:

1.        1.

2.        2.

3.        3.

4.        4.

5.        5.

Constraints

The schedule is limited to:        End User is limited to:

1.        1.

2.        2.

3.        3.

4.        4.

5.        5.

 

Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course: Y3 U3

Unit Title:  Got Energy? (Systems Engineering / Medical Design)

Approximate Length of Unit:  6 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

This unit will raise student interest in their own health. Students will be presented with the following problem:

Current technology for biofeedback requires a technician or doctor to perform a biofeedback assessment on a patient. These assessments can cost $100 or more to perform. A personal unit would eliminate that cost and allow someone to monitor him or herself as often as desired. As an innovation to an existing biofeedback system developed in Germany, design and model a personal unit that would be easier for an individual to use on a daily basis to monitor and adjust nutritional intake.

“In 1992, Bruce Taino of Taino Technology, an independent division of Eastern State University in Cheny, Washington, built the first frequency monitor in the world. Taino has determined that the average frequency of a healthy human body during the daytime is 62 to 68 Hz. When the frequency drops, the immune system is compromised. If the frequency drops to 58 Hz, cold and flu symptoms appear; at 55 Hz, diseases like Candida take hold; at 52 Hz, Epstein Bar and at 42 Hz, Cancer. Taino’s machine was certified as 100 percent accurate and is currently being used in the agricultural field today.”(The Frequency. . .)

At the beginning of this unit, students will be learning about the bio-energy circulation systems in the body, namely the meridians or pathways in the body along which vital energy is said to flow. Twelve such pathways associated with specific organs exist. The human body has an electrical frequency and much about a person’s health can be determined by these frequencies. Frequency is the measurable rate of electrical energy flow that is constant between any two points. They will need to know what healthy frequency levels are and how they are determined. They will need to know how energy is sensed in and out of the body. A biofeedback test exists that a practitioner is capable of using with a patient. As more devices are made to be patient friendly so that the patient can self medicate or regulate, this testing device might also be made available for people to regulate their own energy levels and adjust food types and intake.

In order to prepare them with the understandings they will need to develop a viable solution to the problem, students will need to understand how existing devices work. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then collaborate as a team to develop a personal unit for someone to get feedback on their own bodies needs for the day. At the end of the unit, students will develop a model and brochure to explain the use and operation of the unit.

Throughout the unit, students will acquire insight into the biomedical field careers and the alternative methods of treating illnesses. In addition, they will take on the roles of a project manager, manufacturers, scientists and engineers in the design and development of a solution for personal use.

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:  Engineering, Medical Science


21st Century Themes: Health Literacy

Unit Rationale

This chosen issue is important as we attempt to get the health of people back in check and look to future careers related to engineering and design. Most students know someone that is suffering from an illness or disease and may be suffering from something as well. The health of people is different in different geographic locations and diet can be attributed too much of the problem. Collaboration in design is important to provide students with opportunities to take on leadership roles and experience a variety of engineering related careers.

The medical field is growing due to needed personnel to attend to the sick in hospitals, and through home aid. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, healthcare boasts 9 out of the 20 occupations projected to grow most quickly within the next decade.        With America's increasingly aging population along with the baby boomer generation approaching their senior years, the average age of the population has continued to increase. The largest projected increases will occur in the 40-59 and 80+ age categories. The elderly will always need medical care and these demographics suggest that the drastic increase in the senior population results in an equivalent demand for medical services and healthcare professionals to provide them.

Coupled with this population growth is an increase in the use of innovative medical technology for intensive diagnosis and treatment, which will also require trained personnel to operate the equipment in hospitals and as home health aids.

However, preventative care is more cost effective and better for a person’s health in general. Too often we are caught putting on band-aids to fix something rather than avoid the situation all together. Areas of rehabilitation, health and fitness, wellness, imaging technology, home care, nutrition, new diagnostic services, or prevention, to name a few all involve using technical devices and technical expertise. So that healthy people can remain healthy, personal devices can help track daily body status and needs.

This unit will provide the students with some insight to a demanding and challenging field that will continue to change and evolve. With design yet again being the focus of this unit in addition to the health care issues, students will gain further experience in the design process.

Learning Targets

Standards for Technological Literacy (ITEEA)

Standard 14: Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use medical technologies.

K. Medical technologies include prevention and rehabilitation, vaccines and pharmaceuticals, medical and surgical procedures, genetic engineering, and the systems within which health is protected and maintained.

Math (NJCCCS 4) – I hunted all over for these and am not real sure what version to use. When you get clarification, we can complete this. Not worth attempting at this time.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Science (NJCCCS 5)

5.3 Life Science: All students will understand that life science principles are powerful conceptual tools for making sense of the complexity, diversity, and interconnectedness of life on Earth. Order in natural systems arises in accordance with rules that govern the physical world, and the order of natural systems can be modeled and predicted through the use of mathematics.


 

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

5.3.12.A.6

Describe how a disease is the result of a malfunctioning system, organ, and cell, and relate this to possible treatment interventions (e.g., diabetes, cystic fibrosis, lactose intolerance).

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.1.12.A.2

Produce and edit a multi-page document for a commercial or professional audience using desktop publishing and/or graphics software.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.2.12.F.3

Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system.

8.2.12.G.1

Analyze the interactions among various technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity.

The Career Ready Practices: component of the CCTC provides a framework for the developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be “practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

CRP7

Employ valid and reliable research strategies.

CRP8

Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

CRP9

Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP12

Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

9.3 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

(Old 94: Summarize the goals of biotechnology research and development and describe how biotechnological products that improve the quality of life are developed within legal and ethical protocols),

9.3.ST-ET.3

Apply processes and concepts for the use of technological tools in STEM.

(Old 94: Identify and explain processes used for biotechnology product design, development, and production and describe how they work together to demonstrate an understanding of the biotechnology product development process).

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

(Old 94: Develop and deliver formal and informal presentations using appropriate media to


engage and inform audiences).

9.3.ST-ET.4

Apply the elements of the design process.

(Old 94:Design a new product that meets identified customer needs, while also demonstrating the use of strategies and techniques for developing manufacturing production processes).

9.3.ST-ET.6

Apply the knowledge learned in the study of STEM to provide solutions to human and societal problems in an ethical and legal manner.

(Old 94: Design a product that satisfies a customer’s desires to demonstrate the relationship between production processes and meeting customer needs).

9.3.ST-ET.5

Apply the knowledge learned in STEM to solve problems.

(Old 94: Employ critical thinking skills independently and in teams to solve problems and make decisions).

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

(Old 94: Effectively develop and apply the skills inherent in systems engineering in which requirements, configuration, integration, project management, quality assurance, and process applications are necessary).

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data.

(Old 94: Use mathematics, science, and technology concepts and processes to solve problems in projects involving design and / or production).

9.3.ST-SM.1

Apply science and mathematics to provide results, answers and algorithms for engineering and technological activities.

(Old 94: Select and use a range of communication technologies, including word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation, email, and Internet applications, to locate and display information).

9.3.ST.4

Understand the nature and scope of the Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Career Cluster® and the role of STEM in society and the economy.

(Old 94: Employ concepts and processes for the application of technology to engineering).

9.3.ST-SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

(Old 94: Model technical competence by developing and applying processes and concepts in the design process).

English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)

WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  • Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

Mathematics (Common Core)

Modeling.

  • Modeling links classroom mathematics and statistics to everyday life, work, and decision-making. Modeling is the process of choosing and using appropriate mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, to understand them better, and to improve decisions. Quantities and their relationships in physical, economic, public policy, social, and everyday situations can be modeled using mathematical and statistical methods. When making mathematical models, technology is valuable for varying assumptions, exploring consequences, and comparing predictions with data.

Industry Standards

NOCTI

  • Employability Skills – Workplace Readiness
  • STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology

Unit Essential Questions

  • What are considered healthy levels of nutrition

Unit Enduring Understandings

  • Healthy levels of nutrition can prevent or alleviate


 

and how do my patterns compare?

  • How can I use biofeedback to determine my patterns of nutrition?
  • How do biofeedback devices work?
  • How might a personal biofeedback device differ from the existing unit used by a doctor?
  • How do different department personnel function together on a design project?

common health problems.

  • Biofeedback is the process of using instruments that provide information to gain insight to various physiological functions.
  • Changes in thoughts, emotions and behavior can alter physiological changes and can aid in improving health or performance.
  • Large design projects require department personnel to manage the integration of expertise efforts.

Unit Learning Targets

Throughout the unit, students will acquire insight into the biomedical field and the alternative methods of treating illnesses. In addition, they will take on the roles of scientists and engineers in the design and development of a solution for personal use. Role-playing provides students with the opportunity to gain experience in systems engineering and learn leadership techniques.

Students will . . .

  1. Identify the bio-energy circulation systems in the body, namely the meridians or pathways in the body along which vital energy is said to flow. Twelve such pathways associated with specific organs exist. (5.3.12.A.6)
  2. Research and document how a disease is the result of a malfunctioning system, organ, and cell, and relate this to possible treatment interventions and the importance of monitoring bodily functions. (5.3.12.A.6) (9.3.ST.4)
  3. Research healthy levels are and how they are determined. (5.3.12.A.6) (ST-ET.5)
  4. Research how energy is sensed in and out of the body. A biofeedback test exists that a practitioner is capable of using with a patient. (5.3.12.A.6) (9.3.ST.3)
  5. Research how existing devices work. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then be engaged in developing a personal unit for someone to get feedback on their own bodies needs for the day.  At the end of the unit. (ITEEA14K) (9.3.ST.2)
  6. Analyze the interactions among similar technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity. Develop a viable solution to the problem using the steps of the design process. (8.2.12.G.1)  (Old 9.3.ST-ET.1) (Old 9.3.ST.1)
  7. Analyze materials and manufacturing processes used to produce existing devices. (9.3.ST-ET.3)
  8. Summarize the research and development and describe how the product improves the quality of life meets legal and ethical protocols. Identify and explain processes used for the product design, development, and production and describe how they work together to demonstrate an understanding of the biotechnology product development process. (9.3.ST-ET.5) (9.3.ST-ET.6)
  9. Summarize rationale for selected solution. (WHST.11-12.2)
  10. Write Press Release about new product. (WHST.11-12.2)
  11. Complete 2D and 3D drawings and plan of procedures. (9.3.ST-ET.2) (9.3.ST-ET.3)
  12. Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system. Develop a model and brochure to explain the use and operation of the unit. (8.2.12.F.3)
  13. Produce and edit a multi-page document for the consumer audience using desktop publishing and/or graphics software to illustrate how to operate the device. (8.1.12.A.2)
  14. Write test procedures and test results. (CRP8)


  1. Write a self and design evaluation for the project. (9.3.ST.4)
  2. Work effectively on multidisciplinary teams consisting of engineers, clinicians, medical researchers, biologists and non-technical personnel. (CRP9) (9.3.ST.2) (9.3.ST-ET.5)
  3. Present project design to peers. (9.3.ST.4)

Project-Based Learning Plan:

Engineering Design Process (Sequence and Assessments)

Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem

The health of people varies from person to person and country to country. Some people deal with climate issues while others deal with lack of nutrition. Personal feedback would be a great way to determine what the body needs on a daily basis. The Biofeedback machine measures the frequencies of all of the organs and glandular systems in the body and is able to provide feedback if healthy function, inflammation or degeneration exists in the body.

Review the questions that students will be able to answer at the end of this unit and that students will be assessed on. The following introductory lessons can spark conversation to lead into the design project.

Lessons/ Topics

  • “ How healthy is America? What health issues do we face in the US? How have eating habits changed over time?”
  • “What are the health issues currently in the news?” (Have students address the questions and find information, articles and statistics related to each.)
  • Support Lesson A - “What is Acupressure and Acupuncture?”
  • Support Lesson B – “How can you determine healthy biomeridian levels?”

Formative Assessments: (must have feedback)

  • Discussion of topic and project to increase breadth and depth of their understanding while discarding erroneous information and expanding and explicating background knowledge.
  • Learning / Response (b)logs by students –

o        Background Information posted on blog checked by peers and teacher.

  • Peer assessment – students will review each other’s findings and pose further questions.

Summative Assessments:

N/A

Notes: This site on Health will be valuable to locate information and statistics.

Day 1

Provide Assignment Sheet with Rubric. Assign questions and homework.

Day 2

Check information, articles and statistics found

Notes:


on topics. Day 3

Check additional info found.

Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

The following scenario may be used unless teacher and student can derive another topic or innovation to attempt. Then use the information below as a guide for what to expect students to address and submit.

Also, at this point the students should be taking leadership roles to develop design brief, specifications and limitations for projects. Select someone to lead the class discussion and document the final statements.

Background/Scenario:

Biofeedback test devices have been around for a few years, but require a second person to perform the test on the patient.  This means that the patient must set up an appointment with the practitioner and pay for a doctor’s visit and services. The device is user friendly and with some training and background someone could operate the machine themselves if the probe portion was designed differently.

Problem/Opportunity Statement:

In a team of 7, design and develop a model for an innovation to the existing biofeedback test device so that a person could perform the test themselves to gain the same results that they would with a practitioner. Each team could consist of a scientist, designer, manufacturer and project manager.

Specifications:

The personal device must

  • Function as accurately as the existing models used by practitioners.
  • Remain portable so that the device can be stored or carried.
  • Be operable by one person.

Constraints:

The device is limited to: Energy:

  • Being battery operated Time:
  • Providing instantaneous feedback Space:
  • A device no larger than a hand held item Materials

Formative Assessments:

  • Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or post their background situation, design brief, specifications and constraints.
  • Peer assessment - students will review each other’s posts and revise if necessary.
  • Teacher questioning – teacher reviews (b)log and provides feedback.

Summative Assessments:

N/A


  • Conductive/insulated materials
  • Minimal use of water to assist in conductivity

People

  • Others with knowledge of existing Capital
  • N/A Knowledge
  • Understanding how the existing device works
  • Other devices that do similar tasks

Stakeholders:

  • The target audience would be those interested in preventive health maintenance.
  • The intended user is anyone that wants to obtain information on daily energy level.
  • Adults using this on children.
  • Software updates for the unit.
  • Marketing sales people.

Suggested Materials:

Some of the materials used in the existing devices may be appropriate (brass conductors), but the thought here is to make something ergonomic for the intended user to be able to operate the device without assistance. If a physical model is to be produced, provide some clay might be useful for modeling along with foam for sculpting. Perhaps some Bondo (an auto body filler good for adding to foam) or wood filler might be used to give the item a final shape and then paint to provide a professional finish. If no physical model is to be produced, a 3D animation of the device would be appropriate.

Suggested Tools/Machines:

Students might need some sculpting tools, sandpaper, paintbrushes, knives, etc.

Suggested Student Grouping:

Students can be broken into small groups of 3-4 to work together through the process and act as a competitive company that is trying to propose their design against other companies. The teams could then present to a panel of stakeholders to get feedback and a critique. The teams could also be formed so that those designing it are not the same as those producing the model so that a higher level of communication must take place in order to convey the correct information.


Students may need to create surveys or interview practitioners that use the device to learn how it functions.

Notes:

Day 4-5 – Discuss Rubric Section on Assignment Sheet for this section. Provide time for students to sort through information and formulate a design brief, specifications, and criteria for the design work.

Notes:

Students could apply for the different roles on the team and build a resume for that job. The teacher would then place students on teams according to their desired roles and resume. This method provides team leaders to be selected by the instructor if this project is one of the first of the year. Good team leaders should be in charge to set standards and expectations for the rest of the year.

Step Three:  Research  & Brainstorming

Each student on the team should become the expert in a particular area of the project. Each student will produce and maintain a schedule of tasks and time on task to monitor and model work ethics and practices.

Project Manager (1) – needs to maintain completed work and finalize documentation for presentation use. Will have to schedule work to be done and decide on deliverables by team members.

Scientist (2) – needs to understand the performance of a healthy body and of the device in order to guide the designer. Will have to look into bio-energy, diseased bodily systems, and conductive materials to determine the best materials for the task. Will work together to divide and conquer the tasks and collaborate on final documentation.

Designer/Engineer (2) – needs to understand the device and materials available, and end user. A biofeedback test device exists that a practitioner is capable of using with a patient. May need to meet with practitioner and act as the patient to understand how the device operates. Will work together to divide and conquer the tasks and collaborate on final documentation.

Manufacturer (2) – needs to understand the materials involved and be able to identify how mass production of the item would happen. Will have to look beyond the modeling materials used for this

Formative Assessments:

o        Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or post their research and brainstorming

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Scientist

  • PowerPoint of the bio-energy circulation systems in the body, namely the meridians or pathways in the body along which vital energy is said to flow. Twelve such pathways associated with specific organs exist. (ULT #1)
  • PowerPoint of how a disease is the result of a malfunctioning system, organ, and cell. (ULT #2)
  • PowerPoint of what healthy levels are and how they are determined. (ULT #3)

Designer/Engineer

  • Engineer Log Entry with research on how energy is sensed in and out of the body. (ULT #4)
  • Engineer Log Entry with research how existing devices work. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then be engaged in developing a personal unit for someone to get feedback on their own bodies needs for the day. (ULT #5)


project to the real materials in order to propose the manufacturing process. Will work together to divide and conquer the tasks and collaborate on final documentation.

Lessons/ Topics

  • “ What are deliverables?” (Provide information on items students are expected to submit to project manager.)
  • “What is a Gantt Chart or Critical Path Method?” (Have students address the questions and find information and examples related to each, and deduct why these items are used.)
  • Meet with or contact practitioner, seek out manufacturing advice, locate anthropometric charts for hands and fingers, and obtain conductivity charts for various materials.

This is also a good time to explore careers related to their role and perhaps the careers that this role would answer to or direct.

  • Engineer Log Entry with analysis of the interactions among similar

technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity. (ULT #6)

  • Develop a viable solutions (brainstorming) to the problem using the steps of the design process. (ULT #6)

Manufacturer

  • Analyze materials and manufacturing processes used to produce existing devices. (ULT #7)

Project Manager

  • Gantt chart with deliverable deadlines. (ULT # 8)
  • Summarize and document the research and development and describe how the product improves the quality of life meets legal and ethical protocols. Identify and explain processes used for the product design, development, and production and describe how they work together to demonstrate an understanding of the biotechnology product development process. (ULT #9)

Notes: Students may need some guidance here to determine who to contact as experts. Teacher may want to line up mentors for the project in order for students to have professionals in the related fields to talk to. Practitioner or Service Rep may be willing to visit with class.

Day 6-7 – provide time for students to further their research and brainstorm ideas for solution.

Notes:

Project Manager would start and maintain a blog to document all work completed by team. The blog would then be projected during a presentation to use for visuals.

Step Four:  Generation Alternate Solutions

Students need to know the level of expectations you have for end product.

Lessons/ Time

  • Provide examples to Generating Alternate Solutions through sketches and drawings
  • Provide examples for Modeling Alternate Solutions using clay or foam.

Formative Assessments:

  • Learning (b)logs by students – student will document alternate solutions and model.
  • Teacher conferences with students

Summative Assessments

  • Presentation of project designs to peers as per rubric. (ULT #18)

Notes:

Day 8-11 – provide time for students to generate multiple solutions to compare and contrast.

Notes: Students would give deliverables to project manager to post to blog. This allows project manager the opportunity to review work and question what is not understandable or complete.


Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

After oral presentation of the options and selected solution, teacher will collect solution with detailed rationale and drawing of selected solution, provide feedback and return work to students for revisions if necessary.

Lesson / Time

“Outlining a Presentation”

Formative Assessments:

  • Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or post their rational and detailed drawings of selected solution
  • Oral Presentation or teacher/ team meeting with rubric for feedback.

Summative Assessments

  • Rationale report for selected solution as measured by a rubric. (ULT #10)

Notes:

Day 12,14 – provide time for students to develop a rationale for the best solution to develop.

Notes: Project manager will lead rationale report as others provide the input based on their role checking against the constraints and specifications.

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Students will use CAD and publishing software to produce a set of Working Drawings and a Plan of Procedures (POP) for producing the final product. Note that the POP must be done for the manufacturing process not the modeling process.

Formative Assessments:

o        Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or post drawings and plan of procedures.

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Project Manager

  • Press Release as per rubric (ULT #11)

Designers/Engineers

  • 2D and 3D drawings as per rubric (ULT

#12)

Manufacturers

  • Plan of Procedures as per rubric (ULT # 12)

Scientists

  • Brochure content for scientific device principles (ULT #13)

Notes:

Day 15-20 – provide time for students to create working drawings and a plan of procedure for the product to be produced.

Notes: Students would give deliverables to project manager to post to blog.

Step Seven: Prototype

Students will produce a working model of the device. Materials may be different but form and

Formative Assessments:

o        Learning (b)logs by students – students


function must be realistic. At this point, students could also benefit from some tips on photography of a product and writing a press release to announce the innovation that has been created.

Lessons/ Topics

  • “Modeling techniques”
  • “ How do you photograph a prototype?”
  • “Writing a Press Release”

will document or post imagery of prototype production and final product.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Project Manager

  • Press Release about new product. (UTL

#11)

Designers/Engineers

  • Brochure to explain the use and operation of the unit. (UTL #14)

Manufacturers

  • Model of final design (ULT #14)

Scientists

  • Medical and Scientific content for brochure (ULT #14)

Notes:

Day 21-23 – provide time, tools and materials for students to produce prototype of solutions

Notes: Students would give deliverables to project manager to post to blog.

Step Eight:  Testing and Evaluation

Students will develop testing procedures for the final solution and determine testing subjects.

Formative Assessments:

o        Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or post imagery of testing final product.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Project Manager/Manufacturers

  • Test Procedures and Results report. (ULT

#15)

Designers/Engineers/Scientists

  • Team Design Evaluation report for the project. (ULT #16)

Notes:

Day 24-26 – provide time for students to set up testing, run tests and document test results.

Notes: Students would give deliverables to project manager to post to blog.

Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Students will complete a design evaluation report to reflect on all aspects of the project.

Formative Assessments:

o        Learning (b)logs by students – students will document or repost imagery of design


corrections.

Summative Assessments:

o        Individual Self-Evaluation report for the project as measured by a rubric. (ULT

#16)

Notes:

Day 27-28 – Provide time and outline for students to write a design evaluation.

Notes: Students would make corrections to thoughts, theories and documents and repost to blog.

Step Ten: Communicate

Students will present individually and in small groups at various stages of the project to gain feedback and input where needed.

Formative Assessments:

  • Peer and teacher comments on improving blogs.

Summative Assessments:

  • Follow the principles and practices of effective teamwork as measured on a teamwork performance rating scale. (ULT

#17)

  • Presentation of project design to peers. (ULT #18)

Notes: Day 29-30

Assess presentation with rubric. Assess team contribution with rubric.

Notes:

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities

Biotechnology Design Engineering Design

Curriculum Development Resources

Alternatives        for        Healing:        http://www.alternativesforhealing.com/cgi_bin/practitioner-biomeridian- testing.php

Biomeridian: Innovations in Health: http://www.biomeridian.com/, http://www.biomeridian.com/meridian-stress-assessment.htm

EB Nutrition. http://ebnutrition.blogspot.com/2010/12/biomeridian-biofeedback-testing-is-here.html Health, United States, 2010 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm

The Frequency of the Human Body…and Your Coffee. 19 August 2011. http://cellphonesafety.wordpress.com/2006/09/17/the-frequency-of-the-human-bodyand-your-coffee/

Resources Updated Summer 2015

Updated Curriculum Development Resources and Addenda (Submitted by Chris Better, Gateway Regional High School, 2015)

-Circuits Components Datasheets (PDF)

-Oscillation Schematic Diagram (PDF)

-Relaxation Monitor Schematic Diagram (PDF)

-Trans Schematic Symbols Chart (PDF)

Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course: Y3 U4

Unit Title:  Under Pressure… (Ocean Engineering / Electrical, Mechanical and Structural Design)

Approximate Length of Unit:  10 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

This unit will expose students to Ocean Engineering, the field that involves sea worthy structures such as oil platforms and offshore wind farms and vessels for above and below the surface, robotics to gather samples and sensors to transmit data back to shore, and forms of forecasting water phenomena. Ocean Engineering requires knowledge in areas such as hydrodynamics, fluid mechanics, material science for harsh conditions, ocean chemistry, ocean currents, and acoustics and wave action. Students will be presented with the following problem:

Using the current or past Sea Perch competitive scenario, design and build an underwater robot to perform the competition tasks.

The field of ocean engineering links oceanographic disciplines such as marine biology, chemical and physical oceanography, and marine geology and geophysics. Interests of oceanographers have driven the demand for the design skills and technical expertise of ocean engineers. Ocean engineers have revolutionized the field of oceanography with innovations in instrumentation and equipment design especially within the last three decades.

The invention of thousands of oceanographic instruments and devices has changed the way oceanographers study the oceans and coasts. Examples include: computer- and satellite-linked buoys and floats, sediment traps, ocean seismometers (instruments that measure seafloor movement in a manner similar to the way seismographs measure earthquake activity on land), underwater video equipment, acoustic measuring devices (instruments that make it possible to "sense" underwater objects and seafloor formations), and underwater vehicles, including submersibles and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs).

Information that once took years to compile, and that frequently involved sampling in harsh weather conditions can now be accomplished in minutes, often from remote locations, including ships and laboratories. The innovations of ocean engineers have enabled oceanographers to travel farther offshore and deeper into the sea, and to stay there for longer periods of time. Because of ocean engineers, major oceanographic discoveries -- including hydrothermal vents, ocean volcanoes, thousands of miles of underwater mountain chains, "new" species, and biological, chemical, geographical, and physical processes and phenomena -- have been made.” (Ocean Engineering)

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:  Engineering, Ocean Science

21st Century Themes: Creativity and Innovation, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, Life and Career Skills

Unit Rationale

This chosen topic and project is important for students to be exposed to due to the many issues related to our water sources. Oceanographers interested in measuring or studying the ocean rely on the expertise of ocean engineers. New technologies such as programmable buoys can remain at sea for extended periods of time so currents and weather can be studied in many locations at one time. This also allows for real time data as the information can be relayed back to the oceanographer immediately.


Structures and instrumentation must withstand the harsh conditions of salt water, which is highly corrosive to many materials. Other ocean related conditions to consider are high winds, wave action, currents, storms, and marine life interference. Depending on the nature of the project challenge, material selection will be a large part of this unit. This project also integrates several systems at once. Each needs to be designed with the others in mind.

This unit will provide the students with some insight to a demanding and challenging field that will continue to change and evolve as technology allows. With design yet again being the focus of this unit in addition to the focus on underwater vehicles, students will gain further experience in the design process.

Suggested Materials:

The Sea Perch sponsor provides a very specific list of materials that can be used for the design of the underwater robot. They offer a kit for purchase and possible grants for kits. See list provided on Sea Perch website.

Suggested Tools/Machines:

Students will need small hand and modeling tools for the Underwater Robot Project.

Unit Assumptions

Students have been exposed to the problem solving process more than once and that the steps are understood.

Students have been exposed to a variety of hand and power tools and can use them as needed. Students have been trained in CAD and technical drawing.

Students have processed a variety of modeling and prototyping materials. Students have accessed and use the internet, email, and research databases. Students have used MLA and APA report formats.

Students have performed on structured teams.

Students know the role of various team members and a systems engineer. Students have written a resume.

Learning Targets

Math (NJCCCS 4)

4.2 All students will develop spatial sense and the ability to use geometric properties, relationships, and measurement to model, describe, and analyze phenomena.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

4.2.12 A.2

Geometric Properties - Draw perspective views of 3D objects on isometric dot paper, given 2D representations (e.g., nets or projective views).

Science (NJCCCS 5)

5.1 Science Practices: Students will understand that science is both a body of knowledge and an evidence- based, model-building enterprise that continually extends, refines, and revises knowledge. The four Science Practices strands encompass the knowledge and reasoning skills that students must acquire to be proficient in science.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

5.1.12.D.1

Engage in multiple forms of discussion in order to process, make sense of, and learn from others’ ideas, observations, and experiences.


 

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.1.12.A.2

Produce and edit a multi-page document for a commercial or professional audience using desktop publishing and/or graphics software.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.2.12.A.1

Design and create a technology product or system that improves the quality of life and identify trade-offs, risks, and benefits.

8.1.12.A.2

Produce and edit a multi-page document for a commercial or professional audience using desktop publishing and/or graphics software.

8.2.12.F.3

Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., Computer Numeric Control (CNC) equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system.

8.2.12.G.1

Analyze the interactions among various technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity.

The Career Ready Practices: component of the CCTC provides a framework for the

developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be

“practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings.

.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

CRP9

Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP12

Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

9.3 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST-ET.4

Apply the elements of the design process.

9.3.ST-ET.5

Apply the knowledge learned in STEM to solve problems.

9.3.ST-ET.6

Apply the knowledge learned in the study of STEM to provide solutions to human and societal problems in an ethical and legal manner.


9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data.

9.3.ST.3

Describe and follow safety, health and environmental standards related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workplaces.

9.3.ST-SM.1

Apply science and mathematics to provide results, answers and algorithms for engineering and technological activities.

9.3.ST-SM.2

Apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes and projects that address real world problems.

English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)

WHST.11-12.3 Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  1. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  2. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
  3. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)

WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  • Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

Mathematics (Common Core)

Algebra – Reasoning with Equations and Inequalities

A-REI.3. Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable, including equations with coefficients represented by letters.

Industry Standards

NOCTI

  • Employability Skills – Workplace Readiness
  • STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology


Unit Essential Questions

  • What environmental factors must be taken into consideration when designing an underwater robot?
  • What engineers would be involved with the design of an underwater robot.
  • What organization methods will work to manage a project such as this one?
  • What deliverables are necessary for this project?
  • What type of schedule is necessary to manage his project?

Unit Enduring Understandings

  • Advances in technology changed the way oceanographers study the ocean.
  • The ocean is a harsh environment for which to design technology.
  • Systems are often an integration of sub-systems.
  • Subsystems require careful planning in order to function together.
  • Systems Engineers oversee the integration of subsystems.

Unit Learning Targets (ULT)

Throughout the unit, students will acquire insight into the oceanography field and the harsh conditions of the ocean when designing technology for the ocean. In addition, they will take on the roles of engineers in the design and development of a solution. Role-playing provides students with the opportunity to gain experience in systems engineering and learn leadership techniques.

Students will . . .

  1. Create and maintain an individual blog to document design process, time on task and provide reflections. (9.3.ST-ET.2)
  2. Research, discuss and document the tasks that need to be address in the design. (9.3.ST-ET.1) (5.1.12.D.1)
  3. Research, discuss and document conditions in which each sub-system must operate. (9.3.ST-ET.1) (5.1.12.D.1)
  4. Research, discuss and document materials that will function in underwater conditions. (9.3.ST.1) (5.1.12.D.1)
  5. Research, discuss and document how existing devices work. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then be engaged in developing the sub-systems. (9.3.ST-ET.1) (5.1.12.D.1) (WHST.11-12.3.4-6)
  6. Analyze the interactions among similar technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity. Develop a viable solution to the problem using the steps of the design process. (8.2.12.G.1) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (9.3.ST-ET.5) (9.3.ST-ET.6) (5.1.12.D.1)
  7. Analyze materials and manufacturing processes used to produce existing devices. Develop a list of viable material processes available to students at school and home. (9.3.ST.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  8. Analyze deliverables of team and create a schedule for deliverables. (8.2.12.G.1) (9.3.ST.1) (9.3.ST.2) (9.3.ST-ET.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  9. Analyze poster requirements and brainstorm ideas for poster content and layout. (8.2.12.G.1) (9.3.ST-ET.1) (9.3.ST-ET.2) (9.3.ST-ET.3) (5.1.12.D.1)
  10. Summarize the research and brainstorming and describe how the product meets the specification and limitations. (8.2.12.A.1 ) (9.3.ST.2) (9.3.ST-ET.6) (5.1.12.D.1)
  11. Generate multiple ideas for poster layout, electrical system, hull, mechanical system and poster content. (8.2.12.A.1 ) 9.3.ST-ET.1) (9.3.ST-ET.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  12. Summarize rationale for selected solutions. Identify and explain processes used for the product


production.  (WHST.11-12.2) (5.1.12.D.1)

  1. Model selected solution. (8.1.12.A.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  2. Calculate and adjust buoyancy of vessel as needed. (A-REI.3.)
  3. Create a Plan of Procedures for designed systems to be produced. (8.2.12.A.1) (5.1.12.D.1)
  4. Develop final design poster for display and presentation. (8.2.12.G.1) (9.3.ST-ET.2) (9.3.ST-ET.5) (5.1.12.D.1)
  5. Complete 2D and 3D drawings and plan of procedures. (9.3.ST-ET.4) (9.3.ST-ET.6)
  6. Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system. Develop a model and poster content to explain the use and operation of the unit. (8.2.12.F.3)
  7. Produce and edit a multi-page document for user manual using desktop publishing and/or graphics software to illustrate how to operate the device. (8.1.12.A.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  8. Produce a poster to explain design solution. (8.1.12.A.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  9. Write test procedures and test results. (9.3.ST-ET.5) (5.1.12.D.1)
  10. Write a self and design evaluation for the project. (9.3.ST-SM.1)
  11. Work effectively on multidisciplinary teams consisting of engineers, and scientists. (9.3.ST.1) (9.3.ST.3) (CRP12)
  12. Present project design to peers. (9.3.ST-ET.2) (5.1.12.D.1)

Project-Based Learning Plan:

Engineering Design Process (Sequence and Assessments)

Design Brief:

As a team, design, develop and build an underwater ROV to perform and complete the tasks in the competition scenario listed below. (Note: check the SeaPearch website each year for new event scenario. Kits can be purchased from seaperch.org or duplicated to run your own event.)

Example Background:

The use of Lift Bags in diving and salvage operations is compulsory. In order for Divers and ROVs that are neutrally buoyant to lift heavy objects to the surface, additional buoyancy needs to be added to the object.

A lift bag is an item of diving equipment consisting of a robust and air-tight bag with straps, which is used to lift heavy objects underwater by means of the bag's buoyancy. The heavy object can then either be moved horizontally underwater or sent unaccompanied to the surface. The volume of the bag determines its lifting capacity: a 100-litre (4 cu ft) bag can lift a 100-kilogram (220 lb) underwater object.

Setup:

The lift bags for the competition will be five (5) 5-gallon buckets inverted on the bottom of the pool. Each bucket will have a series of holes drilled thru the bottom to prevent air from collecting. The buckets will have different size weights attached to the handles and enough floatation to allow them to stand as shown in the photos below.

Competition:


Teams are required to float each 5-gallon bucket to the surface and then to the side of the pool. Any means may be used to float the buckets as long as the following rules are not violated:

  1. No additional materials shall be transported down the tether. (i.e. an air hose cannot added to the tether);
  2. No chemicals or loose materials shall be introduced into the pool. (All materials must remain on the vehicle or be greater than a 1.5 in. cube. (Remember that they must be recoverable by pool divers.);
  3. All modifications must be safe for other vehicles and for pool divers, and
  4. All modifications must comply with the cost limitation of the competition.

Each lane will have a supply of 1/4" slices of flotation for use in during this competition event. While other methods are encouraged, use of the supplied flotation may be used to accomplish this task.

Teams are encouraged to think outside of the box and it is permitted to change the shape and configuration of the SeaPerch ROV.

Teams have a budget of $20.00 to purchase any upgrades they deem necessary. However, teams are not allowed to add additional thrusters and must use only the motors that come with the SeaPerch kit.

Everything else in the kit may be used at the team's discretion.

Hooks and attachments may be added/removed depending on the competition round.

Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 1: Overview of the underwater robot design project

  • Competition scenario and tasks
  • Engineering roles for design team
  • Blog format documentation and expectations

Formative Assessments:

  • Discussion of project through question and answer session to increase breadth and depth of student understanding while discarding erroneous information and expanding and explicating background knowledge.
  • Discussion of individual blogs to be used as sources of documentation and reflection.
  • Teacher feedback to student on blog set up after administrative invitation is made.
  • First blog entry to document time on tasks, and receive feedback from teacher.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

  • Blog entry with background report on competition tasks. (ULT #1)


Notes:

Notes:

Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

Lesson / Topic

Lesson 2: Framing the design brief for the underwater robot project

  • Review of design brief requirements
  • Review of specifications
  • Review of constraints

Formative Assessments:

  • Student will complete a template for the scope of the project to include team and individual design brief, specifications and constraints per role to submit for teacher feedback. (ULT #2)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

  • Blog entry of team and individual design brief, specifications, and constraints per role. (ULT #2, ULT #3)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Three:  Research  & Brainstorming

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 3: Reviewing Step Three deliverables, guidelines and examples.

  • Project research and documentation format.
  • Brainstorming guidelines and expectations.

Lesson 4:  Understanding the Gantt Chart

  • Project planning with tasks, dates and time segments
  • Plotting progress

Lesson 5: Finding resources for research and brainstorming

  • Research options
  • Internet
  • Science books
  • Other
  • Professional help
  • Mentors
  • Field Professionals

Lesson 6:  Blogging the research

  • What to include
  • How to document

Formative Assessments:

  • Blog entries on for expected role deliverables.
  • Gantt Chart set up with teacher feedback and correction of erroneous interpretations.
  • Individual Gantt chart submitted to Systems Engineer to combine to produce team Gantt chart.
  • Blog entries for research and brainstorming feedback from teacher.
  • Individual list of selected resources to start research with teacher feedback.

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Systems Engineer

  • Gantt chart with deliverable deadlines for team. (ULT # 8)
  • Blog entry with brainstorming (jpegs) for Poster Layout. (ULT #9)
  • Research Report on how the systems must work together posted to blog. (ULT #10)

Scientist(s)

  • Gantt chart with deliverable deadlines for deliverables related to role. (ULT # 8)


  • Blog entry of the tasks that need to be addressed in the design. (ULT #2)
  • Blog entry of the harsh conditions of the ocean and the environment for the competition. (ULT #3)
  • List of ideas for poster content (ULT #6)

Engineers/Architect(s) (Mechanical, Electrical, Naval)

  • Gantt chart with deliverable deadlines for deliverables related to role. (ULT # 8)
  • Blog entry with research, of conditions in which each sub-system must operate. (ULT #3)
  • Blog entry with research of materials that will function in underwater conditions. (ULT #4)
  • Engineer blog entry with research of how existing devices work. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then be engaged in developing the sub- systems. (ULT #5)
  • Engineer blog entry with analysis of the interactions among similar

technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity. (ULT #6)

  • A list of viable materials and processing options available. (ULT #7)
  • Sketches of ideas (brainstorming) to the problem for related system. (ULT #6)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Four:  Generation Alternate Solutions

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 7: Generating alternate solutions for project deliverables

  • Content Lists
  • Design Drawings
  • Circuit Diagrams
  • Design Templates

Formative Assessments:

o        Student blog entries for alternate solutions to receive teacher feedback.

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Systems Engineer

o        Blog entry of 3-5 poster layouts to display science and math application for final design solution. (ULT #11)


Scientist(s)

  • Blog entry of list of science and math content for Poster. (ULT #11)

Engineers/Architect(s) (Mechanical, Electrical, Naval)

  • Blog entry for of 3-5 design ideas in drawing form for related system. (ULT

#11)

Notes:

Notes: Students will post deliverables on blog. This allows instructor the opportunity to review work and question what is not understandable or complete.

Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

Lesson / Time

Lesson 8: Modeling alternate solutions using appropriate supplies

  • Materials
  • Adhesives
  • Alternative modeling for poster

Lesson 9: Blogging thorough rationale reports

  • Design Matrix/Specification Analysis Chart
  • Pros/Cons
  • Descriptions

Lesson 10: Delivering effective presentations

  • Creating the outline
  • Planning for transitions from one speaker to the next
  • Planning for imagery
  • Concluding and summarizing

Formative Assessments:

  • Dry run of oral presentation with teacher/ team feedback using actual graded rubric.
  • Team outline submitted for teacher feedback.

Summative Assessments

  • Model of selected design solution. (ULT

#13)

  • Rationale report for selected solution as measured by a rubric posted to the blog. (ULT #12)
  • Presentation of project designs to peers as per rubric. (ULT #24)

Notes:

Notes: Each student must post their portion of the rationale to their blog and submit file to Systems Engineer to compile the information to create the final report.

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Lesson / Time

Lesson 11: Reviewing Step Six deliverables by work assignment role

  • Working drawings
  • Gantt Chart

Formative Assessments:

o        Teacher review of work over time during class while students are working.


  • Poster template

Lesson 12: Calculating and adjusting for buoyancy

  • Formulas
  • Methods

Lesson 13: Reviewing requirements for plan of procedures

  • Supply List
  • Tools and Equipment List
  • Material List
  • Material processing steps
  • Parts list
  • Assembly steps

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Systems Engineer

  • Poster Layout ready for content. (ULT

#16)

Architect(s)/Engineers

  • 2D and 3D drawings of related system for underwater robot (ULT #17)
  • Buoyancy Calculations (ULT #14)
  • Plan of Procedures for each system (ULT

# 15)

Scientist(s)

  • Poster content for scientific device principles; buoyancy, circuitry, propulsion (ULT #16)

Notes: Students will use CAD and publishing software to produce a set of working drawings and a Plan of Procedures (POP) for producing the final product. Note that the POP must be done for the manufacturing process not the modeling process.

Notes:

Step Seven: Prototype

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 14: Creating an illustrated manual

  • Operation steps
  • Step illustrations

Lesson 15: Creating a prototype

  • Following POP
  • Editing POP

Lesson 16: Writing Test Procedures

  • Reason for test procedures
  • Format for test procedures

Formative Assessments:

o        Learning blogs by students – students will document or post imagery of prototype production and final product.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Systems Engineer

  • Blog entry for Test Procedures (ULT #21)
  • Blog entry for illustrated operation manual. (UTL #19)

Designers/Engineers

  • Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) sub- systems and system. Blog entry of product photos. (UTL #18)

Scientists


o        Final poster (ULT #20)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Eight:  Testing and Evaluation

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 17: Testing and documenting test results

  • Procedures for testing
  • Imagery for testing
  • Results of testing
  • Conclusion of testing

Lesson 18: Evaluating design systems and subsystems

  • Scope of project
  • Description of solution
  • Description of discrepancies
  • Description design flaws
  • Description of unresolved design problems
  • Description of suggestions for improvements

Formative Assessments:

o        N/A

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Systems Engineering

  • Blog entry for Test Results Report. (ULT

#19)

Engineers/Scientists

  • Blog entry for Team Design Evaluation report for the project. (ULT #20)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 19: Evaluation of design aspects and learning

  • Scope of design team role (what did it entail?)
  • Description of successes you encountered
  • Describe setbacks you encountered
  • Describe what you learned from your setbacks
  • Describe additional learning that occurred beyond the scope of the project
  • Describe ways the project improved
  • Problem Solving skills
  • Communication skills through drawing, speaking, and writing
  • Organizational skills

Formative Assessments:

  • N/A

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

  • Individual Self-Evaluation report for the project as measured by a rubric posted to the blog. (ULT #22)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Ten: Communicate

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 20: Completing final peer assessment

Formative Assessments:

o        Peer and teacher comments on improving blogs.


  • Scale of assessment
  • Considerations

Lesson 21: Preparing presentation outline

  • Creating the outline
  • Planning for transitions from one speaker to the next
  • Planning for imagery
  • Concluding and Summarizing

Summative Assessments:

  • Follow the principles and practices of effective teamwork as measured on a teamwork performance rating scale. (ULT

#23)

  • Presentation of project design to peers. (ULT #24)

Notes:

Notes:

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities

Engineering Design


Lesson Plans

Lesson

Timeframe

Lesson 1

Overview of the underwater robot design project

45 minutes / 4 days

1 day to lecture, 3 days to select teams, start blog and initial posts

Lesson 2

Framing the design brief for the underwater robot project

45 minutes / 3 days

1 day to lecture, 2 days to determine individual design briefs, specs, and constraints and post

Lesson 3

Reviewing Step 3 deliverables: guidelines and examples

45 minutes / 1 day

Lesson 4 Understanding the Gantt Chart

45 minutes / 1 day

Lesson 5

Finding resources for research and brainstorming

45 minutes / 1 day

Lesson 6

Writing the research report

45 minutes / 3 days

1 day to review, 2 days to complete

Lesson 7

Generating alternate solutions for project deliverables.

45 minutes / 4 days

½ day to review expectations, 3.5 days to generate ideas.

Lesson 8

Modeling alternate solutions using appropriate supplies

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to review options, 2.5 days to produce model

Lesson 9

Blogging thorough rationale reports

45 minutes / 3 days

1 day to review criteria, 1 day to write individual rationale, 1 day to compile final report and post

Lesson 10

Delivering effective presentations

45 minutes / 4 days

1 day to review expectations, 1 day to prepare, 2 days to present

Lesson 11

Reviewing Step Six deliverables by work assignment role

45 minutes / 4 days

1 day to review deliverables and document on individual blogs, 3 days to do drawings

Lesson 12

Calculating and adjusting for buoyancy

45 minutes / 2 days

1 day to lecture, 1 day to adjust buoyancy

Lesson 13

Reviewing requirements for plan of procedures

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to lecture, 1.5 days to complete

Lesson 14

Creating an illustrated manual Lesson 15

Creating a prototype

45 minutes / 5 days

1 day for lectures, 4 days to complete product

Lesson 16 Writing test procedures

45 minutes / 2 days

1 day for lecture, 1 day to photograph


Lesson 17

Testing and documenting test results

45 minutes / 3 days

Lesson 18

Evaluating design systems and subsystems

45 minutes / 1 days

Lesson 19

Evaluation of design aspects and learning

45 minutes / 1 days

Lesson 20 Completing final peer assessment

45 minutes / 1 days

Lesson 21 Preparing presentation outline

45 minutes / 3 days

Teacher Notes:

Curriculum Development Resources

Ocean Engineering. WHOI Sea Grant Program and NH Sea Grant Program. 2009. 29 Aug 2011

<http://www.marinecareers.net/field_oceanengineering.php>.

Updated Curriculum Development Resources and Addenda:

-Circuits Components Datasheets

-Oscillation Schematic Diagram

-Relaxation Monitor Schematic Diagram

Resources Updated Summer 2015

Citizen Engineer Handbook, Chapter 9, Water and Other Natural Resources, citizenengineer.org, 2015

Unit Overview – Socially Responsible Engineering & Technology (POS)

Course: Y3 U5        082713

Unit Title: Planning to Keep it All in My Site; Designing the World Around You (Civil Engineering- Geotechnical concentration)

Approximate Length of Unit:  8 Weeks (based on five day weeks; 45 minute periods each day)

Unit Summary

This unit focuses on Civil Engineering and the infrastructure required to improve or maintain the environment as our population increases and adds more stress on the environment. Students will be presented with a realistic design problem which they will be required to solve later in the unit by engaging the Engineering Design Process:

Problem/Opportunity Statement: You are hired as a civil engineer to develop a designated piece of land to maintain or improve the quality of life in a community. You are responsible for the development of a designated site and its infrastructure to function for a growing community.

At the beginning of this unit, students learn about the career of civil engineering and focus on the various disciplines within the career but specifically in the area of site design and the effects of site design within a community. They will need to know the importance of municipality zoning. They will need to know how to calculate for acreage square footage, interpolate contours for water drainage, design roads, sidewalks, and utilities and their relationship and function in site design, and appropriate placement of structures within a site.

With this unit, students gain insight to what an accurate and complete site design entails, which will take the form of a well developed working drawing to explain the solution to the design problem. Students must understand how to subdivide property using contours and existing site features. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then be engaged in developing the designated site.

Throughout the unit, students acquire insight to the civil engineering field and a real life project that a civil engineer may encounter as a professional.

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:  Math, Natural Science - Geology

21st Century Themes: Engineers apply the principles of science and mathematics to develop economical solutions to technical problems. Their work is the link between scientific discoveries and the commercial applications that meet societal and consumer needs.

Unit Rationale

Most students are exposed to construction and land development in their community.

This chosen issue is important as we attempt to develop and maintain infrastructure and land in our towns and communities to function to societies ever changing needs.

Civil Engineers design and supervise the construction of roads, buildings, airports, tunnels, dams, bridges, and water supply and sewage systems. They must consider many factors in the design process from the construction costs and expected lifetime of a project to government regulations and potential environmental hazards such as earthquakes and hurricanes. Civil engineering, considered one of the oldest engineering disciplines, encompasses many specialties. The major ones are structural, water resources,


construction, transportation, and geotechnical engineering.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Civil engineers are expected to have employment growth of 24 percent over the projections decade, much faster than the average for all occupations. Spurred by general population growth and the related need to improve the nation's infrastructure, more civil engineers will be needed to design and construct or expand transportation, water supply, and pollution control systems, and buildings and building complexes. They also will be needed to repair or replace existing roads, bridges, and other public structures. Because construction industries and architectural, engineering, and related services employ many civil engineers, employment opportunities will vary by geographic area and may decrease during economic slowdowns, when construction is often curtailed.

This unit will provide the students with some insight to a demanding and challenging field that will continue to change and evolve. With design yet again being the focus of this unit in addition to the various math science and engineering issues, students will gain further experience in the design process. (ICE)

Suggested Materials:

Example Site Plans

Videos on Civil Engineering

Suggested Tools/Machines:

Students will need small hand and modeling tools. ???

Unit Assumptions

Students have been exposed to the problem solving process more than once and that the steps are understood.

Students have been exposed to a variety of hand and power tools and can use them as needed. Students have been trained in CAD and technical drawing.

Students have processed a variety of modeling and prototyping materials. Students have accessed and use the internet, email, and research databases. Students have used MLA and APA report formats.

Students have performed on structured teams.

Students know the roles of various team members and a systems engineer.

Learning Targets

Standards for Technological Literacy (ITEEA)

  • Standard 11: Students will develop the abilities to apply the design process.
  • Standard 17: Students will develop an understanding of and be able to select and use information and communication technologies.

Math (NJCCCS 4)

4.2 All students will develop spatial sense and the ability to use geometric properties, relationships, and measurement to model, describe, and analyze phenomena.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)


4.2.12 A.2

Geometric Properties - Draw perspective views of 3D objects on isometric dot paper, given 2D representations (e.g., nets or projective views).

4.4.12.A.4

Data Analysis - Estimate or determine lines of best fit (or curves of best fit if appropriate) with technology, and use them to interpolate within the range of the data.

Science (NJCCCS 5)

5.1 Science Practices: Students will understand that science is both a body of knowledge and an evidence- based, model-building enterprise that continually extends, refines, and revises knowledge. The four Science Practices strands encompass the knowledge and reasoning skills that students must acquire to be proficient in science.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

5.1.12.D.1

Engage in multiple forms of discussion in order to process, make sense of, and learn from others’ ideas, observations, and experiences.

Educational Technology (NJCCCS 8.1)

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaboratively and to create and communicate knowledge.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.1.12.A.2

Produce and edit a multi-page document for a commercial or professional audience using desktop publishing and/or graphics software.

Engineering and Technological Literacy (NJCCCS 8.2)

8.2 Technology Education, Engineering, and Design: All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world, as they relate to the individual, global society, and the environment.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

8.2.12.A.1

Design and create a technology product or system that improves the quality of life and identify trade-offs, risks, and benefits.

8.2.12.F.3

Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., Computer Numeric Control (CNC) equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system.

8.2.12.G.1

Analyze the interactions among various technologies and collaborate to create a product or system demonstrating their interactivity.

The Career Ready Practices: component of the CCTC provides a framework for the

developmental experiences necessary to becoming career ready; experiences that can be

“practiced” using many different approaches in a variety of settings.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

CRP2

Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.

CRP4

Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.

CRP8

Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.


CRP9

Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.

CRP12

Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

9.3 Career and Technical Education All students who complete a career and technical education program will acquire academic and technical skills for careers in emerging and established professions that lead to technical skill proficiency, credentials, certificates, licenses, and/or degrees.

CPI #

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

9.3.ST.1

Apply engineering skills in a project that requires project management, process control and quality assurance.

9.3.ST.2

Use technology to acquire, manipulate, analyze and report data.

9.3.ST.3

Describe and follow safety, health and environmental standards related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workplaces.

9.3.ST-ET.1

Use STEM concepts and processes to solve problems involving design and/or production.

9.3.ST-ET.2

Display and communicate STEM information.

9.3.ST-ET.4

Apply the elements of the design process.

9.3.ST-ET.5

Apply the knowledge learned in STEM to solve problems.

9.3.ST-SM.1

Apply science and mathematics to provide results, answers and algorithms for engineering and technological activities.

English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)

WHST.11-12.3 Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  1. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  2. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
  3. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.


English Language Arts Writing (Common Core)

WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  • Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

Mathematics (Common Core)

Algebra – Reasoning with Equations and Inequalities

A-REI.3. Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable, including equations with coefficients represented by letters.

????? more needed and cross referenced

Industry Standards

NOCDI

  • Employability Skills – Workplace Readiness
  • STEM – Pre-Engineering, Engineering Technology

Unit Essential Questions

  • What is the square footage of an acre?
  • What linetypes are used in site planning and why is it important to have several linetypes?
  • Why are contours important in site design?
  • Why is zoning important in site planning and design?
  • How do communication skills help to market a project to an audience through a presentation?

Unit Enduring Understandings

  • An acre is 43560 square feet or approximately 208 feet by 208 feet.
  • Line types vary with designation
  • Existing contours are dashed lines
  • New contours are solid lines
  • Property lines are broken lines with two dashes between
  • The role of a civil engineer in project and site planning
  • Site development planning directly related to building design.
  • Professional project documentation and symbols

Unit Learning Targets (ULT)

Throughout the unit, students will acquire insight into the oceanography field and the harsh conditions of the ocean when designing technology for the ocean. In addition, they will take on the roles of engineers in the design and development of a solution. Role-playing provides students with the opportunity to gain experience in systems engineering and learn leadership techniques.

Students will . . .

  1. Create and maintain an individual blog to document design process. (9.3.ST.2) (9.3.ST-ET.2)
  2. Research, discuss and document the background information for the design problem. (9.3.ST.2) (5.1.12.D.1)


  1. Review and document design brief, specifications and constraints. (9.3.ST.1)
  2. Analyze deliverables of team and create a schedule (Gantt Chart) for deliverables. (8.2.12.G.1) (9.3.ST.1) (9.3.ST-ET.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  3. Research, discuss and document new vocabulary. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then be engaged in developing the design problem. (9.3.ST-ET.2) (9.3.ST-ET.5) (5.1.12.D.1) (WHST.11- 12.3.4-6) (CRP2) (CRP3)
  4. Research and analyze sub-divisions and note the information included and format used. Develop a viable solution to the problem using the steps of the design process. (8.2.12.G.1) (9.3.ST-ET.4) (9.3.ST-ET.5) (5.1.12.D.1) ( CRP8) (CRP9)
  5. Research and analyze designated site location. ( CRP2) (CRP8) (9.3.ST.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  6. Summarize the research and brainstorm ideas for site plan and park. (8.2.12.A.1 ) (9.3.ST.2) (9.3.ST-ET.1) (5.1.12.D.1)
  7. Generate multiple site layouts and describe each layout. (8.2.12.A.1 ) (9.3.ST.1) (9.3.ST.2) (9.3.ST.3) (5.1.12.D.1) (9.3.ST-ET.1)
  8. Write rationale report  for selected solutions.  (WHST.11-12.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  9. 11. Draw a site plan for sub-division and park. (4.2.12.A.2) (4.4.12.A.4) (8.2.12.F.3) (8.2.12.G.1) 9.3.ST-ET.4)
  10. Create a list of Block and Lots with acreage. (9.3.ST-ET.2)
  11. Create an Equipment List for park equipment and materials. (9.3.ST-ET.2)
  12. Draw a site plan for park. (9.3.ST-ET.2) (8.2.12.F.3) (8.2.12.FG.1) (9.3.ST-ET.4)
  13. Select and utilize resources that have been modified by digital tools (e.g., CNC equipment, CAD software) in the creation of a technological product or system. (8.2.12.F.3) (9.3.ST-ET.5)
  14. Model selected solution. (8.1.12.A.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  15. Prepare work for testing via presentation to peers as stakeholders. (9.3.ST-ET.2) (5.1.12.D.1)
  16. Present project design to peers. (9.3.ST-ET.2) (5.1.12.D.1) (9.3.ST.3)
  17. Write Testing Report. (8.1.12.A.2)
  18. Write a self and design evaluation for the project. (9.3.ST-SM.1)
  19. Revise drawings. (8.2.12.F.3) (9.3.ST-ET.4)

Project-Based Learning Plan:

Engineering Design Process (Sequence and Assessments)

Design Brief/Problem/Opportunity Statement:

In a team of 2 developers, design, develop and present a subdivision for the designated piece of property for 41 properties and a park. Create a plan for the property that would allow the preservation of the Hoffman family’s 1.4-acre farmstead, which includes the farmhouse near the northwest corner of Pine and Forest roads.

Specifications

  • Extend of the street grid in the Prairie Grove subdivision to the north.
  • Complete Olive Hill Drive, a half street with one-way access from Prairie Road, as a full street.
  • End two streets at the west side of the development, for later extension if the Didier Farm is one day developed.
  • Dedicate the addition of .83 acres to the Prairie Grove Park District’s Buffalo Grove Park.


o        Feature two-story, four-bedroom homes from 3,250 to 4,000 square feet with bonus rooms and three-car garages.

Example Background:

The Hoffman family, which owns 20 acres at 22140 N. Prairie Road, hopes to sell the property to a developer who is proposing to construct 41 single-family homes north of Aptakisic Road between Buffalo Grove and Prairie roads. Mr. Hoffman and his siblings maintained ownership after their parents passed away. The time has come to welcome more families to the farmland. The Hoffman’s tend to gardens and orchards and raises chickens and ducks.

Buffalo Grove officials require a preliminary proposal from the developer and a request to annex the unincorporated land to refer the proposal to the Plan Commission for review.

Setup:

The site can be seen using any online map system by searching for the address. This will allow the students to search the area for local schools, businesses, police, firehouse, etc. More information can be obtained about the area for styles of other dwellings nearby by doing a online tour of the area using a map system. Students must not duplicate road names in the area. Obtain bearings if possible or print site and develop an exercise for students to determine the bearings and lengths of property lines.

Map and Aerial View of area around 22140 N. Prairie Road


Extensions

Require the infrastructure to support the subdivision after approvals. Students could develop plans for drainage, plumbing, sewage, electric, cable, street lighting, etc.

Teacher Instruction

Student Evaluation

Step One:  Identify the Problem

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 1: Introducing the Problem, Opportunity or Background

  • Scenario
  • Roles for stakeholders
  • Blog format documentation and expectations

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on:

  • Blog set up after administrative invitation is made.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, student will be responsible for:

  • Blog portfolio to document design process of project. (ULT#1)
  • Blog entry with background report on scenario. (ULT#2)
  • Completed student created Graphic Organizer in a “Research Log” posing prompts such as: (ULT#2)


  • What I know . . .
  • What I need to know . . .

Notes:

Notes:

Step Two:  Frame the Design Brief

Lesson / Topic

Lesson 2:  Introducing the Challenge

  • Review of design brief requirements
  • Developer
  • Civil Engineer
  • Town Officials
  • Plan Commission
  • The Hoffman Family
  • Review of specifications
  • Review of constraints
  • Review deliverables
  • Blog Entries of design brief, specifications and constraints.
  • Gantt Chart

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher feedback on student posed questions as needed during class. (ULT#3, 4)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, student will be responsible for blog entry for:

  • Blog entry of design brief, specifications, and constraints. (ULT#3)
  • Gantt chart with deliverable deadlines. (ULT # 4)

Notes: Each pair of students can role-play each of the stakeholders listed above during the presentations. Designate student roles so that they correlate their questioning with their role.

Notes:

Step Three:  Research  & Brainstorming

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 3: Reviewing Deliverables, Guidelines and Examples

  • Project research and documentation format.
  • Brainstorming guidelines and expectations.

Lesson 4:  Creating a Gantt Chart

  • Project planning with tasks, dates and time segments
  • Plotting progress

Lesson 5: Finding Resources for Research and Brainstorming

  • Research options
  • Internet
  • Town Hall
  • Other
  • Professional help
  • Mentors

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on:

  • Blog entries for research and brainstorming. (ULT#5, 6, 7, 8)

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, student will be responsible for blog entry for:

  • New vocabulary (ULT#5)
  • Research on sub-divisions (ULT#6)
  • Research of surroundings to the site. (ULT#7)
  • Research of existing site. Once an understanding is acquired, students can then be engaged in developing the site. (ULT #7)
  • Sketches of ideas (brainstorming) to the design problem. (ULT #8)


o        Field Professionals

Lesson 6: Writing and Posting the Research on the Blog

  • What to include
  • How to document

Notes:

Notes:

Step Four: Alternate Solution Generation

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 7: Generating Alternate Solutions

  • Sub-division
  • Park layout

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback on:

  • Student blog entries for alternate solutions. (ULT #9)

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, student will be responsible for blog entry for:

  • Hand or CAD drawings of proposed sites subdivision and park. (ULT#9)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Five:  Chosen Solution with Rationale

Lesson / Topics

Lesson 8: Writing Rationale Report

  • Design Matrix/Specification Analysis Chart
  • Pros/Cons
  • Descriptions

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback as needed during class. (ULT#10)

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, student will be responsible for blog entry for:

o Rationale report for selected solution as measured by a rubric posted to the blog. (ULT #10)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Six:  Developmental Work

Lesson / Time

Lesson 9:  Reviewing Developmental Work

  • Working drawings

Formative Assessments:

o        Teacher reviews of work over time during class while students are working. (ULT#11-15)


Lesson 10: Calculating acreage

  • Formulas
  • Methods

Lesson 11:  Determining and Calculating Bearings

  • Formulas
  • Methods

Lesson 12: Selecting Park Equipment

  • Equipment Lists
  • Site plan

Summative Assessments

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

Architect(s)/Engineers

  • 2D drawings of subdivision (ULT #11, 15)
  • Listing of individual blocks and lots, acreage, pricing. (ULT#12)
  • Equipment list for park. (ULT#13)
  • Park Site Plan (ULT#14, 15)

Notes:

Notes:

Step Seven: Prototype

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 13: Creating a Prototype of Sub-division

  • Physical Model
  • Color Coded Site Plan

Lesson 14:  Creating 3D Park Site

  • Physical Model
  • 3D drawing

Formative Assessments:

  • Teacher reviews of work over time during class while students are working. (ULT#16)
  • Learning blogs by students – students will document or post imagery of prototype production and final product.

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, student will be responsible for blog entry for:

  • Imagery of Model. (ULT#16)
  • Color Coded Site Plans. (UTL#16)
  • Sub-division
  • Park

Notes: Depending on time and resources, you may have students do a color-coded drawing rather than a physical site plan model.

Notes:

Step Eight:  Testing and Evaluation

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 15: Testing and Documenting Test Results

  • Procedures for testing
  • Imagery for testing
  • Results of testing
  • Conclusion of testing

Lesson 16: Preparing Presentation Outline

  • Creating the outline

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback of work over time during class. (ULT#17, 18, 19)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, student will be responsible for:

o        Oral Presentation for final solution. (ULT#18)


  • Planning for transitions from one speaker to the next
  • Planning for imagery
  • Concluding and Summarizing
  • Addressing Questions

Lesson 17: Evaluating Design

  • Scope of project
  • Description of solution
  • Description of discrepancies
  • Description design flaws
  • Description of unresolved design problems
  • Description of suggestions for improvements
  • Blog entry for Test Results Report. (ULT #19)

  • Blog entry for Evaluation Report for the project. (ULT #20)

Notes:

Lesson 15: Have students display their sub- divisions in a museum format for peers to review and leave comments. Have students review comments.

Lesson 16: Have students present to class. Class can role play as the Town Officials and provide feedback about the design.

Lesson 17: Have students evaluate their designs and make suggestions for improvements.

Notes:

Step Nine:  Redesign and Reflect

Lessons / Topics

Lesson 18: Reflecting on Feedback

  • What you did well
  • What skills need improvement

Lesson 19: Revising Design

Formative Assessments:

Teacher feedback of work over time during class. (ULT#20, 21)

Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

  • Individual Self-Evaluation report for the project as measured by a rubric posted to the blog. (ULT #20)
  • Revised Site Plan. (ULT#21)

Notes: Have students reflect on all the feedback received from peers and teacher and make final revisions to their design.

Notes:

Step Ten: Communicate

Lessons/ Topics

Lesson 20: Posting to Blog

  • Final Sub-division drawing

Formative Assessments:

o        Peers and teacher provides feedback as requested while preparing for final posting. (ULT#21)


Summative Assessments:

At the end of the step, as measured by a rubric, designated team member will be responsible for:

o        Completed Sub-division drawing (ULT#21)

Notes:

Notes:

Corresponding Technology Student Association (TSA) Activities

CAD 2D Design


Lesson Plans

Lesson

Timeframe

Lesson 1

Introducing the Problem, Opportunity or Background

Lesson 2 Introducing the Challenge

45 minutes / 1 day

½ day to lecture, ½ days to select teams, start blog and initial posts

Lesson 3

Reviewing Deliverables, Guidelines and Examples Lesson 4

Creating a Gantt Chart

45 minutes / 1 day

1 day to lecture, discuss and Create Gantt Chart

Lesson 5

Finding Resources for Research and Brainstorming

45 minutes / 3 days

1 day to lecture and discuss, 2 days to complete

Lesson 6

Writing and Posting the Research on the Blog

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to review, 1 ½ days to complete

Lesson 7 Generating Alternate Solutions

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to review expectations, 2 ½ days to generate ideas

Lesson  8 Writing Rationale Report

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to review, 1 ½  days to complete

Lesson 9

Reviewing Developmental Work

45 minutes / 4 days

½ day to review, 3 ½ days to complete

Lesson 10 Calculating acreage

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to review, 1 ½ days to complete

Lesson 11

Determining and Calculating Bearings

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to review, 1 ½ days to complete

Lesson 12 Selecting Park Equipment

45 minutes / 1 days

½ day to lecture, ½ day to complete

Lesson 13

Creating a Prototype of Sub-division

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to lecture, 2.5 days to complete

Lesson 14 Creating 3D Park Site

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day for review, 1 ½ days to complete product

Lesson 15

Testing and Documenting Test Results

45 minutes / 2 days

1 day for lecture, 1 day to photograph

Lesson  16 Preparing Presentation Outline

45 minutes / 4 days

½ day to review, ½ day to prepare, 3 days to present

Lesson 17 Evaluating Design

45 minutes / 3 days

½ day to lecture, 2.5 days to complete

Lesson 18 Reflecting on Feedback

45 minutes / 1 day


½ day to review. ½ day to reflect

Lesson 19 Revising Design

45 minutes / 2 days

½ day to review, 1 ½ days to complete

Lesson 20 Posting to Blog

45 minutes / 1 day 1 day to post work

Teacher Notes:

Curriculum Development Resources

22140 N Prairie Rd. Trulia. Retrieved on August 24, 2013 from http://www.trulia.com/homes/Illinois/Prairie_View/sold/21945473-22140-N-Prairie-Rd-Prairie-View-IL- 60069

22140 N Prairie Rd Prairie View, IL 60069 map. Google Maps. 2013. Retrieved on August 23, 2013.

Mohrman, Cristel. Farm Owners Hope to Sell land to Annex to Buffalo Grove. Buffalo Grove Patch. August 20, 2013. Retrieved on August 23, 2013 from http://buffalogrove.patch.com/groups/politics-and- elections/p/farm-owners-hope-to-sell-land-annex-to-buffalo-grove

Tentative Plat Example. Pima County Development Services. February 15, 2007. Retrieved on August 25, 2013 from http://www.pimaxpress.com/subdivision/download.htm

Residential Subdivision. AM Engineering. Retrieved on August 25, 2013 from http://am-engineering- surveying.com/land-surveying/subdivision-plat-map/

Resources Updated Summer 2015

Updated Curriculum Development Resources and Addenda:

-“Engraving a Map” Instructable PDF - Instractables.com (2014)(Submitted by Shane Evans, Pilot Teacher, Freehold Regional High School)

-Sustainable Living Materials (PDF) STEMJOBS.com

Supplemental Reading:

-Citizen Engineer Handbook, Chapter 8, Chemical Materials and Waste citizenengineer.org, 2015

-http://www.nj.gov/education/cte/hl/CRP.pdf


List of Terms and Topics for Research

Access Permitted (ACC) Bearings

Benchmark

Conditions and Restriction Contours

Corner Markers Cut and Fill Deed

Drainage Easement (D/E) Fence Easement (F/E) Legend

Limits of No Access (LNA) Location Map

Lot and Block Monuments Plot

Plat

Public Roadway Easement (R/E) Retention Basin

Right-of-Way Easement (R/W) Building Setback Lines (B/L) Soil testing

Storm Water Runoff Subdivision

Survey Swale

Turning Radius

Utility Easement (U/E) Water table