OPEN LETTER TO THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA  

re: Philippines Government Crackdown on HR defenders November 2019

Appuyez ici pour la version en français

Click here to add the signature of your organization

Civil society organizations in Canada join the international community in raising alarm about the crackdown on humanitarian and social justice organizations, trade unions, churches, and environmental and human rights defenders in the Philippines. We express our solidarity with  organizations and activists throughout the Philippines, whose advocacy for the rights and  wellbeing of the most marginalized and for a society characterized by peace, justice, and  democracy has become a dangerous pursuit.    

Progressive movements and organizations who are critical, or deemed critical of President  Duterte policies and actions, have been subjected to systematic state-sponsored profiling,  harassment, intimidation and threats for many years1. Over the past week, these same  organizations, and now their international partners and allies, have experienced an escalation of harassment and targeted repression. A new “red-tagged” list has emerged2, and many on the list have had their offices raided, and over 60 people have been arrested3. Red-tagging is a practice through which the Government of the Philippines claims human and environmental rights defenders and their organizations, as well as humanitarian workers and their organizations among others are supporting the New People’s Army associated with the  communist movement. It is an established and very dangerous tactic used to suppress  perceived political dissent. 

In 2008, then United Nations Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial killings, Philip Alston,had  already pointed that red-tagging frequently led to arrests, detention, disappearances and the extrajudicial killing of the victims4. Red-tagging is a tactic employed in the government’s  counter-insurgency war, currently implemented through Executive Order No. 70 of the National  task Force to End Local Communist Armed Conflict5, which makes no distinction between armed combatants and unarmed legal organizations critical of the government.  

The Canadian Government has a long history of supporting the important work of many of the  organizations currently experiencing this crackdown 6.. The Canadian Government also has a  duty to protect human rights. It is therefore critical for the Trudeau Government to make every  effort, including issuing a public statement in defence of the growing list of targeted  organizations and leaders, to protect their organizational integrity as well as that of their Philippine partners, and to protect the safety and security of all individuals and organizations being targeted. We also believe that Canada has an important role to play in supporting human  rights defenders in the Philippines as reflected in Canada’s Voices at Risk: Canada’s Guidelines on Supporting Human Rights Defenders7. The purpose of these guidelines is to make clear the responsibility of Canadian embassies to take actions in support of human rights defenders. 

There is increasing international concern about the repression and crack down against human  rights and humanitarian organizations in the Philippines at the level of the UN and EU. We  applaud Canada for its support for the resolution on human rights violations in the Philippines  which was adopted in the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) in July 2019. This  resolution requests that the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)  present a comprehensive report on human rights in the Philippines to the Council in its 44th  session in June 2020. It urges the Philippines Government to prevent extrajudicial killings and  acts of intimidation or retaliation, to carry out impartial investigations, and to hold perpetrators accountable in accordance with international norms and standards. Furthermore, the  resolution calls on the Philippine government to cooperate with the OHCHR, including  facilitating country visits in the preparation of this comprehensive report8.   

As civil society organizations in Canada, some with targeted partners in the Philippines, and  some who are targeted organizations ourselves, we urge the Government of Canada to:  

  1. issue a statement in defence of the growing list of organizations and leaders being “red  tagged”,  
  2. actively press for an independent investigation by the UNHRC,  
  3. strengthen and expand its support to Filipino civil society, especially for human rights  defenders at risk, in line with the Voices at Risk: Canada’s Guidelines on Supporting  
    Human Rights Defenders through the Canadian Embassy in the Philippines, and  
  4. to express strong support for the resumption of the Peace Talks between the  
    Government of the Republic of the Philippines and the National Democratic Front of the Philippines in order to resolve the political conflict that is at the root of the human rights crisis in the country.
     

Respectfully signed by:  

Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)

mission inclusion

Inter-Pares

KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives

The United Church of Canada

Development and Peace-Caritas Canada

Mining Watch

The National Union of Public and General Employees

ICHRP Canada (International Coalition on Human Rights in the Philippines - Canada)

Centre for Philippine Concerns

Migrants Resource Centre Canada

BAYAN Canada

Canada-Philippines Solidarity for Human Rights (CPSHR)

Migrante BC

Alliance for People's Health (APH)

Coalition for Justice and Human Rights

GabrielaBC Women's Collective

John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights

DamayanBC

Victoria Philippine Solidarity Group

Sanctuary City Edmonton

BAYAN-Canada

Migrant Workers Alliance for Change

Philippine Advancement Through Arts and  Culture

Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users

Anakbayan Toronto

Jamhoor Media

Infordus Legal Services

Sulong UBC

Unifor

Memoria Viva Society of Edmonton

Migrante Alberta

Gabriela Ontario

Migrante Canada

Caregivers Action Centre

Butterfly

Ontario Committee for Human Rights in the Philippines

Femmes de diverses origines

International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group

Footnotes:

[1] Lian Buan et Jodesz Gavilan,’Duterte’s War on Dissent’, Rappler (blog), 29 June 2019, https://www.rappler.com/newsbreak/in-depth/234183-duterte-halfway-mark-war-on-dissent-human-rights-defenders.

[2] Mara Cepeda,'Red-Tagged Oxfam, NCCP Slam Military for "malicious, Careless" Attack', Appler (blog), 6 November 2019, https://www.rappler.com/nation/244252-red-tagged-oxfam-nccp-slam-military.

[3] Marchel P. Espina,'Authorities Arrest 56 in Bacolod Crackdown on Militant Groups', Rappler (blog), 1 November 2019, https://www.rappler.com/nation/243909-authorities-arrest-militants-bacolod-crackdown-october-31-2019.

[4] https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G08/130/01/PDF/G0813001.pdf?OpenElement

[5] https://www.officialgazette.gov.ph/downloads/2018/12dec/20181204-EO-70-RRD.pdf

[6]  The list of organizations that are implicated in the latest “red-tagging” includes labour, churches, human rights and humanitarian organizations who are signatories to this letter. Many are members, or local partners of members, of the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) and represent organizations that have worked with the Canadian government on human rights, humanitarian aid and the implementation of sustainable and equitable development projects in the Philippines

[7] https://www.international.gc.ca/world-monde/issues_development-enjeux_developpement/human_rights-droits_homme/rights_defenders_guide_defenseurs_droits.aspx?lang=eng

[8] https://undocs.org/A/HRC/RES/41/2


LETTRE OUVERTE AU GOUVERNEMENT DU CANADA  

Objet : Répression contre les personnes défenseures des droits humains par le gouvernement philippin - Novembre 2019

Cliquez ici pour ajouter la signature de votre organisation

Les organisations de la société civile au Canada se joignent à la communauté internationale pour sonner l’alarme au sujet de la répression contre des organisations humanitaires et de justice sociale, des syndicats, des églises et des personnes défenseures de l’environnement et des droits humains aux Philippines. Nous exprimons notre solidarité avec les organisations et les activistes des Philippines, pour qui le plaidoyer pour les droits et le bien-être des plus marginalisés et pour une société caractérisée par la paix, la justice et la démocratie est devenu une quête dangereuse.  

Les mouvements et organisations progressistes qui sont critiques, ou qui sont perçus comme étant critiques, des politiques et des actions du Président Duterte ont fait l’objet de profilage, de harcèlement, d’intimidation et de menaces systématiques de la part de l’État pendant de nombreuses années[1]. Au cours de la semaine dernière, ces mêmes organisations, et maintenant leurs partenaires et alliés internationaux, ont connu une escalade du harcèlement et de la répression ciblée. Une nouvelle liste « red-tagged » est apparue[2], et beaucoup de personnes figurant sur la liste ont fait l’objet d’une descente dans leurs bureaux, et plus de 60 personnes ont été arrêtées[3]. Le « red-tagging » (étiquetage rouge) est une pratique par laquelle le Gouvernement philippin affirme que des personnes défenseures des droits humains et de l’environnement, et leurs organisations, ainsi que les travailleurs humanitaires et leurs organisations soutiennent la Nouvelle armée populaire (New People’s Army) associée au mouvement communiste. Il s’agit d’une tactique établie et très dangereuse utilisée pour réprimer ce qui est perçu comme dissidence politique.

En 2008, le Rapporteur spécial des Nations Unies sur les exécutions extrajudiciaires, Philip Alston, avait déjà souligné que le « red-tagging » conduisait souvent à des arrestations, des détentions, des disparitions et des exécutions extrajudiciaires des victimes[4]. Le « red-tagging » est une tactique employée dans la guerre anti-insurrectionnelle du gouvernement, actuellement mise en œuvre par le décret Executive Order No. 70 of the National Task Force to End Local Communist Armed Conflict[5], qui ne fait aucune distinction entre combattants armés et organisations légales non armées qui critiquent le gouvernement.

Le gouvernement canadien appuie depuis longtemps l’important travail de bon nombre des organisations qui subissent actuellement cette répression[6]. Le gouvernement canadien a également le devoir de protéger les droits de la personne. Il est donc essentiel que le gouvernement Trudeau déploie tous les efforts possibles, notamment en publiant une déclaration publique pour défendre les organisations et les activistes ciblés, dont le nombre ne cesse d’augmenter, pour protéger leur intégrité organisationnelle ainsi que celle de leurs partenaires philippins, et pour assurer la sécurité de toutes les personnes et organisations visées. Nous croyons également que le Canada a un rôle important à jouer pour appuyer les défenseurs des droits de la personne aux Philippines, comme en témoignent Voix à risque : Lignes directrices du Canada pour le soutien des défenseurs des droits de la personne[7]. Le but de ces lignes directrices est d’établir clairement la responsabilité des ambassades canadiennes de prendre des mesures à l’appui des personnes défenseures des droits de la personne.

La répression contre les organisations humanitaires et de défense des droits humains aux Philippines suscite de plus en plus d’inquiétude à l’échelle internationale, y compris au niveau de l’ONU et de l’UE. Nous félicitons le Canada pour son appui à la résolution sur les violations des droits de la personne aux Philippines qui a été adoptée par le Conseil des droits de l’homme des Nations Unies (CDHNU) en juillet 2019. Cette résolution prie le Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme (HCDH) de présenter un rapport complet sur les droits de l’homme aux Philippines au Conseil à sa 44e session en juin 2020. Il prie le Gouvernement philippin de prévenir les exécutions extra-judiciaires et les actes d’intimidation ou de représailles, de mener des enquêtes impartiales et de demander des comptes aux auteurs de ces actes conformément aux normes et règles internationales. En outre, la résolution demande au gouvernement philippin de coopérer avec le HCDH, notamment en facilitant les visites dans les pays pour l’élaboration du présent rapport détaillé[8].

En tant qu’organisations de la société civile au Canada, dont certaines ont des partenaires ciblés aux Philippines et d’autres sont nous-mêmes des organisations ciblées, nous demandons au gouvernement du Canada de :

  1. Publier une déclaration pour défendre la liste croissante d’organisations et d’activistes qui font l’objet de « red-tagging »,
  2. Faire activement pression pour que le HCDH mène une enquête indépendante,
  3. Renforcer et élargir son soutien à la société civile philippine, en particulier aux personnes défenseures des droits de la personne en danger, conformément au document Voix à risque : Lignes directrices du Canada pour le soutien des défenseurs des droits de la personne par l’entremise de l’ambassade du Canada aux Philippines, et
  4. D’exprimer son ferme soutien à la reprise des pourparlers de paix entre le Gouvernement de la République des Philippines et le Front national démocratique des Philippines (National Democratic Front of the Philippines) afin de résoudre le conflit politique qui est à l’origine de la crise des droits humains dans ce pays.

Respectueusement signé par :

Syndicat canadien de la fonction publique (SCFP)

mission inclusion

Inter-Pares

KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives

L'Eglise Unie du Canada

Développement et Paix-Caritas Canada

Mining Watch

Syndicat national des employées et employés généraux et du secteur public

ICHRP Canada (International Coalition on Human Rights in the Philippines - Canada)

Centre d'appui aux Philippines

Migrants Resource Centre Canada

BAYAN Canada

Canada-Philippines Solidarity for Human Rights (CPSHR)

Migrante BC

Alliance for People's Health (APH)

Coalition for Justice and Human Rights

GabrielaBC Women's Collective

John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights

DamayanBC

Victoria Philippine Solidarity Group

Sanctuary City Edmonton

BAYAN-Canada

Migrant Workers Alliance for Change

Philippine Advancement Through Arts and  Culture

Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users

Anakbayan Toronto

Jamhoor Media

Infordus Legal Services

Sulong UBC

Unifor

Memoria Viva Society of Edmonton

Migrante Alberta

Gabriela Ontario

Migrante Canada

Caregivers Action Centre

Butterfly

Ontario Committee for Human Rights in the Philippines

Women of Diverse Origins

Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles

Notes de bas de page:

[1] Lian Buan et Jodesz Gavilan,’Duterte’s War on Dissent’, Rappler (blog), 29 June 2019, https://www.rappler.com/newsbreak/in-depth/234183-duterte-halfway-mark-war-on-dissent-human-rights-defenders.

[2] Mara Cepeda,'Red-Tagged Oxfam, NCCP Slam Military for "malicious, Careless" Attack', Appler (blog), 6 November 2019, https://www.rappler.com/nation/244252-red-tagged-oxfam-nccp-slam-military.

[3] Marchel P. Espina,'Authorities Arrest 56 in Bacolod Crackdown on Militant Groups', Rappler (blog), 1 November 2019, https://www.rappler.com/nation/243909-authorities-arrest-militants-bacolod-crackdown-october-31-2019.

[4] https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G08/130/01/PDF/G0813001.pdf?OpenElement

[5] https://www.officialgazette.gov.ph/downloads/2018/12dec/20181204-EO-70-RRD.pdf

[6] La liste des organisations impliquées dans la dernière « red-tagging » inclut des organisations syndicales, religieuses, humanitaires et de défense des droits humains qui sont signataires de la présente lettre. Plusieurs sont membres du Conseil canadien pour la coopération internationale (CCCI), ou partenaires locaux de ses membres, et représentent des organisations qui ont travaillé avec le gouvernement canadien sur les droits de la personne, l’aide humanitaire et la mise en œuvre de projets de développement durable et équitable aux Philippines.  

[7] https://www.international.gc.ca/world-monde/issues_development-enjeux_developpement/human_rights-droits_homme/rights_defenders_guide_defenseurs_droits.aspx?lang=fra

[8] https://undocs.org/A/HRC/RES/41/2