Spring 2018 GLS Course Descriptions

Advanced Writing Studio

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar

Cultural Foundations

Global Topics

Senior Seminars

Senior Thesis

Social Foundations

Advanced Writing Studio

Advanced Writing Studio | Elayne Tobin

Other Voices, Other Rooms: Autobiography, Memoir, and the Global Self

In this course, we will be examining how writers write, how we read, and how observing and transforming our own reading skills and attitudes about language can help us improve our own prose. We will be focusing specifically on autobiography and memoir, and how differing notions of  “selfhood” help construct our stories, as well as help us read and interpret the stories of others. While autobiography is generally understood to refer to the narrative of a whole life, memoir tends to take on a specific theme or time period in one’s life. Nevertheless, we will explore and compare the genres themselves.

We will explore memoirs/autobiographies in traditional forms, through poetry, film, fiction, and nonfiction to explore how people have written about themselves and why. We will also compare how cultural, socio-economic, and geographic differences may influence and inflect both the process of memoir writing and the way that writing gets interpreted and used across varies histories and cultures. We will focus our own writing toward the autobiographical and will work with experimental forms in an intense workshop environment. The goal of the course is to become better critical readers of the genre, while at the same time working rigorously and critically on our own written production.

Why focus on writing the “self”?  Because writing and creating languages of artistic remembrance and history-making are the tools we use to make our way in the world; we write to explore, explain, complain, cry out, critique, commiserate, declare, decry, denounce, demystify…you get the idea. Writing is a way not only of recording thoughts and emotions, facts and fictions, but it is the process of using language that brings those elements of our lives into being in the first place. And if you are going to make your way through this messed-up, alienating, strange, and glorious place called existence, you better hope you can talk and that people will listen. In turn, you need to understand how other people use memory, so you can craft your own. Otherwise, what’s the whole point?

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar | Karen Karbiener

ARTS AND LITERATURES

Outlaw Poetry: Whitman’s Radical Cultural Legacy

No other poet since Shakespeare has appealed to so many people in so many places in so many ways as Walt Whitman. In this class, we’ll explore the Whitmanic tradition and its shaping of global countercultural movements, focusing on the development of the prophetic, populist and political poetics of the 20th century. We’ll examine the impact of this tradition on art, film, music, and oral musico-literary culture. We will construct a lineage of outlaw poetry from Whitman through the Harlem Renaissance, Beat poets and American pop culture, and will also discuss how Whitman’s style, philosophy, and vision was appropriated by artists around the world. In addition to exploring the ways Whitman’s writings continue to be meaningful well beyond the time and place in which they were written, we’ll take Walt as an example of the recent globalization trend in American studies—examining the worldview, and the world’s view, of America’s greatest poet.

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar | Susanna Horng

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

Book It!

This course teaches basic book making and storytelling, which will enable students to write, make, and produce an edition of five artists books as the final project. Outside of class, we will study the creation and production of contemporary artists’ books by visiting the Museum of Modern Art's Research Library, The Center for Book Arts, and Printed Matter to examine primary sources. In class, we will analyze storytelling and hone our practice through three formal papers. Students may write short stories, creative nonfiction, graphic memoirs/novels, comics, ethnography, monograph, a one act play, a short screenplay or avant-garde/experimental work.

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar | Suzanne Menghraj

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

The Artist-Critic: Imaginative Approaches to Theory

Rather than viewing theory as one realm of discourse and the arts as another, this course invites students to break the boundaries between theory and art. Students might, for example, write a response to Umberto Eco's series of lectures "Six Walks in the Fictional Woods" in the voice of a fictional character. Another assignment might in Luis Buñuel fashion ask students to film a short surrealist documentary (amateur or expert) that critiques the documentary form. The course prepares students for more advanced work in GLS by making theory a liberatingly playful—yet still rigorous—realm of expression. Whether their senior thesis is ultimately creative or theoretical or both, students who've taken this course will be more keenly attuned to the exuberance and creativity of theory in their own work as well as that of others.

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar | Matt Longabucco

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

Thinking with the Centaur: The Essay-Film

In this course, we will read theoretical texts that underlie and provide various methodologies for contemporary critical thought about media and material culture, sexuality and the unconscious, time and technology, archives and memorials, labor and the urban landscape, ideological critique and political activism. At the same time, we will investigate the genre of the essay-film, in which artists and filmmakers Chris Marker, Chantal Akerman, Agnès Varda, Derek Jarman, Moyra Davey, Yvonne Rainer, Harun Farocki, Hito Steyerl, the Otolith Group, the Black Audio Film Collective, Thom Andersen, Claudia Rankine and others have sought to use the potent combination of image and text to manifest and explore such theoretical concerns. As the semester progresses, our critical writing in relation to our reading will begin to take the shape of a script that will eventually become an essay-film of its own.

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar | Phillip Washburn

LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION

Soul, Self, Mind: A Global Perspective

The theme of this course is the ways that different people in different places and times have tried to understand the mind, the self, and human nature.  In the modern West this attempt grew into the science of psychology.  But our topic is larger.  We first want to look at pre-scientific ideas and beliefs about the mind, in the West and in other parts of the world.  For example, Indian philosophers in the first millennium BCE had much to say about the nature of the self.  Chinese thinkers emphasize relations between individuals and their societies.  Their ideas are similar in some ways to social psychologists’ theories today, and in other ways different. We will then examine the origins of the science of psychology in the late nineteenth century and some main trends in the twentieth century.  We will ask what makes psychology as a science different from earlier theories of the mind.  Actually different schools of psychology answer that question in different ways.  In the third part of the course we will examine three current challenges to psychology, or three alternative ways of thinking about the mind.  First, some writers defend the concept of an immaterial soul, which is beyond the reach of psychology.  Is such a view compatible with modern brain science, explanations of moral feelings, and other advances in psychology?  Second, some critics argue that a science of the mind is an oxymoron.  Science depends on observation and objective data.  But thoughts, feelings, and all experiences are subjective, in the sense that no one can see or measure the experience but the person having it.  Can there be a science of subjective experiences?  Finally, Buddhists say they have created a science of mental life, but not in the way Western psychologists have.  We will examine a prominent writer’s defense of Buddhist psychology. Along the way we will examine a number of controversial issues, but one main question runs through all three parts of the course.  Do we understand the mind by looking within ourselves, or by looking at what other people do?  Are poets’ and gurus’ reports of their inner life – their souls’ journeys, their levels of consciousness – valid for others?  Or do we need repeatable experiments and measurable observations of objective events (behavior or brains) in order to understand the mind?  Are these two different ways of knowing?  This question is one of the central problems of modernity, and one source of misunderstanding between the modern (technological, rational) West and other parts of the world.

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar | Ward Regan

LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION

Rules, Norms and (History) Modes of Enforcement

This course will examine and explore the different discourses concerning: belief and religious institutions, the establishing of codes of approved behavior, the creation and enforcement of social and cultural standards and the political structures used to enforce them and ensure compliance. These sociocultural processes will be examined: historically, psychologically, economically, politically and culturally. The books for the course are a mix of interdisciplinary contemporary and historical great books.

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar | Mitra Rastegar

IDENTITIES AND REPRESENTATIONS

Impurity and Danger: Race and Nation in a Global Context

Mary Douglas argues that the concept of dirt, which she defines as a matter out of place, plays an important role in the maintenance of social boundaries and social order. All dirt must be dealt with in some way to reestablish the social order and every society inculcates rituals to put dirt in its place (bathing, hand washing, brushing teeth, etc.). The concept of “race” has often followed a similar logic, requiring that people be kept “in place” (for example, through the policing of sexual relations) or else be deemed threats to the social order. In a global context of capital flows, circulating media, cultural hybridity and human migration, the concept of purity of people has been challenged. What does an increasing recognition and apparent celebration of cultural (and biological) cross-pollination and hybridity mean for concepts of race? In an age of “impurity” how is the concept of race challenged, reasserted and reconfigured? The course begins with a historical and theoretical overview of the concept of race in relation to the modern nation-state and colonial powers, especially as manifest through the regulation of sexuality and reproduction. We will then consider how racial identities are formed,

lived and reconfigured in the context social movements for racial justice, of cultural and economic globalization, and of the global war on terror. Throughout, our discussion will consider both the theories of racialization and racial identities, and the methods by which such identities are being explored, theorized, and represented. More specifically, we will consider different humanistic and social scientific approaches to engaging experiences of identity formation, including novels and ethnographies.

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar | Mona El-Ghobashy

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Four Faces of Democracy

The definition of democracy is clear: self-rule, or government by the people. But thinking about what democracy looks like reveals an astonishing range of meanings, in theory, history, and practice. This seminar will focus on four influential 'schools' of democracy and what each thinks democracy is. Procedural theories hold that honest, periodic elections are the essence of democratic government. Substantive theories insist that no democracy is worth the name if it does not promote human development and social justice. The next two schools focus on dimensions of participation: deliberative democrats argue that legislators must justify to citizens, in open discussions, the laws and policies they devise for living together, and theorists of contestatory democracy say that citizens must have the ability to contest government decisions effectively. With each school of thought, we look at examples of democratic practices in a wide variety of settings, including Senegal, Yemen, Spain, Brazil, Argentina, South Africa, India, and the contemporary US. The cases are not merely 'illustrations' of the theories, but call forth new problems and dimensions for how we should understand democracy.

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar | Roxana Julia

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

The Global Economy: Growth, Sustainability and the Environment

In the global economy of the twenty-first century, environmental and natural resource considerations are shaping policies of economic growth and development, as global threats such as climate change fossil fuel depletion resource constraints gradually gained recognition as fundamental challenges to the sustainability of past and current rates of economic growth and improvements in living standards. This course will introduce students to a set interdisciplinary literature that will help them understand and analyze the relationships between economic growth, human populations and the global environment, as well as related economic policies sensitive to environmental and resource constraints. The first part of the course will introduce the theories and tools necessary to understand these relationships; the second part of the course is dedicated to studying the concept of sustainability and the sustainable development approach to economic growth. The primary objective of the course is that student will have, after completion, a set of critical, theoretical tools that they can use to better analyze the processes, relationships and phenomena involved in the growth and sustainability debate.

Approaches: Sophomore Seminar | Heidi White

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Global Justice & the Global Citizen

Many people are extremely poor, others very rich. Many live under tyrannical regimes. Many are vulnerable to violence, disease, and starvation. How should we understand and respond to these facts? What do we, as global citizens, owe to each other? Global justice is an issue in political philosophy arising from the concern that we do not live in a just world. While half the people of the world continue to live on less than $2 a day, there are growing demands for a world where democracy, development, and security are permanent features in all our lives. This course will explore the meaning of global justice and global citizenship and provide an introduction to the core concepts and debates in the field. Three central concerns will structure our discussion: global political justice, global economic justice, and human rights; and various approaches will be applied: Liberal Political Theory, Ethical Theory, Political Realism, Communitarianism, Cosmopolitanism, and Capabilities Theory. This course will also include a trip to the United Nations.


 Cultural Foundations

CFII-UF 102.006 | TR 9:30-10:45 | Afrodesia McCannon

Course Description TBA

CFII-UF 102.015 | MW 2:00-3:15 | Lindsay Davies

Course Description TBA

CFII-UF 102.024 | TR 11:00-12:15 |  Nancy Reale

Course Description TBA

CFII-UF 102.028 | MW 12:30-1:45 | Molly Martin

Course Description TBA


Global Topics

Global Topics | Johann Jaeckel

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Critiques of Capitalism

This course introduces students to a wide range of writings from different philosophical and economic schools of thought, all of which have one central theme in common: they have a bone to pick with capitalism. Based on a close reading of primary texts, the course investigates the following questions. How do different authors characterize the fundamental features of the social system that we refer to as capitalism? Which, if any, aspects of this system do they appreciate and which do they reject? How are different critiques informed by historical events and, in turn, how do they shape the political dynamics of different eras? Finally, how is the critique of capitalism informed by perspectives outside the main power structures and intellectual centers of the enlightenment and beyond? The first part of the course covers criticisms formulated by moral philosophers and classical political economists during the emergence of industrial capitalism in the 18th and 19th century. Readings demonstrate the linkage between theories of value and emergent disciplines in the social sciences. The second part, 1914 to 1945, focuses on analyses and arguments put forward during the chaotic pre­ and interwar period. Critics and theorists in this period help to display the difficulty of thinking through the challenges to capitalism from fascist and communist movements. The third part presents of a range of critical commentaries on postwar capitalism up to the present drawing from religious, environmental, feminist, and postcolonial perspectives.The course concludes with a comparative reading of defenses and radical critiques of neoliberalism. The team teaching approach to this course allows to emphasize both the underlying philosophical and economic commitments which inform different critical inquiries of capitalism. Historically, a variety of traditions in economic thought and philosophy have examined rules of exchange, depicted general tendencies in human labor and consumption, and expressed normative prohibitions and endorsements for various types of market practices. Our focus here, capitalism as a unique mode of economic reproduction, is no different with regard to being an object of this economic and philosophical examination. This course aims to participate in this ongoing questioning and contemporary reconstruction.

Global Topics | James McBride

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

The Struggle for Human Rights and its Future in a Posthuman World

This seminar examines basic concepts of human rights, addressing at the outset whether human rights are natural and universal or whether they are moral and historical imperatives.  Students will study the historical evolution of human rights and the U.N. conventions, multilateral and bilateral treaties, and domestic laws, which govern human rights, as well as specific topics within the field.  These topics include the rights of immigrants and refugees in a global context, particularly the impact in and response to the refugee crisis in Europe and the United States and the Trump Administration's response.  The seminar will also study the history and social psychology of genocide, be it political mass killings or ethnic cleansing.  Students will analyze the persistence of modern slavery, such as forced labor, sex trafficking, and organ harvesting.  The seminar will also explore the issues of torture, particularly the Argentine "dirty war" in the late 1970s and its use by Americans at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo, as well as capital punishment around the globe.  Finally, students will consider whether corporate rights are human rights (as is the law in the European Union) and whether human rights should apply in  the impending posthuman age, including to cryonics, cyborgs, and humanoid robots.

Global Topics | Eugenia Naro-Maciel

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Globalism and Environmental Conservation

In this class we will investigate, in a global context, the conceptual foundations of environmental conservation, the primary threats to biodiversity, the consequences of small populations, and approaches to solving conservation problems. Through reading assignments and exercises, field trips to local sites of conservation interest, a presentation, and exams, the course will foster student-active learning of environmental conservation, with a focus on sites of interest to the students.

Global Topics | James Polchin

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

Crosslisted with ARTS AND LITERATURES

Image Cultures: Photography In a Global Context

From its origins, the photograph has been crucial in defining global encounters through colonialism, anthropology, journalism, and travel, as well as crafting and preserving local, vernacular experiences in family portraiture and street photography, to name just a two. But beyond the images themselves, the photograph as both object and technology, has made possible distinct cultural practices and experiences. As many historians and critics have shown, the photograph has shaped the way we inhabit the world, comprehend it, and make sense of it, even as these images are incomplete in the vision they offer. In our digital era as we create and circulate photographs at an unprecedented rate, the social and political uses of making photographs seem even more pressing and more uncertain. This interdisciplinary seminar explores the distinct cultural practices around photography through contemporary and historical case studies. From Japanese camera clubs, and French memoirs of mourning, from lynching photographs in the US to Chinese street photography, the seminar rethinks photography at the intersections of technology and cultural practices.

Global Topics | Heidi White

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Cross listed with LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION

Reaction and Dissent in the 20th Century: Existentialism, Magic Realism, and the Theatre of the Absurd

This course will examine three significant philosophical and literary reactions in a post-colonial and post-World War II world. Existentialism, magical realism, and theater of the absurd may be distinguished by their break from traditional styles and themes, and each contains an implicit critique, whether of the privileged role of reason, of the idea of an objective reality, or of former elites. Each may also be viewed as a reaction to the breakdown of an earlier conception of an ordered, European-dominated world. We will address the following themes in twentieth-century philosophy and literature: the asserted meaninglessness of human existence, the effects of war, the decline of colonial powers, and the rise of new political orders. We will ask: What are the political and philosophical origins of each movement? What literary themes and styles do they share and how do they differ? We will read Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Kafka, Gogol, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, Pirandello, Calvino, Carpentier, Garcia Marquez, Borges, Allende, and Bombal.

Global Topics | Minu Tharoor

IDENTITIES AND REPRESENTATIONS

Crosslisted with POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

Global Women’s Rights and Organizations

ALBERT Topic Title: Global Women’s Rights and Organizations

This course introduces students to important ideas, activities, debates and institutions that shape the issues and actions around Women’s Rights as they are conceived and advocated today in many parts of the world and in a global frame. Some of these rights – diverse freedoms and entitlements – are sought by both men and women; others are of particular relevance to women. The rights pertain to all aspects of lives and livelihoods and constitute the women seeking or enjoying them in their political, cultural, social and economic identities. The last century has witnessed an extensive struggle for rights across many regions: many rights have been secured, others remain tenuous or distant. Women have fought, struggled, suffered and triumphed – sometimes in small groups within local communities, but often in transnational associations, governmental bodies and international institutions. Local grievances regarding rights have global dimensions; local solutions offer global lessons. Global organizations and networks facilitated by modern technology provide solidarity amidst difference as women (sometimes joined by men) seek a rightful and rights-filled world for women, which is ultimately a better world for everyone.

Roberta Newman: No Sleep ‘til Brooklyn

IDENTITIES AND REPRESENTATIONS

Cross-listed with ARTS AND LITERATURES and CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

It has been said that one third of all Americans can trace their roots to Brooklyn.  A city in its own right until 1898--the fourth largest in America--Brooklyn is known for its accent, its bridge, its Bums.  It is also the place where members of so many ethnic immigrant groups--from Dutch farmers in the 18th Century to Fujianese, South Asians, people from the Caribbean and Central America in the 21st, and the many waves in between--learned to negotiate America.   It is both the site of a landmark gain in the fight for the civil rights of African-Americans and the locus of considerable racial conflict.  It is, at once, fundamentally global and intensely parochial.  And, today, it is both the beneficiary and the victim of shifting demographics, as it becomes an increasingly desirable place to live and play for people of means and financially prohibitive for the working class that made it.   In this course, we will look at Brooklyn from both a socio-cultural and historical perspective.  Most particularly, we will pay close attention how the various identities, individually and collectively labeled “Brooklynite” are represented in mass media, literature, art, music, and film, and most particularly from our own first-hand observations.  In doing so, we will use Brooklyn as a laboratory for the investigation of the global city.  


Senior Seminars

Senior Seminar | Jessamyn Hatcher & Thuy Linh Tu

Design and Development: Couture/Culture (crosslisted with Social & Cultural Analysis Dept.)

The journey from cloth to clothing, from the hands that sew to the bodies that wear, is in most accounts a long one. The journey continues as wear (and laundering, staining, repairing, lending, and storing) eventually gives to disposal, and clothes are sent to landfill, or to encounters with new wearers. Stretching across multiple nations, modes of labor, forms of presentation, and ways of knowing, the production, consumption, use, disposal, and reuse of clothing is literally a global project. The clothing industry was, after all, among the first to become transnational, and its structures of production, consumption, use, disposal, and reuse, both material and symbolic, are among the most globally dispersed. When addressed in context of globalization, clothing tends to be posited only ever as a problem—of over-consumption, labor exploitation, environmental degradation, and the division of “the west and the rest.” But the long life cycle of clothing is also a trenchant example of how people and things are involved in relationships of attachment, entanglement, dependence, and care. The recent movement in “humanitarian design,” which seeks to “demonstrate how design addresses the world’s most critical issues,” presents the opportunity to rethink the role of clothing over its long life, as both critical problem and possible solution.

Senior Seminar | Lindsay Davies & David Ludden

Worlds of World War One (cross-listed with History Dept.)
This is a team-taught course presenting a global history of World War One through collaboration among faculty in the NYU Global Network. It will be offered in Spring 2016, 2017, and 2018, cross-listed in Liberal Studies and History, and linked via coordinated syllabi, video conferencing, a webpage, and internet communication to connected courses in NYU-London and NYU-Abu Dhabi, to create a diverse, integrated GNU learning environment.  
Each of the connected courses will be distinctive and designed to take advantage of local faculty and resources. One linked course will be offered in NYUL (Phillip Drummond), “The First World War: An Interdisciplinary History.” Another linked course (TBA) will be offered in NYUAD (Martin Klimke). In addition, a workshop at NYUL in early July 2016 will bring together GNU faculty and students to enhance ongoing WWI courses, stimulate faculty and student research, and promote related course activity at other GNU sites.
This course is emphatically interdisciplinary. It is not only about the study of History from books and textual primary sources. It is also designed to introduce students to the range and diversity of material that we can use to explore worlds of war, including interpretive prose, painting, poetry, fiction, films, TV dramas, museums, monuments, and archives of public and private material. Creating a WWI film collection is one of our projects, which Phillip Drummond is leading.
All the instructors in these interconnected World War One courses are committed to the idea that World War One has continued relevance today, not only as a memory, or as history, but also as a laboratory for the study of modernity and the world we live in today. We will highlight this theme throughout the course.

Senior Seminar | Carley Moore

Youth in Revolt: Case Studies in Global Activism

Globalization has led to massive social, political, and economic changes around the world, and young people have often been at the center of, and at times the impetus for, those changes. Increasingly, mainstream global movements for social change have begun in youth-led subcultures and countercultures. These subcultures have provided the methodology, initial human capital, and home base from which to begin mobilization. This course will offer us an opportunity to examine a constellation of key moments, or case studies if you will, in youth and/or student-led activism around the globe in the second half of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century. It will also allow us to examine the idea of the subculture (an important theoretical concept in studies of globalization) in relation to larger arguments in cultural studies and global history. This course will provide us with an opportunity to consider the ways in which youth-led movements for social, political, and economic change have offered us new methodologies for thinking about social justice, activism, and revolution. Some of the questions we may consider are: in what ways and by what means have young people approached activism? What kinds of primary documents and media have young people created to aid in disseminating their message? How have young people used their bodies in these particular moments of social change? What do youth-led movements look like? How have they been historicized and written about? Finally, is there a particular, somehow unique relationship between young people and activism? We will begin the course with an investigation of the cultural and historical origins of the teenager or the teenage, so that we may better understand the emergence of the young person as a particular kind of citizen—one who is often configured as either a consumer or a rebel, one who is part of a subculture. Once, we’ve examined this vexed figure, we will move to significant moments of youth activism—moments that have been widely theorized and/or are visible in the media and/or have a particularly youthful methodology for social change: the formation of the radical student-led Weather Underground in 1970, the 1989 Student Movement in China that led to the massacres in Tiananmen Square, and most recently the Arab Spring and Occupy Movement.

Senior Seminar | Marion Thain

Cosmopolitanism and Cultural Exchange

What do we mean by ‘cosmopolitan’, and how is culture formed by the notion of global citizenship, or transnationalism? Where is the line between cosmopolitanism and cultural appropriation, and how might reverse appropriation result from cosmopolitan exchange? How is cosmopolitan identity inhabited through style, design and culture? This course provides a frame through which to answer these questions using a list of key theoretical texts, and provides case studies of transnational transactions (in literature, the visual arts, fashion, and design) between diverse cultures that we will use to focus, apply, and debate these ideas of what cosmopolitanism might mean in practice. Ending in a project that explores ideas of cosmopolitanism in relation to a case study of the student’s choice, the course will enable you to reflect on your own experiences of transnationalism during your year abroad (and perhaps your own identity as a cosmopolitan) in a conceptually sophisticated way. Modernity -- as characterized by the ‘second’ industrial revolution (the revolution of the commodity) -- saw a new wave of globalization in which the styles and taste to which the middle classes aspired were truly transnational in their formation. The modern conception of cosmopolitanism can be traced back to Kant’s political writings; yet for the majority of the growing middle class, the impact of ‘world citizenship’ was experienced more immediately through literature, art, trends in interior design, and the fashions they wore. Coinciding with the second industrial revolution, the aesthetic movement saw a merging of cosmopolitan aesthetics with the design that expressed these ideals in the home and on the body. This cultural cosmopolitanism is still powerfully operative in the styles, designs, writings and fashions of today – an era still defined by proliferation of the commodity. This course will give you a sophisticated understanding of how a ‘cosmopolitanism’ identity is formed and expressed through art, culture and style.

Senior Seminar | Jennifer Zoble

The Global Go-Between: Translation Studies Seminar

George Steiner, in his seminal 1975 book After Babel: Aspects of Language and Translation, famously asserted, “All acts of communication are acts of translation.” While translation may be a fundamental part of what we do as expressive creatures, and while the formal practice of translation stretches back centuries, the profession of translator and the academic discipline of translation studies are relatively new. In this course, we’ll immerse ourselves in the major theoretical questions of the translation field, and in the ever-changing ideas about language, culture, and power that inform them. Students will analyze literary as well as “technical” (audiovisual, journalism, law, medicine, business, diplomacy) translations, and collaboratively investigate translation practices in a community, industry, or discipline they care about. They will speak with local translators and attend translation-focused events. And all along, they will consider why, in this age of English-language hegemony, interest in, and study of, translation seems only to be growing. Proficiency in a language other than English is not required, but interlingual analysis will be encouraged for those students capable of it.


Senior Thesis

SCOI-UF 401.001 | MW 12:30-1:45 | Elayne Tobin

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401.002 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Emily Bauman

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401.003 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Tamuira Reid

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401.004 | MW 3:30-4:45 |  Johann Jaeckel

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401.005 | MW 2:00-3:15 | Martin Reichert

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401.006 | TR 4:45-6:10 | Luis Ramos

ARTS AND LITERATURES

SCOI-UF 401.007 | MW 9:30-10:45 | Matt Longabucco

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE AND CREATIVE PRODUCTION

SCOI-UF 401.008 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Regina Gramer

LAW, ETHICS, AND RELIGION

SCOI-UF 401.009 | MW 11:00-12:15 | Patricio Navia

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT

SCOI-UF 401.010 | TR 2:00-3:15 | Rochelle Almeida

IDENTITIES AND REPRESENTATIONS

SCOI-UF 401.011 | TR 3:30pm-4:45pm | Phillip Washburn

POLITICS, RIGHTS, AND DEVELOPMENT


Social Foundations

SFII-UF 102.005 | TR 11:00-12:15 | Peter Diamond

Course Description TBA

SFII-UF 102.010 | TR 12:30-1:45 | Michael Shenefelt

Course Description TBA

SFII-UF 102.014 | MW 9:30-10:45 | Farzad Mahootian

Course Description TBA

SFII-UF 102.034 | TR 3:30-4:45 | Joseph Portanova

Course Description TBA