Course Number: ENG 400
Course Title: Catholic English Literature

Instructor: Dr. Hilary Finley
hfinley@holyapostles.edu

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

Literature is an important mode of artistic endeavor aiming to communicate truth about the human experience. In this course, we will look at the thoughtful and beautiful works of English playwrights, poets, and novelists. The literature we will examine in detail includes works by William Shakespeare, G. M. Hopkins, T. S. Eliot, Graham Greene, and Evelyn Waugh. As we approach the various authors, time periods, and genres, we will discuss the ideas contained within each play, poem, or novel. We will consider the mode of writing along with the content, style, and gain of each work. In addition to readings and class discussions, students will write a thoughtful paper on the literature and be guided through the research and draft-writing phases, as well as the proper method of referencing.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Your primary responsibility week-by-week is to read the literature according to the schedule below and engage one another on the discussion board. Short assignments contributing to your final research paper project will appear in addition to reading assignments. Please know that I am eager to help you with any problems you have with readings or responses!

Week 1: Introduction to William Shakespeare; “Twelfth Night” (1599)

Reading: Read “Twelfth Night” (Acts 1 and 2)

Assignment: Introduce yourselves on the Populi Bulletin Board!

Week 2: “Twelfth Night” by William Shakespeare

Reading: Finish “Twelfth Night” (Acts 3, 4, 5)

Assignment: Post a 300-word response to the prompt on the discussion board, due by the end of Friday; in 50 words or more, respond to another student’s reflection, due by the end of Sunday.

Week 3: “Hamlet” by William Shakespeare (1600)

Readings: Read “Hamlet” (Acts 1-3)

Assignments: Post a 300-word response to the prompt on the discussion board, due by the end of Friday; in 50 words or more, respond to another student’s reflection, due by the end of Sunday.

Week 4: “Hamlet” by William Shakespeare

Reading: Read “Hamlet” (Acts 4 and 5)

Assignment: Post a 300-word response to the prompt on the discussion board, due by the end of Friday; in 50 words or more, respond to another student’s reflection, due by the end of Sunday.

Week 5: Sonnets by William Shakespeare (1609)

Reading: Read “Sonnet 18,” “Sonnet 73,” “Sonnet 116,” “Sonnet 127,” “Sonnet 153,” and “Sonnet 154”

Assignment: Post a 300-word response to the prompt on the discussion board, due by the end of Friday; in 50 words or more, respond to another student’s reflection, due by the end of Sunday.

Week 6: Annotated Bibliography

Reading: Read the lecture about how to create an Annotated Bibliography.

Assignment: Read and annotate five journal articles: one journal article must be about “Twelfth Night,” one journal article about “Hamlet,” and one journal article about the Sonnets. The two remaining entries must relate to the works we have read in class. Email your annotations to me by the end of Sunday.

Week 7: Selected Poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins, SJ

Reading: Read the following poems: “The Wreck of the Deutschland” (1875), “Hurrahing in Harvest” (1877), “The Windhover, To Christ Our Lord” (1877), “The May Magnificat” (1878), and “The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo” (1882)

Assignment: Post a 300-word response to the prompt on the discussion board, due by the end of Friday; in 50 words or more, respond to another student’s reflection, due by the end of Sunday.

Week 8: “The Wasteland” by T. S. Eliot (1922)

Reading: Read “The Wasteland” by T. S. Eliot

Assignments: Post a 300-word response to the prompt on the discussion board, due by the end of Friday; in 50 words or more, respond to another student’s reflection, due by the end of Sunday.

Week 9: The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene (1940)

Reading: ReadThe Power and the Glory

Assignments: Post a 300-word response to the prompt on the discussion board, due by the end of Friday; in 50 words or more, respond to another student’s reflection, due by the end of Sunday.

Activity: Read and annotate one journal article about a book or poem we have read so far.

Week 10: The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene

Reading: Finish The Power and the Glory

Assignments: Post a 300-word response to the prompt on the discussion board, due by the end of Friday; in 50 words or more, respond to another student’s reflection, due by the end of Sunday.

Week 11: Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh (1945)

Reading: Read Brideshead Revisited 

Assignment: Post a 300-word response to each of the two prompts on the discussion board, due by the end of Friday; in 50 words or more, respond to another student’s reflection, due by the end of Sunday.

Activity: Submit a 100- to 200-word explanation of your paper topic proposal. We will work this out together to ensure that you like your topic and can sustain a 5-6 page paper.

Week 12: Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh; Begin Paper

Reading: Finish Brideshead Revisited

Assignment: Post a 300-word response to the prompt on the discussion board, due by the end of Friday; in 50 words or more, respond to another student’s reflection, due by the end of Sunday. 

Activity: Submit a 200-word explanation of your paper topic. We will work together to create a topic which you will enjoy writing about and will sustain a 5-6 page paper.

Week 13: Annotated Bibliography and Paper Outline

Assignment: Read and annotate five journal articles to create an Annotated Bibliography relating to your paper topic. Write an outline for your final paper, due by the end of Sunday.

Week 14: First Draft and Bibliography

Assignment: Draft a 5-6 page paper, due by the end of Sunday. Add a Bibliography to the end of your paper.

Week 15: Submit Final Paper

Assignment: Submit the final draft of your paper, including your Bibliography. Post a 300-word response to the prompt on the discussion board, due by the end of Sunday. 

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

In effect, the grading system is the following:

Total: 1100 points

Discussion Posts: (550 points) 50% of total. Each original response is worth 40 points, and one peer response is worth 10 points, so each week the points total to 50 points, for a total of 550.

Activities: (230 points) 20% of total. All annotations are given equal weight, whether in the Week 6 assignment or the final annotation assignment in Week 13 for the Research Paper, so the total points for the annotations comes to 200; another "Activity" is to submit a Topic Proposal for the research paper, due in Week 11, worth 30 points. The total activity points are 230.

Research Paper: (320 points) 30% of total. The Outline due in Week 13 is worth 50 points; the First Draft due in week 14 is worth 160 points; the Final Paper due in Week 15 is worth 110 points. The total points for the Research Paper is 320.

(320 + 230 + 550 = 1100 points total)

Citations in Discussion Posts

Should you choose to reference an outside source on the discussion board on Populi, please briefly cite the source. For example:

Vincent Balaguer, Understanding the Gospels (New York: Scepter Publishers, Inc., 2005).

NB – For help with formatting, please refer to http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl.

5. REQUIRED READINGS:

6. EVALUATION

All late assignments and discussion board posts will be dropped 10% per day each is late. If a post or assignment has not been submitted within three days past the deadline, then the post or assignment will be given a grade of 0 (zero) points. This applies to required discussion responses to fellow classmates’ posts. Exceptions to this rule will apply only if a student receives permission from me via email prior to the due date of an assignment.

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

Grading Rubric for the Major Papers and Discussion Board (DB) Postings

CONTENT

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Absence of Understanding

Posting shows no awareness of the concepts addressed in the topic by shifting off-topic

Misunderstanding

Posting demonstrates a misunderstanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic through an inability to re-explain them

Adequate Understanding

Posting demonstrates an adequate understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic by a re-explanation of them

Solid understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic and uses that understanding effectively in the examples it provides

Insightful understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts of the topic through the use of examples and by making connections to other concepts

RESEARCH

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; poor quality of chosen sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format.

WRITING & EXPRESSION

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Incomplete writing

Posting is only partially written or fails to address the topic

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Posting touches only on the surface of the topic and proceeds to talk about something else; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Posting is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment; satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors

Solid writing with something interesting to say

Posting is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples;  level-appropriate syntax and diction;  mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Posting is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage

COMMUNITY INTERACTION (50-word response)

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Weak response

Response summarizes original posting to which it responds.

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds.

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development.

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development.

7. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

8. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

9. ATTENDANCE POLICY

You are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

10. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

11. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSORS

Hilary Finley received a Ph.D. and M.A. in Literature from the University of Dallas. She received a B.A. in Humanities and Catholic Culture from the Franciscan University of Steubenville. She enjoys teaching college English and looks forward eagerly to each new semester and the discussions each brings. Her dissertation examines nature and natural law in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.