Academy of Innovative StudieS (AIS) High School

Course Descriptions for the 2020-2021 School Year

ENGLISH COURSES

1002 English 9

English 9, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language

Arts in Grades 9-10, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication, focusing on

literature within an appropriate level of complexity for this grade band. Students use literary

interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of

historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction.

Students write responses to literature, expository (informative), narrative, and argumentative/persuasive

compositions, and sustained research assignments. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral

presentations with attention to audience and purpose and access, analyze, and evaluate online

Information.

1004 English 10 

 English 10, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 9- 10, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication, focusing on literature with an appropriate level of complexity for this grade band. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write responses to literature, expository (informative) and argumentative/persuasive compositions, and sustained research assignments. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations with attention to audience and purpose and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

1006 English 11

English 11, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language

Arts in Grades 11-12, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication focusing on

literature with an appropriate level of complexity for this grade band. Students use literary

interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of

historical or cultural significance appropriate in classic and contemporary literature balanced with

nonfiction. Students write narratives, responses to literature, academic essays (e.g. analytical, persuasive,

expository, summary), and more sustained research assignments incorporating visual information in the

form of pictures, graphs, charts and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia

presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

1008 English 12

English 12, an integrated English course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language

Arts for Grades 11- 12, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication focusing

on an exploration of point of view or perspective across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary

interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of

historical or cultural significance in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction.

Students write narratives, responses to literature, academic essays (e.g. analytical, persuasive,

expository, summary), and more sustained research assignments incorporating visual information in the

form of pictures, graphs, charts, and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia

presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES

1514 Economics

Economics examines the allocation of resources and their uses for satisfying human needs and wants. The course analyzes economic reasoning and behaviors of consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, voters, institutions, governments, and societies in making decisions. Students explain that because resources are limited, people must make choices and understand the role that supply, demand, prices, and profits play in a market economy. Key elements of the course include the study of scarcity and economic reasoning; supply and demand; market structures; the role of government; national economic performance; the role of financial institutions; economic stabilization; and trade.

1540 United States Government

United States Government provides a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and

practices of constitutional representative democracy in the United States. Responsible and effective

participation of citizens is stressed. Students understand the nature of citizenship, politics, and

governments and understand the rights and responsibilities of citizens and how these are part of local,

state, and national government. Students examine how the United States Constitution protects the rights

and provides the structure and functions of various levels of government. Analysis of how the United

States interacts with other nations and the government’s role in world affairs is included in this course.

Using primary and secondary resources, students will articulate, evaluate, and defend positions on

political issues. As a result, they will be able to explain the role of individuals and groups in government,

politics, and civic activities and the need for civic and political engagement of citizens in the United

States.

1542 United States History

United States History is a two-semester course that builds upon concepts developed in previous studies

of U.S. History and emphasizes national development from the late nineteenth century into the twentyfirst century. After reviewing fundamental themes in the early development of the nation, students are

expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of

the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political,

economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century

through the present as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States. Students are expected to trace

and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S. History.

Students develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore

topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time.

1548 World History and Civilization

World History and Civilization emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected

large numbers of people across broad areas and that significantly influenced peoples and places in

subsequent eras. Key events related to people and places as well as transcultural interaction and

exchanges are examined in this course. Students are expected to compare and contrast events and

developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. They will

examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among

various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Students are also expected to practice and

process skills of historical thinking and research and apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking

and inquiry skills and processes. There will be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and

content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history.

MATH COURSES

2516 Algebra I Lab

Algebra I Lab is a mathematics support course for Algebra I. Algebra I Lab is taken while students are

concurrently enrolled in Algebra I. This course provides students with additional time to build the

foundations necessary for high school math courses, while concurrently having access to rigorous, gradelevel appropriate courses. The five critical areas of Algebra I Lab align with the critical areas of Algebra I:

Relationships between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations; Linear and Exponential Relationships;

Descriptive Statistics; Expressions and Equations; and Quadratic Functions and Modeling. However,

whereas Algebra I contains exclusively grade-level content, Algebra I Lab combines standards from high

school courses with foundational standards from the middle grades.

2520 Algebra I

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics students learned in the middle grades. Algebra I is made up of six strands: Real Numbers and Expressions; Functions; Linear Equations, Inequalities, and Functions; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Exponential Equations and Functions; and Data Analysis and Statistics. These critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Students will also engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

2522 Algebra II

Algebra II builds on work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and allows for students to extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. Algebra II is made up of seven strands: Complex Numbers and Expressions; Functions; Systems of Equations; Quadratic Equations and Functions; Exponential & Logarithmic Equations and Functions; Polynomial, Rational, and Other Equations and Functions; and Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

2532 Geometry

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students

explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships,

moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Seven critical areas comprise the Geometry course:

Logic and Proofs; Points, Lines, Angles, and Planes; Triangles; Quadrilaterals and Other Polygons; Circles;

Transformations; and Three-dimensional Solids. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply

throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that

students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability

to make sense of problem situations.

SCIENCE COURSES

3024 Biology I

Biology I is a course based on the following core topics: cellular structure and function, matter cycles and

energy transfer; interdependence; inheritance and variation in traits; evolution. Instruction should focus

on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural

phenomena and experimentation, by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory, and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

3044 Earth and Space Science I

Earth and Space Science I is a course focused on the following core topics: universe; solar system; Earth

cycles and systems; atmosphere and hydrosphere; solid Earth; Earth processes. Students analyze and

describe earth’s interconnected systems and examine how earth’s materials, landforms, and continents

are modified across geological time. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that

scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation, by

designing and conducting investigations guided by theory, and by evaluating and communicating the

results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

3108 Integrated Chemistry-Physics

Integrated Chemistry-Physics is a course focused on the following core topics: constant velocity; uniform

acceleration; Newton’s Laws of motion (one dimension); energy; particle theory of matter; describing

substances; representing chemical change; electricity and magnetism; waves; nuclear energy. Instruction

should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation

of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory

and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted

Procedures.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH

3560 Elective Physical Education

Elective Physical Education, a course based on selected standards from Indiana’s Academic Standards for Physical Education, identifies what a student should know and be able to do as a result of a quality physical education program. The goal of a physically educated student is to maintain appropriate levels of cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition necessary for a healthy and productive life. Elective Physical Education promotes lifetime sport and recreational activities and provides an opportunity for an in-depth study in one or more specific areas. A minimum of two of the following activities should be included: team sports; dual sports activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance. This course includes the study of physical development concepts and principles of sport and exercise as well as opportunities to develop or refine skills and attitudes that promote lifelong fitness. Students have the opportunity to design and develop an appropriate personal fitness program that enables them to achieve a desired level of fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEPs and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-27-11.

3542 Physical Education I

Physical Education I focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and

comprehensive physical education curriculum which provides students with opportunities to actively

participate in at least four of the following: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities;

outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance, all of which are within

the framework of the skills, knowledge and confidence needed by the student for a lifetime of healthful

physical activity and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill

evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those

with IEPs and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary injuries, obesity, etc.). See 511 IAC 7-27-9, 7-

27-11.

3506 Health and Wellness Education

Health and Wellness, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for Health and Wellness and

provides the basis to help students adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. Health education should

contribute directly to a student’s ability to successfully practice behaviors that protect and promote

health and avoid or reduce health risks. Through a variety of instructional strategies, students practice

the development of functional health information (essential concepts); determine personal values that

support health behaviors; develop group norms that value a healthy lifestyle; develop the essential skills

necessary to adopt, practice, and maintain health-enhancing behaviors. This course includes the

application of priority areas in a planned, sequential, comprehensive health education curriculum.

Priority areas include: promoting personal health and wellness, physical activity, and healthy eating;

promoting safety and preventing unintentional injury and violence; promoting mental and emotional

health, a tobacco- free lifestyle and an alcohol- and other drug-free lifestyle; and promoting human

development and family health. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills of health

and wellness core concepts, analyzing influences, accessing information, interpersonal communication,

decision-making and goal-setting skills, health-enhancing behaviors, and health and wellness advocacy

skills.

FINE ARTS

4060 Drawing 

Drawing is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in drawing engage

in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production

and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create drawings utilizing processes such as

sketching, rendering, contour, gesture, and perspective drawing and use a variety of media such as

pencil, chalk, pastels, charcoal, and pen and ink. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural

and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and

the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and

incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries,

and studios, and identify art-related careers.

4000 Introduction to Two Dimensional Art

Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

4002 Introduction to Three Dimensional Art

Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual

Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art

criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality

works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize,

and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of

art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover

opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to

utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION (CTE) COURSES

4512 Business Math

Business Math is a course designed to prepare students for roles as entrepreneurs, producers, and

business leaders by developing abilities and skills that are part of any business environment. A solid

understanding of math including algebra, basic geometry, statistics, and probability provides the

necessary foundation for students interested in careers in business and skilled trade areas. The content

includes mathematical operations related to accounting, banking and finance, marketing, and

management. Instructional strategies should include simulations, guest speakers, tours, Internet

research, and business experiences.

4518 Introduction to Business

Introduction to Business introduces students to the world of business, including the concepts, functions,

and skills required for meeting the challenges of operating a business in the twenty- first century on a

local, national, and/or international scale. The course covers business management, entrepreneurship,

marketing fundamentals, and business ethics and law.

The course develops business vocabulary and provides an overview of business and the role that business

plays in economic, social, and political environments.

5967 Introduction to Entrepreneurship

Introduction to Entrepreneurship provides an overview of what it means to be an entrepreneur. Students

will learn about starting and operating a business, marketing products and services, and how to find

resources to help in the development of a new venture. This course is ideal for students interested in

starting their own art gallery, salon, restaurant, etc.

5914 Principles of Marketing

Principles of Marketing provides a basic introduction to the scope and importance of marketing in the

global economy. Emphasis is placed on oral and written communications, mathematical applications,

problem-solving, and critical thinking skills as they relate to advertising/promotion/selling, distribution,

financing, marketing-information management, pricing, and product/service management.

4528 Digital Applications and Responsibility

Digital Applications and Responsibility prepares students to use technology in an effective and

appropriate manner in school, in a job, or everyday life. Students develop skills related to word

processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and communications software. Students learn what it means to

be a good digital citizen and how to use technology, including social media, responsibly. Students expand

their knowledge of how to use digital devices and software to build decision-making and problem-solving

skills. Students should be provided with the opportunity to seek industry-recognized digital literacy

Certifications.

5362 Child Development

Child Development is an introductory course for all students as a life foundation and academic

enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers that draw on knowledge of

children, child development, and nurturing of children. This course addresses issues of child development

from conception/prenatal through age 3. It includes the study of prenatal development and birth; growth

and development of children; child care giving and nurturing; and support systems for parents and

caregivers. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership,

management processes, and fundamentals to college and career success is recommended in order to

integrate these topics into the study of child development. Direct, concrete mathematics and language

arts proficiencies will be applied. Authentic applications such as introductory laboratory/field experiences with young children and/or service learning that build knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children are strongly recommended. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to children, child development, and nurturing of children.

5342 Nutrition and Wellness

Nutrition and Wellness is an introductory course valuable for all students as a life foundation and

academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers related to nutrition, food,

and wellness. This is a nutrition class that introduces students to the basics of food preparation so they

can become self-sufficient in accessing healthy and nutritious foods. Major course topics include nutrition

principles and applications; influences on nutrition and wellness; food preparation, safety, and sanitation;

and science, technology, and careers in nutrition and wellness. A project-based approach that utilizes

higher order thinking, communication, leadership, management processes, and fundamentals to college

and career success is recommended in order to integrate these topics into the study of nutrition, food,

and wellness. Food preparation experiences are a required component. Direct, concrete mathematics

and language arts proficiencies will be applied. This course is the first in a sequence of courses that

provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition,

food, and wellness have the option of offering a second version of the course that is focused more on the fitness aspects of wellness and nutrition. This version may be taught within the family and consumer sciences department or it may be interdisciplinary and team taught or co-taught with a teacher licensed in physical education. Such a course may be differentiated from the regular course offering by using a subtitle in addition to Nutrition and Wellness. A student may earn credits for multiple versions of the course. No waiver is required in this instance. Local programs may offer an additional version of this course for a specific student population, for instance, seniors who have never taken nutrition or foods courses. Such a course may be differentiated from the regular course offering by using a subtitle in addition to Nutrition and Wellness. A student may earn credits for multiple versions of the course. No waiver is required in this instance.

5340 Advanced Nutrition and Wellness

Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is a course which provides an extensive study of nutrition. This course

is recommended for all students wanting to improve their nutrition and learn how nutrition affects the

body across the lifespan. Advanced Nutrition and Wellness is an especially appropriate course for

students interested in careers in the medical field, athletic training and dietetics. This course builds on

the foundation established in Nutrition and Wellness, which is a required prerequisite. This is a projectbased course; utilizing higher-order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes.

Topics include extensive study of major nutrients, nutritional standards across the lifespan, influences on

nutrition/food choices, technological and scientific influences, and career exploration in this field.

Laboratory experiences will be utilized to develop food handling and preparation skills; attention will be

given to nutrition, food safety and sanitation. This course is the second in a sequence of courses that

provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition,

food, and wellness.

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY

4540 Personal Financial Responsibility

Personal Financial Responsibility addresses the identification and management of personal financial resources to meet the financial needs and wants of individuals and families, considering a broad range of economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, and maintenance factors. This course helps students build skills in financial responsibility and decision making; analyze personal standards, needs, wants, and goals; identify sources of income, saving and investing; understand banking, budgeting, record-keeping and managing risk, insurance and credit card debt. A project based approach and applications through authentic settings such as Work-based observations and service learning experiences are appropriate. Direct, concrete applications of mathematics proficiencies in projects are enco0500 Basic Skills Development (BAS SKLS) Basic Skills Development is a multidisciplinary course that provides students continuing opportunities to develop basic skills including: (1) reading, (2) writing, (3) listening, (4) speaking, (5) mathematical computation, (6) note taking, (7) study and organizational skills, and (8) problem-solving skills, which are essential for high school course work achievement. Determination of the skills to be emphasized in this course is based on Indiana’s standards, individual school corporation general curriculum plans, and the student’s Individualized Education Programs (IEP) or other individualized plans. Skills selected for developmental work provide students with the ability to continue to learn in a range of different life situations.

5394 Preparing for College and Careers

Preparing for College and Careers addresses the knowledge, skills, and behaviors all students need to be prepared for success in college, career, and life. The focus of the course is the impact of today’s choices on tomorrow’s possibilities. Topics to be addressed include twenty- first century life and career skills; higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes; exploration of personal aptitudes, interests, values, and goals; examining multiple life roles and responsibilities as individuals and family members; planning and building employability skills; transferring school skills to life and work; and managing personal resources. This course includes reviewing the 16 national career clusters and Indiana's College and Career Pathways, in-depth investigation of one or more pathways, reviewing graduation plans, developing career plans, and developing personal and career portfolios. A project based approach, including computer and technology applications, cooperative ventures between school and community, simulations, and real life experiences, is recommended.

0500 Basic Skills Development

Basic Skills Development is a multidisciplinary course that provides students continuing opportunities to

develop basic skills including: (1) reading, (2) writing, (3) listening, (4) speaking, (5) mathematical

computation, (6) note taking, (7) study and organizational skills, and (8) problem-solving skills, which are

essential for high school course work achievement. Determination of the skills to be emphasized in this

course is based on Indiana’s standards, individual school corporation general curriculum plans, and the

student’s Individualized Education Programs (IEP) or other individualized plans. Skills selected for

developmental work provide students with the ability to continue to learn in a range of different life

situations