AP US History I                                                                                                                         Page  of

Units:

Period 1: 1491-1607

Period 2. 1607-1754

Period 3. 1754-1800

Period 4. 1800-1848

Period 5. 1844-1877



Unit Title

Period 1: 1491-1607

Timeframe 

3 weeks

Unit Summary

Students are introduced to the course and will become acclimated to the expectations and rigor of the course.  They will have an opportunity to investigate the initial interactions of European settlers and native people in the New World.  They will analyze the impact of those interactions on European explorers, European continentals, and for the native people.  To do this, an introductory study skills lesson series is woven into the unit to equip students with the requisite skills needed for successful completion of the class and top scores on the AP Exam.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How is studying history like a living investigation of cold cases?

  • What factors drove Europeans to explore the land and ultimately exploit the resources and people of the New World?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Key Concept 1.1 — As native populations migrated and settled across the vast expanse of North America over time, they developed distinct and increasingly complex societies by adapting to and transforming their diverse environments.
  • Key Concept 1.2 — Contact among Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans resulted in the Columbian Exchange and significant social, cultural, and political changes on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Different native societies adapted to and transformed their environments through innovations in agriculture, resource use, and social structure.
  • European expansion into the Western Hemisphere generated intense social, religious, political, and economic competition and changes within European societies.
  • The Columbian Exchange and development of the Spanish Empire in the Western Hemisphere resulted in extensive demographic, economic, and social changes.
  • In their interactions, Europeans and Native Americans asserted divergent worldviews regarding issues such as religion, gender roles, family, land use, and power.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

Primary Sources

  • Describe historically relevant information and/or arguments within a source.
  • Explain how a source provides information about the broader historical setting within which it was created.
  • Explain how a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience might affect a source’s meaning.
  • Explain the relative historical significance of a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience.
  • Evaluate a source’s credibility and/or limitations.

Secondary Sources

  • Describe the claim or argument of a secondary source, as well as the evidence used.
  • Describe a pattern or trend in quantitative data in non-text-based sources.
  • Explain how a historian’s claim or argument is supported with evidence.
  • Explain how a historian’s context influences the claim or argument.
  • Analyze patterns and trends in quantitative data in non-text-based sources.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of a historical claim or argument.

Writing Skills

  • Make a historically defensible claim in the form of an evaluative thesis.
  • Support an argument using specific and relevant evidence.

Study Skills

  • Note taking when reading a textbook
  • Note taking when reading a primary source
  • Note taking when listening to a video lecture
  • Note taking while in class

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Roleplay exit assessment: Students working in their groups should determine which one of the Native American societies did the best job of adapting to and transforming its environment through innovations in agriculture, resource use, and social structure providing at least one example for each category to support their conclusion. Group members may not select the society they researched.
  • Brunch exit assessment: divide students into 6-8 groups and assign students in each group one of the sample DBQ documents to analyze using the analytical skills required on the DBQ – context, audience, point of view and purpose.  Use APPARTS as a mnemonic device to help remember analysis parts.
  • Columbian Exchange FRQ writing sample
  • Concept Outline

Summative/ Benchmark

Multiple Choice Period 1 mini-test

Short Answer Question (SAQ)

Alternative Assessments

Students can consult with the teacher to design an independent research project that encompasses all of the required standards and learning objectives as set forth by the College Board AP US History Course Description.

Learning Activities

  • Provide students with the Historical Thinking Skills/Themes Chart. Ask them to research or determine the definitions of each of the skills and themes and write them on the chart.

  • To begin the course and help students understand that history is not simply “what happened in the past,” students will read “The Strange Death of Silas Deane,” available as the prologue to After the Fact by Davidson and Lytle or online by googling the title.  As students read the article, they should determine the answers to the following questions and provide one example from the reading that illustrates each of the historical thinking skills and each of the themes:

  1. Explain why the authors believe that the view that “history is what happened in the past” is, in their words, a “profoundly misleading” view of history. Do you agree with their premise?

  2. How do the authors define the word history?

  3. Identify from the reading at least 5 general tasks the historian must face if he/she is to produce history. (determining which topic to write about; locating materials on the topic; selecting materials from among available sources; analyzing available materials on the topic; determining relationships among selected data; presenting data and analyses in a coherent and intelligible manner.)

  4. “The Strange Death of Silas Deane” is a secondary historical source.  What makes it a secondary source? What is a primary source? Did the authors use any primary sources to help them write this story?  If so, please identify any primary sources they used.

  • “Speed Dating” Activity

  • Prior to the beginning of class the teacher should arrange desks in four groupings. Students should begin “Speed Dating” and be given 10-12 minutes to meet with each of the other groups and share their information. Students should take notes on their charts and locate each Native American society on their maps.

  • Brunch brought to you by the Columbian Exchange

  • Begin class by preparing two bowls of cereal – one corn based and one wheat based.  Add sugar and milk and accompany your breakfast with a cup of coffee. As students watch you eat your breakfast, explain to them that the foods you are enjoying represent some of the products transmitted in The Columbian Exchange. Prior to 1491, even if the “Old World” and the “New World” had the technology available to produce cereal, the population would not have had access to all of the basic ingredients that are part of your breakfast – corn, wheat, sugar, coffee, milk.

  • Prepare sentence strips containing the names of the various products that were traded between the Old World and the New World after 1492 using as a resource the chart in American Pageant

  • Have students categorize each product as coming from “Old World to New” or from “New World to Old” based on prior knowledge and their reading. Conduct a brief discussion in which students exchange ideas about which “world” benefited most from the Columbian Exchange.

  • Intro to APPARTS

  • Document analysis mnemonic device for Author, Place/time, Point of View, Audience (intended), Reason, The Main Idea, Significance.  

  • Working in small groups, students will use a sample DBQ document to analyze and create a poster expressing their analysis using APPARTS.

  • When students have completed their task, one member from each group should hang the group paper on the wall and present the group’s findings while students in other groups take notes on their charts. (In this activity students should present the document analysis in chronological order of the date of the documents.) After the presentations have been completed, students in their groups should write one 2 minute speech to be presented by a student other than the one who made the original presentation. The speech should be written in the first person from the point of view of the speaker and should cover the following topics in the speech:

  • Very brief background information about the speaker

  • The cultural group the speaker represented and the cultural groups(s) with whom he had the most contact

  • The speaker’s attitude regarding the members of the cultural group(s) with whom he came into contact

  • His goal during the period of contact

  •  The degree of success of the speaker in achieving his goals

  • Examples (if any) of the impact on the speaker’s culture as he interacted with the other culture(s)

  • The extent to which the cultural convergence resulted in acceptance, resistance, or accommodation

  • The speeches will summarize the lesson.

  • Students working in groups should: Select the person or group which best A) made accommodations to other cultures and B) resisted cultural change

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

American Pageant, 16th edition (AP), 2016

Documenting US History, 2016 edition

AMSCO AP US History review, 2015 edition

UC Scout University of California Scout Lectures-Online lectures

Get a Five-Online lectures

Equipment

Chromebooks

Projector

Supplemental Resources

Links to website resources located in Learning Activities

AP Institute folder from Geri Hastings

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

MIG-2.0

Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.

GEO-1.0

Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

WXT-2.0

Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

WXT-3.0

Analyze how technological innovation has affected economic development and society.

WOR-1.0

Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

MIG-1.0

Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigration’s effects on U.S. society

WXT-1.0

Explain how different labor systems developed in North America and the United States, and explain their effects on workers’ lives and U.S. society.

CUL-1.0

Explain how religious groups and ideas have affected American society and political life.

CUL-3.0

Explain how ideas about women’s rights and gender roles have affected society and politics.

CUL-4.0

Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and changed over time.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

  • Language Arts: writing, critical thinking
  • Art-portraiture, political cartoons
  • Technology Education-impact of technological advances
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 8.1

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.12.C.1 Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s or 504 plans.

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s or 504 plans.

ELLs

  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators.
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs.

END OF UNIT


COPY FROM THE LINE BELOW TO THE NEXT HORIZONTAL LINE. PASTE FOR EACH UNIT.


Unit Title

Period 2. 1607-1754

Timeframe 

8 weeks

Unit Summary

In this unit, students will learn about the colonial period prior to the French/Indian War.  Students will focus on the foundational documents as the early seeds of democracy, the regional distinctions that emerge economically and socially, and the competition among colonies’ European inhabitants and among the native people.  This competition extends into a mercantile policy tying the colonies to their European motherlands, particularly the English colonies.  Students will continue to develop as writers by focusing on the construction of a credible argument rooted in relevant, accurate historical information.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What drove Europeans to continually expand their New World settlements?

  • How did competition for resources among settlers affect American Indians?
  • What characterized the relationship(s) the colonies had with the Old World?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Key Concept 2.1 — Europeans developed a variety of colonization and migration patterns, influenced by different imperial goals, cultures, and the varied North American environments where they settled, and they competed with each other and American Indians for resources.
  • Key Concept 2.2 — The British colonies participated in political, social, cultural, and economic exchanges with Great Britain that encouraged both stronger bonds with Britain and resistance to Britain’s control.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Spanish, French, Dutch, and British colonizers had different economic and imperial goals involving land and labor that shaped the social and political development of their colonies as well as their relationships with native populations.
  • In the 17th century, early British colonies developed along the Atlantic coast, with regional differences that reflected various environmental, economic, cultural, and demographic factors.
  • Competition over resources between European rivals and American Indians encouraged industry and trade and led to conflict in the Americas.
  • Transatlantic commercial, religious, philosophical, and political exchanges led residents of the British colonies to evolve in their political and cultural attitudes as they became increasingly tied to Britain and one another.
  • Like other European empires in the Americas that participated in the Atlantic slave trade, the English colonies developed a system of slavery that reflected the specific economic, demographic, and geographic characteristics of those colonies.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

Primary Sources

  • Describe historically relevant information and/or arguments within a source.
  • Explain how a source provides information about the broader historical setting within which it was created.
  • Explain how a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience might affect a source’s meaning.
  • Explain the relative historical significance of a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience.
  • Evaluate a source’s credibility and/or limitations.

Secondary Sources

  • Describe the claim or argument of a secondary source, as well as the evidence used.
  • Describe a pattern or trend in quantitative data in non-text-based sources.
  • Explain how a historian’s claim or argument is supported with evidence.
  • Explain how a historian’s context influences the claim or argument.
  • Analyze patterns and trends in quantitative data in non-text-based sources.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of a historical claim or argument.

Writing Skills

  • Make a historically defensible claim in the form of an evaluative thesis.
  • Support an argument using specific and relevant evidence.
  • Use historical reasoning to explain relationships among pieces of historical evidence.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Assessments for Regional Geography activity:
  • Teachers can check the accuracy of the maps as they walk around the room.
  • Students should identify 2 similarities and 2 differences among the four colonial regions.  Which productive resource was in shortest supply in the British North American colonies throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries?  What type of labor systems developed in response to this shortage?
  • Take-away material for Colonial Rebellions activity
  • Mercantilism assessment
  • DBQ Period 2
  • Students will be graded only on thesis and on the accuracy of information derived from the document analysis.
  • Slavery and the Making of America journal
  • Roots Movie Guide (Google Doc)

  • Practice SAQs
  • Assessment for Great Awakening/Enlightenment activity:
  • Students should move to the side of the room representing the Great Awakening or Enlightenment that they think had the greatest impact on American society and culture from the eighteenth century to the present and be prepared to justify their choice.  After about 5 minutes of sharing, students should complete the Great Awakening/Enlightenment assessment where they categorize statements, ideas, and quotations as referring to either the Great Awakening or the Enlightenment
  • FRQ: “The years from 1607 to 1733 can be called the Era of English Settlement. Explain whether you think this label fits the era.”  Be sure to use relevant, accurate historical evidence to support your argument. Read over the rubric before and after you write to maximize your scoring potential.

Summative/ Benchmark

Joint Stock Prospectus project (primary grade)

MC Test Period 2

FRQ Period 2  

Alternative Assessments

Students can consult with the teacher to design an independent research project that encompasses all of the required standards and learning objectives as set forth by the College Board AP US History Course Description.

Learning Activities

  • Hardships faced by settlers
  • Students each one background article focused on one of the major European settlement groups: English, French, Spanish
  • Meet with small groups to discuss reading and prepare an assessment of the group’s management of those hardships.  Share assessment in class discussion.
  • After all groups have shared, students will vote in two Twitter polls through @gatorAPUSH: which group was most successful, which group would they have wanted to settle with.  In the reply, they will explain why they chose that group in 140 characters or less.
  • Pocahontas: Dispelling myths-Did Pocahontas save John Smith’s life.
  • Jamestown Murder Mystery: Correlation vs Coincidence
  • Correlation vs Causation vs Coincidence
  • CSI-style investigation and examination of evidence The Mystery of Olde Virginia
  • Read the Intro and use the clues to create a hypothesis about what happened in Virginia.
  • Get the first set of clues and complete the first set of boxes. Each clue gives them one piece of the puzzle but they will need to put them together to solve the mystery. No clue is meaningless.
  • Switch the sets of clues as small groups finish.
  • Debrief in small groups and write a thesis in response to the prompt “Why did Jamestown have such a high death rate?”:
  • Each group will post to Google Classroom Discussion Board and we will analyze and refine thesis statements as a class.
  • Analyzing evidence: Old Bones Tell Grim Tales
  • Colonial Maryland
  • The Place:         Patuxent Point, MD, the oldest colonial cemetery in Maryland
  • The Time:         1658-1685
  • The People:   Deceased former occupants of a 3 century old Calvert County Plantation
  • “When archaeologists excavated 18 graves at a Calvert County plantation a few years ago, they had no diaries, no headstones, no letters, and no church records.  There was nothing to tell the stories of those long vanished colonists.  But by studying the wear and tear and the shapes and sizes of bones, Dr. Ubelaker, an anthropologist at the Smithsonian Institution, has produced snapshots of life on a mid-17th century settlement.” (The Baltimore Sun, June 25, 1993)
  • Before you read about Dr. Ubelaker’s findings and his conclusions, examine some of the evidence he uncovered and see what conclusions you can draw.  
  • What picture of life in the 17th century Chesapeake region can you put together from the following pieces of evidence? How did geographic and environmental factors shape the development of the Chesapeake colonies (Maryland and Virginia) in North America in the 17th century?

  • Working in teams, students will act as crime scene investigators to answer the following question:

  • Explain whether the conclusions drawn from the primary source information discovered at the gravesites in colonial Maryland support, modify, or refute what has been learned about life in the Chesapeake region - colonial Virginia and colonial Maryland - from the secondary sources read. Provide at least two pieces of relevant historical evidence to support the argument.

  • If there is time students can move to a “support, modify, or refute” corner of the room and share their arguments and evidence with the class.

  • Puritans immigration

  • Push/Pull factors class brainstorming session

  • Analysis of Mayflower Compact.  Practice annotations.  Use Documenting US History pg 31-32 Doc 2.3 and have students answer I/A/E questions.

  • Puritanism

  • Puritan goals and establishment of colony

  • Analyze excerpt of “Model of Christian Charity”

  • Fundamental beliefs of Puritanism overview

  • Puritan life

  • Puritan adjective activity:  Read “Were the Puritans Puritanical?” and select 5 adjectives that describe the Puritans and/or their way of life. Do not use puritanical as one.  Then give an example to support your choices.  Massachusetts Bay Colony was a quasi-theocracy, not a theocracy.  List and explain 4 reasons for the quasi-theocracy label.  Located in Geri Hastings folder.

  • Read “Puritans and Sex” excerpt and answer questions and compare it against “American Jezebel” excerpt.  Do the authors support one another?  Refute one another?
  • Establish the reasons for each’s dissent and how they expressed that dissent.

  • Read excerpt from American Jezebel by Eve LaPlante (a descendent of Hutchinson) to establish a foundation for Puritan norms

  • Salem Witch Trials

  • Document analysis of primary and secondary sources
  • “They Called it Witchcraft” from the NY Times in Geri Hastings folder
  • Play: THE CHURCH TRIAL OF MISTRESS ANN HIBBENS in Geri Hastings folder
  • Characters: the Narrator, the Pastor, Elder Oliver, Mistress Hibbens, Brother Penn, Brother Hibbens, and the Reverend Cotton
  • Debrief the play.  What factors led to the Trials?  What impact did the trials have on the community?
  • Middle Colonies establishment and identity

  • Pennsylvania: Historical interpretations of reasons for establishment
  • Students will all read an excerpt from Penn’s The Frame of the Government of the Province of Pennsylvania in America, 1682 (attached) and think about the following questions: What does William Penn see as necessary for good government? Who does William Penn want in his colony? How does he entice new settlers?
  • In pairs, one student will read the William Penn Letter (http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/7440), while the other reads Daniel Pastorius’ “Positive Information from America” (http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/7439).
  • Students should go through the documents highlighting sections and making annotations in response to the following questions:
  • How is the land described?
  • What are some of the author's general attitudes towards the land and its natural resources?
  • What is viewed as positive? What is viewed as negative?
  • What descriptions of Native Americans and European settlers are included in the document?
  • Does the document encourage settlement in the new colony? What characteristics do you think Penn or Pastorius desire in settlers? Please include any social, religious, and ethnic characteristics that are expressed or implied (referred to indirectly, but not expressly stated) in the document.
  • Can you explain the reason(s) for the differences between these two documents?
  • What do these documents, taken together, teach us about the importance of determining an author’s perspective when using primary sources?
  • See attached chart to help organize notes: https://edsitement.neh.gov/sites/edsitement.neh.gov/files/worksheets/Charts717-01.pdf 
  • Students will share information from notes and annotations on both letters. Then they use that evidence for a debate on whether a prospective settler should emigrate to Pennsylvania. They can consider evidence that either supports immigration or discourages immigration. Partners can disagree. Students should cite the sources (either Penn or Pastorius) as evidence in the debate. One way the teacher might divide the class is into three groups: Pro-immigration, anti-immigration, and judges. It depends on the arguments students present.
  • Development of colonial regions

  • For this student-centered geography activity, students should NOT be given the objective.  They should simply be told that they are being tested on their knowledge of rudimentary geography in preparation for the AP U.S. History course. In reality they will be determining the geographical characteristics of the four colonial regions and sharing this information with their classmates. At some point during the lesson they will begin to figure this out.

  • Divide students into groups of three or four.  Small classes will need to have four groups and larger classes should have eight groups (two for each region). Distribute the appropriate regional map to each group.  Recollect the maps at the conclusion of the lesson.
  • Distribute the handout, “The Regional Geography of British Colonial America,” to each student.  Students should complete this handout working in their groups.  Each student will have a different colored pencil.  Direct all groups working on Region A to combine, and then do the same for Regions B, C, and D to evaluate the other groups’ work.
  • Complete assessments listed in the Formative Assessment section.
  • Class discussion: How does the layout of a colonial region reflect its values?  Its development?  Why?
  • Maryland Toleration Act: Rewrite the Maryland Toleration Act in 21st century language.  Evaluate the significance of this Act.

  • Rebel, Rebel...Rebellions of the Colonial Period
  • Each group will take one of the rebellions and will become an expert and then create a take-away material and workshare presentation of 5-7 minutes in length for a round-robin presentation.  
  • Bacon’s Rebellion: (1676), New York Conspiracy: (1741), Paxton Boys’ March: (1763), Regulator Movement: (1765-1771), Stono Rebellion: (1739)
  • DBQ Introduction and Instruction
  • Using the Writing Guide, review DBQ rubric.  Take students through the best-practices process of analyzing the prompt, document analysis, planning, citation of documents, and pacing for a DBQ.
  • Formative assessment on comparing colonial regions to follow lesson
  • Skills-Based Investigative Lesson: Mercantilism
  • Students will evaluate the benefits and burdens of mercantilism from the point of view of both the colonists and the mother country in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
  • Display a copy of the handout, “Mercantilism,” and review the major ideas of this economic theory with the students. Project maps showing the Triangular Trade Routes and the products exchanged.
  • Ask students whether the relationship described between the colonies and the mother country appears to be symbiotic or parasitic and why.
  • Have students working in groups complete the “Benefits and Burdens of Mercantilism” handout. Students should use information from their homework reading and the following:
  • ·      Kennedy/Cohen, American Spirit Volume I in Chapter 7 The Road to Revolution: “Virginia Resents Restrictions” and “Adam Smith’s Balance Sheet.” (primary source)
  • ·      Dollar/Reichard, American Issues in chapter 3 The Colonial Relationship Defined: “Mercantilism,” by Gerald N. Grob and George A. Billias. (secondary source)
  • ·      Kennedy/Cohen, The American Pageant 16th Edition, pp. 118-119, “The Menace and Merits of Mercantilism.”
  • When students have completed their charts, they should determine whether the colonies or the mother country benefitted the most from mercantilism and be prepared to explain their choice.
  • Slavery and the Making of America
  • The first article is the Historical Overview:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/experience/education/history.html
  • After that, visit the timeline: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/timeline/index.html Mouse over all of the dates. Obviously, we haven't learned about everything on the timeline, but you will probably be familiar with some of the events. It's a great way for you to put this information in context. In fact, you may want to bookmark it for future reference throughout the course.
  • Next, you'll navigate over to Music in Slave Life:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/experience/education/feature.html We will listen to a couple of selections, but feel free to take a listen yourself.
  • Then, go over to Personal Narratives:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/experience/education/narratives.html As part of a project from the New Deal (1930s-era federal government program to help the nation come out of the Great Depression). Testimonies from former slaves were written and recorded. Figure that if you were born in 1860 and your story was recorded in 1935, you'd be 75 years old. Portable sound recording devices were a newer piece of technology put to use to preserve former slaves' stories. This selection is from Harriet Smith. Try to listen to the selection, but the page has a transcribed version of what she said.
  • After you review these things, please respond to the following in 1-2 paragraphs: In what ways did African slaves attempt to maintain their cultural identity while enslaved? What unique cultural traits did they develop? Using whatever knowledge you have of African American culture today, what connections can you make? We will share these tomorrow.

  • Documentary: Slavery and the Making of America Episode 1: 1619-1750--Establishment of colonial slavery (stop at 38:24)

  • Slavery and the Making of America-Daily Reactions: Following each day’s viewing, write a reaction on what you saw. Label each section with the date. Submit at the end of the viewing series.  (Google Doc with the same title)

  • Roots

  • Selections from ROOTS over three days: birth/naming, becoming a man, capture on the beach, Lord Ligonier hiring captain, loading of slaves, examination of below deck, middle passage, slave auction, arrival on plantation, slave girl brought to overseer, Kunta and Fiddler discussing girl and overseer's "relationship," (tell them about escape), being brought back from escape, Fiddler talking to master, "Toby" scene.

  • Roots Movie Guide (Google Doc)--Complete this as we watch selections from the television mini-series ROOTS. You will submit for a grade at the conclusion of the viewing.

  • Virginia Slave codes historical investigation--activity includes slave codes that have been reordered similarly to the Jamestown Murder Mystery
  • This time, you'll be looking at slave codes. Instead of paper envelopes, you have a Google Form which is set up like a virtual envelope with clues you'll extract one at a time.
  • Link to slave code form: https://goo.gl/forms/DsRXroPfg5SKpc2M2
  • Introduction to the SAQ: format, expectations, ways to score points.  Write one in class.  The other will be for homework.  Both will be scored.
  • Great Awakening:
  • The pdf students need is hyperlinked throughout the instructions, but they can download the whole thing by clicking here: http://edsitement.neh.gov/sites/edsitement.neh.gov/files/worksheets/Religion02.pdf 
  • ACTIVITY #1: Begin by reading the background information on Jonathan Edwards and the Great Awakening: http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel02.html on "Religion in 18th Century America." Then read "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" while watching this dramatic reading: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03OjTtoJjZQ Start the audio at 1:45 to match your reading on pg. 4 of the pdf. Stop at 9:04. (Now, it doesn't follow exactly, but it's darn close! Remember, he gave this sermon hundreds of times. Ever try to tell the exact same story even twice? It doesn't always match word-for-word.) After reading/listening, do the activity on pg. 1 and 2. If you struggle with the column on the right, that's ok. Just make sure the left column is all done. You can discuss the column on the right with group members in class.
  • ACTIVITY #2: Begin by reading: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5711, an account of George Whitefield in Connecticut. Do the three questions on pg. 6 of the pdf. Then, read the excerpt on George Whitefield's background.
  • ACTIVITY #3: Students will examine Sansom Occom's short autobiography, in which he describes his difficulties in making a living, his experiences as an Indian minister, and his poor treatment at the hands of the religious establishment. Occom (sometimes spelled Occum) is one of the most historically significant Native Americans who converted during the Great Awakening. In 1740, at the age of sixteen, he met Eleazar Wheelock, an enthusiastic Congregational preacher and a notable missionary to Native Americans. At the age of twenty, Occom went to live with Wheelock. After four years under Wheelock's tutelage, Occom departed to start his own work as a Christian missionary to Indians in New England and on Long Island. Occom was officially ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1759 on Long Island. In 1769, with funds partially raised by Occom, Wheelock founded Dartmouth College. The founding charter of Dartmouth declared one of the college's purposes to be "the education and instruction of Youth of the Indian Tribes in this Land ... and also of English Youth and any others.”
  • Read the preface to Samsom Occom's autobiography "I believe It Is Because I Am a Poor Indian" located here: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5788
  • Categorize Samsom Occom's autobiography according to "Major Events," "Religious Practices or Influences," and "Occom's Personal Reflections." Complete the worksheet located on page 8 of the Text Document to help you better comprehend the three time periods outlined in his autobiography:
  • From my Birth till I received the Christian Religion
  • From the Time of our Reformation till I left Mr. Wheelock
  • From the Time I left Mr. Wheelock till I went to Europe
  • Great Awakening and the Enlightenment: Did the Great Awakening or the Enlightenment have the greater influence on American society and culture from the 18th century to the present?
  • Divide the class into two groups.  One group will argue that the Great Awakening had a greater influence on American society and culture from the 18th century to the present than did the Enlightenment. The other group will argue that the Enlightenment had a greater influence on American society from the 18th century to the present than did the First Great Awakening.
  • Students must provide relevant historical evidence to support their assertions and go into depth when explaining their ideas.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

American Pageant, 16th edition (AP), 2016

Documenting US History, 2016 edition

AMSCO AP US History review, 2015 edition

UC Scout University of California Scout Lectures-Online lectures Chapter 2, Lessons 4-6 and Chapter 3, Lessons 7-8

Get a Five-Online lectures

Equipment

Chromebooks

Projector

Supplemental Resources

Links to website resources located in Learning Activities

AP Institute folder from Geri Hastings

APUSH Writing Guide by Diana Jordan from the Arlington, VA Public School District, edited by Denise Kane with help from guidelines by John P. Irish and John Henderson

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

MIG-1.0:

Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigration’s effects on U.S. society.

WOR-1.0

Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

NAT-1.0

Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

WXT-2.0

Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

MIG-2.0

Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.

GEO-1.0

Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

CUL-4.0

Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and changed over time.

POL-1.0

Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.

CUL-1.0

Explain how religious groups and ideas have affected American society and political life.

CUL-2.0

Explain how artistic, philosophical, and scientific ideas have developed and shaped society and institutions.

WXT-1.0

Explain how different labor systems developed in North America and the United States, and explain their effects on workers’ lives and U.S. society.

CUL-3.0

Explain how ideas about women’s rights and gender roles have affected society and politics.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

  • Language Arts: writing, critical thinking
  • Art-portraiture, political cartoons
  • Technology Education-impact of technological advances
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.
  • and employability.

Technology Standards - 8.1

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.12.C.1 Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s or 504 plans.

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s or 504 plans.

ELLs

  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs.

END OF UNIT


Unit Title

Period 3. 1754-1800

Timeframe 

9 Weeks

Unit Summary

This unit focuses on the examination of foundational documents and American political philosophy.  The majority of the period centers around the American Revolution and early republic.  Students will focus on examining competing points of view and historical interpretations.  

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

How do the colonies mobilize and overthrow the British government?

Was the American Revolution a coup or a natural step in a developmental process?

What resources did the founders consult to inspire the content of key foundational document and why?

What events in colonial history were directly addressed in the Constitution and its first 10 amendments and why?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Key Concept 3.1 — British attempts to assert tighter control over its North American colonies and the colonial resolve to pursue self-government led to a colonial independence movement and the Revolutionary War.
  • Key Concept 3.2 — The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.
  • Key Concept 3.3 — Migration within North America and competition over resources, boundaries, and trade intensified conflicts among peoples and nations.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The competition among the British, French, and American Indians for economic and political advantage in North America culminated in the Seven Years’ War (the French and Indian War), in which Britain defeated France and allied American Indians.
  • The desire of many colonists to assert ideals of self-government in the face of renewed British imperial efforts led to a colonial independence movement and war with Britain.
  • The ideals that inspired the revolutionary cause reflected new beliefs about politics, religion, and society that had been developing over the course of the 18th century.
  • After declaring independence, American political leaders created new constitutions and declarations of rights that articulated the role of the state and federal governments while protecting individual liberties and limiting both centralized power and excessive popular influence.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

Primary Sources

  • Describe historically relevant information and/or arguments within a source.
  • Explain how a source provides information about the broader historical setting within which it was created.
  • Explain how a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience might affect a source’s meaning.
  • Explain the relative historical significance of a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience.
  • Evaluate a source’s credibility and/or limitations.

Secondary Sources

  • Describe the claim or argument of a secondary source, as well as the evidence used.
  • Describe a pattern or trend in quantitative data in non-text-based sources.
  • Explain how a historian’s claim or argument is supported with evidence.
  • Explain how a historian’s context influences the claim or argument.
  • Analyze patterns and trends in quantitative data in non-text-based sources.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of a historical claim or argument.

Writing Skills

  • Make a historically defensible claim in the form of an evaluative thesis.
  • Support an argument using specific and relevant evidence.
  • Use historical reasoning to explain relationships among pieces of historical evidence.
  • Consider ways that diverse or alternative evidence could be used to qualify or modify an argument.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • SAQ #1 and #4 on pg 82-83 of AMSCO.  When finished, tell students to pick the stronger of the two for grading.  Collect for pop quiz grade.
  • American Revolution Debate prep
  • Students will be assigned an historical character for this, the first AP U.S. History debate.  Using at least one primary source and a minimum of two secondary sources (no traditional encyclopedias or textbooks either online or in print may be cited as sources), students should:
  • 1 - identify their historical character as pro- separation or pro- remaining loyal to England.
  • 2 - identify the colony or country from which their character came.
  • 3 - identify their character’s occupation and socio-economic background, especially any governmental offices which the person has held, and the time period in which he held them. (Please confine the character’s occupations to the period between 1760- May, 1776).
  • 4 - become totally familiar with the person’s arguments for or against colonial independence.
  • 5 - discover what happened to the individual once American independence was declared ( ie., did he go to Canada or to England; did he fight for the colonists or the British etc.?).
  • 6 - identify pamphlets and other works your character has written on this issue.
  • 7 - identify those people who are your allies, and those against whom you will be debating
  • 8 - complete a formal resume (see the sample resume you have been given) for your historical character; resumes must contain a bibliography of at least 3 sources in correct MLA bibliographic format.
  • The task is to use documents and write a short SPEECH (NOT an essay--it's why SPEECH is in capital letters) in response to the question: How Revolutionary was the American Revolution?
  • DBQ: Articles of Confederation
  • Constitution scavenger hunt
  • Constitution debate prep
  • Constitution SAQ

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Annotated Timeline of Pre-Revolutionary War events
  • American Revolution Debate
  • Creative interpretation of content of Constitution
  • Constitution debate
  • MC Test
  • SAQ Test

Alternative Assessments

Students have the opportunity to choose how they present their creative interpretation of the Constitution.

Students can select format of Pre-Revolutionary Timeline.

There are many different roles to select from in the debates and role plays.

Learning Activities

  • How were North American alliances forged between Europeans and Native Americans?  
  • Why was the Ohio Valley so important to control?  
  • How did settlement of the New World push the mother countries closer to conflict?
  • F/I War Organizer: complete in pairs on Google Docs.  Assign groups in pairs.
  • Map analysis of colonies pre-French/Indian War
  • +What were British colonial leaders, American colonists, and Native Americans each looking for in North America?
  • +What were their political goals?
  • +How did they hope to achieve them?
  • +How did they want political life in America to be organized?
  • +What rules did they want?
  • The documents are:
  • Causes of the American Revolution from Geri Hastings folder: Document analysis in small groups examining conflicting historians’ viewpoints
  •  Advantages and Disadvantages on the eve of Revolution
  • Compare and contrast the British and American advantages and disadvantages at the beginning of the war using 2 t-charts.  Allow each student 16 minutes (4 minutes per column) to work independently and prepare for discussion.  For the remainder of the period, solicit student input.  Post jpgs of results after discussion.  Wrap-up: Setting aside the fact that we know how the Revolutionary War ends, at the beginning of the war, which side is likely to win and why?
  • American Revolution Debate: Should the colonies declare their independence and separate from England?
  • Time Frame: May, 1776 (This date is after the Battles of Lexington and Concord and the publication of Common Sense and before the Declaration of Independence was written.)
  • Place: London, England
  • Debate Moderator: King George III of England
  • Scenario: In May, 1776, King George III invites a diverse group of notable men from both sides of the Atlantic to come to London to participate in a round table debate which will focus on whether the American colonies should declare their independence and separate from the mother country or remain loyal to England.
  • (Formative assessment) Students will be assigned an historical character for this, the first AP U.S. History debate.  Using at least one primary source and a minimum of two secondary sources (no traditional encyclopedias or textbooks either online or in print may be cited as sources), students should:
  • 1 - identify their historical character as pro- separation or pro- remaining loyal to England.
  • 2 - identify the colony or country from which their character came.
  • 3 - identify their character’s occupation and socio-economic background, especially any governmental offices which the person has held, and the time period in which he held them. (Please confine the character’s occupations to the period between 1760- May, 1776).
  • 4 - become totally familiar with the person’s arguments for or against colonial independence.
  • 5 - discover what happened to the individual once American independence was declared ( ie., did he go to Canada or to England; did he fight for the colonists or the British etc.?).
  • 6 - identify pamphlets and other works your character has written on this issue.
  • 7 - identify those people who are your allies, and those against whom you will be debating
  • 8 - complete a formal resume (see the sample resume you have been given) for your historical character; resumes must contain a bibliography of at least 3 sources in correct MLA bibliographic format.
  • Continental Congresses: Complete the T-chart listing the events that took place during the 1st and 2nd continental Congresses and documents that came out of the Congresses.
  • Then read and annotate the Declaration of Independence using the Comments feature in Google docs. A sample is included. Things to consider while reading/annotating: What are the sections? How is this Declaration like an argumentative essay? If you were to group the grievances (complaints/accusations) by category, what would call those categories?
  • Complete Declaration of Independence Study Guide in Geri Hastings folder.
  • Comparing viewpoints: Was the Revolution inevitable?
  • Read pg 156 in American Pageant.  Summarize each viewpoint: Whig, Imperial, Progressive, Progressive Revival (neoprogressives).  Then read Was the Revolution Inevitable--UK perspective.pdf.  Compare/contrast with American viewpoints.  
  • Evolution of American political philosophy
  • Pairs will read and analyze documents and teach the class about the impact of the changes in colonial taxation. Relate each document to previous reading on Common Sense.
  • When finished, create a Google Doc and write a 2 paragraph summary of American political philosophy as you see it developing through these documents. You must have a thesis to help focus your argument because the goal is to prove a particular point. When you use a document to support your thesis, be sure to cite your evidence within the text like this. [Doc 4.4] Additionally, remember, with a DBQ, you DO NOT QUOTE directly from the text, nor summarize the document. Your job is to focus on the significance of the document and use its information to prove your point. Things to consider when writing:
  • Author’s POV (biases)
  • Author’s purpose in writing (intention)
  • Author’s reason for writing (motivation)
  • Historical context of the piece (what inspired the document’s creation? what might have resulted because of the publication of the document--did it cause a change/event in history?)
  • Political influences on Declaration of independence: Much of the language and many of the ideas in the Declaration can be found in other documents, to which Jefferson and the other writers had access. In this activity, you will be able to see these influences and understand the evolution of ideas over time that culminated in the Declaration.
  • As students read each of the four documents, they will search for the portion of the Declaration that was influenced by the document's text. They will compare the Declaration's ideas with these other documents. They should analyze the extent of the connection and influence of the ideas in the document to the wording in specific sections of the Declaration.
  • In addition, students will fill in the accompanying chart to document the accumulation of ideas leading to the Declaration. Revisit the annotated Declaration of Independence you previously created.
  • Using the attached Google Doc, students will post their explanation of their ranking of the documents that MOST influences the Declaration of Independence to the one that influences the least. Influence can mean direct text or philosophy.
  • Class discussion: Conclusion of the war: Terms of the Treaty of Paris (1783)
  • What problems did this treaty solve?  What problems do you think it created?
  • Analyzing evidence: Articles of Confederation
  • Provide students with a map of the United States during the period 1783-1787 and have them make some observations about the state of the country at this time. (foreign powers –Spain, England – surrounded the United States; states were in conflict over territory; some states claimed a great amount of territory while others had much less; states ceded territory to the central government, but not right away)  Ask: What problems did the situations above cause?
  • Have students work in groups as they read through the excerpts from the Articles of Confederation and answer the related questions. Check student answers as you circulate around the room.  It is unnecessary to review all the answers.  Just discuss question 12 with the students.
  • Assess this portion of the lesson by having students read the handout “Quotations Regarding the Articles of Confederation.” Ask: In what ways are the quotations similar?  In what ways are they different?  How might one account for the similarities and differences? How do the quotations relate to the questions about the Articles?
  • Explain to students that they will be analyzing primary source documents about the Articles of Confederation in order to determine to what extent they were effective. (Provide each student with a copy of the graphic organizer.)  Provide each group with a folder containing copies of one document. Students in each group should read their assigned document and determine to what extent the document shows the Articles as an effective government.  They should provide evidence to support their answers.  Have one or more members of each group provide answers to the categories on the graphic organizer and present the group’s conclusions.
  • Butterfly T-chart: Analyzing strengths and weaknesses of Articles of Confederation as well as Challenges faced during the AoC time and how they were overcome.  Stored on Google Drive as AoC Butterfly T-Chart.
  • Complications of new government
  • Creating the Constitution
  • Create a graphic organizer that compares and contrasts the Virginia and New Jersey Plans.  Students could do a Venn diagram, make a table by category, or make a T-chart.
  • Debate Question: Should the Constitution of the United States be ratified?
  • Time Frame: October, 1787
  • Place: Philadelphia, PA
  • Debate Moderator: George Washington
  • Scenario: Although in reality the Constitution had to be ratified by each state in special ratifying conventions called expressly for that purpose, this is a hypothetical debate in which Federalist and Anti-Federalist leaders from many states have assembled to discuss their beliefs and air their grievances.
  • Content Information:  Students will be assigned an historical character for this AP U.S. History debate.  Using at least one primary source and a minimum of two secondary sources (no traditional encyclopedias, internet encyclopedias, or your textbook; at least one print source must be used and listed), students should:
  • 1- identify their character as Federalist or Anti-Federalist.
  • 2- identify the state which their character represents - with particular attention to the state’s geography, economy, population and social structure.
  • 3- identify the character’s occupation and socio-economic background
  • 4- discover whether the character was a member of the Constitutional Convention what his role was at the convention.  If the person was not a member of the Convention find out why.
  • 5- determine whether the character was a member of the state’s ratifying convention and how he voted.
  • 6- analyze and evaluate the character’s arguments for and against ratification.
  • Alternate perspectives on revolution, ratification, and the republic:
  • Women: DocUSHist5-5and5-7.pdf (Abigail Adams--Remember the Ladies)
  • Slaves/Africans: DocUSHist5-13.pdf (abolition in PA 1780) (compared against Phillis Wheatley's poem DocUSHist5-3 in one of the questions)
  • International: DocUSHist5-17.pdf (Haiti)
  • Do any of these influence the construction and administration of the US Constitution?
  • Emergence of political parties
  • Hamilton vs. Jefferson: How were the ideas of  Alexander Hamilton similar to or different from the ideas of Thomas Jefferson?
  • After watching play respond to question posed by moderator: And now it is up to you, the American people, to predict whether America will follow the Hamiltonian model or the Jeffersonian model, and whether the controversy between strict and loose construction will ever subside.
  • Washington’s domestic and foreign concerns
  • Mini-lecture--Domestic issue to highlight: Judiciary Act of 1789, Whiskey Rebellion, National Bank
  • Farewell Address
  • Identify major issues of the election of 1800 as a group.  
  • Divide students into a collective Adams and a collective Jefferson.  Have them assemble positions on major issues of the day.  Brief debate: position on domestic issues, position on relationships with England and with France.
  • Results of election: use Transition of Power from History channel: 14:48-15:50 http://www.history.com/specials/transition-of-power-the-presidency/full-special
  • Each student will be assigned to read a part of Thomas Jefferson's First Inaugural Address. Using the comments feature in Google Docs, they will annotate one of five assigned sections. When they reassemble as a group, each will explain what you read and will come up with a summarized version of Thomas Jefferson's message.
  • A 6th section is a biography on Thomas Jefferson located here: http://www.biography.com/people/thomas-jefferson-9353715#synopsis. This person’s job will be to listen to the group and explain, based on Jefferson’s background, what likely influenced his message (as related by classmates). In addition, share 5 cool facts about Jefferson that give some insight into the man himself.
  • REVIEW QUESTIONS
  • 1. Did Jefferson speak of continuity or change?
  • 2. How did he define the president’s powers and relationship with the legislative branch?
  • 3. How did he define the federal government’s power and responsibilities?
  • 4. Did he speak of or imply a belief in American exceptionalism?
  • 5. Were the sentiments expressed in this address in agreement with his earlier opinions?
  • Lesson plan based on: http://www.whitehousehistory.org/teacher-resources/the-revolution-of-1801-thomas-jeffersons-first-inaugural-address
  • Discuss the following:
  • Jefferson is considered one of America's greatest writers. His inaugural address is filled with beautifully constructed thoughts, well expressed. Several phrases are still quoted today: "entangling alliances"; "every difference of opinion is not a difference of principle"; and "we are all Republicans, we are all Federalists." Consider the historical context of these phrases and discuss the meanings behind them.
  • Consider Jefferson's agenda. Find phrases and sections in which he discusses his views of the American republic and highlight them. For example, where does he discuss his tax policy, states rights, foreign policy, debt reduction? Create a list of policy topics accompanied by Jefferson's language, then use 21st-century "straight talk" to interpret the president's text. Go further and compare these policies to those of the Federalists.
  • Jefferson acknowledges the audience, Congress, in his inaugural speech. He also refers to George Washington ("our first and greatest revolutionary character"). Does he mention his predecessor, John Adams? Does he refer to Adams's policies? What do you make of this? How do modern presidents acknowledge their political opponents and their viewpoints?

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

American Pageant, 16th edition (AP), 2016

Documenting US History, 2016 edition

AMSCO AP US History review, 2015 edition

UC Scout University of California Scout Lectures-Online lectures, Chapter 3, Lesson 9, Chapter 4, Lessons 10-11, Chapter 5, Lessons 12-15, Chapter 6, Lessons 16-19

Get a Five-Online lectures

Equipment

Chromebooks

Projector

Supplemental Resources

Links to website resources located in Learning Activities

AP Institute folder from Geri Hastings

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

MIG-2.0

Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.

WOR-1.0

Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

NAT-1.0

Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

POL-2.0

Explain how popular movements, reform efforts, and activist groups have sought to change American society and institutions.

CUL-1.0

Explain how religious groups and ideas have affected American society and political life.

CUL-3.0

Explain how ideas about women’s rights and gender roles have affected society and politics.

NAT-2.0

Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.

POL-1.0

Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.

POL-3.0

Explain how different beliefs about the federal government’s role in U.S. social and economic life have affected political debates and policies.

WXT-2.0

Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

WXT-1.0

Explain how different labor systems developed in North America and the United States, and explain their effects on workers’ lives and U.S. society.

CUL-2.0

Explain how artistic, philosophical, and scientific ideas have developed and shaped society and institutions.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

  • Language Arts: writing, critical thinking
  • Art-portraiture, political cartoons
  • Technology Education-impact of technological advances
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 8.1

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.12.C.1 Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.12.D.4 Research and understand the positive and negative impact of one’s digital footprint.

8.1.12.D.5 Analyze the capabilities and limitations of current and emerging technology resources and assess their potential to address personal, social, lifelong learning, and career needs.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.12.E.1 Produce a position statement about a real world problem by developing a systematic plan of investigation with peers and experts synthesizing information from multiple sources.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s or 504 plans.

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s or 504 plans.

ELLs

  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs.

END OF UNIT


Unit Title

Period 4. 1800-1848

Timeframe 

11 weeks

Unit Summary

This unit focuses on the changes that took place prior to the Civil War as the United States was coming into its own as a nation economically and politically.  The nation also became more attractive as a destination to the rest of the world, attracting immigrants.  As De Tocqueville said, the era was marked by “equality of condition,” but was it?  This unit also looks at the deep entrenchment of slavery into the nation’s fabric and how its continuance was dividing the nation.  This unit also provides the first real opportunity to examine the historical thinking skill of continuity and change over time.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What influence did rapidly developing technological advances have on the nation’s labor systems?
  • How did increased immigration influence voter participation and the political party system?
  • How did the transition from mercantilism to a market economy affect American society?
  • Why did the American government begin to expand the original territory ceded in the Treaty of Paris (1783)?
  • How and why do sectional struggles begin to occur?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • Key Concept 4.1 — The United States began to develop a modern democracy and celebrated a new national culture, while Americans sought to define the nation’s democratic ideals and change their society and institutions to match them.
  • Key Concept 4.2 — Innovations in technology, agriculture, and commerce powerfully accelerated the American economy, precipitating profound changes to U.S. society and to national and regional identities.
  • Key Concept 4.3 — The U.S. interest in increasing foreign trade and expanding its national borders shaped the nation’s foreign policy and spurred government and private initiatives.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • The nation’s transition to a more participatory democracy was achieved by expanding suffrage from a system based on property ownership to one based on voting by all adult white men, and it was accompanied by the growth of political parties.
  • While Americans embraced a new national culture, various groups developed distinctive cultures of their own.
  • Increasing numbers of Americans, many inspired by new religious and intellectual movements, worked primarily outside of government institutions to advance their ideals.
  • New transportation systems and technologies dramatically expanded manufacturing and agricultural production.
  • The changes caused by the market revolution had significant effects on U.S. society, workers’ lives, and gender and family relations.
  • Economic development shaped settlement and trade patterns, helping to unify the nation while also encouraging the growth of different regions.
  • Struggling to create an independent global presence, the United States sought to claim territory throughout the North American continent and promote foreign trade.
  • The United States’s acquisition of lands in the West gave rise to contests over the extension of slavery into new territories.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

Primary Sources

  • Describe historically relevant information and/or arguments within a source.
  • Explain how a source provides information about the broader historical setting within which it was created.
  • Explain how a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience might affect a source’s meaning.
  • Explain the relative historical significance of a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience.
  • Evaluate a source’s credibility and/or limitations.

Secondary Sources

  • Describe the claim or argument of a secondary source, as well as the evidence used.
  • Describe a pattern or trend in quantitative data in non-text-based sources.
  • Explain how a historian’s claim or argument is supported with evidence.
  • Explain how a historian’s context influences the claim or argument.
  • Analyze patterns and trends in quantitative data in non-text-based sources.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of a historical claim or argument.

Writing Skills

  • Make a historically defensible claim in the form of an evaluative thesis.
  • Support an argument using specific and relevant evidence.
  • Use historical reasoning to explain relationships among pieces of historical evidence.
  • Consider ways that diverse or alternative evidence could be used to qualify or modify an argument.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • FRQ: Compare the political objectives and the economic goals of the United States and Great Britain heading into and during the War of 1812.
  • MC Quiz: Jefferson and Madison.
  • Revolution of 1800
  • Louisiana Purchase
  • Foreign relations
  • War of 1812
  • 2nd National Bank
  • Analyze the extent to which TWO of the following influenced the development of democracy between 1820 and 1840.
  • Jacksonian economic policy            
  • Changes in electoral politics
  • Second Great Awakening                  

OR

  • Compare and contrast the presidencies of Jefferson and Jackson with respect to TWO of the following:
  • Constitutional interpretation
  • The power of the common man in decision-making
  • Expansion of the electorate (increase in voter participation)
  • Freed slave city recommendation (work product formats will vary)

Summative/ Benchmark

  • Reformer’s Convocation
  • Freed slave city recommendation (work product formats will vary)
  • MC Test
  • FRQ Test

Alternative Assessments

  • Formats of projects and roles played are negotiable

Learning Activities

  • Substitute writing assignment in step 7 for this: Directions: Please respond in writing to the following prompt: “Did Federalists oppose the Louisiana Purchase for practical or political reasons? In other words, did the Federalists have real concerns over the purchase of the Louisiana Territory or did they just hate Jefferson?” Must include: 1. Background on the Louisiana Purchase (what was it, who bought it, why?) 2. Make a claim statement: ex. “The Federalists had valid concerns over the Louisiana Purchase” or “The Federalists only opposed Jefferson’s decision over the Louisiana Purchase because they did not like him.” 3. Include three pieces of textual evidence to support your claim. The evidence must come from Doc. A and Doc. B (at least one from each). 4. You must “interact” with the quotes (explain and further develop the ideas- don’t just state the evidence and leave it.) 5. At least three paragraphs- one intro and two evidence.
  • Ask students to predict consequences of the Louisiana Purchase.
  • Lewis and Clark Structured Academic Controversy
  • Class discussion-Revisit Jefferson’s inaugural address and ask students to assess his first term on domestic policy
  • Foreign policy: Causation
  • Everyone will read the attachment on Early Foreign Policy. After that, students are in three groups looking at different aspects of foreign policy in the Jefferson era and how they will contribute to Madison's foreign policy.
  • In what ways did JEFFERSON'S foreign policy contribute to the War of 1812?
  • In what ways did MADISON'S foreign policy contribute to the War of 1812?
  • Organizing and categorizing historical evidence
  • Working as a team, write lists of causes, effects, and complicating issues of the War of 1812.  Transfer to sentence strips.
  • Students work in teams to organize evidence strips into categories to practice appropriate selection of evidence and historical argumentation.
  • The period of the War of 1812 is considered by many historians to be a second war for American independence.  Support, refute, or modify this statement.
  • Surprise FRQ on a very similar topic using the same evidence will follow lesson.
  • Burgeoning National Economy
  • Class discussion-National Bank
  • Trace the reasons for the establishment of the 1st national bank and compare them with the 2nd national bank.
  • American System
  • Was there an industrial revolution?
  • http://edsitement.neh.gov/sites/edsitement.neh.gov/files/worksheets/IndRev9-12_2.pdf

  • Adopt a persona of a person working before the Civil War.  Speaking in the first person, students will interview one another while in character and record the conversation on a worksheet.  Debrief and answer the topic question: Was there an industrial revolution?
  • Hand-made and Store-Bought Goods.  By 1840, goods people had previously made for themselves were sold cheaply enough at stores to make the purchase worthwhile.
  • A New Mode of Production: the "American system of manufactures"
  • One of the reasons store-bought goods became inexpensive was the development of the American system of manufactures, in which individual workers made only part of a finished product. This differed from earlier practices, in which someone skilled in a craft, toiling at home or in a shop, started with raw materials and worked through the entire creative process alone.
  • Read the attached articles, "The Two Countries That Invented the Industrial Revolution" and "Economic Growth and the Early Industrial Revolution."
  • Analyzing the Products of Industry
  • You can claim one of five topics and will complete the attached activity called Industrial Advances in the “Industrial Revolution” and in the “Industrial Age”.  More specific instructions are located in the attached activity.  Be sure that you complete your portion of the chart at the end of the activity and be prepared to share it with the class as part of the discussion.  Do not do the discussion questions on the last page.  We will do those after discussing as a group.
  • Factories and Machines
  • Transportation
  • Scientific Innovations
  • Agriculture
  • Communication
  • John Marshall and the Marshall Court
  • Background biography
  • Formative Events in the Life of John Marshall worksheet
  • Important cases of the Marshall Court and accompanying assessment
  • How did the Marshall Court support business?
  • Jackson’s Presidency
  • -Ideals
  • -Likely party member descriptions
  • Trial of Andrew Jackson
  • Investigative Question: How did Andrew Jackson’s political beliefs and view of the presidency impact American society and American political life?
  • Part 1
  • It will be your responsibility, as a member of the House Committee on Impeachment, to write 4-5 articles of impeachment, each of which must contain a specific charge against the President.  As you will be working with other members of the House committee, the number of articles you write will depend on the number of members in your group.  If your group has 4 members, you must write 4 articles of impeachment.  If your group has 5 members, you must write 5 articles.  Each article of impeachment must be explained and numbered.
  • Next, the group should develop a list of witnesses for and against the President.  You will need a witness list of 8-10 people on each side along with a brief explanation of why you have chosen them, who they are, and to which political party each witness belongs (if that information is available).  Be sure to state which witnesses are for the defense and which witnesses are for the prosecution.  Each group may use no more than one generic person, ie. a farmer, a Native American etc.  Each witness may be used to support or refute only one charge.  Place the number of the charge next to the name of the witness.
  • Sources may include your presidential outline, your textbook, books containing primary sources, and the internet.
  • Part 2
  • It is January 2, 1835 and Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States has been impeached by the House of Representatives. Two days later, he is brought before the Senate.  You will relive this historic and totally fictitious moment.
  • The trial will begin on or about the following date: ____________________________
  • Be ready!  On that date the two defense attorneys and the two prosecuting attorneys will interview prospective witnesses.  They will decide which witnesses they plan to call and together decide on the order of witnesses in the trial.  Tentatively, the charges against the president are as follows:
  • Destroying the government service by appointing people to public jobs without consideration of merit.
  • Destroying the separation of powers by illegally expanding the powers of the executive.
  • Destroying the federal system of government by eroding the power of state governments.
  • Undermining the U.S. economy by ill-advised and politically motivated actions.
  • Causing sectional strains by mishandling matters in Texas.
  • Failing to carry out the principles of the Declaration of Independence regarding African-Americans, Native Americans, women, laborers, Mormons, Catholics, and others similarly without power.
  • 2nd Great Awakening and its influence
  • DeTocqueville’s Democracy in America: APPARTS the introduction.  Why is “equality of condition” such an important phrase at this time?
  • Background on Reformers and their causes
  • Read article excerpts and complete the assessment for “A PORTRAIT OF THE REFORMERS”
  • The following excerpts are taken from an article by David Donald called “Toward a Reconsideration of the Abolitionists.”  At the time this article was published Dr. Donald was a Professor of History at The Johns Hopkins University.
  • Read pages 320-333 in American Pageant. Attached is a Reformers to Know chart. Many, but not all, of the reformers are mentioned in the reading. Each of you will be assigned a collection of reformers. You will research these people, complete the boxes on the chart, and be prepared to share your findings with the class.
  • Reformers' elevator pitch
  • Audience: white male
  • Time: 1840
  • Adopt one of the major reform issues of the day (women's, temperance, education, prison/mental health, environmentalism/hygiene--but NOT abolition--separate project later).  You can choose to be a particular person or a combination of people.  Explain the goals of your reform(s) and methods you plan to use/used in the past.
  • Format: 2:00 elevator pitch
  • Reformers Convocation
  • Date: December 22, 1835
  • Dear (reformer’s name):
  • It has come to my attention that you have made an inquiry concerning plans for spending the current White House budget surplus.  Please plan to attend a Reformers’ Convocation at the White House, date and time to be announced, at which you will be asked to discuss the following:
  • The reform movement of which you are a proponent
  • Your relationship to the movement, your occupational background, and the state in which you live
  • Your accomplishments in pursuit of the movement’s goals
  • Ways in which you think that the federal government, specifically the president, can advance the goals of your movement (i.e., financial support, emotional support, proposing legislation, preventing harassment etc.)
  •  Because of my busy schedule and the number of people seeking a meeting with me, please plan to limit your remarks to three minutes.  Also be prepared to ask two questions of members of different groups and to answer questions that will be posed to you by those in attendance from other groups.  A personal resume with at least three references, two index cards (each containing one question to be asked of other attendees), and this letter will gain you admission to the convocation.  Refreshments will be served.
  • Respectfully,

Andrew Jackson

President of the United States

  • Expansion of the franchise
  • Monroe Doctrine
  • Emergence of Sectionalism
  • The Missouri Compromise: Mapping the Slavery Controversy in 1820
  • The Missouri Compromise: A Textual Analysis
  • The Autobiography of Frederick Douglass Socratic Seminar Lesson Plan:  Geri Hastings
  • Students will participate in a Socratic Seminar based on the reading of The Autobiography of Frederick Douglass and  primary source documents written by apologists  for slavery  in order to evaluate both the role this book played in the anti-slavery movement and arguments for and against the institution of slavery.
  • Slavery and the Making of America
  • Episode 3: Political debates about slavery in the early expansion period.
  •  Working in groups of 4-5 persons, it will be your job to complete this project which will determine where Mary Johnson (a freed woman) should begin her new life.
  • The options are: Baltimore, Maryland
  • Boston, Massachusetts
  • New York, New York
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Canada – any area
  • Each group member will research one of the 4 or 5 localities and making a final determination about which locality will be the best choice for the Johnson family. You will need to research the following for the location you have been assigned:
  • economic opportunities available for formerly enslaved persons including jobs and housing
  • social and political opportunities available for formerly enslaved persons
  • the laws of the locality and court cases that have been decided regarding the status of free African Americans and formerly enslaved persons
  • the advantages and disadvantages of the locality for a formerly enslaved person who desires a good quality of life
  • The group, working together, will evaluate the locations and determine the place to which Mary Johnson should move.  Reasons for the final decision must be provided. Remember that the Johnsons could live for a number of years, so look at laws between 1820 and 1850.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

American Pageant, 16th edition (AP), 2016, Chapters 11-16

Documenting US History, 2016 edition

AMSCO AP US History review, 2015 edition

UC Scout University of California Scout Lectures-Online lectures, Chapter 7, Lessons 20-21, Chapter 8, Lessons 22-25, Chapter 9, Lessons 26-29, Chapter 10, Lessons 30-31

Get a Five-Online lectures

Equipment

Chromebooks

Projector

Supplemental Resources

Links to website resources located in Learning Activities

AP Institute folder from Geri Hastings

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

NAT-2.0

Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.

NAT-4.0

Analyze relationships among different regional, social, ethnic, and racial groups, and explain how these groups’ experiences have related to U.S. national identity.

POL-1.0

Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.

WXT-2.0

Explain how patterns of exchange, markets, and private enterprise have developed, and analyze ways that governments have responded to economic issues.

CUL-1.0

Explain how religious groups and ideas have affected American society and political life.

CUL-2.0

Explain how artistic, philosophical, and scientific ideas have developed and shaped society and institutions.

CUL-4.0

Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and changed over time.

NAT-1.0

Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

POL-2.0

Explain how popular movements, reform efforts, and activist groups have sought to change American society and institutions.

CUL-3.0

Explain how ideas about women’s rights and gender roles have affected society and politics.

POL-3.0

Explain how different beliefs about the federal government’s role in U.S. social and economic life have affected political debates and policies.

WXT-3.0

Analyze how technological innovation has affected economic development and society.

WXT-1.0

Explain how different labor systems developed in North America and the United States, and explain their effects on workers’ lives and U.S. society.

MIG-1.0

Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigration’s effects on U.S. society.

MIG-2.0

Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life

WOR-1.0

Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

WOR-2.0

Analyze the reasons for, and results of, U.S. diplomatic, economic, and military initiatives in North America and overseas.

GEO-1.0

Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

  • Language Arts: writing, critical thinking
  • Art-portraiture, political cartoons
  • Technology Education-impact of technological advances
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.
  • 9.2.12.C.3 Identify transferable career skills and design alternate career plans.

Technology Standards - 8.1

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.12.A.1 Create a personal digital portfolio which reflects personal and academic interests, achievements, and career aspirations by using a variety of digital tools and resources.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

C. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.

  • Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others by employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • Communicate information and ideas to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
  • Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
  • Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

8.1.12.C.1 Develop an innovative solution to a real world problem or issue in collaboration with peers and experts, and present ideas for feedback through social media or in an online community.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s or 504 plans.

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s or 504 plans.

ELLs

  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs.

END OF UNIT


Unit Title

Period 5. 1844-1877

Timeframe 

9 weeks

Unit Summary

Key Concept 5.1 — The United States became more connected with the world, pursued an expansionist foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere, and emerged as the destination for many migrants from other countries.

Key Concept 5.2 — Intensified by expansion and deepening regional divisions, debates over slavery and other economic, cultural, and political issues led the nation into civil war.

Key Concept 5.3 — The Union victory in the Civil War and the contested reconstruction of the South settled the issues of slavery and secession, but left unresolved many questions about the power of the federal government and citizenship rights.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • How did popular enthusiasm for U.S. expansion, bolstered by economic and security interests, result in the acquisition of new territories, substantial migration westward, and new overseas initiatives?
  • In the 1840s and 1850s, why did Americans continue to debate questions about rights and citizenship for various groups of U.S. inhabitants?
  • Why did ideological and economic differences over slavery produce an array of diverging responses from Americans in the North and the South?
  • How did debates over slavery come to dominate political discussion in the 1850s, culminating in the bitter election of 1860 and the secession of Southern states?
  • How and why did the North’s greater manpower and industrial resources, the leadership of Abraham Lincoln and others, and the decision to emancipate slaves eventually lead to the Union military victory over the Confederacy in the devastating Civil War?
  • Why and how did Reconstruction and the Civil War ended slavery, altered relationships between the states and the federal government, and lead to debates over new definitions of citizenship, particularly regarding the rights of African Americans, women, and other minorities?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

  • The impact of westward expansion as a catalyst to the Civil War
  • The changing definition and application of citizenship rights to varying groups
  • The nuanced differences in attitudes regarding slavery
  • The “decade of crisis” resulted in a contentious election, the election of Abraham Lincoln, and the subsequent secession of the South
  • The factors that led to the North’s victory such as leadership, supply lines, and impact of freeing slaves in selected regions and then all places.
  • The complicated and conflicting plans to recover after the Civil War and move forward as one nation

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

  • Popular enthusiasm for U.S. expansion, bolstered by economic and security interests, resulted in the acquisition of new territories, substantial migration westward, and new overseas initiatives.
  • In the 1840s and 1850s, Americans continued to debate questions about rights and citizenship for various groups of U.S. inhabitants.
  • Ideological and economic differences over slavery produced an array of diverging responses from Americans in the North and the South.
  • Debates over slavery came to dominate political discussion in the 1850s, culminating in the bitter election of 1860 and the secession of Southern states.
  • The North’s greater manpower and industrial resources, the leadership of Abraham Lincoln and others, and the decision to emancipate slaves eventually led to the Union military victory over the Confederacy in the devastating Civil War.
  • Reconstruction and the Civil War ended slavery, altered relationships between the states and the federal government, and led to debates over new definitions of citizenship, particularly regarding the rights of African Americans, women, and other minorities.

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

Primary Sources

  • Describe historically relevant information and/or arguments within a source.
  • Explain how a source provides information about the broader historical setting within which it was created.
  • Explain how a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience might affect a source’s meaning.
  • Explain the relative historical significance of a source’s point of view, purpose, historical situation, and/or audience.
  • Evaluate a source’s credibility and/or limitations.

Secondary Sources

  • Describe the claim or argument of a secondary source, as well as the evidence used.
  • Describe a pattern or trend in quantitative data in non-text-based sources.
  • Explain how a historian’s claim or argument is supported with evidence.
  • Explain how a historian’s context influences the claim or argument.
  • Analyze patterns and trends in quantitative data in non-text-based sources.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of a historical claim or argument.

Writing Skills

  • Make a historically defensible claim in the form of an evaluative thesis.
  • Support an argument using specific and relevant evidence.
  • Use historical reasoning to explain relationships among pieces of historical evidence.
  • Consider ways that diverse or alternative evidence could be used to qualify or modify an argument.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

  • Reading quizzes after textbook reading assignments
  • Quiz 1844-1860, SAQ 1844-1860
  • SAQ Quiz: SlaveOpponentSlaverySAQ.docx (10 minutes)
  • FRQ Quiz:
  • Explain the ways in which the growth of slavery contributed to the coming of the Civil War from 1800 to 1860.
  • To what extent did the emergence of the Republican Party signal the end of the antebellum period?
  • Period 5 Concept Outline

Summative/ Benchmark

Civil War Newspaper

With a partner or small group of no more than 3, create a newspaper edition (northern or southern location) from the time period of the Civil War complete with articles highlighting the progress of the war to that point. (It is important that all items included in the newspaper pages represent people, events, and artifacts from this time period.  Also, since it’s a newspaper and can only report on things that have already happened.  You cannot reference things that haven’t happened yet.)

Use actual photographs from online sources.  For instance, try:

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html

http://www.civilwarphotos.net/

http://www.archives.gov/research/military/civil-war/photos/#lincoln

The finished project should reflect your understanding of the events of the Civil War including major battles, personalities, issues related to both northern and southern experiences, issues related to soldier life, and political concerns.

Features should include at least

· three news articles regarding events of the Civil War
· one editorial (choose your position on the Civil War, northern or southern)
· three advertisements
· two letters to the editor regarding recent Civil War events
· two political cartoons
· weather report
· three brief international news reports
· at least five actual Civil War photographs

Use Microsoft Publisher, InDesign, Google Docs, or some other document-formatting software for this project.  Work on this throughout the unit.  Assemble the pieces a little at a time.  If you wait until the weekend before, you will not have enough time to do a good job.

Be creative!  I’m doing something I hate: giving you a sample.  What I don’t want are identical copies of the sample.  Be critical of the samples!  They aren’t perfect!  Stretch your wings!  Take a risk!  Samples:

http://flashmedia.glynn.k12.ga.us/webpages/kadams/apushunitresources.cfm?subpage=28025

http://flashmedia.glynn.k12.ga.us/webpages/kadams/apushunitresources.cfm?subpage=27970

Reconstruction Project (Requires 4-5 days in class)

Students will analyze political, constitutional, and social developments between 1860 and 1877 in order to determine the degree to which Reconstruction caused changes in the lives of formerly enslaved persons and the United States.

  • Analyze social, economic, and political problems facing the nation at the end of the Civil War
  • Compare and contrast Presidential and congressional goals and methods for Reconstruction
  • Analyze the struggle between the executive and legislative branches for control of Reconstruction
  • Evaluate the success of congressional legislation and social experiments in empowering African Americans
  • Explain the significance of the Election of 1876
  • Determine whether Reconstruction was a success or a failure
  • Resources:
  • In addition to reading pages in their textbook, students should read the following in preparation for this debate and take extensive notes to support their arguments. When students speak during the debate they must support all arguments and assertions with relevant historical evidence from their reading and cite the source of the evidence that they use to justify their arguments.
  • All students should read:
  • Degler, Carl. Out of Our Past. New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1984, pp. 228-257.
  • Students arguing that Reconstruction was a total failure should read:
  • Randall, J.G., “The Civil War and Reconstruction,” in Kuzirian, Eugene and Madaras, Larry. Taking Sides:  Clashing Views on Controversial Issues in American History Volume II. Guilford, CT: The Dushkin Publishing Group, Inc. 1985.
  • Students arguing that Reconstruction was not a total failure should read:
  • Foner, Eric. “The New Vision of Reconstruction,” in Kuzirian, Eugene and Madaras, Larry. Taking Sides:  Clashing Views on Controversial Issues in American History Volume II. Guilford, CT: The Dushkin Publishing Group, Inc. 1985.

Period 5 MC Test

Period 5 DBQ Test

Alternative Assessments

Civil War Newspaper: Students can create a video news report but must still adhere to required features.

Learning Activities

  • Manifest Destiny Debate:
  • Debate Question: Should the United States follow a policy of manifest destiny in the 1840s?
  • In the debate, students should research the arguments for and against manifest destiny, the motives behind manifest destiny, arguments for and against the annexation of Texas and the acquisition of territory from Mexico, and arguments for and against the acquisition of the Oregon territory.
  • Compromise of 1850
  • Review elements of Comp of 1850.  For each provision, have students create a concept web of historical context.  What led to the inclusion of each provision? Have students use the whiteboard to transfer the concept web.  Each takes a provision and repeats, looking to link the ideas and explain the relationships.
  • Kansas-Nebraska Map activity
  • Was John Brown a “misguided fanatic”?
  • Issues of the 1856 election (and changes in Second Party system).  Why does Buchanan win?
  • Dred Scott decision
  • Debate Question:     Should the institution of slavery be abolished?
  • Date of Debate:             1857
  • Place of Debate:            Washington, D.C.
  • In this debate students will assume the roles of either abolitionists or apologists for slavery. They need to research only moral, constitutional, legal, religious, and economic arguments for and against the institution of slavery.  This topic is important, not only because it is on the list of topics covered on the AP Exam, but also because one of the essay questions on the 1995 AP U.S. History Exam asked students to analyze the legal, religious, and economic justifications for slavery.  As students research their historical figures they should do the following:
  • Identify the individual as being for or against slavery.
  • Identify the state or section of the country from which the individual came. (It is interesting to read the arguments of northerners who justified slavery and southerners who were willing to speak out against it.)
  • Research and understand the arguments your historical figure used to oppose or justify slavery.
  • Identify any important works written by the historical figure and prepare to explain the impact of those historical works on the nation.
  • Research and understand the arguments of individuals with opposing viewpoints.
  • For use in preparing for debate: Compare and contrast viewpoints on slavery readings and create a series of three Venn diagrams comparing and contrasting pro/anti viewpoints.  Then compare and contrast with classmates to organize on a continuum:
  • Calhoun, John C. Either Slavery or Disunion Pro Slavery.docx
  • Christy, David The Kingdom of Cotton Pro Slavery.docx
  • Dew, Thomas R. Pro Slavery.docx
  • Furman, Richard A Religious Defense of Slavery Pro Slavery.docx
  • Garrison, William Declaration of the American Anti Slavery Society.docx
  • Garrison, William Lloyd The Dangers of Slavery Anti Slavery.docx
  • Harper, William The Inequality of Man Pro Slavery.docx
  • Helper, Hinton R. Pro Slavery.docx
  • McDuffie, George The Natural Slavery of the African American Pro Slavery.docx
  • Turner, Nat Confession Anti Slavery.docx
  • Weld, Theodore Slavery As It Is Anti Slavery.docx
  • Lincoln-Douglas Debates
  • Election of 1860
  • Issues of 1860 election, schism of political parties
  • Results of election
  • Discussion questions based on readings and lecture:
  • How and why do King Wheat and King Corn replace King Cotton?
  • What role did the British play as a foreign ally in the Civil War?
  • What role did the Native Americans play?  How and why did they choose alliances?
  • Cooperative Learning Activity
  • The problems the North and South faced at the beginning of the war
  • Create T-charts examining the advantages and disadvantages of the North and South as a group debrief work product.  Use big sheets of paper, each kid adds information from their own chart on the T-chart where appropriate.
  • Draft Riots in NYC
  • Draft riots in NYC (put down by federal troops)
  • Supply of soldiers drying up?  Why?
  • Causes of the draft riot?  How does this highlight the class-based opinions about the war?
  • How does this highlight the class-based opinions about the war?  Racial tensions between blacks and Irish?
  • How does this highlight racial tensions between blacks and Irish?
  • Military strategies, weapons, atrocities
  • Lincoln’s goals for the war
  • How does Lincoln's primary goal shift during the Civil War?
  • Compare and contrast, assess the reasons why they shift
  • Emancipation Proclamation
  • Was Abraham Lincoln a racist?
  • Use the documents and questions, but we don't have enough kids to do the actual debate.  Instead, do a whole-class discussion.
  • Gettysburg Address 
  • SCOTUS simulation (from Geri Hastings folder)
  • Students will argue some of the questions that the US Supreme Court avoided in 1864.  They will roleplay Vallandigham, Lincoln, and the Supreme Court justices.  One from each role will form small groups of 3.
  • Lincoln and expansion of executive powers-class discussion
  • How do these cases compare?  Contrast?
  • What legal right did Lincoln cite to justify his imprisonment of those reporters in the border states?
  • What was SCOTUS' opinion on Lincoln's actions?
  • Reconstruction Plans
  • Compare and contrast the three reconstruction plans: Lincoln, Johnson, Radical Republicans (Congress).  Create a triple Venn diagram.

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

American Pageant, 16th edition (AP), 2016, Chapters 14-23 (stop at Compromise of 1877)

Documenting US History, 2016 edition, Documenting US History Chapters 10-12

AMSCO AP US History review, 2015 edition, AMSCO United States History Chapters 12-15

UC Scout University of California Scout Lectures-Online lectures, Unit 4 Chapters 11-12, Lessons 32-38, Unit 5 Chapters 13, Lessons 39-40

Get a Five-Online lectures, Manifest Destiny, Part 1 through Reconstruction Part 2

Equipment

Chromebooks

Projector

Supplemental Resources

Links to website resources located in Learning Activities

AP Institute folder from Geri Hastings

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

NAT-3.0

Analyze how ideas about national identity changed in response to U.S. involvement in international conflicts and the growth of the United States.

MIG-2.0

Analyze causes of internal migration and patterns of settlement in what would become the United States, and explain how migration has affected American life.

GEO-1.0

Explain how geographic and environmental factors shaped the development of various communities, and analyze how competition for and debates over natural resources have affected both interactions among different groups and the development of government policies.

WOR-1.0

Explain how cultural interaction, cooperation, competition, and conflict between empires, nations, and peoples have influenced political, economic, and social developments in North America.

WOR-2.0

Analyze the reasons for, and results of, U.S. diplomatic, economic, and military initiatives in North America and overseas.

NAT-4.0

Analyze relationships among different regional, social, ethnic, and racial groups, and explain how these groups’ experiences have related to U.S. national identity.

CUL-4.0

Explain how different group identities, including racial, ethnic, class, and regional identities, have emerged and changed over time.

MIG-1.0

Explain the causes of migration to colonial North America and, later, the United States, and analyze immigration’s effects on U.S. society.

NAT-1.0

Explain how ideas about democracy, freedom, and individualism found expression in the development of cultural values, political institutions, and American identity.

POL-2.0

Explain how popular movements, reform efforts, and activist groups have sought to change American society and institutions.

WXT-1.0

Explain how different labor systems developed in North America and the United States, and explain their effects on workers’ lives and U.S. society

CUL-2.0

Explain how artistic, philosophical, and scientific ideas have developed and shaped society and institutions.

NAT-2.0

Explain how interpretations of the Constitution and debates over rights, liberties, and definitions of citizenship have affected American values, politics, and society.

POL-1.0

Explain how and why political ideas, beliefs, institutions, party systems, and alignments have developed and changed.

POL-3.0

Explain how different beliefs about the federal government’s role in U.S. social and economic life have affected political debates and policies.

CUL-3.0

Explain how ideas about women’s rights and gender roles have affected society and politics.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

  • Language Arts: writing, critical thinking
  • Art-portraiture, political cartoons
  • Technology Education-impact of technological advances
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.
  • 9.2.12.C.4 Analyze how economic conditions and societal changes influence employment trends and future education.

Technology Standards - 8.1

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.12.A.2 Produce and edit a multi-page digital document for a commercial or professional audience and present it to peers and/or professionals in that related area for review.

8.1.12.A.3 Collaborate in online courses, learning communities, social networks or virtual worlds to discuss a resolution to a problem or issue.

F: Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.

  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
  • Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
  • Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
  • Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

8.1.12.F.1 Evaluate the strengths and limitations of emerging technologies and their impact on educational, career, personal and or social needs.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s or 504 plans.

504s

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s or 504 plans.

ELLs

  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs.

END OF UNIT