Music Games

Class/grade: Grade 3                                       Age group:             8-9

School: Qatar Academy Al Wakra                 School code:          538310

Title: Music Games

Teacher: Kehri Magalad

Date: W2 September

Proposed duration: 12 weeks (12 hours)

1 What is our purpose?

To inquire into the following:

Central Idea:

Children can develop skills and learn values by engaging in musical games and respecting their rules.

Summative assessment task(s): 

For the summative assessment, students will create their own musical game. The game must have a musical component (steady beat, rhythm, melody, dynamics, etc.) Student will provide the form (rules of the game), skills (how can you be successful at the game) and responsibility (how to make sure everyone enjoys the game). Student will then teach their game to the a class.

What are the possible ways of assessing students’ understanding of the central idea? What evidence, including student initiated actions, will we look for?

Task

Create original musical game

Evidence

Student creates their own game highlighting a musical component such as steady beat, rhythm, melody, dynamics, etc.)

Action

Student plays their game at home or at recess; student teaches game to other students

Assessment

Student teaches game to the class. Game is videotaped and posted on Google classroom for submission and to receive feedback from teacher and peers. Student will receive a performance assessment rubric for this task. Game will be assessed by their peers in class in order to give opportunity to make changes before teacher assessment using the same rubric.

Conceptual Understandings (CU) and Learning Outcomes (LO) from PYP Arts Scope and Sequence

Responding (Phase 1)

CU: We enjoy and experience different forms of arts. People share art with others.

LO: explore body and untuned percussion instrument sounds; use voice to imitate sounds and learn songs; describe the difference in music; distinguish the sounds of different instruments in music

Responding (Phase 3)

CU: We use what we know to interpret arts and deepen our understanding of ourselves and the world around us.

LO: Sing with accuracy and control focusing awareness on the musical elements; analyse different compositions describing how the musical elements enhance the message

Creating (Phase 2)

CU: We can communicate our ideas, feelings and experiences through our artwork. We are receptive to the value of working individually and collaboratively to create art.

LO: read, write and perform simple musical patterns and phrases; create music for different purposes

2 What do we want to learn?

What are the key concepts (form, function, causation, change, connection, perspective, responsibility, reflection) to be emphasised within this inquiry?

Key Concept: Form and Responsibility

Related Concept: Rhythm, Melody, Dynamics

What lines of inquiry will define the scope of the inquiry into the central idea?

     Learning the rules of the game (form)

     Making sure everyone enjoys the game (responsibility)

     Creating our own musical game highlighting specific musical elements (such as rhythm, beat, melody, dynamics, etc.)

What teacher questions/provocations will drive these inquiries?

  • What are musical games?
  • What are the common musical elements found in music games?
  • What transdisciplinary skills does this game help us to develop?
  • Why do people play musical games?
  • How do you think people in different countries play musical games?

3 How might we know what we have learned? 

What are the possible ways of assessing students’ prior knowledge and skills? What evidence will we look for?

  • Knowledge of games; look for evidence by having students write and draw the answers to questions such as: What is a musical game? Why do people play games? Who plays games? What games do you like? Do you know any music games?
  • Students will discuss, analyze and/or explain any music games that they know (use list, chart, diagram, etc.)

What are the possible ways of assessing student learning in the context of the lines of inquiry? What evidence will we look for?

Learning the rules of the game (form)

Making sure everyone enjoys the game (responsibility)

Creating our own musical game

Students create a graphic organizer (chart, list, diagrams, mind maps, etc.) to show:  

  • Rules for different games
  • Sequence and order when teaching how to play a specific game
  • Learn skills of the game

Students create a graphic organizer (chart, list, diagrams, mind maps, etc.) to show/demonstrate:  

  • Skills needed in order to be successful at playing the game
  • How we make sure everyone is enjoying the game
  • How to be a team player
  • Transdisciplinary skills

 Students create an original game (or modified from a game they already know) with a variety of musical elements (elements can include singing, rhythm, steady beat, dynamics, etc.)

4 How best might we learn?

What are the learning experiences suggested by the teacher and/or students to encourage the students to engage with the inquiries and address the driving questions?

Tuning in/thinking: Play a simple musical game Doggy, Doggy Where’s Your Bone?. Students respond to their experience of the game by completing the before section of “before and after” reflection questions: What is a game? What defines a game? What music elements are in this game? Why do people play games?

Finding out/investigating: Learn solfege/rhythms/words/movement of various singing games. Play musical games from around the world. Students will conduct a small research to find other games from around the world and share their findings via Google Classroom. During these learning experiences focus should be placed on transdisciplinary skills, learner profile, musical elements such as beat, rhythm, melody, movement, etc. Allow students to consider music elements that they recognize  and connect from previous unit.

Sorting out/categorising: Continue learning new games and reflect on similarities and differences among the music and content of each game. Discuss and explore the connection between the music and the game? Experience playing a game without the musical elements and compare. Knowledge gained from this stage will be displayed on the UOI board and Google Classroom. New games during this phase of the inquiry cycle can include Jugaremos en el bosque, Singing Forest, Forbidden Rhythm, Musical Statues, Crazy Conductor and more.

Going further/exploring: Students create their own original game including a musical component. To differentiate, if students are struggling to create an original game, they may choose to build on and/or modify a game that they already know. During this time, Google Classroom will be utilised as a tool for students to post their game in progress in order to receive feedback from their peers - peers in their own classroom and peers in a different class/section. The students will have the opportunity to revise their games according to peer evaluation (using a rubric) before final submission.

Making connections/linking: Students become the teacher and teach their game to the class. They will discuss the rules of the game (form) and strategies to become successful and enjoy the game (responsibility). They may also show connections between their original game and a game they already know.

What opportunities will occur for transdisciplinary skills development and for the development of the attributes of the learner profile?

Selected Learner Profile Items

Principled - following the rules and taking turns; playing fair

Thinker - using strategies and skills when playing games; sorting games; thinking about reasons why people play games; creating an original game

Attitudes

Appreciation - valuing our peers and their created games

Cooperation - collaborating; working towards a common goal

Transdisciplinary Skills

Communications Skills - listening and speaking while learning the rules of the game (form); reading musical notation; nonverbal communications (movement; dance; signs, etc.)

Self-Management Skills - safety; spatial awareness; organization; gross motor skills

Social Skills - accepting responsibility; respecting others; cooperating; resolving conflict; adopting a variety of group roles (while playing games)

5 What resources need to be gathered?

What people, places, audio-visual materials, related literature, music, art, computer software, etc, will be available? How will the classroom environment, local environment, and/or the community be used to facilitate the inquiry?

Spotlight on Music; Orff instrumentarium; Music for Children Vol. 1 Orff-Keetman; teacher created materials; selected YouTube videos; Mallet Madness A. Armeida; Google Classroom; iPads and/or IT Lab; variety of auxiliary percussion instruments

6 To what extent did we achieve our purpose?  

Assess the outcome of the inquiry by providing evidence of students’ understanding of the central idea. The reflections of all teachers involved in the planning and teaching of the inquiry should be included.

How you could improve on the assessment task(s) so that you would have a more accurate picture of each student’s understanding of the central idea.

7 To what extent did we include the elements of the PYP? 

What were the learning experiences that enabled students to:

  • develop an understanding of the concepts identified in “What do we want to learn?”
  • demonstrate the learning and application of particular transdisciplinary skills?
  • develop particular attributes of the learner profile and/or attitudes?

8 What student-initiated inquiries arose from the learning? 

9 Teacher Notes

Scope and Sequence 

Responding (Phase 1)

     Conceptual Understandings - We enjoy and experience different forms of arts; people share art with others

     Learning Outcomes - Explore body and untuned percussion instrument sounds; use voice to imitate sounds and learn songs; describe the differences in music; distinguish the sounds of different instruments in music

Responding (Phase 3)

     Conceptual Understandings - We use what we know to interpret arts and deepen our understanding of ourselves and the world around us.

     Learning Outcomes - Sing with accuracy and control focusing awareness on the musical elements; analyse different compositions describing how the musical elements enhance the message

Creating (Phase 2)

     Conceptual Understandings - We can communicate our ideas, feelings and experiences through our artwork

     Learning Outcomes - read, write and perform simple musical patterns and phrases; create music for different purpose

ISTE Standards for Students

  1. Empowered Learner - students leverage technology to take an active role in choosing, achieve and demonstrating competency in their learning goals, informed by the learning sciences. Students:

b. Build networks and customize their learning environments in ways that support the learning process

c. Use technology to seek feedback that informs and improves their practice and demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways