Music Curriculum

Pleasant Ridge Elementary

Emily Ouellette

What music skills do you work on?

Our music curriculum builds on many different skills that are essential to developing strong musicianship. These skills provide tools to express, create, and communicate with music:

 

How are these skills addressed?

LANGUAGE AND MUSIC

Through workshops, conferences, and coursework study I have become familiar with a music education pedagogy called Music Learning Theory (MLT). It was developed by Edwin Gordon, a leading researcher and teacher in the field of music education. An important concept behind this theory is “audiation,” coined in the music world as a process of comprehending music with context; “thinking” in music. This is the basis for building strong musicianship and a better understanding of music. Audiation, as well as other sequential concepts that play an important role in MLT, have been compared to the process of learning a new language.

THREE STAGE APPROACH TO MUSIC LEARNING

Students are introduced to music concepts and skills in sequential parts and in broad context. This provides students the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of what they are learning.

Stage 1: Whole

Stage 2: Part

Stage 3: Whole

Experience concepts in broad context

Patterns, content, and skills that become building blocks for deeper knowledge of the music concepts.

Combining sequential content to comprehend concepts in its entirety.

MODES OF PERFORMANCE

It is important to utilize different modes of learning and performing in the music classroom. Providing opportunities for aural, visual, and hands-on learning help meet the needs of different types of learners, giving all students an opportunity for meaningful learning. These same modes are also found in the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) National Standards.

Singing

Readiness

Unison

Solo

Ostinato

Movement

Space

Flow

Time

Weight

Pathways

Chanting

Unison

Solo

Ostinato

Instrument Playing

Readiness

Small percussion

Pitched and non-pitched percussion

Music Reading

Visual symbols to represent music concept

Form

Notation

Listening

Music of different cultures and genres

Listening Maps

How do I see my child’s progress?

Report cards are reflective of these skills in the following categories

Kindergarten

Voice

  • Singing fundamentals
  • Timbre
  • Expression

Beat

  • Moving, Playing, and Chanting with steady beat
  • Using beat to move to phrasing (basics of Form)
  • Chanting rhythm patterns with steady beat

1st Grade

Level 1 Rhythm

  • Chanting rhythm patterns with steady beat, with emphasis on quarter notes, eighth notes, half notes, and all accompanying rests.
  • Macro/micro ostinato

Level 1 Vocal

  • Harmony (focus on tonic and dominant)
  • Melody (matching pitch)
  • Style
  • Singing Fundamentals (solfege)
  • Timbre
  • Expression

Beat

  • Identifying macro and micro beat (Meter)
  • Moving, Playing, and Chanting with steady beat
  • Identifying phrases and form

2nd Grade

Level 2 Rhythm

  • Chanting rhythm patterns with steady beat, with emphasis on quarter notes, half notes, eighth notes, sixteenth notes, as well as accompanying rests.
  • Rhythm ostinato
  • Identifying meter of a song

Level 2 Voice

  • Melody (Matching pitch)
  • Vocal ostinato (Harmony)
  • Tonic and dominant bass lines
  • Identifying Tonality
  • Identifying different instruments in music (Timbre)

Music Literacy Level 1

  • Identifying notation such as quarter notes, half notes, eighth notes, sixteenth notes, as well as accompanying rests.
  • Read rhythmic notation with steady beat

3rd Grade

Level 3 Rhythm

  • Chanting rhythm patterns with steady beat, with emphasis on whole notes and rests, syncopated rhythms, and dotted rhythms
  • Rhythm ostinato
  • Identifying meter of a song

Level 3 Voice

  • Matching pitch
  • Vocal ostinato
  • Tonic, subdominant and dominant bass lines
  • Expanding singing range
  • Identifying Tonality
  • Identifying different instrumentation and styles of music

Music Literacy Level 2

  • Identifying notation such as whole notes and rests, syncopated rhythms, and dotted rhythms
  • Read rhythmic notation with steady beat

Rubric

Students receive a number score in each category. Scores are based on the following criteria:

Students receives a 3

Student exceeds expectations; they can demonstrate skills in each category consistently and independently.

Students receive a 2

They meet most criteria in the category consistently and independently. Student may need teacher support in some areas.

Students receive a 1

Student needs teacher support in most criteria in the category. Student may demonstrate skills independently for a small period of time, but may need teacher support to maintain the skill.

Students receive an NA

The content was covered and an assessment was provided. However, the teacher was not able to get a viable assessment on the student’s ability in that content area. This may be due to different circumstances, including student absences when content is assessed, or behaviors that kept the assessment from being completed reliably.

Students receive a C

The content was covered. No assessment was provided to the student body. Assessment may be taken at a later point in the school year.

Students receive a NC

The content was not covered for the student. This may be due to different circumstances, including student absences when content was covered, or that the content will be addressed later in the year.