GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Grade 5

Social Studies

Three Worlds Meet (Beginnings to 1620)

6.1 U.S. History: America in the World: All students will acquire the knowledge and skills to think analytically about how past and present interactions of people, cultures, and the environment shape the American heritage. Such knowledge and skills enable students to make informed decisions that reflect fundamental rights and core democratic values as productive citizens in local, national, and global communities.

Focus of this Unit:

  • Indigenous societies in the Western Hemisphere migrated and changed in response to the physical environment and due to their interactions with Europeans.
  • European exploration expanded global economic and cultural exchange into the Western Hemisphere.

NJ STUDENT LEARNING STANDARDS

6.1.8.A.1.a        Compare and contrast forms of governance, belief systems, and family structures among African, European, and Native American groups.

6.1.8.B.1.a        Describe migration and settlement patterns of Native American groups, and explain how these patterns affected interactions in different regions

6.1.8.B.1.b        Analyze the world in spatial terms, using historical maps to determine what led to the exploration of new water and land routes.

6.1.8.C.1.a     Evaluate the impact of science, religion, and technological innovations on European exploration

6.1.8.C.1.b     Explain why individuals and societies trade, how trade functions, and the role of trade during this period.

6.1.8.D.1.a     Compare and contrast gender roles, religion, values, cultural practices, and political systems of Native American groups.

6.1.8.D.1.b     Explain how interactions among African, European, and Native American groups began a cultural transformation.

6.1.8.D.1.c     Evaluate the impact of the Colombian Exchange on ecology, agriculture, and culture from different perspectives.

Enduring Understandings (The big ideas)

Essential Questions

  • Students will analyze the adaptations made by Indigenous societies to the European explorations.
  • Students will analyze how European exploration initiated a global and cultural exchange of ideas.

  • How did Indigenous societies change and adapt during European exploration in the Western Hemisphere?
  • What economic and cultural exchange of ideas occurred between Europeans and Indigenous societies?
  • What impact did the Colombian Exchange have on the ecology, agriculture, and culture of the United States?

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Core Content/Objectives

Instructional Actions

Concepts

What students will know

Skills

What students will be able to do

Activities/Strategies

Learning Activities/ Differentiation

Interdisciplinary Connections

Assessment

How learning will be assessed

-African, Native American and European groups had different forms of government, beliefs, and family structures.

- Compare/contrast the Native American’s, Europeans, and African forms of governance, belief systems, and family structures.

- Research the family structures, governance, and belief systems of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans.

- Create a 3 part Venn diagram including the similarities and differences between these three groups of inhabitants.

- Venn diagram

- Diary/journal entry of life in a family unit

-Various formative assessments: open ended responses, graphic organizers, quick writes

Geography, People, and the Environment

Core Content/Objectives

Instructional Actions

Concepts

What students will know

Skills

What students will be able to do

Activities/Strategies

Learning Activities/ Differentiation

Interdisciplinary Connections

Assessment

How learning will be assessed

Native American groups settled in various regions of North America and adapted in different ways.

-Trace the migration routes Native Americans took into North America and why.

-Explain how the Native Americans adapted to environment based on migration patterns.

-Utilize various maps skills to understand migration patterns.

-Compare/contrast the migration patterns of big game and Native American groups during the last Ice Age.

-Use historical maps to trace the water and land routes from Asia to North America by Native Americans.

-Correlate adaptations made by Native Americans to the environment they settled in.

-Use a blank map to draw the migration patterns of big game and Native Americans in Native America.

- Create a field journal/brochure/diary of a traveling Native American to their route to their settlement.

- Create a display of the various Native American adaptations to environment (housing, clothing, food, etc.)

-Various formative assessments: open ended responses, graphic organizers, quick writes.

Economics, Innovation, and Technology

Core Content/Objectives

Instructional Actions

Concepts

What students will know

Skills

What students will be able to do

Activities/Strategies

Learning Activities/ Differentiation

Interdisciplinary Connections

Assessment

How learning will be assessed

-European exploration (Spain, England) developed in North America based on science, religion and technology.

-Societies need to trade with each other to acquire the items needed for survival and wealth.

-Explain several factors

(Science, religion, technological innovations) that led to European exploration of the Americas in the 15th and 16th century.

- Evaluate the reasons why individuals and societies trade, how trade functions, and the role of trade.

-Archeologists investigation of a sunken Spanish ship(trade goods- Astrolabe, compass, religious artifacts); History Alive Lesson 4

-  Research report on individual explorers

-Students will read about the explorations/ motives/ impacts of European explorers

- Read Pedro’s Journal- Pam Conrad

- Timeline of European exploration

- Simulation of the need for trade- different groups of students needing various goods that they do not have.

-Role playing of a European trade market based on natural resources and the wants of individuals.

- Introduce the water routes for trade purposes between Europe and the Americas.

-Various formative assessments: open ended responses, graphic organizers, quick writes.

-Archeologists field journal

- Design a monument for a European explorer that details the positive and negative impacts of their exploration.

- Making of a timeline that reflects the sequential order of events of European exploration.

- Research report on individual explorers

- Newspaper article/ opinion piece/ summary of the impact of the astrolabe and compass on exploration.

- Students will create a journal of the activities and daily events of a European explorers- spy journal

- Exit ticket/ quick write about trading

History, Culture, and Perspectives

Core Content/Objectives

Instructional Actions

Concepts

What students will know

Skills

What students will be able to do

Activities/Strategies

Learning Activities/ Differentiation

Interdisciplinary Connections

Assessment

How learning will be assessed

-Native American groups of North America had different cultures dependent on their region.

- The interactions between African, European, and Native American groups and how it created a cultural transformation.

- The impact of the Colombian Exchange affected the agriculture, ecology, and culture of Europe and North America.

-Compare and contrast the Native American groups and their regions (gender roles, religion, cultural practices, political systems, values).

- Identify how the interactions among African, European, and Native American groups began a cultural transformation.

-Evaluate the impact of the Colombian Exchange( agriculture, culture, ecology)

- Analyze the impact of sugar cane on the Americas

-History Alive Chapter 3 activity

-History Alive Chapter 5 activity

- Track a crop from the New World to the Old World and identify its impact on at least three different regions.

- Journal/diary entry of Native Americans on the introduction and impact of Old World animals to the landscape

-Create a sequence chain of the sugar cane trade and the African slave trade.

- Create a display(poster, tri fold brochure, etc.) of the cultural regions in North America and their differences( gender roles, religion, cultural practices, political systems, and values)

-Cause/effect chart on the impact of European exploration on Native Americans

-Create a before and after chart of Europe and North America before and after the Colombian Exchange in terms of food, culture, and ecology.

- Write a journal entry from the perspective of a Native American and of a European settler on the Colombian Exchange’s impact.

- Track a crop from the New World to the Old World

- Opinion piece on how their life would be different without the Colombian Exchange.

--Create a sequence chain of the sugar cane trade and the African slave trade.

                Evidence of Learning

Assessment:

Equipment Needed:

  • Build Our Nation: American History and Geography
  • History Alive

Teacher Resources:

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Flexible grouping  
  • Pairing of students of similar ability  
  • Student centered activities  
  • Learning stations  
  • Small group discussions  
  • Problem solving situations
  • Adaptive Equipment

504s

  • Flexible grouping  
  • Pairing of students of similar ability  
  • Student centered activities  
  • Learning stations  
  • Small group discussions  
  • Problem solving situations
  • Adaptive Equipment

ELLs

  • teaching key aspects of a topic.
  • Eliminate nonessential information .
  • using videos, illustrations, pictures, and drawings to explain or clarify.
  • allowing products (projects, timelines, demonstrations, models, drawings, dioramas, poster boards, charts, graphs, slide shows, videos, etc.) to demonstrate student’s learning; .
  • allowing students to correct errors (looking for understanding) .
  • allowing the use of note cards or open-book during testing .
  • decreasing the amount of work presented or required

G/T

  • teaching key aspects of a topic. Eliminate nonessential information .
  • using videos, illustrations, pictures, and drawings to explain or clarify.
  • allowing products (projects, timelines, demonstrations, models, drawings, dioramas, poster boards, charts, graphs, slide shows, videos, etc.) to demonstrate student’s learning;
  • allowing students to correct errors (looking for understanding) .
  • allowing the use of note cards or open-book during testing . decreasing the amount of work presented or required

At-Risk Failure

  • Projects designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student need
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities and support
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills based on student needs
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Directions written and read/explained thoroughly and in chunks
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers and other organizational aides
  • Student Success Team and implementation of RTI Interventions
  • Set goal plan with reachable goals and pathways and collaboration with parents
  • One-on-one conference with teacher to include feedback on work and progress toward meeting goals

Grade 5