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Jacksonville College Course Catalog 2022-2023
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Our Alma Mater so proudly stands

Proclaiming truth to every land,

Exalting Christ our aim shall be

As we march on to victory.

As we go forth from thy dear walls

To answer duty’s urgent calls,

Thy memories ever dear shall be

We hail thee ever, our J.B.C.


JACKSONVILLE COLLEGE

105 B.J. Albritton Drive, Jacksonville, Texas 75766-4759

Telephone (903) 586-2518; FAX (903) 586-0743; email:admissions@jacksonville-college.edu

COURSE CATALOG for 2022-2023

MEMBER

American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers

Broadcast Music, Inc.

Council for Higher Education Accreditation

Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas

International Association of Baptist Colleges and Universities

Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce

National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities

National Junior College Athletic Association

Region XIV Athletic Conference

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges

Texas Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers

Texas Council of Academic Libraries

Texas Music Educators Association

Texas State Historical Association

No person shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity sponsored or conducted by Jacksonville College on any basis prohibited by applicable law, including but not limited to race, color, age, national origin, sex, veteran status, or disability. Under federal law, the College may discriminate on the basis of religion to fulfill its purposes.

Jacksonville College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) to award the following: Associate Degree, Junior College Diploma, and Continuing Education Units. Contact the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia, 30033-4097 or call (404) 679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Jacksonville College.

Serving Baptists and Higher Education since 1899

Historic relationship with the Baptist Missionary Association of Texas

Affiliated with the Southern Baptists of Texas Convention

This catalog is effective for the Fall 2022 through Summer 2023 terms.

 Jacksonville College reserves the right to change without prior notice any policy, procedure, or curricular offering contained herein. In the case of unforeseen circumstances, instructional modalities and/or instructional personnel may change.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

JACKSONVILLE COLLEGE ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2022-2023        9

ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLEGE        10

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND        10

MISSION STATEMENT        12

INSTITUTIONAL GOALS AND STRATEGIC PLAN        12

GENERAL EDUCATION LEARNING OUTCOMES        13

ACCREDITATION        13

APPROVAL        13

GOVERNMENT        13

BOARD OF TRUSTEES        14

CABINET        14

SENIOR DIRECTORS        15

FACULTY        16

FULL-TIME FACULTY        16

ADJUNCT FACULTY        17

FACILITIES        20

STUDENT ADMISSION        21

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS        21

GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES        25

CONCEALED HANDGUN POLICY        25

JACKSONVILLE COLLEGE FACILITIES POLICY        25

STUDENT RIGHTS        26

STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE        26

STUDENT PARTICIPATION IN INSTITUTIONAL DECISION MAKING        27

TOBACCO AND DRUG-FREE CAMPUS        27

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES        27

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION        27

TITLE IX OF THE EDUCATION AMENDMENTS OF 1972        28

PROTECTION OF PRIVACY FOR STUDENTS AND PARENTS        28

INSTITUTIONAL GRADUATION RATES AND CAMPUS SECURITY DISCLOSURES        29

JACKSONVILLE COLLEGE HONOR CODE        29

DEFINITIONS        29

DISCIPLINARY CONSEQUENCES FOR ACADEMIC VIOLATIONS:        30

REPORTING ACADEMIC VIOLATIONS:        30

APPEALS: The student may refer to the “Student Grievance Procedure” section.        30

COSTS        30

CHARGES        30

APPLICATION/REGISTRATION        31

TUITION        31

SPECIAL COURSE FEES        31

STUDENT SERVICES (LONG TERMS ONLY)        31

ROOM AND BOARD        31

GRADUATION        31

ADDITIONAL FEES        31

OPTIONAL FEES        32

POLICIES        32

PAYMENT PLANS        33

REFUNDS        34

WHAT ARE THE TUITION AND FEES FOR ONLINE EDUCATION STUDENTS?        35

WHAT IS THE TUITION FOR DUAL CREDIT STUDENTS?        36

SCHOLARSHIPS, DISCOUNTS, GRANTS AND FINANCIAL AID        36

GOVERNMENTAL FINANCIAL AID        36

INSTITUTIONAL AWARDS        37

SCHOLARSHIPS         37

GOVERNMENTAL FINANCIAL AID        38

HARDSHIP POLICIES FOR TITLE IV FEDERAL AID PROGRAM AND TUITION EQUALIZATION GRANT        38

SCHOLARSHIPS, DISCOUNTS, GRANTS AND APPLICATIONS        39

ADDITIONAL FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION        40

BENEFITS FOR VETERANS AND OTHER ELIGIBLE PERSONS        40

ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR VETERANS AND OTHER ELIGIBLE PERSONS        40

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND INFORMATION        40

PROGRAMS OF STUDY        41

ENROLLMENT OF CURRENT HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS        41

TESTING AND PLACEMENT        42

ADVANCED CREDIT        42

ONLINE EDUCATION        43

TRANSFER-IN STUDENTS FROM OTHER COLLEGES OR UNIVERSITIES        43

HONORS PROGRAM        44

ACADEMIC ADVISING        45

COURSE ATTENDANCE        45

ADDING AND DROPPING COURSES        46

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSE OR COLLEGE        46

EXAMINATIONS        46

FINAL EXAMINATIONS        47

GRADING SYSTEM AND REPORTS        47

CREDIT HOUR POLICY        48

GRADE APPEAL PROCESS        48

TRANSCRIPT OF GRADES        48

PRESIDENT’S LIST        49

DEAN’S LIST        49

OTHER STUDENT HONORS        49

SCHOLASTIC PROBATION        49

ENFORCED SCHOLASTIC WITHDRAWAL        50

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY FOR STANDARD OF WORK        50

TRANSFER TO ANOTHER INSTITUTION        50

STUDENT LIFE        51

CHAPEL        51

RESIDENTIAL SERVICES        51

STUDENT MAIL        51

ADVISING/COUNSELING SERVICES        51

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS        52

STUDENT OFFICE        54

ATHLETICS        54

DISCIPLINE        54

ALUMNI AND FORMER STUDENTS ASSOCIATION        54

GRADUATION: ASSOCIATE DEGREE, JUNIOR COLLEGE DIPLOMA        54

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION        55

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION        55

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE        56

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE        58

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE JUNIOR COLLEGE DIPLOMA        59

GENERAL EDUCATION LEARNING OUTCOMES        59

GRADUATION HONORS        60

SUGGESTED GENERAL COURSE SEQUENCE LEADING TO ASSOCIATE DEGREES        60

OPTION 1: FRESHMAN YEAR        61

OPTION 1: SOPHOMORE YEAR        61

OPTION 2: FRESHMAN YEAR        62

OPTION 2: SOPHOMORE YEAR        62

CURRICULAR OFFERINGS        63

TEXAS COMMON COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM        63

TEXAS CORE CURRICULUM        63

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE        65

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, PSYCHOLOGY, SOCIOLOGY, AND FINE ARTS        65

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION        66

DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES        66

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS        67

DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL STUDIES AND PHILOSOPHY        67

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE        68

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE        68

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS        69


JACKSONVILLE COLLEGE ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2022-2023

ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLEGE

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

Moved by the need for a college in East Texas, a group of earnest Baptists met in Palestine, Texas in March 1899. They formed a permanent organization known as “The East Texas Educational Society.” The following officers were elected: A. W. Ewing, president; D. L. Scarborough and R. B. Longmire, vice presidents; C. A. Lawler, secretary; and W. J. Foscue, treasurer. They realized East Texas must educate its youth in order to rise to the heights of its possibilities. With this in mind, they proceeded with their plans to establish an institution that would provide academic and cultural training under religious influence. Jacksonville became their choice for the location of the college.

The East Texas Educational Society applied for a charter for Jacksonville College on June 10, 1899. The procedure was executed by A.P. Schofield, W. J. Foscue, R.B. Longmire and J. M. Newburn, then acting in the capacity of a corporation. The charter was approved and signed by the Secretary of State of Texas on July 26, 1899, and was renewed in 1957.

On July 20, 1899, a building site consisting of 18 acres was bought for Jacksonville College. The trustees gave a contract for a three-story brick building in May of 1899. This building was not completed for the opening session of 1899-1900. The upper story of the Templeton building on South Bolton Street was rented, and the school opened in September with an enrollment of 34 students. Before the end of the opening session, the enrollment increased to 85 students. Prior to the Christmas holidays, the three-story brick building was completed, and classes were moved to that location. Since that date, all activities of the college have been at the present site.

In the original organization, the College was organized on the senior college level, awarding the Bachelor of Arts degree to its graduates. The college functioned as a senior college until 1918 when it was reorganized on the junior college level. The course of study conformed to that offered by standard colleges and universities in their first and second year requirements. The college has continued to function on the junior college level since 1918, awarding its graduates the Associate in Arts degree and the Associate in Science degree. In 1919, affiliation was established with the State Department of Education.

In 1923, the original charter was amended and a historical relationship with the Baptist Missionary Association of Texas began.

In 1974, Jacksonville College achieved accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. In July 2004, the College also became affiliated with the Southern Baptists of Texas Convention.

To add a little known fact, at the same time that Jacksonville College was being reorganized into a junior college in 1918, the Jacksonville College academy was organized as well. Its purpose was to offer a four-year course measuring up to the standards of high school work. The academy became affiliated with the State Department of Education in 1919. It maintained affiliation with the State Department until 1958 when it was discontinued.

Nestled in the beautiful, rolling hills of East Texas, Jacksonville College is located in a city of some 15,000 inhabitants in the same location of its founding. The city of Jacksonville boasts several industries, a prosperous farming region, friendly people, an excellent system of public schools, a national seminary, and many active churches.

The student body, the strong faculty, the campus spirit, and the location all combine to make Jacksonville College an ideal place for any student who seeks a sound education that keeps Christ preeminent.

Jacksonville College has been served by several great men of God who were faithful to the cause of Christian education. Listed below are the names of the presidents and their terms of office. The college has ample reason to be intensely proud of its leadership through these many years.

NAME              TERM OF OFFICE

J. V. Vermillion            1899-1903

B. J. Albritton               1903-1905

J. M. Newburn             1905-1906

B. J. Albritton               1906-1908

J. V. Vermillion            1908-1911

F. D. Graves                 1911-1912

H. R. Chapman                   1912-1913

J. W. Hoppe                 1913-1914

D. C. Dove                   1914-1915

J. V. Vermillion            1915-1918

B. J. Albritton               1918-1937

J. W. Overall                1937-1941

C. R. Meadows            1941-1944

Gerald D. Kellar          1944-1956

Douglas L. Laird         1956-1961

Curtis M. Carroll          1961-1986

F. Donald Collins           1986-1988

H. Edwin Crank          1988-2011

W. Michael Smith                  2011-2021

Joseph A. Lightner        2021-2022

(Interim President) John Mann                2022-Present

STATEMENT OF FAITH

MISSION STATEMENT

We provide Christ-centered teaching and training that prepares students to lead meaningful lives that transform the world.

INSTITUTIONAL GOALS AND STRATEGIC PLAN

 

 

 

 

GENERAL EDUCATION LEARNING OUTCOMES

ACCREDITATION

Jacksonville College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and is approved to award the Associate Degree and the Junior College Diploma. For questions about accreditation, contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call (404) 679-4501.

APPROVAL

Jacksonville College is approved by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to offer a complete associate degree online.

Jacksonville College is also approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs to administer benefits to veterans and other eligible persons enrolled in the associate degree program.

GOVERNMENT

Jacksonville College is governed by fifteen voting members, officially titled “The Jacksonville College Board of Trustees.” This Board is the ultimate source of authority in all College affairs and meets three times a year to set policy. The trustees act collectively, not individually, through committees and the president. The Board consists of ten trustees from the Baptist Missionary Association of Texas churches, four trustees from the Southern Baptists of Texas Convention, and one trustee at-large submitted by the president of Jacksonville College. All trustees are approved by the Baptist Missionary Association of Texas during its annual meeting.

The management of the College is the responsibility of the President, who is the Chief Executive Officer elected by and responsible to the Jacksonville College Board of Trustees. The Executive Vice President is responsible for financial operation and is responsible to the President. The Administrative Vice President is responsible for the administration function of the College and is responsible to the President. The Vice President of Academics / Academic Dean is responsible for all academic affairs and is responsible to the President. The Vice President of Student Leadership is responsible for all athletic and student life programs and is responsible to the President. The Vice President of Property is responsible for all property needs, including residential, transportation, security, maintenance, and custodial, and is responsible to the President. The faculty perform the details of instruction. The support staff are responsible for their assigned areas and are responsible to their immediate supervisor.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Bart Barber                         Farmersville, TX

Debbie Berry                 Ft. Worth, TX

Sherry Bryant                 Nacogdoches TX

Billy Byrd                        Gilmer, TX

Robbie Caldwell                 Tyler, TX

Sam Deville                        Bullard, TX

Neil Dumas                        Jacksonville, TX

Robert Fannette                 Jacksonville, TX

Charles Johnson                 Gilmer, TX

Dwayne Orr                         Jacksonville, TX

David Parish                        Cleveland, TX

Wes Pratt                         West Conroe, TX

Clayton Reed                Southlake, TX

Ray Thompson                 Gilmer, TX

Ronnie Yarber                 Athens, TX

        

CABINET

John Mann - Interim President / Executive Vice President / VP of Business / Interim VP of Academics / Interim Academic Dean

B.A., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

        M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

        Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

Jodye Jay - Administrative Vice President / VP of Enrollment

        B.S., University of Texas at Tyler

        M.Ed., Lamar University

        Post Graduate Study, Stephen F. Austin State University

        Post Graduate Study, Portland State University


Danny Long - Vice President of Student Leadership/Athletic Director

        M.Ed., Stephen F. Austin University

George Baker - Vice President of Property/Director of Security

        BBA., LeTourneau University

Aaron Gray - Dean of Students

        M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary

        M.C.C., Bible Believers Christian College and Seminary

        PSY.D., Bible Believers Christian College and Seminary

Ph.D., Bible Believers Christian College and Seminary

Michelle Kearney - Dean of Enrollment Director of Institutional Research and Effectiveness

B.F.A., University of Texas at Tyler

                M.A., University of North Texas

TBD - Athletic Director

SENIOR DIRECTORS

Liz Brents - Senior Director of Online Education and Information Technology

        B.S., The University of Texas at Tyler

        M.Ed., The University of Texas at Tyler


Emily Sturm -
Interim Registrar

        B.S., The University of Texas at Tyler

        MSHRD., The University of Texas at Tyler -In Progress

TBD - Senior Director of Student Business Services

DIRECTORS

Paul Galyean - Director of Financial Aid

        B.S., Stephen F. Austin State University

Ashley Mason - Director of Residential Services

        B.A., The University of Texas at Tyler

        M.B.A., The University of Texas at Tyler

Laura Hall - Director of Human Resources/Director of Finance

        BBA., Baylor University

Chris Hultberg - Director of Systems and Technology / Director of Marketing and Recruiting

William Cumbee - Director of Admissions

        Undergraduate Studies in Business Data Processing at Western Kentucky University

Tori Finck - Director of Library Services

        B.A., Texas A&M University-Commerce

        M.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce

Jan Modisette - Director of the Teaching & Learning Center

B.A., Stephen F. Austin State University

        M.A., Stephen F. Austin State University

        Ed.D., Texas A&M University – Commerce

Shawn Moore - Director of Student Life

        B.S., Southwestern Oklahoma State University

Todd Chancey - Director of Property Services

George Baker - Director of Security

        BBA., LeTourneau University

Sheyla Armas - Director of Student Account

        B.A., Stephen F. Austin University

Danny Leatherman - Director of Game Day Operations

        B.A., Stephen F. Austin University

TBD - Sports Information Director

FACULTY

FULL-TIME FACULTY

 

Brett Eckles - History

        B.S., University of Texas at Tyler

        M. S., University of Texas at Tyler

Aaron Gray - Philosophy, Religion

M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary

        M.C.C., Bible Believers Christian College and Seminary

        PSY.D., Bible Believers Christian College and Seminary

Ph.D., Bible Believers Christian College and Seminary

 

Jodye Jay - Mathematics

        B.S., University of Texas at Tyler

        M.Ed., Lamar University

        Post Graduate, Stephen F. Austin State University

 

Michelle Kearney - Art, Education

                B.F.A., University of Texas at Tyler

                M.A., University of North Texas

Darrell Kirchner - Chemistry

        B.A., Southern Illinois University

        Ph.D., West Virginia University

 

Tina Lane - Biology, Psychology

        B.S., Texas A&M University

        M.S., Texas A&M University

        M.S., (In Progress) Southern New Hampshire University

John Mann - Philosophy, Religion

         B.A., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

        M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

        Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

Ashley Mason - Business

B.A., The University of Texas at Tyler

        M.B.A., The University of Texas at Tyler

 

Jan Modisette - English, Education

        B.A., Stephen F. Austin State University

        M.A., Stephen F. Austin State University

        Ed.D., Texas A&M University – Commerce

Vanita Pettey - English

        B.A., University of Texas at Tyler

        M.A., University of Texas at Tyler

 

Patricia Richey - Computer Science, History, Government, Geography

        B.S.H.E.S.S., Stephen F. Austin State University

        M.S., Stephen F. Austin State University

        M.Ed., Texas A&M University-Commerce

            Ed.D., Texas A&M University-Commerce

        Post Graduate Study, University of Texas at Arlington,

        University of Texas at Tyler, Louisiana State University at Shreveport,          

        University of Central Arkansas, and BMA Theological Seminary

Cathy Smith - Mathematics

        B.S., Texas State University

        M.A., University of Texas, Austin


ADJUNCT FACULTY

 

Megan Fleming - Government

        B.A., Stephen F. Austin

        M.A., Stephen F. Austin

 

Janis Gowin - Biology

        B.S., Stephen F. Austin State University

        M.S., Stephen F. Austin State University

Grant Haney - History

        B.A., Sam Houston State University

M. Ed., University of Texas at Tyler

M.A., Sam Houston State University

Whitney Hastings - Mathematics

        B.S., University of Texas at Tyler

        M. Ed., University of Texas at Tyler

        Post Graduate Study, Texas A&M Central Texas

Gerald Hawkins - Biology

        B.A., University of Texas

        D.O., University of Health Sciences Medical school

Felix Knott - Spanish

        B.A., Texas A&M university

        M.A., Baptist Missionary Association Theological Seminary

Ryan Melton - Mathematics

        B.S., Stephen F. Austin University

        M.S., Stephen F. Austin University

Wendy Mills - Psychology

        B.A., Texas A&M University

        M.A., Houston Clear Lake

Mark Rogers - Religion, Philosophy

        B.A., East Texas Baptist University

        M. Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

        Post Graduate Study, Baptist Missionary Association Theological Seminary

Post Graduate Study, University of Texas at Tyler

Pamela Price - Mathematics

        B.S., Stephen F. Austin State University

        M.Ed., University of Texas at Tyler

Christopher Thorman - Business

        B.S., Western Governors University

        M.S., Western Governors University

Kathleen Glidewell - Education

B.S. - University of Texas at Tyler

M.Ed. - Stephen F. Austin State University

John Armitage - Music

        B.M., Stephen F. Austin University

        M.A., Liberty University

Allison Powell - English

        B.S., University of Texas at Austin

        M.A., The University of Texas at Tyler

Penny Burdette - Theater, Speech

        B.A., The University of Texas at Tyler

        M.A., The University of Texas at Tyler

Charles Williams - Business, Science

        B.S., Centenary College of Louisiana

        M.A., Rice University

        M.B.A., Texas A&M University

        D.B.A., Latech University

        DEng, Latech University

Duane Stark - Religion

        M.A., (Counseling) - Multnomah University

        M.A., (Pastoral Studies) Multnomah University

Kirby Shepherd - Physical Education

B.B.A., Southern Arkansas University

        M.S., Southern Arkansas University

Kelly King - Business

        B.S., Texas A&M University

        M.BA., Texas A&M University

Tonya Watson - Sociology

        B.S., The University of Texas at Tyler

        M.Ed., Lamar University

        M.Ed., Lamar University

        M.S., Texas A&M University

Matt Pitts - Religion

        B.A., Texas A&M University

        M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

        DMin., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

FACILITIES

Jacksonville College is located in the northwest section of the city of Jacksonville, Texas. The campus has been occupied continuously since 1899. Native oak, pine, and paper-shell pecan trees add beauty and a restful atmosphere to the campus. Appropriate areas are provided for easy parking and for outdoor sports and activities, including tennis.

The Buckner Chapel and Gerald Orr Music Annex (1975) houses an auditorium with a seating capacity of 500, classrooms, and faculty offices.

Collins Hall, the women’s residence hall (1965), houses fifty-two students.

The C. R. Meadows Hall (1962) has housed offices and classrooms and is now being renovated as a student resident facility.

The Curtis Carroll Field House/Gymnasium (1979) houses a regulation-size basketball court, offices, and a large meeting room.

The Jimmie Little Cafeteria and Student Union Building (SUB) (1968) serves several purposes. The SUB provides space for studying, watching television, and playing various types of games, including pool, ping-pong, and electronic games. The cafeteria provides complete meals for students and college personnel at nominal cost.

The Mary S. Lewis Theater is located on Kickapoo Street, just one block west of the main campus. The facility has a proscenium arch stage and seats about 175 people.

The Mary Nell and Summers A. Norman Building (2002) is located on the corner of Travis Street and Kickapoo Street. The facility houses administrative and faculty offices, including the President, Vice Presidents, Academic Dean, Dean of Students, Registrar, Admissions, Financial Aid, and Student Accounts office. It also includes an archive room and conference rooms used for various purposes. Additionally, the Teaching and Learning Center (TLC) and reading room, along with our fiction library collection, is located in the Stevens Room of the Norman building.

Memorial Hall, a men’s residence hall (1966), is designed to accommodate forty-eight students.

The Newburn-Rawlinson House (1903) was built by the Rev. John Madison Newburn, who pastored First Baptist Church in Jacksonville. The home was purchased by Dallas L. Rawlinson and his wife, Thelma Elizabeth Douglas Rawlinson, in 1945. Both families played significant roles in the development of the city of Jacksonville. When owned by the Newburn family, the home served various functions for Jacksonville College and was purchased by the College in 1994. The house, which bears a historical marker, is currently home to the majority of our library collection, including reference materials, our non-fiction collection, periodicals, and publications issued by national, state, and local associations affiliated with the Baptist Missionary Association of America (BMAA) and the Southern Baptists of Texas Convention (SBTC). Additionally, the library subscribes to multiple online databases, the largest of which is through TexShare.These online sources give access to hundreds of additional periodicals and books. Newburn-Rawlinson also features study and tutoring areas, instructional space, student computer and printer access, and offices.  

The Pine Street Residence Hall consists of five apartments that are normally used as an additional residence hall.

The Shoffner-Thurston Maintenance Building was originally the Travis Street Baptist Church building and was renovated in 2011 to house the maintenance department of Jacksonville College.

The Weatherby Memorial Building (1952) is the former library. Since 2002, it has undergone significant renovation and now houses a computer lab, instructional space, and offices.

The Fitness Center of Jacksonville College is committed to providing a quality exercise facility that targets all levels of fitness and training for students and employees. The Jacksonville College Fitness Center is a 3,000 square foot air conditioned weight room used by Jaguar athletic teams and equipped with free weights, weight machines, exercise bicycles, treadmills, and other equipment beneficial to exercise needs. It is located on the east side of campus.

STUDENT ADMISSION

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS        

Admission decisions are based on applicants’ academic records and likelihood of success at the college level. Jacksonville College is compliant with all applicable federal non-discrimination laws, which do allow Jacksonville College to discriminate on the basis of religion to fulfill the College’s purpose. Admission decisions are based on documentation provided by the applicant. Providing false or misleading information is grounds for denial of admission or dismissal from the college if the false or misleading information is discovered after the applicant has been admitted. Admission to Jacksonville College is available by meeting the requirements in one of the applicable categories listed below.

Freshmen 

  1. Provide an official high school transcript showing graduation date and one of the following:
  1. An ACT composite score of at least 12
  2. An old SAT score of at least 590 when critical reading and math sections are totaled
  3. An SAT composite score of 680 on the new SAT
  4. Evidence of having passed Texas exit requirements (not modified or ARD exempt)
  5. Accuplacer (in-house testing) score of Math 260+, Reading 276+, Writing 276+
  6. Old (before October 2015) PSAT/NMSQT2 composite score of 107
  7. New (on/after 2015) PSAT/NMSQT2 Math 510, English 460
  8. TSI Assessment Math 350 +, English 351 +
  9. TSIA2 Assessment Math 950 +, English 945 +
  1. GED recipients must provide an official GED state-issued certificate.
  2. Evidence of meningitis vaccination within the last 5 years for all students 21 and younger.

Transfer Students 

  1. Provide evidence of admission as a regular degree-seeking student in an academic, not vocational, program of an accredited college or university
  2. Provide final transcripts from all colleges and universities attended whether credits were earned or not
  3. Provide a final high school transcript showing graduation date or official GED certificate
  4. Evidence of meningitis vaccination within the last 5 years for all students 21 and younger.

International Students 

  1. Academic Admission
  1. Proof of high school/secondary school completion is required and shall be performed by INCRED (International Credential Evaluations).  The applicant must go to their website www.InCredEvals.org to create an account and enter  their information.  INCRED charges a fee of $95. (US) for this service and a credit card is required.  When INCRED has completed their evaluation, they will notify the applicant, and INCRED’s evaluation will be forwarded to Jacksonville College.
  2. ACT or SAT not required but recommended. Without an ACT or SAT score, course placement will be based on in-house testing.
  1. Language Requirements
  1. Students schooled in English require no further proof of English proficiency.
  2. Students not schooled in English may demonstrate proficiency in one of the following ways:
  1. TOEFL (iBT) score of 50 or higher
  2. Duolingo English Proficiency Test 80 or higher
  3. IELTS overall band score of 5.5
  4. ELS completion of level 109, English for Academic Purposes
  5. English 3 Proficiency Exam (online/on-demand) score of 57
  6. iTEP Academic Test score of 3.0 or higher
  7. GED English version
  1. Evidence of meningitis vaccination within the last 5 years for all students 21 and younger.
  2. Provide evidence of sufficient funds to cover one year’s educational and living expenses.
  3. Provide a clear copy of their current passport page.

Dual Credit:         A current high school student who is taking courses may apply approved courses toward high school graduation requirements.

  1. Participating schools must complete a Dual Credit Agreement for the current academic year.
  2. A concurrent enrollment form signed by a high school official is required for each course taken.
  3. If the student will be taking courses on the Jacksonville College campus must provide evidence of meningitis vaccination within the last 5 years for students 21 and younger.
  4. Students expecting to begin their dual credit courses prior to their junior year must have a letter of recommendation from the high school counselor stating their academic record indicates ability to successfully engage in college-level learning.
  5. Homeschool high schools must sign a dual credit partnership agreement with Jacksonville College before any homeschool students will be able to register for courses. The partnership agreement may be obtained from the Admissions Office.
  6. Eligibility Requirements:
  1. An ACT composite score of at least 12
  2. An old SAT score of at least 590 when critical reading and math sections are totaled
  3. An SAT composite score of 680 on the new SAT3
  4. Evidence of having passed Texas exit requirements (not modified or ARD exempt)
  5. Accuplacer (in-house testing) score of Math 260+, Reading 276+, Writing 276+
  6. Old (before October 2015) PSAT/NMSQT2 composite score of 107
  7. New (on/after 2015) PSAT/NMSQT2 Math 510, English 460
  8. TSI Assessment Math 350 +, English 351 +
  9. TSIA2 Assessment Math 950 +, English 945 + and Essay Score of 5 - 8
  10. TSA2 Math Standard 950+ or Math Score under 950 and Math diagnostic Level 6
  11. Grade of B or higher in Algebra II and an Algebra I EOC of 4000
  1. Upon receipt of the final high school transcript showing graduation, a former dual credit student may re-apply to Jacksonville College as a freshman.

Transient: A student currently enrolled at another college or university as a degree-seeking student and who is taking courses with Jacksonville College by approval from his or her home institution  

There is a two part process for this student.

  1. Must complete a new Transient Application online for each term they wish to take courses.

2.        Must provide Jacksonville College a completed Transient Agreement Form, signed by the home institution confirming the student is in good academic standing and the student has been granted permission to take selected courses to apply toward the degree. The Transient Agreement Form is obtained once the application is completed..

3. No other documentation is required.

Non-degree: A student who is not seeking a degree but desires to take a course for credit.

  1. The student must apply and provide proof of high school completion or official transcript from another accredited college or university.
  2. The student is limited to fourteen hours as a non-degree. Further enrollment requires declaring a degree and meeting full admission standards.
  3. Financial aid is not available to non-degree seeking students.
  4. If the student will be taking courses on the Jacksonville College campus must provide evidence of meningitis vaccination within the last 5 years for students 21 and younger.

Audit:         A person who wants to take a course(s) to gain knowledge but has no desire to earn credit.

  1. No application or documentation is required. See Registrar’s Page for more information.
  2. No credit will be granted for the course.

Conditional admission may be offered for one term to a high school graduate who does not meet any of the secondary admission criteria as stated in the course catalog. Students admitted conditionally must enroll in and successfully complete a minimum of twelve semester credit hours at Jacksonville College with a GPA of 2.0 or higher in the first term. Upon successful completion of these conditional admission requirements for the first term, the student’s admission status will be moved to full admission.

The student understands that as a Christian institution the College places emphasis upon high standards of personal conduct by all students. The student agrees to abide by the rules and regulations as set forth in this catalog, the student handbook, and by the administration of the college. The student certifies that the meeting of the degree requirements for graduation from Jacksonville College is his or her responsibility and not that of the College. The student acknowledges that the College will not be held liable for his or her ability to meet the admission or degree requirements of another institution to which the student may transfer.

GENERAL COLLEGE POLICIES

CONCEALED HANDGUN POLICY

Jacksonville College chooses to OPT OUT of Campus Carry. The College does this because the majority of JC students do not meet the minimum age requirement. Those who hold permits may still store weapons in their vehicles out of sight and locked up. The College is not responsible for damage or theft to vehicles or vehicle contents. (SB1907. Z9/01/2013)

JACKSONVILLE COLLEGE FACILITIES POLICY

Jacksonville College is affiliated with the Southern Baptists of Texas Convention. The College is guided by the Bible and statements of faith. Therefore:

STUDENT RIGHTS

Upon becoming a student at Jacksonville College, the individual has entered into an agreement with the College and thereby agrees to accept and abide by the philosophy, objections, and regulations of this institution. If this agreement is broken, the student shall forfeit the privilege of attendance. Therefore, Jacksonville College insists on the right to discipline or even to expel from the campus any student who does not, in the opinion of the College, conform to the spirit and regulations of the College. On the other hand, the College firmly believes in the preservation of due process for all students in all disciplinary or grievance proceedings. The student has a right to appeal. (For more details, consult the Jacksonville College Student Handbook.)

STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

Any student who has a complaint alleging an infraction of established Jacksonville College rules, regulations, policies, or an injustice in matters of student life should request to visit with the Dean of Students or Campus Security. In matters relating to academic areas, the student should request to visit with the Academic Dean.

The student initiating a grievance may discuss his or her problem informally with the appropriate Dean, and if an agreement is reached with respect to the student’s request, no further action will be taken. If not, the student may submit a formal Grade Appeal to the Academic Dean if the matter in question pertains to academics or submit a Disciplinary Appeal Form to the Judicial Committee if the complaint is regarding disciplinary consequences. A specific process regarding a grade appeal can be found in the Grade Appeal section. A specific process regarding the appeal of a disciplinary consequence can be found in the Jacksonville College Student Handbook. The section is entitled “Student Appeals Process.” The student may present evidence relevant to the grievance raised and may be assisted or represented at the hearing by persons of his or her choice, including attorneys at the student’s expense.

NOTE: A student grievance may or may not be categorized as an appeal. The grievance procedure may instead be used by a student to request action regarding a concern.

Additional resources: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) and Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC)

STUDENT PARTICIPATION IN INSTITUTIONAL DECISION MAKING

Jacksonville College believes in obtaining input from and, when appropriate, allowing the participation of students in various decisions reached by the institution. For example, students are members of certain College councils, and surveys of students are periodically taken. However, the College staff, faculty, administration, and ultimately the Board of Trustees retain the final and unequivocal right to produce a decision, rule, or policy.

TOBACCO AND DRUG-FREE CAMPUS

In compliance with the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1986, as amended in 1989, students found in use, possession, or distribution of alcohol or controlled substances will be subject to both legal and college disciplinary action. Additional information can be found in the Jacksonville College Student Handbook.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCOMMODATIONS 

Jacksonville College complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. This compliance is pertaining to the provision of reasonable accommodations for students with a disability. In accordance with Section 504 and ADA guidelines, Jacksonville College strives to provide reasonable accommodations to students who request and require them. The Federal regulations that deal with implementing Section 504 and the ADA establish that reasonable and appropriate academic accommodations must be provided to students with disabilities to allow equal access to educational opportunities. While providing accommodation, however, institutions of higher education are not required to lower academic standards or compromise the integrity of the school, department, or program. The Office of Disability Services recommends accommodations for students with disabilities in compliance with these Federal and State mandates. Additional information can be found in the Jacksonville College Disability Accommodation Handbook.Students that have a disability requiring accommodations should contact the Office of Disability Services (counselor.504@jacksonville-college.edu; 903-586-2518 ext. 7103; Direct Line 903-589-7103).

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

The Texas Rehabilitation Commission offers assistance for tuition and non-refundable fees to students who have certain disabling conditions provided their vocational objectives have been approved by a TRC counselor. Examples of such conditions are orthopedic deformities, emotional disorders, diabetes, epilepsy, heart conditions, etc. Other services are also available to assist the disabled student to become employable. Applications for such service should be directed to: Texas Workforce Solutions Office, 2027 N. Jackson St Suite A, Jacksonville, TX 75766;

telephone number: 903-586-3688.

TITLE IX OF THE EDUCATION AMENDMENTS OF 1972

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a comprehensive federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any federally funded education program or activity. The principal objective of Title IX is to avoid the use of federal money to support sex discrimination in education programs and to provide individual citizens effective protection against those practices.

No person at Jacksonville College will, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied benefit of, or be subjected to sex discrimination, sexual harassment, or sexual misconduct under any education program or activity.

PROTECTION OF PRIVACY FOR STUDENTS AND PARENTS

In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Jacksonville College gives notice that the following directory information may be released: student’s name, physical address, email address, telephone number, date and place of birth, degrees, certifications, and awards received, date of graduation, dates of attendance, major field of study at Jacksonville College, photographs, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, and enrollment status (e.g., undergraduate or graduate; full-time or part-time).

Students may have all Directory Information withheld by submitting a Request to Release or Withhold Directory Information to the Office of the Registrar. Requests for non-disclosure will be honored by the institution until the student submits a Request to Release or Withhold Directory Information to the Office of the Registrar.

No other information may be released without written consent of the student.  Grades, social security numbers, student identification numbers, ethnic backgrounds, and student schedules may not be released to anyone other than the student. This information will not be released over the phone to anyone. Any student requesting his or her own personal information must do so in writing. No information will be released over the phone.

Parents, guardians, spouses, and others may have an interest in the student's record; however, access to or release of the educational record is only by written student consent. Students may choose to complete and submit a FERPA Education Record Access Change Form to the Office of the Registrar to allow access or release of their educational record to specific individuals.

For more information to help parents or guardians understand how FERPA regulates access to their college student’s information, visit the U.S. Department of Education website.

INSTITUTIONAL GRADUATION RATES AND CAMPUS SECURITY DISCLOSURES

Pursuant to Section 485 of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act (P.L. 101-542) and the Higher Education Technical Amendments (P.L. 102-26 and P.L. 105-18), institutional graduation rates and campus security information is made available to prospective and enrolled students. This information is made available to view on the Jacksonville College website..

JACKSONVILLE COLLEGE HONOR CODE

Each person of the Jacksonville College community is expected to uphold the Honor Code. The purpose of the Honor Code is to establish and preserve an environment of honor and integrity in the academic community. A deep faith in God is the foundation of Jacksonville College and should influence the personal and scholarly conduct of every student. Therefore, “. . . whatever you do, do it heartily, as to the Lord and not to men” (NKJV, Colossians 3:23).

A violation of the Honor Code consists of but is not limited to the following defined actions:

DEFINITIONS

  1. Lying: making a false statement made with the deliberate intent to deceive. Lying includes but is not limited to the following:
  1. Substituting for another student, or permitting another student to substitute for oneself, in taking a quiz or test.
  2. Falsifying College documents including alteration or forgery. (Disciplinary consequences for this violation are determined by the College administration.)
  3. Providing false information during the course of an investigation of an alleged violation of the JC Honor Code or the Student Code of Conduct.
  1. Stealing: taking the property of another, including College property, without permission or right.
  2. Cheating: dishonest behavior including but not limited to the following acts:
  1. Plagiarism: the act of taking or closely imitating another individual’s thoughts or words and using them as one’s own, whether by paraphrase or direct quotation, without giving credit through proper documentation; the submission of an assignment written by another student, commercial organization, or anyone other than the student.
  2. Unauthorized Assistance or Collaboration: students working together on any tests, quizzes, assignments, or exams without the instructor’s permission.
  3. Use of Unauthorized Materials: using textbooks, cell phones, laptops, calculators, or other electronic devices for tests, quizzes, or assignments without instructor’s permission.
  4. Unauthorized Dual Submission of Previous Academic Work: using any work from a previous course or another course for an assignment unless a student has received prior permission from an instructor.
  5. Other Academic Misconduct: including but not limited to stealing quizzes or exams, altering academic records including grades, sabotaging the work of another student, or unauthorized use of another student’s electronic devices; intentionally reporting a false violation of academic integrity or offering a bribe to any College member in exchange for special consideration or favors.        

DISCIPLINARY CONSEQUENCES FOR ACADEMIC VIOLATIONS:

  1. First Offense: The student will be given a zero or “F” on the test, exam, course paper, or course assignment.
  2. Second Offense (whether in the same course or another course): The student will receive an “F” in the course in which the second offense occurred.
  3. Third Offense (whether in the same course or another course): The student is subject to being withdrawn from the College by the Academic Dean.

REPORTING ACADEMIC VIOLATIONS:

  1. The instructor will complete the Academic Violation Report Form which notifies the Academic Dean and places the violation on the student’s record. This academic violation including a copy of the work in question will remain on the student’s record for the duration of the student’s enrollment at Jacksonville College.
  2. The Academic Dean, or other designated personnel, may talk with the student regarding the academic violation. (See the Jacksonville College Student Handbook.)
  3. For a second offense, the Academic Dean will notify the student regarding an “F” in the course in which the second and subsequent violation occurred.
  4. For a third offense, the Academic Dean will notify the student of his or her due process in the withdrawal procedures from the College.

APPEALS: The student may refer to the “Student Grievance Procedure” section.

COSTS

CHARGES

APPLICATION/REGISTRATION  

Note 1

International fee for non immigrant aliens        

(non-refundable)                        500.00

Transient application fee                        25.00

TUITION

Per semester hour                                                                       210.00

Audit fee per semester hour                                                      50.00

Advanced Placement/CLEP per semester hour                 25.00

Summer and Winter 1 hour courses                                        185.00

Summer and Winter 3 hour courses                                             485.00

Summer and Winter 4 hour courses                                         585.00

SPECIAL COURSE FEES

Applied music fee per course                                200.00

Science laboratory use fee per course                         38.00

Online course fee  Note 2                                                       27.00

STUDENT SERVICES (LONG TERMS ONLY)  

Note 3

Student service fee (9 hours or more)                        441.00

Student service fee (8 hours or less)                        150.00

ROOM AND BOARD

Room and board per long term (with tax)                        4046.00

Room only per long term                                              2221.00        

Board only per long term (with tax)                        1825.00

Private room surcharge                        444.00

Private suite surcharge                        888.00

Room reservation fee for student residence                            100.00

Mattress fee                        140.00

GRADUATION

Graduation fee                        25.00

Cap and gown fee                        35.00

ADDITIONAL FEES          

Technology fee per term (9 hours or more)                 549.00

Technology fee per term (8 hours or less)                 150.00

Transcript fee (for pick-up)                                         7.45

Transcript fee (mailing and electronic)                        9.25

Certified Mail/United States                                21.25

Mail/International                                                14.25

Student residence key/F.O.B replacement                 25.00

Rekey lock to student residence                                 10.00

Student ID card replacement                                 25.00

Returned check fee                                                 25.00

Administrative charge for payment plan                         20.00

Late payment fees                                                 20.00        

Placement Testing                                                 35.00

Schedule change (after courses begin)                         25.00

Late Registration                                                 25.00

Diploma Reprint fee                                         15.00

Athletic Insurance per long term                                 125.00

OPTIONAL FEES          

Laundry Facilities ($5 a week)                                 80.00

Snack Pack                                                        

Jag Bucks                                                        Any increment of 100.00

Note 1  A nonimmigrant alien student requesting an I-20 must pay the $500 non-refundable International fee.

Note 2 All students taking an online course will be charged an online course fee of $27 per online course. This fee covers the cost of SmarterMeasure Learning Readiness Assessment, Respondus Lockdown Browser and Monitor, Moonami hosting for Moodle, EZProxy, tutorial/video production, live streaming of events, and online faculty professional development.

Note 3 All students will be charged a student service fee each term. This fee covers the cost of admission to home athletic contests, institutional resources, student activities, tutoring, academic advising, library services, spiritual formation, student organizations and societies, performances and programs, servant leadership opportunities, and campus safety including cyber security (firewall, antivirus, physical security for servers).

Note 4 All students will be charged a technology fee each term. This fee covers the cost of student information system (EMPOWER), tech support (IT Helpdesk), learning management system (Moodle), writing assistance service (Turnitin.com), JagAlert, Jagmail, Google Apps for Education, network infrastructure, and instructional technology.

POLICIES

Payment is due by the end of the first week of courses except when the student has sufficient financial aid to satisfy the cost of the entire term. The assistance may come from PELL, TEG, veteran's benefits, a student loan, a Jacksonville College discount, an external scholarship, or any combination of the aforementioned.

Short terms which include May Session, Summer 1 Session, Summer 2 Session, Winter Session, and Eight Week Sessions require full payment by the first day courses begin.

FAFSA applications for financial aid must be completed for the appropriate year before a student is eligible to register for fall or spring term courses. Registration dates for each term are posted on the Jacksonville College Academic Calendar. A Financial Aid Waiver Form is available in the Office of Admissions for persons who do not wish to apply for financial aid.

Students whose financial assistance is not sufficient to cover the entire bill must pay the remaining balance in full or set up a payment plan as described below. Payment arrangements should be made with the Student Accounts before the first payment is due.

PAYMENT PLANS

Failure to meet payment obligations could result in dismissal from the College, and no transcripts or degree will be issued until the account has been cleared.

Failure to make payments by the indicated due date may result in the administrative suspension of the student from Moodle, EMPOWER, and extracurricular activities and/or all courses at Jacksonville College. The student will have five (5) business days to satisfy the payment obligation once notice of administrative suspension has been issued. If sufficient payment is not made within the five (5) day period, the student will be subject to administrative withdrawal from Jacksonville College.

Students on teams who fail to make payments by the indicated due date are suspended from their respective sport or activity and may not play, practice, or perform until their student account is current.

Failure of the student to fulfill his or her financial obligations within sixty days after the official close of the term attended or the College withdrawal date will result in deliverance of the account to a collection agency. The administration reserves the right to make decisions on an individual case basis.

IMPORTANT: Withdrawal from the College does NOT excuse the student from payment. Refund terms and time limits are given below.

Jacksonville College reserves the right to change the tuition, fees, and room and board charges at any time.

REFUNDS

(For procedures and other information relating to adding and dropping courses, withdrawing from courses, and withdrawing from College, see section VII, “Adding and Dropping Courses” and “Withdrawal from Course or College.”)

A student withdrawing from a course during a fall or spring term may receive a refund of tuition and fees according to the following schedule (processing fee applies):

  1. Through the last day to add/drop:                        100 percent
  2.  After the last day to add/drop:                        None

A student withdrawing from the College during a fall or spring term may receive a refund of tuition and fees according to the following schedule (processing fee applies):

  1.  During the first 5 instructional days of the term:                80 percent minus processing fee
  2.  During the 6th through the 15th instructional days:                65 percent minus processing fee
  3.  During the 16th through the 20th instructional days:                40 percent minus processing fee
  4.  After the 20th instructional day:                                None

A processing fee of $25 for short terms or a $50 fee for long terms will be automatically deducted from the refundable amount.

(Note: “instructional days” refers to all scheduled courses, not just the specific course or courses the student may be taking.)

If the student is receiving Title IV federal aid, a potential refund to the federal government must be calculated according to federal guidelines. Any unearned portion of the federal funds must be returned to the government. The student is held responsible to pay any outstanding balance on his or her account. This federal refund policy overrides the Jacksonville College institutional refund policy in cases of withdrawal from the College.

Any student withdrawing from a course or from the College for a summer session during the add/drop period will receive a full refund of tuition. No refund of tuition will be given after the close of the add/drop period. If Title IV federal aid is involved, the federal refund guidelines override the Jacksonville College institutional refund policy.

In no case will tuition or fee monies be refunded to a student who has been withdrawn from a course or from the College by due process of College authorities for reasons of discipline, absenteeism, or failure to meet financial obligations.

Any student withdrawing from the College or who is authorized to move out of a student residence during the term will receive a refund of prepaid board charges on a prorated basis determined by the number of days the student was in residence. Refunds on prepaid board charges will be made only in cases of illness or hardship circumstances. No refund of room charges will be made, although this policy may be modified on behalf of the student in the event of special circumstances.

WHAT ARE THE TUITION AND FEES FOR ONLINE EDUCATION STUDENTS?

WHAT IS THE TUITION FOR DUAL CREDIT STUDENTS?

The tuition for dual credit students is at a reduced rate.

SCHOLARSHIPS, DISCOUNTS, GRANTS AND FINANCIAL AID

Jacksonville College offers two basic types of aid to assist students in meeting the financial demands of attending college, neither of which have to be repaid. 

GOVERNMENTAL FINANCIAL AID

Governmental financial aid includes federal/state grants and work study.

All federal aid is based on an applicant's FAFSA results. Therefore, the first step is to complete the online Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Some information to consider before filling out the FAFSA:

  1. Eligibility for and the amount of aid is dependent upon several factors that include but are not limited to the source of income, number of students in college, number of family members, dependent or independent, student need, and maintaining satisfactory academic progress.
  2. The student will be asked for information based on his or her previous year's income tax return, so he or she should have that information readily available. Even persons who do not file a tax return because of disability or low income must fill out the form. Disability and low income can be indicated on the form.
  3. The student will be asked to select the school(s) to where he or she wants the results to be sent. The school code for Jacksonville College is 003579. The student may want to send the results to several schools in case he or she changes his or her mind before actually enrolling in one specific college.
  4. It takes approximately three working days for the application to be processed and returned to the recipient schools after submission. The FAFSA should be submitted each year after filing the previous year's tax return.
  5. Some aid is available from the State of Texas as well. The student should consult the Financial Aid Office to find out if he or she may be eligible for state financial aid and what to do to receive it.

INSTITUTIONAL AWARDS

Institutional awards are provided by the College to pay for a portion of the educational expenses of the student. See scholarship information below.

 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Institutional scholarships, discounts, and grants are awarded to students who qualify and are available in various categories. Refer to the section on “Scholarships and Applications” for details. General guidelines are outlined below.

 

  1. Students receiving institutional scholarships/discounts (except ministerial part-time scholarships and academic scholarships) must enroll for a minimum of twelve hours of associate-degree core courses each fall and spring term until core courses are completed. Students receiving academic scholarships/discounts ( Academic Dean or Departmental Scholar) must enroll for a minimum of fifteen hours of associate-degree core courses each fall and spring term until core courses are completed.

  1. Scholarship/discount monies cannot be used to pay for advanced credit or audit courses. In general, a scholarship/discount covers only tuition costs for a maximum of twelve semester hours. An individual student cannot receive benefit concurrently from more than one Jacksonville College scholarship/discount. Scholarships/discounts will be awarded according to qualifications and on a first-come, first-served basis as long as monies are available.

  1. Students receiving scholarships/discounts must attend Chapel every week. Students who are unable to attend should contact the Financial Aid Office at pgalyean@jacksonville-college.edu.
  2. Scholarships/discounts are awarded on an annual basis for one academic year (fall and spring terms). Once awarded for that academic year, the type of scholarship/discount cannot be changed. Maintaining a scholarship/discount is dependent upon meeting specified academic performance and course attendance requirements. Scholarships/discounts may also be reduced or revoked if directed by the administration for due cause. Contact the Financial Aid Office or Admissions Office for further details.
  3. If the scholarship/discount recipient’s date of degree conferment occurs in May, the student is expected to participate in Jacksonville College’s spring graduation ceremony.

GOVERNMENTAL FINANCIAL AID

All students enrolled at Jacksonville College who receive financial aid through the Federal Title IV Programs must meet the Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) requirements.

 

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 1.50 during the first year, 24 to 32 hours, and complete at least 67% of hours attempted.  Students who have not met these requirements will be placed on financial aid warning for the following long term.  Students who have been placed on financial aid warning must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 after the completion of the following long term or they will be placed on financial aid suspension.

 

Students who maintain the GPA requirements will continue receiving financial aid the following term. 

 

Any student receiving an “I” in a course may fulfill the course requirements and receive a proper grade within forty-five days after the end of the term in which the “I” was given.  Any student who has more than 90 semester hours of college work attempted will be ineligible for financial aid at Jacksonville College unless they change majors.

 

Exceptions to the above levels of Satisfactory Academic Progress may be made by the Financial Aid Officer based upon documented data indicating unusual and unavoidable hardships which may influence the student’s ability to make “Satisfactory Academic Progress.”

 

HARDSHIP POLICIES FOR TITLE IV FEDERAL AID PROGRAM AND TUITION EQUALIZATION GRANT

SCHOLARSHIPS, DISCOUNTS, GRANTS AND APPLICATIONS

Academic

Ministry

Online

Other

ADDITIONAL FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION

Additional Forms

 

BENEFITS FOR VETERANS AND OTHER ELIGIBLE PERSONS

Before the school term begins, veterans and other eligible persons should apply directly to an office of the Veterans Administration (VA) online at https://www.vets.gov/education/apply/ for a Certificate of Eligibility. The Certificate of Eligibility should then be submitted to the School Certifying Official within the Admissions Department. VA students must also provide a Joint Service Transcript and any other transcripts from previously attended institutions. A veteran entitled to benefits under these laws will be reimbursed by the Veterans Administration for tuition based on the amount allowed according to the program under which the veteran is eligible for benefits. Information for Federal benefits such as the Post-9/11 GI Bill® and Dependents Educational Assistance can be found at www.gibill.va.gov.

Visit the VA’s website http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill for additional information concerning your educational benefits or call the toll free number at (888) 442-4551.

All courses taken must meet graduation requirements for the student’s particular program of study. A student must maintain a 2.0 GPA to receive veterans benefits.The student shall pay College charges upon registration.

 

ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR VETERANS AND OTHER ELIGIBLE PERSONS

Academic progress requirements for the minimum satisfactory academic progress required of veterans and other eligible persons receiving VA educational benefits is a 2.00 ("C" average) cumulative grade-point average (GPA). This satisfactory progress requirement is in addition to any other general college requirements. Academic progress for veterans and other eligible persons is evaluated at the end of each term and policies are administered by the Academic Dean's Office of Jacksonville College under the sanctioning legal guidelines of the Veterans Administration. Students who fail to achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.00 shall be placed on probation for the following term. If the student achieves a term GPA of 2.00 or better during the probationary term, but has not achieved the required cumulative GPA of 2.00, the student may continue on probation for one more term. If the student on probation fails to achieve a term GPA of 2.00 at the end of the first probationary term, the student shall be reported to the Veterans Affairs Regional Office as making unsatisfactory progress. A student who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.00 at the end of the second consecutive probationary term shall be reported to the Veterans Affairs Regional Office as making unsatisfactory progress. In either case, unsatisfactory progress shall result in enforced scholastic withdrawal from the College for the next long-term term. However, a student may make an appeal to the Academic Dean and a special academics committee for a hearing and under special circumstances may not be forced to withdraw. The requirements for special admission shall be documented and agreed to by the student. A student who returns to the College subsequent to the date of the withdrawal status shall return on probation unless and until the cumulative GPA reaches 2.00 or more. 

 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND INFORMATION

The Administrative Vice President is in charge of administrative matters pertaining to the student’s academic work.

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Associate Degree—Students in this program choose a field of study and select course work comprising sixty hours of Texas Core Curriculum elements and various electives related to their chosen field.

Junior College Diploma—This two-year program may be terminal but also allows a student to receive a diploma as recognition for completion of sixty hours of coursework, only partially comprising Texas Core Curriculum elements, which is required for an associate degree.

Continuing Education—Certain regularly scheduled courses and special short courses are offered to the public as continuing education (non-college credit). Ten hours of course time will be counted as one (1.0) Continuing Education Unit (C.E.U.). A fee is charged specific to each course. No refunds will be given after the first scheduled meeting of the course.

ENROLLMENT OF CURRENT HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

A current student in a U.S. high school may enroll as a student at Jacksonville College and receive college credit for courses taken and completed successfully (“concurrent enrollment”). Both college credit and high school credit for certain courses taken and completed successfully may be awarded by specific approval of the high school (“dual credit enrollment”). Students beginning dual courses prior to their junior year will need to submit a letter of recommendation from the high school counselor. The high school must give permission for students to enroll and should indicate whether the course will be accepted for dual credit. Both concurrent enrollment and dual credit enrollment students, whether on the college campus or on the high school campus, are subject to the published Jacksonville College admission procedures and requirements and other applicable policies. A course offered on the high school campus is administered by the same policies as those taught on campus, including instructor qualifications, course syllabus, student placement in English or mathematics courses, student grades, and evaluation of course instruction. The student may not enroll in college-level English or math if placement scores indicate that developmental education is needed in those areas. Developmental education cannot be provided while still in high school. Courses taken by current high school students are placed on an unofficial Jacksonville College transcript that can be presented to another college/university for evaluation of transfer credit. The student should contact the transfer school to determine what courses are required and which Jacksonville College courses satisfy those requirements. The College provides library and other student services to students.

Home-schooled students are also eligible to participate in the dual credit/concurrent enrollment program. The student must provide a high school transcript, and a letter of permission from the home school counselor if the student begins dual courses prior to junior year, in addition to the application credentials of all high school students. (See "Admission Requirements.")

TESTING AND PLACEMENT

Jacksonville College is committed to a continuing effort to ensure a proper and effective education for all students. To assist students in having a successful college experience, Jacksonville College requires that certain minimum scholastic standards be met before admission into college-credit English and mathematics courses.

These standards are based on one or more of the following criteria:

If the minimum standards are not met or if transcripts do not clearly indicate appropriate placement, the student will be required to enroll in lab supported English and/or mathematics courses. Details of the testing and placement policies and procedures can be obtained by contacting the Director of Admissions.

ADVANCED CREDIT

At the request of the student, Jacksonville College may give advanced credit for courses listed in the section “Course Offerings.” The necessary requirements for advanced credit are for the student to complete the AP/CLEP Credit Request Form and submit official AP/CLEP scores to Jacksonville College. The fee for advanced credit is $25.00 per semester hour; this cost is not covered by scholarship or financial aid monies. After this fee is paid and all forms and scores submitted to the Registrar’s office, the credit(s) will be posted on the student’s academic transcript at the end of the term of enrollment at Jacksonville College. Credit will be shown as “CR” (“credit”) for each specific course. Such credit will not be used for calculation of grade-point average, but the hours will count toward graduation at Jacksonville College. A maximum of fifteen hours will be given. A student cannot receive advanced credit for courses in which he or she is currently enrolled or has been previously enrolled.

ONLINE EDUCATION

In order to meet the changing educational needs of its students, Jacksonville College provides online education opportunities via the internet as well as hybrid courses that combine face-to-face instruction with internet delivery. Courses taught by online education will meet the same learning outcomes as comparable courses taught by face-to-face delivery on the college campus and are awarded the same amount of credit as the comparable courses. Online education courses are required to contain the same amount of direct instructional time as face-to-face courses. This is achieved through the use of faculty directed activities and assignments.

Students enrolling in online education courses must have completed admissions requirements prior to registering for courses and must participate in a required on-campus or online orientation. All students taking online education courses must also complete the SmarterMeasure Learning Readiness Assessment. Assistance for online education students is available through the Online Education Office at online.education@jacksonvillecollege.edu. 

A student who enrolls in an online education course is responsible for maintaining access to the equipment required for successful completion of the course. Computers with internet access are available for student use in several locations on campus. Computers with webcams and internet access are available for student use in the library. Hours of operation are posted at each site. In addition, wireless network access is available on campus for students to connect to the internet with mobile devices.

TRANSFER-IN STUDENTS FROM OTHER COLLEGES OR UNIVERSITIES

Academic transcripts from all colleges/universities previously attended will be evaluated for possible transfer credit to Jacksonville College according to the following guidelines:

  1. The course must have been taken for college credit and must represent content and level of instruction resulting in student competencies at least equivalent to those of students enrolled in Jacksonville College degree programs.

  1. No grade of "F" will be accepted in transfer. Grades of "D" will be accepted for credit; grades of "C" or higher in ENGL 1301 and 1302 are required for an associate degree.

  1. The College accepts a maximum of 45 hours transferred in. However, all Jacksonville College graduation requirements are applicable to transfer-in credits.

  1. Only freshman and sophomore level courses will transfer to Jacksonville College. These courses normally start with a “1” or a “2.”

After applying these criteria, courses and grades accepted for credit will be shown on the Jacksonville College academic transcript. These courses will be included in calculation of the cumulative grade-point average. If a course has been repeated, it is considered only one time, using the higher grade, for grade-point average calculation and for total hours completed.

If a transfer student does not meet Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements, financial aid may be denied.

HONORS PROGRAM

The Honors Program at Jacksonville College exists to provide ambitious students additional opportunities to develop higher level thinking skills and connect subject areas to the community through service, faith, and culture. Students are required to fill out the Honors Program application and admission will be determined by the Academic Committee of the Programming Council based upon the following initial criteria:

  1. Standardized test scores
  1. ACT composite score of 25 or sub-score of 25 in Reading,

English, Mathematics, or Science or

b) SAT combined score of 1150 on Critical Reading and Mathematics or a subscore of 570 in Critical Reading, Writing, or Mathematics or

2. a cumulative GPA of 3.25 after 12 hours of college credit

3. Require no college developmental courses

4. Completed application and essay

To enter into a contract for honors credit in a specific course, the student must be approved by the instructor of that course. In order to receive honors credit, the student must earn a grade of "B" or better in the course. Graduation from the Honors Program requires completion of at least five courses with honors credit.

If an Honors Program participant’s date of degree conferment occurs in May, the student is expected to participate in Jacksonville College’s spring graduation ceremony.

ACADEMIC ADVISING

Academic advising is provided by an advisor assigned to each student enrolled at Jacksonville College. These advisors will assist the student during registration for courses and throughout the term. Advising may also be provided by the Enrollment Office or Office of the Academic Dean.

During advising, the student and the advisor should be aware of the following information and policies:

  1. The standard academic load shall be twelve semester hours of college credit courses per term; however, it is recommended that students planning to graduate within four terms should enroll in a minimum of fifteen hours of college courses per term..

  1. A student is considered to be “full-time” if he or she is taking at least twelve semester hours in a fall, spring, or (Summer 1 plus Summer 2) term; “half-time” for six to eleven semester hours; and “less than half-time” for less than six semester hours. “Part-time” refers to students taking less than twelve semester hours.

  1. A Senior Director must approve a student’s program if the student is registering for nineteen (19) or more semester hours. No student may register for more than twenty-one term hours in a long-term. Use the Request to Approve Over Maximum Semester Credit Hour Limit form to submit for consideration.
  2. A Senior Director must approve more than ten semester hours in any given short term or session and more than eight hours in Winter and May Sessions. Use the Request to Approve Over Maximum Semester Credit Hour Limit form to submit for consideration.

  1. Developmental or lab-supported courses cannot be taken without approval of a Senior Director if the student is qualified for the corresponding credit courses.

  1. A student who has less than thirty semester hours of degree credit is classified as a freshman; a student who has thirty or more semester hours of degree credit is classified as a sophomore.

COURSE ATTENDANCE

Students should be present to facilitate the learning process and to develop effective learning habits. Attendance requirements are outlined by the individual instructor in his or her course syllabus.

Instructors are encouraged to consider not only a punitive policy whereby a student’s grade is reduced for excessive absences or tardiness, but also a motivational policy whereby grades may be increased for limited absences. Such policies should be included in the course syllabus. Make-up work is at the discretion of the instructor; the student is responsible for requesting the work.

Absences due to official college business that is sponsored by appropriate college personnel shall not be counted or penalized. Such absences must be submitted by the sponsor to the faculty. Jury duty is considered an excused absence; the student must provide verification of duty. Instructors shall allow make-up work for jury duty absences; however, requesting the work is the responsibility of the student.

ADDING AND DROPPING COURSES

During the add/drop period only, a student may add or drop a course or courses. Courses dropped during the Add/Drop period will not appear on the student’s permanent college transcript. The student should initiate the drop process within the JC Academic Calendar add/drop timeframe by emailing the Registrar’s Office and his/her advisor. Students will be assessed a fee of $25 per day to drop courses after courses begin and before the drop period ends. The JC Academic Calendar may be found on the College website under Academics.

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSE OR COLLEGE

JC allows a possible withdrawal grade of W. The withdrawal grade of W counts as hours attempted and has financial aid ramifications, but it does not affect GPA. A student may withdraw from a course through the date indicated on the JC Academic Calendar and receive a grade of W. Withdrawing from a course is not an option during the add/drop period or after the withdrawal deadline.

To withdraw from any and all courses, a student must complete a Course(s) Withdrawal Request Form. The form will only be active and available during the time it may be used.

In certain cases, withdrawal from the College may become necessary and can be initiated by the College administration for due cause. Due cause may include but is not limited to: failure to satisfy financial obligations to the college or failure to attend courses. In any case, proper withdrawal must involve use of the official withdrawal form and procedures by an official representative to secure an honorable withdrawal. The process must be initiated and concluded through the Office of the Registrar. Official withdrawal from courses will take effect only when the student has been cleared by all appropriate departments, including clearance from Student Accounts regarding financial obligations. Failure to attend courses or departure from the campus does not constitute official withdrawal. In an honorable withdrawal, initiated by the deadline indicated on the JC Academic Calendar, a grade of “W” will be given. If proper withdrawal is not concluded by the date listed on the JC Academic Calendar, the student will receive grades as assigned by his or her instructors. Withdrawal after the deadline to withdraw will not be approved.

EXAMINATIONS

Examinations and quizzes are given at regular intervals each term. These tests, along with other requirements as set forth by the instructor, determine the final course grade that is reported to the Registrar. Students who miss an appointed test may be able to take a makeup test at the discretion of the instructor.

FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Final examinations are an integral part of the course at the end of each term. Instructors should schedule and administer exams during Final Exam days as designated on the JC Academic Calendar.

GRADING SYSTEM AND REPORTS

The final term grade shall be determined by the instructor, based on appraisal of the student’s progress in the course. Examinations, daily grades, participation, additional representative examples of course objectives, and such shall be considered in determining the grade. Unofficial status grades are given at mid-term during long-terms (fall/spring). At the end of each term, the student's final grade for each course is posted in EMPOWER. However, the final grade report may not be released if the student has not met all financial obligations to the College or has not completed all admission requirements. Grades are released to a parent or guardian only if the student has completed a FERPA Education Record Access Change Form.

Letter         Numerical  Interpretation                              Grade Points per

                                                                                         Semester Hour

A                90-100            Excellent                                 4

B                80-89              Good                                         3

C                70-79              Fair                                         2

D                60-69              Passing                                 1

F                0-59                Failing                                 0

W                ----                  Withdrew                                 N/A

I                   ----                  Incomplete Work                         N/A

CR              ----                  Advanced Credit                         N/A 

Any student receiving an “I” in a course during a long term has 45 days to fulfill the course requirements and receive a proper grade. Any student receiving an “I” in a course during a short term has 15 days to fulfill the course requirements and receive a proper grade. The student is responsible for making arrangements with the instructor to fulfill the course requirements. If the course requirements are not fulfilled, and a proper grade is not assigned within the 45-day or 15-day period, the “I” automatically becomes an “F, and the Registrar will transcript the grade accordingly.

The grade-point average for a term is calculated by first multiplying the course semester hours by the grade points per semester hour based on the course grade. These values are summed for all courses for the term and the total value divided by the total semester hours attempted. Note that courses with grades of “W,” “I,” and “CR” are not included in the calculation.

A cumulative grade-point average includes all courses taken at Jacksonville College and other collegiate work as shown on the Jacksonville College academic transcript.

If the same course has been repeated, it is counted only one time, using the higher grade, for grade-point average calculation and for total hours completed.

CREDIT HOUR POLICY

The semester hour is the basis for credit at Jacksonville College in which a credit hour is at least one hour of direct instruction and a minimum of two hours out of class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester.  The same equivalencies apply to shorter terms such as winter, maymester and summer. See SACSCOC Credit Hour Policy for further information

GRADE APPEAL PROCESS

A student may contest a final semester grade by submitting a Grade Appeal Form no later than 45 calendar days during long semesters or 15 calendar days during short semesters from the close of the semester in which the grade was given. Students should attempt to informally resolve their situation directly with the faculty member before completing a Grade Appeal Form. Click here for the Grade Appeal Form. The Grade Appeal Committee (composed of three department chairs, not to include any instructor involved in the appeal) will confer with the student and the instructor to seek resolution to the problem. After investigation, the committee will determine whether or not the appeal has merit and any subsequent action needed. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the committee, the student may appeal the decision to the Academic Dean who will investigate the matter further and render a final decision. All proceedings shall be documented and placed in the student’s file.

TRANSCRIPT OF GRADES

A permanent record (transcript) is kept of each student’s coursework and grades at Jacksonville College. Jacksonville College has authorized the National Student Clearinghouse to provide transcript ordering via the Web at any time, 24/7. Students and alumni can order transcripts using any major credit card. The base cost for a transcript is $7.45, price changes depending on requesters sending method (Ex: $9.25 for electronic). Transcripts can be sent via USPS mail service, electronic, or picked up in person upon notification that order is ready. The credit card will only be charged after the order has been completed. Jacksonville College accepts only transcript requests that come through National Student Clearinghouse. A transcript will be sent only if the student has met all financial obligations and completed all admission requirements to the College.

Unofficial transcripts of current and most former students can be printed from the Jacksonville College website. Log in to EMPOWER on the Jacksonville College homepage and select Student Records. Next, select Transcript (Detail). Click the Show/Hide button depending on the terms desired. Then click Printable Version to print the transcript. Please contact help@jacksonville-college.edu for assistance with login credentials for EMPOWER.

PRESIDENT’S LIST

At the close of each long-term (fall/spring), those students who have excelled scholastically shall be recognized by appearing on the President’s List. This honor is reserved for students completing twelve hours or more and having a grade of  “A” for all hours attempted for the term.

DEAN’S LIST

At the close of each long-term (fall/spring), those students who have excelled scholastically shall be recognized by appearing on the Academic Dean’s List. This honor is reserved for students completing twelve hours or more and having a term grade-point average of 3.50 or more with no term course grade lower than a “C.”

OTHER STUDENT HONORS

Academic Excellence Awards—At the end of each spring term, instructors choose outstanding students in their disciplines to receive awards for academic excellence.

C.R. Meadows Award—At the end of the spring term, the President of the College may choose an outstanding student to receive this award that is given in memory of C.R. Meadows, an outstanding pastor and past President of Jacksonville College.

Curtis M. Carroll Award—The faculty selects an outstanding student for this award at the end of each spring term. The award is in memory of Curtis M. Carroll, past President of Jacksonville College.

Phi Theta Kappa—Jacksonville College hosts the Alpha Beta Alpha chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the international honor society for junior colleges. To be eligible for membership, a student must be of good moral character with full rights and privileges of citizenship in his or her country, possess recognized qualities of leadership, have  established  academic excellence according to the faculty, have completed twelve hours of courses leading to an associate degree, and have at least a 3.50 grade-point average. No transfer work may be considered in determining grade-point eligibility. A student convicted of a felony or crime involving moral turpitude may not be considered for membership.

SCHOLASTIC PROBATION

The academic progress of all students is determined at the conclusion of each fall and spring term. A student who does not attain a cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 1.50 or more after a total of fifteen semester hours have been attempted will be given a written notice of alert regarding satisfactory academic progress. If a cumulative GPA of 1.50 or more is not attained after a total of thirty semester hours, the student will be placed on Scholastic Probation. Students on probation may carry a maximum of fifteen semester hours during a fall or spring term. This maximum number of hours may be reduced by the Office of the Academic Dean in the interest of the student. If a student on Scholastic Probation takes short-term (summer) courses, the GPA will be checked at the end of the summer term to determine its effect on the Scholastic Probation status.

ENFORCED SCHOLASTIC WITHDRAWAL

The academic progress of all students is determined at the conclusion of each fall and spring term. A student who does not attain a cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2.00 or more after a total of forty-five semester hours have been attempted will be placed on Enforced Scholastic Withdrawal and may not enroll for the next long-term (fall/spring). However, a student may make an appeal to the Office of the Academic Dean and a special academic or enrollment committee for a hearing and under certain circumstances may not be forced to withdraw. The requirements for special admission shall be documented and agreed to by the student. A student who returns to the College subsequent to the date of the withdrawal status shall return on Scholastic Probation unless and until the cumulative GPA reaches 2.00 or more. If a student on Enforced Scholastic Withdrawal takes short-term (summer) courses, the GPA will be checked at the end of the summer term to determine effect on the Enforced Scholastic Withdrawal status.

Enforced Scholastic Withdrawal also takes effect when a student does not obtain an honorable withdrawal from the College.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY FOR STANDARD OF WORK

Each student is responsible for knowing whether he or she has met all standards for academic performance, scholarship, discount, grant and/or financial aid requirements, or other requirements. Students placed on probation or withdrawal by Jacksonville College or who transfer from other institutions while on probation or withdrawal are held responsible for determining their scholastic status at all times, especially prior to registration and/or before receipt of a formal notification of status issued by the college.

TRANSFER TO ANOTHER INSTITUTION

Honorable dismissal is granted by Jacksonville College to students who wish to transfer to another institution under the following conditions: acceptable conduct and character, minimum grade requirements met, academic file complete, proper withdrawal, and all financial obligations satisfied. It is the student’s responsibility to request an official transcript to be sent to the transferring institution.

STUDENT LIFE

Jacksonville College supports and encourages activities and services that are an integral part of a well-rounded campus life. The primary purpose of these programs and services is to supplement the quality of academic, social, and religious aspects of student life.

Students are represented on the committees of the Programming Council, the People Council, the Process Council, and the Partners and Property Council. Purposes of these committees include evaluation of student services and program needs according to the current school population; identification of student needs to help make college life better; and recommendation of services and programs that will aid in the areas of physical, mental, and spiritual student growth.

For additional details concerning student life, consult the Jacksonville College Student Handbook.

CHAPEL

Chapel is scheduled once a week during the long-terms (fall/spring). Chapel attendance is mandatory for all degree seeking students. Students who do not attend chapel will receive a failure that will be transcripted on the student's academic record and can negatively impact his/her ability to earn an associate degree at Jacksonville College.

RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

Jacksonville College provides on-campus residences for all students. Student residences are under the supervision of the Director of Residential Services. All resident students will be charged for a meal plan. An $100.00 room reservation fee is required prior to moving into student residence. Any damage to property by the student shall be charged to the student’s account through the Student Accounts Office.

STUDENT MAIL

In the interest of maintaining effective communication, students will be sent notice via student email when mail has arrived in their name. The student is responsible for picking up his or her packages from the Jag Store or Director of Residential Services.

ADVISING/COUNSELING SERVICES

Academic advising is provided by an advisor assigned to each student enrolled at Jacksonville College. These advisors are available during their scheduled office hours to help students configure course schedules, discuss degree plans, and assess career fields of study. Students can view their advisor’s name in EMPOWER.

Spiritual advising is available to all students through the Dean of Students. Many College personnel, including various administrators, faculty, and staff, are also able to assist students in the area of spiritual concerns.

Professional counseling services, through partners, are available for any student enrolled at Jacksonville College. Jacksonville College staff will assist in coordinating services for any student experiencing distress. If a student needs more than crisis intervention, he or she is referred to one of the many organizations that partner with Jacksonville College which provide counseling services for our students. Some of the organizations do not charge a fee, and some organizations charge by the student’s ability to pay. Jacksonville College also partners with the Crisis Center of Anderson and Cherokee Counties to provide free counseling services to female students who are victimized by child abuse, sexual assault, or family/dating violence.  Information about substance abuse and treatment services is available through the Dean of Students, Director of Residential Services, and literature distributed on campus. 

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Jacksonville College provides several organizations for the benefit of students and to make the college experience both pleasant and profitable. All students are encouraged to participate in one or more of the following student organizations.

B.J. Albritton Ministerial Alliance is for ministerial students and affords its members an opportunity to enjoy fellowship with other ministers and to participate in a program of spiritual emphasis and training.

Jacksonville College Singers represent the College at churches, rallies, civic events, and    educational groups throughout various regions of the country.

Freshman Class Officers are elected each September to lead fellow freshmen in activities and events which benefit the class and Jacksonville College. One major event is sponsored by the Freshmen Class during the spring term. Officers include President, Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer.

Sophomore Class Officers are elected each September to lead fellow sophomores in activities and events which will benefit the class and Jacksonville College. One major event is sponsored by the Sophomore Class during the fall term. Officers include President, Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer.

Intercollegiate Sports offers the Jacksonville College Jaguars and Lady Jaguars athletic teams the opportunity to compete in Region XIV of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). All sports teams recruit a high level of talent while maintaining the mission of Jacksonville College. Teams include:

All currently enrolled Jacksonville College students receive free admission to home games upon presentation of a valid Jacksonville College Student ID at the gate.

Phi Theta Kappa, the world's largest and most prestigious honor society for junior colleges, is hosted by the Alpha Beta Alpha Chapter of Jacksonville College. To be eligible for membership, a student must be of good moral character with full rights and privileges of citizenship in his or her country, possess recognized qualities of leadership, have established academic excellence according to the faculty, have completed twelve hours of coursework leading to an Associate Degree, and have at least a 3.5 GPA (excluding transfer work). A student convicted of a felony or crime involving moral turpitude may not be considered for membership. Inductions will only be held in the fall and spring terms.

Student Government Association (SGA) executive officers are elected each September to serve in the prestigious position of student body leaders. Coordinated by the Dean of Students, officers and organizational representatives are expected to exemplify a high personal standard of behavior. A student on academic or disciplinary probation will not qualify. Students desiring to serve in SGA must have at least a 2.5 GPA. Any officer whose GPA drops below a 1.75 in any given term will lose his or her office. The SGA is responsible for planning spiritual, social, and educational activities for the benefit of the students, church affiliates, and the community. Offices include President, 1st Vice President, 2nd Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Reporter. SGA is also comprised of representatives from each student organization. Each organization is responsible for electing one representative to attend all SGA meetings for the year.

Walter Prescott Webb Historical Society is designed for students interested in history—with a focus on local and state history. Members have the opportunity to conduct individual and/or collaborative research, perform community service, participate in campus activities, visit historic sites, attend state conferences, and enter award competitions. The Barnwell Anderson Chapter of this organization is named for a highly respected and appreciated instructor who taught for many years at Jacksonville College.

Jaguar Effective Teachers (JETS) is open to all students interested in pursuing education as a career path. Members have the opportunity for fellowship, collaboration, and learning from guest speakers.

STUDENT OFFICE

All students desiring to hold an office in any college-approved organization must have and maintain a specified grade-point average. Students can consult the “Student Organization” section of the Jacksonville College Course Catalog or the Jacksonville College Student Handbook for details.

ATHLETICS

Jacksonville College currently fields varsity athletic teams in men’s and women’s basketball, golf, tennis, soccer, cross country, track and field. All teams compete at the national level as proud members of the NJCAA and Region XIV Athletic Conference. To be eligible for intercollegiate varsity sports, a student must meet the standards as set forth by the NJCAA and Jacksonville College.

DISCIPLINE

Discipline outside the course is the responsibility of the Dean of Students. Each student is expected to know the requirements of conduct while enrolled at Jacksonville College and to abide by those regulations. Requirements are written in the Jacksonville College Student Handbook, which is accessible to all students on the College website. Conduct violations will result in appropriate disciplinary action. This may range from a verbal warning to a dismissal from the College depending on the severity of the violation. Texas HB 449 requires institutions of higher education to transcript a notation stating that the student is ineligible to reenroll in the institution for a reason other than an academic or financial reason.  At the same time, the College firmly believes in the preservation of due process for all students in all disciplinary proceedings. The student has a right to appeal. Students should consult the Jacksonville College Student Handbook for details. 

ALUMNI AND FORMER STUDENTS ASSOCIATION

One of the greatest assets of Jacksonville College is the Alumni and Former Students Association, which promotes the fellowship of former students and the interests of Jacksonville College. All students, ex-students, alumni, and faculty members are automatically eligible for membership in the association. The association has a regular annual meeting and sponsors the annual homecoming activities.

GRADUATION: ASSOCIATE DEGREE, JUNIOR COLLEGE DIPLOMA

Students may graduate on any of three annual dates in May, December, or August. Specific dates are given in the JC Academic Calendar and on the Registrar’s Page on the College website. A formal graduation commencement ceremony is held each May at the close of the spring term.

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION

An application for graduation must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by the specified dates listed on the JC Academic Calendar for each of the three annual graduation times. The necessary fees must be paid at the time the application is submitted. Students should apply for graduation once they have registered for their final term of attendance at Jacksonville College. A student must file a completed graduation application by the deadline printed in the College’s Academic Calendar. Graduation applications are available online.

A student may apply for one of the following: Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, or Junior College Diploma. If a student qualifies for one associate degree, the other associate degree may be obtained with the successful completion of an additional fifteen hours at Jacksonville College. Students who lack nine hours or less for graduation may also participate in the May commencement ceremony. The degree or diploma will be awarded at the next scheduled graduation date upon completion of the requirements for graduation.

Students applying for graduation also need to complete an Alumni Information Form using the link provided.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

  1. The student must satisfy all College admission requirements, including the submission of all college transcripts.
  2. The student must complete and submit an Application to Receive Associate Degree and must fulfill degree requirements as set forth in the current Jacksonville College Course Catalog under which he or she is applying to graduate.        
  3. The student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.000. This includes all courses taken at Jacksonville College and all courses officially transferable to JC from another institution. If a course is repeated, the semester hour credit is counted only once. The higher grade of the repeated course is used for grade-point average calculation.
  4. A maximum of two (2) semester hours of physical education activity courses may be counted toward graduation.
  5. The student must make satisfactory settlement of all financial accounts.
  6. The student must have a passing semester enrollment in chapel for each term of degree seeking enrollment at Jacksonville College (minimum of one term and maximum of four terms).
  7. If graduating in May, the student must participate in the May commencement ceremony unless the student is an online only student or the student is specifically excused by the Enrollment Department. The student must submit a waiver request to the Enrollment Department asking for permission to be excused. Waivers may be obtained on the College website.
  8. Developmental courses in reading, writing, and mathematics do not count toward the sixty semester hours of credit requirements.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE

  1. Completion of a total of at least sixty semester hours of credit. Twelve of the sixty must be of sophomore level, and at least fifteen must be completed at Jacksonville College.

  1. Completion of the following:

General Requirements (49-51 hrs)

Communication (9-10 hrs)

-- ENGL 1301 or 1401 (Grade of “C” or higher)

-- ENGL 1302 (Grade of “C” or higher)

Choose one of the following:

-- SPCH 1311, 1315, 1318, 1321

Fine Arts (3 hrs)

Choose one of the following:

-- ARTS 1301

-- DRAM 1310

-- MUSI 1306

Government (6 hrs)

-- GOVT 2305

-- GOVT 2306

American History (6 hrs)

-- HIST 1301

-- HIST 1302

Humanities (3 hrs)

Choose one of the following:

-- ENGL 2307, 2322, 2323, 2333, 2341

-- DRAM 2361, 2362

-- HIST 2301, 2321, 2322

-- HUMA 1301, 2323

-- PHIL 1304, 2306, 2321

-- SPAN 2311, 2312

Mathematics (3-4 hrs)

Choose one of the following:

-- MATH 1314, 1316, 1324, 1325, 1132/1332, 1332, 1342, 1350, 1351, 1414, 1442, 2413, 2414

Natural Sciences (6-8 hrs)

Choose two of the following:

-- BIOL 1322, 1406, 1407, 1411, 1413, 2401, 2402, 2404, 2420

-- CHEM 1411, 1412

-- GEOL 1303, 1304

-- PHYS 1405, 2425, 2426

Social/Behavioral Sciences (3 hrs)

Choose one of the following:

-- ECON 2301, 2302

-- GEOG 1303

-- PSYC 2301, 2314, 2319

-- SOCI 1301, 1306

Religion (6 hrs)

Choose two of the following:

-- BIBL 1301, 1302, 2301, 2321

-- PHIL 1304, 2321

Physical Education (1 hr) (Students over 25 years of age, veterans, and those who have a physical disability may apply for a waiver of this requirement through the Office of the Registrar. Waivered students still have to complete 60 hours.)

Choose one PHED course worth 1 hour

Learning Frameworks (3 hrs)

-- EDUC 1300

Foreign Language (6 hrs)

Choose two of the following:

-- SPAN 1411, 1412, 2311, 2312

-- LATI 1411

Electives (9-11 hrs, or remaining hours after General Requirements)

        A passing grade for Chapel for each term of degree seeking enrollment (minimum of one term and maximum of four terms).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE

  1. Completion of a total of at least sixty semester hours of credit. Twelve of the sixty must be of sophomore level, and at least fifteen must be completed at Jacksonville College.

  1. Completion of the following specific courses:

General Requirements (49-51 hrs)

Communication (9-10 hrs)

-- ENGL 1301 or 1401 (Grade of “C” or higher)

-- ENGL 1302 (Grade of “C” or higher)

Choose one of the following:

-- SPCH 1311, 1315, 1318, 1321

Fine Arts (3 hrs)

Choose one of the following:

-- ARTS 1301

-- DRAM 1310

-- MUSI 1306

Government (6 hrs)

-- GOVT 2305

-- GOVT 2306

American History (6 hrs)

-- HIST 1301

-- HIST 1302

Humanities (3 hrs)

Choose one of the following:

-- ENGL 2307, 2322, 2323, 2333, 2341

-- DRAM 2361, 2362

-- HIST 2301, 2321, 2322

-- HUMA 1301, 2323

-- PHIL 1304, 2306, 2321

-- SPAN 2311, 2312

Mathematics (3-4 hrs)

Choose one of the following:

-- MATH 1314, 1316, 1324, 1325, 1332, 1342, 1350, 1351, 1414, 1442, 2413, 2414

Natural Sciences (6-8 hrs)

Choose two of the following:

-- BIOL 1322, 1406, 1407, 1411, 1413, 2401, 2402, 2404, 2420

-- CHEM 1411, 1412

-- GEOL 1303, 1304

-- PHYS 1405, 2425, 2426

Social/Behavioral Sciences (3 hrs)

Choose one of the following:

-- ECON 2301, 2302

-- GEOG 1303

-- PSYC 2301, 2314, 2319

-- SOCI 1301, 1306

Religion (6 hrs)

Choose two of the following:

-- BIBL 1301, 1302, 2301, 2321

-- PHIL 1304, 2321

Physical Education (1 hr) (Students over 25 years of age, veterans, and those who have a physical disability may apply for a waiver of this requirement through the Office of the Registrar. Waivered students still have to complete 60 hours.)

Choose one PHED course worth 1 hour

Learning Frameworks (3 hrs)

-- EDUC 1300

Electives (9-11 hrs, or remaining hours after General Requirements)

        A passing grade for Chapel for each term of degree seeking enrollment (minimum of one term and maximum of four terms).

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE JUNIOR COLLEGE DIPLOMA

  1.  Completion of a total of at least sixty semester hours of credit; at least fifteen must be completed at Jacksonville College.

 

  1. Completion of the following specific courses:

English 1301 or 1401 (Grade of “C” or higher)

ENGL 1302 (Grade of “C” or higher)

        A passing grade for Chapel for each term of degree seeking enrollment (minimum of one term and maximum of four terms).

GENERAL EDUCATION LEARNING OUTCOMES

GRADUATION HONORS

To graduate Cum Laude (Honor), the student must earn a cumulative grade-point average of 3.4000 or more with no grade lower than a “C” included in the average.

To graduate Magna Cum Laude (High Honor), the student must complete at least fifteen semester residence hours at Jacksonville College and earn a cumulative grade-point average of 3.8000 or more with no grade lower than a “C” included in the average.

To graduate Summa Cum Laude (Highest Honor), the student must complete at least fifteen semester residence hours at Jacksonville College and earn a cumulative grade-point average of 4.0000.


SUGGESTED GENERAL COURSE SEQUENCE LEADING TO ASSOCIATE DEGREES

Jacksonville College strongly recommends that a student who plans to transfer to a senior college or university consult the catalog or communicate with appropriate officials at the transfer institution to ensure that courses taken will satisfy the degree requirements at the senior institution.

OPTION 1: FRESHMAN YEAR

First Term                                                     Second Term

                Hours                                                                              Hours

ENGL 1301

3

ENGL 1302

3

HIST 1301

3

HIST 1302

3

Religion

3

Religion

3

 EDUC 1300

3

Math

3

Fine Arts

Chapel

3

P

Humanities  

Chapel          

 3

P

 

15-16

 

15-16

OPTION 1: SOPHOMORE YEAR

Third Term                                                     Fourth Term

           Hours                                                                                        Hours

Speech

3

Social Science

3

GOVT 2305

3

GOVT 2306

3

Science

3-4

Science

3-4

Foreign Language (AA)/Elective

3-4

Phys. Education Activity

1

Foreign Language (AA)/Elective

3

Foreign Languages(AA)Elective

3-4

 Chapel

P

Foreign Language(AA)/Elective

Chapel

3-4

P

 

15-17

 

15-18

OPTION 2: FRESHMAN YEAR

First Term                                                                        Second Term

                Hours                                                                              Hours

ENGL 1301

3

ENGL 1302

3

HIST 1301

3

HIST 1302

3

Math

3

Science

3-4

 EDUC 1300

Chapel

3

P

Math

Chapel

3

P

 

12

 

12-13

  

Winter or May                                          Summer 1                                Summer 2                      

 Fine Arts

3  hours

    Elective    3 hours  

Elective   3 hours

OPTION 2: SOPHOMORE YEAR

 

Third Term                                          Winter                                 Fourth Term

                             Hours                                                                                               Hours

Speech

3

Humanities  3 hours          Social Science

3

GOVT 2305

3

      GOVT 2306

3

Science

3-4

      Religion

3

Foreign Language (AA)/Elective

3-4

      Phys. Education              

      Activity

1

 Chapel                          P

 

       Foreign Language            

       (AA)/ Elective

Chapel

3-4

P

 

12-1

 

13-1

CURRICULAR OFFERINGS

 

TEXAS COMMON COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

 

EXAMPLE: BUSI 1301

BUSI 1301 is course subject abbreviation

BUSI 1301         1 = Freshman Level

BUSI 1301         3 = Number of semester credit hours course equals

BUSI 1301         01 = Course Identifier

 

EXAMPLE: BIOL 2420

BIOL 2420 is course subject abbreviation

BIOL 2420         2 = Sophomore Level

BIOL 2420         4 = Number of semester credit hours course equals

BIOL 2420         20 = Course Identifier

 

EXAMPLE: MATH 0406

MATH 0406 is course subject abbreviation

MATH 0406   0 = Developmental Level

MATH 0406   4 = Number of semester credit hours course equals

NOTE: These hours are not applicable towards graduation requirements.

MATH 0406   06 = Course Identifier

 

Jacksonville College subscribes to the Texas Common Course Numbering System. The purpose of the system is to assist students who are transferring between participating institutions. The system utilizes single unique course alphabetic prefixes and numbers to identify freshman and sophomore level courses that are common among member colleges and universities. Such courses are noted on the following pages with a shaded box on the common course numbering system.

 

Jacksonville College courses that are not a part of the common course numbering system may transfer as equivalent courses or electives. The student should consult the Admissions Office of the transfer institution for confirmation of transferability of these courses.

 

If a particular course has a “Prerequisite,” that course may not be taken unless the prerequisite requirement is met.

TEXAS CORE CURRICULUM

The core requirements for the state of Texas follow. These requirements may be satisfied at Jacksonville College upon completion of the listed courses.

Communication (9-10 credit hours):

-ENGL 1301, 1401

-ENGL 1302

-SPCH 1311, 1315, 1318, 1321

Fine Arts (3 credit hours):

-ARTS 1301

-DRAM 1310

-MUSI 1306

Government (6 hours):

-GOVT 2305

-GOVT 2306

American History (6 credit hours):

-HIST 1301

-HIST 1302

Humanities (3 credit hours):

-ENGL 2307, 2322, 2323, 2333, 2341

-DRAM 2361, 2362

-HIST 2301, 2321, 2322

-HUMA 1301, 2323

-PHIL 1304, 2306, 2321

-SPAN 2311, 2312

Mathematics (3 or 4 credit hours):

-MATH 1314, 1316, 1324, 1325, 1132/1332, 1332, 1342, 1350, 1351, 1414, 1442, 2413, 2414

Natural Science (6-8 credit hours)

-BIOL 1322, 1406, 1407, 1411, 1413, 2401, 2402, 2404, 2420

-CHEM 1411, 1412

-PHYS 1405, 2425, 2426

Social and Behavioral Science (3 hours): 

-ECON 2301, 2302

-GEOG 1303

-PSYC 2301, 2314, 2319

-SOCI 1301, 1306

Institutionally Designated Option (6 hours)

Physical Education (1 hour)

Learning Frameworks (3 hours)

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 

ACCOUNTING

BUSINESS

COMPUTER SCIENCE

ECONOMICS

ETHICS

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, PSYCHOLOGY, SOCIOLOGY, AND FINE ARTS

EDUCATION

PSYCHOLOGY

SOCIOLOGY

ART

DRAMA

MUSIC

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES

ENGLISH

LATIN

SPANISH

SPEECH

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS

DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL STUDIES AND PHILOSOPHY

BIBLICAL STUDIES

PHILOSOPHY

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE

BIOLOGY

GEOLOGY

CHEMISTRY

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

PHYSICS

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE  

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

GEOGRAPHY

GOVERNMENT

HISTORY

HUMANITIES

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

In certain courses, instructional hours each week may be scheduled individually with the instructor due to the nature of the course and will show as TBA on the term schedule. Additionally, lab hours may be scheduled to be completed by each student individually at a time convenient to his/her schedule and will show as TBA on the term schedule.

ACCT 2301

Principles of Financial Accounting

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting as prescribed by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as applied to transactions and events that affect business organizations. Students will examine the procedures and systems to accumulate, analyze, measure, and record financial transactions. Students will use recorded financial information to prepare a balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of shareholders’ equity to communicate the business entity’s results of operations and financial position to users of financial information who are external to the company. Students will study the nature of assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity while learning to use reported financial information for purposes of making decisions about the company. Students will be exposed to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

Prerequisite: Meet TSI college-readiness standard for Mathematics; or equivalent. Recommended corequisite: MATH 1324 Mathematics for Business & Social Sciences.

Semester Hour Credit: 3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

ACCT 2302

Principles of Managerial Accounting

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting appropriate for all organizations. Students will study information from the entity’s accounting system relevant to decisions made by internal managers, as distinguished from information relevant to users who are external to the company. The emphasis is on the identification and assignment of product costs, operational budgeting and planning, cost control, and management decision making. Topics include product costing methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation.

Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 Principles of Financial Accounting

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

ACCT 2401

Principles of Financial Accounting

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting as prescribed by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as applied to transactions and events that affect business organizations. Students will examine the procedures and systems to accumulate, analyze, measure, and record financial transactions. Students will use recorded financial information to prepare a balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of shareholders’ equity to communicate the business entity’s results of operations and financial position to users of financial information who are external to the company. Students will study the nature of assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity while learning to use reported financial information for purposes of making decisions about the company. Students will be exposed to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

Prerequisite: Meet TSI college-readiness standard for Mathematics; or equivalent. Recommended corequisite: MATH 1324 Mathematics for Business & Social Sciences.

Semester Hour Credit: 4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 1 (completed weekly by each student at a time convenient to his/her schedule)

ACCT 2402

Principles of Managerial Accounting

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting appropriate for all organizations. Students will study information from the entity’s accounting system relevant to decisions made by internal managers, as distinguished from information relevant to users who are external to the company. The emphasis is on the identification and assignment of product costs, operational budgeting and planning, cost control, and management decision making. Topics include product costing methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation.

Prerequisite: ACCT 2401 Principles of Financial Accounting

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 1 (completed weekly by each student at a time convenient to his/her schedule)

ARTS 1301

Art Appreciation

A general introduction to the visual arts designed to create an appreciation of the vocabulary, media, techniques, and purposes of the creative process. Students will critically interpret and evaluate works of art within formal, cultural, and historical contexts.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications

Introduces and develops foundational skills in applying essential and emerging business productivity information technology tools. The focus of this course is on business productivity software applications, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation graphics, data analytics, and business-oriented utilization of the internet.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

BIOL 1322

Nutrition & Diet Therapy

This course introduces general nutritional concepts in health and disease and includes practical applications of that knowledge. Special emphasis is given to nutrients and nutritional processes including functions, food sources, digestion, absorption, and metabolism. Food safety, availability, and nutritional information including food labels, advertising, and nationally established guidelines are addressed.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

BIBL 1301

Survey of the Old Testament

An introductory survey of the literature and message of the Old Testament that includes the Pentateuch, the Historical Books, the Poetical Books, and the Prophets.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

BIBL 1302

Survey of the New Testament

An introductory survey of the literature and message of the New Testament that includes the Gospels, the Acts, the Pauline letters, the General Letters, and the Apocalypse.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

BIBL 2301

Hermeneutics

An introduction to the interpretation of the biblical text with an emphasis in preparing the student to engage the text for application. Includes the history of biblical interpretation, the significance of literary genre for biblical interpretation, and the principles of general hermeneutics. Students will also demonstrate knowledge of the resources and methods of biblical research.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

BIBL 2321

Apologetics

An introductory survey of the basic issues in Christian apologetics, including foundations, methods, and challenges. The student will examine the relationship between faith and reason while examining major worldviews and contemporary cultural issues. Finally, evangelism and the formation of a cohesive apologetic response will be explored.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

BIOL 1406

Biology for Science Majors I

Fundamental principles of living organisms will be studied, including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Concepts of cytology, reproduction, genetics, and scientific reasoning are included. Laboratory activities (three hours per week) will reinforce the fundamental principles of living organisms, including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Study and examination of the concepts of cytology, reproduction, genetics, and scientific reasoning are included. Laboratory use fee required.

Recommended prerequisite: MATH 1314 or 1414 Successful completion of College Algebra or concurrent enrollment in higher-level mathematics is recommended.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

BIOL 1407

Biology for Science Majors II

The diversity and classification of life will be studied, including animals, plants, protists, fungi, and prokaryotes. Special emphasis will be given to anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution of plants and animals. Laboratory activities (three hours per week) will reinforce study of the diversity and classification of life, including animals, plants, protists, fungi, and prokaryotes. Special emphasis will be given to anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution of plants and animals. Laboratory use fee required. Recommended prerequisite: MATH 1314 or 1414 Successful completion of College Algebra or concurrent enrollment in higher-level mathematics is recommended.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

BIOL 2401

Anatomy and Physiology I

Anatomy and Physiology I is the first part of a two-course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including cells, tissues and organs of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special senses. Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. The lab provides a learning experience for exploration of human system components and basic physiology. Systems to be studied include integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and special senses. Laboratory use fee required.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

BIOL 2402

Anatomy and Physiology II

Anatomy and Physiology II is the second part of a two-course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including the following systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive (including nutrition), urinary (including fluid and electrolyte balance), and reproductive (including human development and genetics). Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. The lab provides a learning experience for exploration of human system components and basic physiology. Systems to be studied include endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive (including nutrition), urinary (including fluid and electrolyte balance), and reproductive (including human development and genetics). Laboratory use fee required.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

BIOL 2404

Anatomy & Physiology

(Specialized, single-semester course, lecture + lab) Study of the structure and function of human anatomy, including the neuroendocrine, integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive, urinary, reproductive, respiratory, and circulatory systems. Content may be either integrated or specialized.This course cannot replace BIOL 2401 or BIOL 2402 but can be used as a preparation for Biol 2401 or as a prerequisite for certain certificate programs like the LVN program. This course is not adequate for the RN or BSN programs as BIOL 2401 and BIOL 2402 are required.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

BIOL 2420

Microbiology for Non-Science Majors

This course covers basics of culture and identification of bacteria and microbial ecology. This course is primarily directed at pre-nursing and other pre-allied health majors and covers basics of microbiology. Emphasis is on medical microbiology, infectious diseases, and public health.Laboratory use fee required.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

BUSI 1301

Business Principles

This course provides a survey of economic systems, forms of business ownership, and considerations for running a business. Students will learn various aspects of business, management, and leadership functions; organizational considerations; and decision-making processes. Financial topics are introduced, including accounting, money and banking, and securities markets. Also included are discussions of business challenges in the legal and regulatory environment, business ethics, social responsibility, and international business. Emphasized is the dynamic role of business in everyday life.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

BUSI 1307

Personal Finance

Course covers topics to include personal and family accounts, budgets and budgetary control, bank accounts, charge accounts, borrowing, investing, insurance, standards of living, renting or owning a home, wills, and trusts. This course is not part of the business field of study and may not transfer toward a degree in business.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

BUSI 2301

Business Law

The course provides the student with foundational information about the U.S. legal system and dispute resolution, and their impact on business. The major content areas will include general principles of law, the relationship of business and the U.S. Constitution, state and federal legal systems, the relationship between law and ethics, contracts, sales, torts, agency law, intellectual property, and business law in the global context.

Prerequisite: High school coursework in U.S. history and government, or equivalent.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

CHEM 1411

General Chemistry I

Fundamental principles of chemistry for majors in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering; topics include measurements, fundamental properties of matter, states of matter, chemical reactions, chemical stoichiometry, periodicity of elemental properties, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, solutions, properties of gases, and an introduction to thermodynamics and descriptive chemistry. Basic laboratory experiments (three hours per week) supporting theoretical principles presented; introduction of the scientific method, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports. Laboratory use fee required.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

CHEM 1412

General Chemistry II

Chemical equilibrium; phase diagrams and spectrometry; acid-base concepts; thermodynamics; kinetics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; an introduction to organic chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Basic laboratory experiments (three hours per week) supporting theoretical principles presented; introduction of the scientific method, experimental design, chemical instrumentation, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports. Laboratory use fee required.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1411.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

COSC 1301

Introduction to Computing

Overview of computer systems—hardware, operating systems, the Internet, and application software including word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, and databases. Current topics such as the effect of computers on society, and the history and use of computers in business, educational, and other interdisciplinary settings are also studied. This course is not intended to count toward a student's major field of study in business or computer science.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

COSC 1336

Programming Fundamentals I

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of structured programming, and provides a comprehensive introduction to programming for computer science and technology majors. Topics include software development methodology, data types, control structures, functions, arrays, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging. This course assumes computer literacy.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

COSC 1337

Programming Fundamentals II

This course focuses on the object-oriented programming paradigm, emphasizing the definition and use of classes along with fundamentals of object-oriented design. This course includes basic analysis of algorithms, searching and sorting techniques, and an introduction to software engineering processes. Students will apply techniques for testing and debugging software.

Prerequisite: COSC 1336.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

CRIJ 1301

Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course provides a historical and philosophical overview of the American criminal justice system, including the nature, extent, and impact of crime; criminal law; and justice agencies and processes.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

CRIJ 1306

Court Systems and Practices

A study of the court system as it applies to the structures, procedures, practices and sources of law in American courts, using federal and Texas statutes and case law.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

CRIJ 1310

Fundamentals of Criminal Law

A study of criminal law including application of definitions, statutory elements, defenses and penalties using Texas statutes, the Model Penal Code, and case law. The course also analyzes the philosophical and historical development of criminal law and criminal culpability.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

CRIJ 2328

Police Systems and Practices

This course examines the establishment, role, and function of police in a democratic society. It will focus on types of police agencies and their organizational structure, police-community interaction, police ethics, and use of authority.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

DRAM 1310

Theater Appreciation

Survey of theater including its history, dramatic works, stage techniques, production procedures, and relation to other art forms. Participation in productions may be required. Required for all theater majors and all students receiving theater scholarship.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

ECON 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics

An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

ECON 2302 Principles of Microeconomics

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

EDUC 1300

Learning Frameworks

A study of the: research and theory in the psychology of learning, cognition, and motivation; factors that impact learning, and application of learning strategies. Theoretical models of strategic learning, cognition, and motivation serve as the conceptual basis for the introduction of college-level student academic strategies. Students use assessment instruments (e.g., learning inventories) to help them identify their own strengths and weaknesses as strategic learners. Students are ultimately expected to integrate and apply the learning skills discussed across their own academic programs and become effective and efficient learners. Students developing these skills should be able to continually draw from the theoretical models they have learned.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

EDUC 1301

Introduction to the Teaching Profession

An enriched, integrated pre-service course and content experience that provides active recruitment and institutional support of students interested in a teaching career, especially in high need fields. The course provides students with opportunities to participate in early field observations at all levels of P-12 schools with varied and diverse student populations and provides students with support from college and school faculty, preferably in small cohort groups, for the purpose of introduction to and analysis of the culture of schooling and classrooms. Course content should be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards; and the course must include a minimum of 16 contact hours of field experience in P-12 classrooms.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

EDUC 2301

Introduction to Special Populations

An enriched, integrated pre-service course and content experience that provides an overview of schooling and classrooms from the perspectives of language, gender, socioeconomic status, ethnic and academic diversity, and equity with an emphasis on factors that facilitate learning. The course provides students with opportunities to participate in early field observations of P-12 special populations and should be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards. Must include a minimum of 16 contact hours of field experience in P-12 classrooms with special populations.

Prerequisite: EDUC 1301 Introduction to the Teaching Profession

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

ENGL 1301

Composition I

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis. Acceptable placement score required.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

ENGL 1302

Composition II

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 with a grade of “C” or better.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

ENGL 1401 Composition and Rhetoric I with Lab

This course is designed to develop critical thinking skills through the study and practice of using various principles in the writing process: invention, drafting, revising, editing, research, and documentation. An emphasis on rhetorical choices, intended audience, purpose, organization, and style combine to focus on academic writing as a way to promote communication, critical analysis, and learning while providing a workshop for development of academic skills with support for successful completion of the course.

Prerequisite: acceptable placement scores/exemptions.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 1 (completed weekly by each student at a time convenient to his/her schedule)

ENGL 2307

Creative Writing I

Practical experience in the techniques of imaginative writing. May include fiction, nonfiction, poetry, screenwriting, or drama. 

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

ENGL 2311

Technical and Business Writing

Intensive study of and practice in professional settings. Focus on the types of documents necessary to make decisions and take action on the job, such as proposals, reports, instructions, policies and procedures, email messages, letters, and descriptions of products and services. Practice individual and collaborative processes involved in the creation of ethical and efficient documents.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

ENGL 2322

British Literature I

A survey of the development of British Literature from the Anglo-Saxon Age to the Eighteenth Century. Students will study and research works of prose, poetry, and fiction in relation to their historical, linguistic, and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions. Student research will produce documented analysis of a work by a selected author.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 with a grade of “C” or better.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

ENGL 2323

British Literature II

A survey of the development of British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions. Student research will produce documented analysis of a work by a selected author.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 with a grade of “C” or better.

Semester Hour Credit: 3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

ENGL 2333

World Literature II

A survey of world literature from the seventeenth century to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1301 with a grade of “C” or better.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

ENGL 2341 Forms of Literature

Single-semester course that studies one or more literary genres including, but not limited to poetry, fiction, drama, and film.

Prerequisite: "C" or higher in ENGL 1301.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

GEOG 1303

World Regional Geography

This course is an introduction to the world’s major regions seen through their defining physical, social, cultural, political, and economic features. These regions are examined in terms of their physical and human characteristics and their interactions. The course emphasizes relations among regions on issues such as trade, economic development, conflict, and the role of regions in the globalization process.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

GEOL 1303

Physical Geology

Introduction to the study of the materials and processes that have modified and shaped the surface and interior of Earth over time. These processes are described by theories based on experimental data and geologic data gathered from field observations. Laboratory activities will cover methods used to collect and analyze earth science data.  

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

GEOL 1304

Historical Geology

A comprehensive survey of the history of life and major events in the physical development of Earth as interpreted from rocks and fossils.

Laboratory activities will introduce methods used by scientists to interpret the history of life and major events in the physical development of Earth from rocks and fossils.

Prerequisites: GEOL 1303 Physical Geology

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

GOVT 2305

Federal Government

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

GOVT 2306

Texas Government

(Texas Constitution & topics) Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and intergovernmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

GOVT 2389

Academic Cooperative

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical hands-on experience in government. In conjunction with class seminars, the individual student will set specific goals and objectives in the study of human social behavior and/or social institutions.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

HIST 1301

United States History I

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

HIST 1302

United States History II

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

HIST 2301

Texas History

A survey of the political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of Texas from the pre-Columbian era to the present. Themes that may be addressed in Texas History include: Spanish colonization and Spanish Texas; Mexican Texas; the Republic of Texas; statehood and secession; oil, industrialization, and urbanization; civil rights; and modern Texas.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

HIST 2321

World Civilization I

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of the world from the emergence of human cultures through the 15th century. The course examines major cultural regions of the world in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania and their global interactions over time. Themes include the emergence of early societies, the rise of civilizations, the development of political and legal systems, religion and philosophy, economic systems and trans-regional networks of exchange. The course emphasizes the development, interaction, and impact of global exchange.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

HIST 2322

World Civilization II

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of the world from the 15th century to the present. The course examines major cultural regions of the world in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania and their global interactions over time. Themes include maritime exploration and transoceanic empires, nation/state formation and industrialization, imperialism, global conflicts and resolutions, and global economic integration. The course emphasizes the development, interaction, and impact of global exchange.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

HIST 2389 Academic Cooperative

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical hands-on experience in history. In conjunction with class seminars, the individual student will set specific goals and objectives in the study of human social behavior and/or social institutions.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

HUMA 1301

Introduction to Humanities I

This stand-alone course is an interdisciplinary survey of cultures focusing on the philosophical and aesthetic factors in human values with an emphasis on the historical development of the individual and society and the need to create.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

HUMA 2323 World Cultures

This course is a general study of diverse world cultures. Topics include cultural practices, social structures, religions, arts, and languages. 

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

LATI 1411

Beginning

Latin 1

Course study in Latin grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis on the value of Latin as a background for the study of English and modern foreign languages

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 1

MATH 1132 Contemporary Mathematics Lab (Quantitative Reasoning)

Co-requisite for MATH 1332 Contemporary Math ONLY. This course cannot be taken independently.

Corequisite: Enrollment in MATH 1332 required.

Semester Hour Credit:  1

Instructional Hours Each Week: 0

Lab Hours Each Week: 1

MATH 1314

College Algebra

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included.

Prerequisite: "C" or higher in MATH 0408 or acceptable placement score/exemption.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

MATH 1316

Plane Trigonometry

In-depth study and applications of trigonometry including definitions, identities, inverse functions, solutions of equations, graphing, and solving triangles. Additional topics such as vectors, polar coordinates and parametric equations may be included.

Prerequisite: MATH 0408 or acceptable placement score/exemption. Recommended prerequisite: MATH 1314.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

MATH 1324 Mathematics for Business & Social Sciences

The application of common algebraic functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and rational, to problems in business, economics, and the social sciences are addressed. The applications include mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest and annuities; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; and probability, including expected value.

Prerequisite: "C" or higher in MATH 0408 or acceptable placement score/exemption.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

MATH 1325 Calculus for Business & Social Sciences

This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and integration of elementary functions, with emphasis on applications in business, economics, and social sciences. This course is not a substitute for MATH 2413, Calculus I.

Prerequisite: MATH 1314, 1414 or 1324.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

MATH 1332 Contemporary Mathematics (Quantitative Reasoning)

Intended for Non STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) majors.

Topics include introductory treatments of sets and logic, financial mathematics, probability and statistics with appropriate applications. Number sense, proportional reasoning, estimation, technology, and communication should be embedded throughout the course. Additional topics may be covered.

Prerequisite: "C" or higher in MATH 0408 or acceptable placement score/exemption.

Corequisite: Enrollment in MATH 1132 required without acceptable placement score/exemption.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

MATH 1342 Elementary Statistical Methods

Collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing using appropriate technology.

Prerequisite: "C" or higher in MATH 0408 or acceptable placement score/exemption.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

MATH 1350 Mathematics for Teachers I

This course is intended to build or reinforce a foundation in fundamental mathematics concepts and skills. It includes the conceptual development of the following: sets, functions, numeration systems, number theory, and properties of the various number systems with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking.

Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or 1414.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

MATH 1351 Mathematics for Teachers II

This course is intended to build or reinforce a foundation in fundamental mathematics concepts and skills. It includes the concepts of geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking.

Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or 1414.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

MATH 1414 College Algebra with Lab

A bridge course composed of a three hour credit course and a one hour developmental math lab that offers a brief review of topics from Intermediate Developmental Algebra, then proceeds in an in-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included.

Prerequisite: "A" in MATH 0406 or acceptable placement score.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 1

MATH 1442 Elementary Statistical Methods with Lab

A bridge course composed of a three hour credit course and a one hour developmental math lab that offers a brief review of topics from Intermediate Developmental Algebra, then proceeds in a study of collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing using appropriate technology.

Prerequisite: "A" in MATH 0406 or acceptable placement score.

Semester Hour Credit: 4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 1

MATH 2413 Calculus I

Limits and continuity; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; definition of the derivative of a function and techniques of differentiation; applications of the derivative to maximizing or minimizing a function; the chain rule, mean value theorem, and rate of change problems; curve sketching; definite and indefinite integration of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions, with an application to calculation of areas.

Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or 1414; MATH 1316 recommended.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 1

MATH 2414

Calculus II

A thorough investigation of differentiation and integration of transcendental functions; parametric equations and polar coordinates; techniques of integration; sequences and series; and improper integrals.

Prerequisite: MATH 2413.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 1

MEDT 1370

Medical Terminology I

A two-semester study of the origin and structure of basic medical terminology, stressing the understanding of prefixes, suffixes, roots, abbreviations of common medical terminology, and the utilization of these basic components in a variety of biomedical applications. MEDT 1370 provides an overview of general terminology and then covers individual systems of the human body (i.e. respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, etc.). Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in spelling, pronunciation, and definitions of common medical terms in each of the systems.

Semester Hour Credit: 3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

MEDT 1371

Medical Terminology II

A two-semester study of the origin and structure of basic medical terminology, stressing the understanding of prefixes, suffixes, roots, abbreviations of common medical terminology, and the utilization of these basic components in a variety of biomedical applications. MEDT 1371 is a continuation of MEDT 1370 and includes the cardiovascular, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in spelling, pronunciation, and definitions of common medical terms in each of the systems.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

MUSI 1306

Music Appreciation

Understanding music through the study of cultural periods, major composers, and musical elements, illustrated with audio recordings and live performances. This course fulfills the fine arts requirement for an associate degree, but does not count toward music requirements for a music degree.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHED 1114

PHED 1115

PHED 2114

PHED 2115

General Physical Activity I, II, III, IV

Fundamental knowledge of and participation in various physical education activities. Skills of organized games and bodybuilding exercises are taught and practiced.

Semester Hour Credit:  1

Instructional Hours Each Week: 0

Lab Hours Each Week: 1

PHED 1122

PHED 1123

PHED 2122

PHED 2123

Varsity Athletics I, II, III, IV

Participation in varsity athletic programs by female/male athletes. To include varsity competition and practice by NJCAA rules.

Semester Hour Credit:  1

Instructional Hours Each Week: 0

Lab Hours Each Week: 1

PHED 1146

PHED 1147

PHED 2146

PHED 2147

Recreational Activities and Games I, II, III, IV

Instruction and participation in physical and recreational activities and games. Recreational activities and games such as golf, billiards, table tennis and other racquet sports.

Semester Hour Credit:  1

Instructional Hours Each Week: 0

Lab Hours Each Week: 1

PHED 1301

Foundations of Kinesiology

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to human movement that includes the historical development of physical education, exercise science, and sport. This course offers the student both an introduction to the knowledge base, as well as, information on expanding career opportunities.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHED 1304

Personal/ Community Health

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals, concepts, strategies, applications, and contemporary trends related to understanding personal and/or community health issues. This course also focuses on empowering various populations with the ability to practice healthy living, promote healthy lifestyles, and enhance individual well-being.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHED 1306

First Aid

Instruction and practice for emergency care. Designed to enable students to recognize and avoid hazards within their environment, to render intelligent assistance in case of accident or sudden illness, and to develop skills necessary for the immediate and temporary care of the victim. Successful completion of the course may enable the student to receive a certificate from a nationally recognized agency.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHED 1308

Sports Officiating

The purpose of the course is to study officiating requirements for sports and games with an emphasis on mechanics, rule interpretation, and enforcement.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHED 1321

Coaching/Sports/ Athletics I

Study of the history, theories, philosophies, rules, and terminology of competitive sports. Includes coaching techniques.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHED 1336

Introduction to  Recreation

Fundamental theory and concepts of recreational activities with emphasis on programs,planning, and leadership.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHED 1338

Concepts of Physical Fitness

This course is designed to familiarize students with knowledge, understanding and values of health related fitness and its influence on the quality of life emphasizing the development and implementation of fitness programs.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHED 1346

Drug Use and Abuse

Study of the use, misuse, and abuse of drugs and other harmful substances in today's society. Physiological, sociological, pharmacological and psychological factors will be emphasized.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHED 2356

Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

Prevention and care of athletic injuries with emphasis on qualities of a good athletic trainer, avoiding accidents and injuries, recognizing signs and symptoms of specific sports injuries and conditions, immediate and long-term care of injuries, and administration procedures in athletic training.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHIL 1304 Introduction to World Religions

A comparative study of world religions, including but not limited to Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Semester Hour Credit: 3  

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHIL 2306 Introduction to Ethics

The systematic evaluation of classical and/or contemporary ethical theories concerning the good life, human conduct in society, morals, and standards of value.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHIL 2321 Philosophy of Religion

A study of the major issues in the philosophy of religion such as the existence and nature of God, the relationships between faith and reason, the nature of religious language, religious experience, and the problem of evil.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PHYS 1405

Elementary Physics I

Conceptual level survey of topics in physics intended for liberal arts and other non-science majors. Also included are laboratory experiments that emphasize a conceptual understanding of physics.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

PHYS 2425

University Physics I

Fundamental principles of physics, using calculus, for science, computer science, and engineering majors; the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion, physical systems and thermodynamics; and emphasis on problem solving. Basic laboratory experiments supporting and involving the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion and physical systems; experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.

Prerequisite: MATH 2413

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

PHYS 2426

University Physics II

Principles of physics for science, computer science, and engineering majors, using calculus, involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics. Laboratory experiments supporting and involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics; experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.

Prerequisites: PHYS 2425, MATH 2414

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 3

PSYC 2314

Lifespan Growth and Development

Life-Span Growth and Development is a study of social, emotional, cognitive and physical factors and influences of a developing human from conception to death.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

PSYC 2319

Social Psychology

Study of individual behavior within the social environment. May include topics such as the socio-psychological process, attitude formation and change, interpersonal relations, and group processes, self, social cognition, and research methods.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

SOCI 1301

Introduction to Sociology

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race/ethnicity, and deviance.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

SOCI 1306

Social Problems

Application of sociological principles and theoretical perspectives to major social problems in contemporary society such as inequality, crime and violence, substance abuse, environmental issues, deviance, or family problems.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

SPAN 1411

Beginning Spanish I

Basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students will acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the beginner level.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 1 (completed weekly by each student at a time convenient to his/her schedule)

SPAN 1412

Beginning

Spanish II

Continued development of basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the high beginner to low intermediate level.

Prerequisite: SPAN 1411.

Semester Hour Credit:  4

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 1 (completed weekly by each student at a time convenient to his/her schedule)

SPAN 2311

Intermediate Spanish I

The consolidation of skills acquired at the introductory level. Further development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis on comprehension, appreciation, and interpretation of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.

Prerequisite: SPAN 1412 or successful completion of two years of high school Spanish.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

SPAN 2312

Intermediate Spanish II

Consolidation of skills acquired at the introductory level. Further development of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is on comprehension, appreciation, and interpretation of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.

Prerequisite: SPAN 2311.

Semester Hour Credit: 3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

SPCH 1315

Public Speaking

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking

context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as the ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

Semester Hour Credit:  3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0

SPCH 1321 Business and Professional Communication

Study and application of communication within the business and professional context. Special emphasis will be given to communication competencies in presentations, dyads, teams, and technologically mediated formats.

Semester Hour Credit: 3

Instructional Hours Each Week: 3

Lab Hours Each Week: 0