SS7 Social Studies                                                                                                                                  Page  of

Units:

Unit 1 - What is Big History?

Unit 2 - The Big Bang

Unit 3 - Stars & Elements

Unit 4 - Our Solar System & Earth

Unit 5 - Life

Unit 6 - Early Humans

Unit 7 - Agriculture & Civilization

Unit 8- Expansion and Interconnection

Unit 9: Acceleration

To what extent has the Modern Revolution been a positive or a negative force?

Unit 10: The Future

What is the next threshold?




Unit Title

Unit 1 - What is Big History? 

Timeframe 

13 Days

Unit Summary

Where did everything come from?  How did we get to where we are now?  Where do humans fit in?  Where are things heading?  These are questions that origin stories of different cultures have addressed for thousands of years.  Big History attempts to answer them by examining the entire past of the Universe using the best available ideas from disciplines such as astronomy, chemistry, biology, and history.  Throughout the course, you’ll explore different scales of time and space and view human history from new angles.  You’ll learn what we know and what we don’t, consider our place in the Universe, and develop your own ideas for what the future may hold.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

     Why do we look at things from far away and close up?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

Big History is a course that tells the story of the Universe from the Big Bang to the present, which means you and your students are going to be looking at billions of years of history.

Scale

Seeing yourselves as part of the history of everything can help you and your students understand your place in the Universe. Big History brings together a broad range of historical accounts and many different temporal and spatial scales. In your own life, you can ask yourself, “What is my first memory?” Or you can ask about your family history or the history of your country. But you can also ask about the history of humanity, of life on Earth, or of the Solar System. In the same way, you can ask about the history of the entire Universe, and you can then try to see how all these stories fit together

Origin Stories

Every society has its own history and origin stories. Origin stories focus on the most important questions of our existence; they tell us how all the components of our world were created, and by doing so they demonstrate how each of us is linked to everything else. Big History weaves evidence and insights from many scientific and historical disciplines into accessible origin stories that account for everything within the Universe. Big History tells the origin stories as told by modern science.

Ways of Knowing and Understanding

The Big History course relies on information from people other than just historians, which is not typical for a history course. Your students will consider what scholars from many disciplines have to say about the past, including scholars in physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology, anthropology, and of course, history. This type of approach, in which you and your students consider the viewpoints of many different scholars about the same topic, is called an interdisciplinary approach. Your students will learn that when they use the perspectives of many different disciplines to help them answer complex questions, they’ll inevitably get a fascinating and complex answer.

Thresholds of Increasing Complexity

Obviously, you can’t cover everything that’s happened in the last 13.8 billion years. In Big History, we use guiding criteria that determine what gets included in the course and what gets left out. These criteria are defined as the eight thresholds of increasing complexity. These are the ideas critical to the story of Big History and they guide decisions about the resources that have been chosen for you to use in teaching the course. You and your students will spend time learning about the ingredients and “Goldilocks Conditions” necessary to create each of the eight thresholds.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

1.0:  What is Big History?

1.1:  What is scale in Big History

1.2:  What are Origin Stories?

1.3:  What is Claim Testing?

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Define thresholds of increasing complexity, origin stories, and scale.
  2. Understand that Big History is a modern, science-based origin story that draws on many different types of knowledge.
  3. Understand how you fit into the Big History narrative, using the concept of “thresholds” to frame your past, present, and future and the history of the Universe.
  4. Understand what disciplines are and consider how the viewpoints of many different scholars can be integrated for a better understanding of a topic.
  5. Learn to use timelines as a way to compare the scale of personal and historic events.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

1.0 - Big History Scavenger Hunt

1.2 - Origin Stories Jigsaw

1.3 - Claim Testers

Summative/ Benchmark

Later Benchmark Assessment

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 1 Assessments

1.0 Quiz - Max 10 points                               2.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

1.1 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  History of Me Assignment - Max 50 points

1.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  How did our View of the Universe Change? - Max 50 points

1.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  The Vatican Observatory - Max 50 points

1.4 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  Jacqueline Howard - Looking into the Past - Max 50 points

3.0 Quiz - Max 12 points                               4.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

3.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                               4.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

3.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                               4.4 Quiz - Max 12 points

3.4 Quiz - Max 12 points                               Unit 4:  Deadly Meteors - Max 132

Unit 3:  H2O Activity - Max 100 points           Unit 4:  The Sun - Max 132

Unit 3:  Gold Activity - Max 100 points

Unit 3:  Salt Activity - Max 100 points

Gold/Salt Activity - Max 100 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards         Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                           Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                               iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                       Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                              Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1 - 3: Welcome to Big History

Day 4:  1.0 History as a Mystery

Day 5:  1.0 Big History Scavenger Hunt

Day 6:  1.0 What is Big History?

Day 7:  1.1 Football Field Scale

Day 8-11:  1.2 Origin Stories Introduction & Jigsaw Activity

Day 12:  1.3 Claim Testing Snap Judgement / How do we decide what to believe?

Day 13:  1.3 Claim Testers Comic

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://school.bighistoryproject.com/

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

NJSLSA.R7

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

NJSLSA.R10

Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently with scaffolding as needed.

NJSLSA.R8

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA R7, R8, R10

Science-Claims Testing

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home,work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.



Unit Title

Unit 2 - The Big Bang

Timeframe 

12 Days

Unit Summary

Big History will introduce you to many new ideas and claims.  You won’t simply accept these claims as facts and move on.  You’ll be encouraged to test them.  You’ll learn how to evaluate information presented to you, and be encouraged to decide for yourself what to believe and what to investigate further.  This is how our thinking advances.  Today’s scientific view of the history of the Universe is based on the work of thousands of scientists and scholars over thousands of years.  People built upon each other’s work.  New technology and new observations have led to ever sharper theories about the Universe and its beginnings.  As you study how these views have evolved, you’ll develop your own skills for testing the claims of others and making claims of your own.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

    How and why do individuals change their minds?

    How and why did human understanding of the Universe change?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

How have our views of the Universe developed and changed over time? After they’ve examined that topic, students will learn about the basic building blocks of everything around us by understanding what appeared in the first moments after the Big Bang. They’ll then learn how the early Universe evolved as it expanded and cooled. They’ll hear the story of the first half million years of the Universe’s existence and study some of the evidence that has convinced astronomers that this story is correct. This unit discusses topics normally studied within the disciplines of cosmology and nuclear physics. Students also will learn about the process of claim testing, which will help them evaluate claims and resources throughout the course as well as in other aspects of their lives.

The Big Bang

The appearance of the Universe in the Big Bang is the first threshold of increasing complexity. Before this moment, nothing existed; after it, something new existed: the Universe! The Big Bang provided the raw materials for everything around us today. Following the Big Bang, there was space, which rapidly expanded. There were also time, matter, and energy. Energy took different forms and matter appeared in the form of electrons and quarks, which soon linked together to form protons and neutrons. Nothing had turned into something, and that something contained everything needed to build an interesting Universe.

Claim Testing

Big History doesn’t just tell stories about the past; it also explores the evidence on which these stories are based and asks you to make your own judgment as to whether the stories should be trusted. The four main strategies we use for deciding if a story should be trusted, or whether something is true or not, are intuition, authority, logic, and evidence. The trouble with intuition

(gut feeling), is that it’s subjective. Although holding a strong belief that something is or isn’t true might lead to promising avenues of research, by itself it proves nothing. Authority means simply that you trust someone to tell the truth. We can’t test everything that’s said and often we decide to believe someone because we think they know what they’re talking about. Relying on authority is often necessary, but wherever possible, we should test the stories told to us. We can do that by using the last two strategies to answer these questions: Are the assertions or stories logical? Is there some clear, objective, testable evidence to support them?

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

2.0:  What was the Big Bang?

2.1:  How did our understanding of the universe change?

2.2:  What are disciplines?

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Explain the basics of the Big Bang theory and the primary evidence that supports this theory.
  2. Using evidence from texts and claim testing, explain why views of the Universe have changed over time and the roles that scientists have played in shaping our understanding of the origin of the Universe.
  3. Understand how to use claim testing to evaluate a claim or resource.
  4. Locate Ptolemy, Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, and Hubble on a timeline and explain what each added to our collective understanding of the structure of the Universe.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

2.0 - Quiz

2.1 - Changing Views Jigsaw with Quiz

Summative/ Benchmark

2.2 - Investigation 2: How and why do individuals change their minds?

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 1 Assessments

1.0 Quiz - Max 10 points                               2.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

1.1 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  History of Me Assignment - Max 50 points

1.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  How did our View of the Universe Change? - Max 50 points

1.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  The Vatican Observatory - Max 50 points

1.4 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  Jacqueline Howard - Looking into the Past - Max 50 points

3.0 Quiz - Max 12 points                               4.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

3.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                               4.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

3.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                               4.4 Quiz - Max 12 points

3.4 Quiz - Max 12 points                               Unit 4:  Deadly Meteors - Max 132

Unit 3:  H2O Activity - Max 100 points           Unit 4:  The Sun - Max 132

Unit 3:  Gold Activity - Max 100 points

Unit 3:  Salt Activity - Max 100 points

Gold/Salt Activity - Max 100 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards         Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                           Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                               iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                       Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                              Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  2.0 - A Big History of Everything / Threshold 1 / Questions about Big Bang / 2.0 Quiz

Day 2-4:  2.1 - Changing Views Jigsaw Activity with student generated quiz

Day 5:  2.2 - Are we Alone? / Intro to Cosmology / Intro to Astrophysics / 2.2 Quiz

Day 6 - 12:  2.3 - Investigation 2 DBQ and Essay

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://school.bighistoryproject.com/

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

NJSLSA.R1

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences and relevant connections from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

NJSLSA.R3

Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

NJSLSA.R9

Analyze and reflect on how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA 1,3,9

Science-Big Bang Theory

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 3 - Stars & Elements

Timeframe 

4 Days

Unit Summary

By 200 million years after the Big Bang, the Universe had become a very dark and cold place.  Then things started to change.  First galaxies and nebulae formed.  These were the earliest structures in the Universe.  Then stars - “hot spots” of light and energy - emerged from these clouds of dust and gas.  Why did they form and how did they change everything?  Stars, the first complex, stable entities in Universe, have the capacity to generate energy for million, even billions of years.  The first stars, which passed through their entire life cycles relatively quickly, produced many of the chemical elements of the periodic table.  In this unit, you’ll learn how stars first formed and how the lives and deaths of stars provided the chemical diversity necessary for even more complex things.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

      How can looking at the same information from different perspectives pave the way for progress?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

From the darkness of the early Universe, stars bring a new complexity to Big History, adding light, new energy sources, and in their death, many of the chemical elements that surround us. In this unit, students learn how stars were created, how they have changed the Universe, and why they play such an important role in Big History. Students learn how aging and dying stars created new elements, including the elements from which we are made. Finally, they learn how the Universe became more chemically complex as entirely new forms of matter, each with distinctive properties, began to appear in the space between stars.

The Formation of Stars

As the Universe expanded and cooled, clouds of hydrogen and helium were drawn together by gravity. As these clouds grew larger and denser, the temperature rose until it was finally hot enough for protons to overcome their repulsion to one another and become joined by the strong nuclear force. Bam! A star is born. Sometimes small, sometime huge, these stars can burn for millions if not billions of years. As stars began lighting up all over the Universe, they started to gather together in groups we call galaxies. In turn, these galaxies drew together as well.

The Life of a Star

As stars burn, they’re fueled by a process that combines two hydrogen atoms into one helium atom, which gives off a huge amount of energy. This process will continue at the center of every star until the star runs out of hydrogen. At this stage, the star will start burning helium atoms, fusing them into atoms of carbon. Once the helium runs out, the star will burn the carbon, creating neon. Over time, neon is burned, creating oxygen; oxygen is burned, creating silicon; and finally, silicon is burned, creating iron. At this stage, the process can no longer continue and the star ends its main sequence.

The Death of a Star

How fast stars burn depends on their mass. The smaller stars burn fuel slowly and can last millions and millions of years. Larger stars tend to burn faster and live for a shorter amount of time. The larger stars tend to expand greatly once they burn through their fuel, and become red giants. Then, these stars collapse and explode into supernovae, reaching incredibly high temperatures. These explosions are so hot that they are able to fuse together a massive variety of atoms.

The Chemical Elements

Hydrogen and helium are the most abundant elements in the Universe. They first appeared in the moments after the Big Bang as the Universe cooled and some of the energy converted into matter. Because of the high temperatures at the centers of large dying stars, more elements, such as carbon, oxygen, silicon, and iron, appeared. While important, these are but a few of the elements needed for life as we know it. It’s only in the incredibly high temperatures of an exploding star that we get much of the rest of the table of elements.

Why This Matters

All of the elements found on Earth come from the life or death of a star. There is no other way to create large quantities of elements. In a way, we’re all made of stars! Also, the fact that elements can’t be created by any other means explains why there are limited quantities of many valuable elements here on Earth, and why we can’t simply “make more” when we need them. We need to understand the nature of these elements and make good use of the limited supplies we have here on Earth.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

3.0:  How were stars formed?

3.1:  How were complex elements created?

3.2:  How do we know about the elements?

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Describe how stars form.
  2. Explain what happens in the life of a star and explain what happens when a star dies.
  3. Explain how the death of stars results in the creation of heavier elements.
  4. Explain why the formation of stars and the emergence of elements are so important in our world.
  5. Understand what scholars from multiple disciplines know about a topic and the questions they can ask to gain an understanding of the topic from an integrated perspective.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

3.0: How a Star Develops Comic

3.1: 3.1 Quiz

Summative/ Benchmark

Later Benchmark Assessment

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 1 Assessments

1.0 Quiz - Max 10 points                               2.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

1.1 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  History of Me Assignment - Max 50 points

1.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  How did our View of the Universe Change? - Max 50 points

1.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  The Vatican Observatory - Max 50 points

1.4 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  Jacqueline Howard - Looking into the Past - Max 50 points

3.0 Quiz - Max 12 points                               4.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

3.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                               4.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

3.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                               4.4 Quiz - Max 12 points

3.4 Quiz - Max 12 points                               Unit 4:  Deadly Meteors - Max 132

Unit 3:  H2O Activity - Max 100 points           Unit 4:  The Sun - Max 132

Unit 3:  Gold Activity - Max 100 points

Unit 3:  Salt Activity - Max 100 points

Gold/Salt Activity - Max 100 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards         Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                           Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                               iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                       Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                              Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  3.0 - How were stars formed? / A Big History of Everything

Day 2:  3.0 - How a Star is Formed Comic Strip

Day 3:  3.1 - Threshold 3: New Chemical Elements / What did Stars Give Us? / 3.1 Quiz

Day 4:  3.1 - Crash Course Chemistry: Periodic Table of Elements

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://school.bighistoryproject.com/

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

NJSLSA.R2

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

NJSLSA.R3

Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

NJSLSA.R7

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA 2,3,7

Science- Stars and Elements

  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 4 - Our Solar System & Earth

Timeframe 

10 Days

Unit Summary

Billowing clouds of matter spun around and around our young Sun, gradually forming just about everything in our Solar System - from meteors and asteroids to all the planets and moons.  One planet in particular would enable the creation of even more remarkable complexity.  Why?  How did that happen?

Leftovers usually aren’t all that interesting or important.  The leftovers that circled our Sun just after its birth are another story.  Gravity helped to separate that matter by density, forming all the different planets in our solar system.  Our own planet, Earth, was uniquely positioned at just the right distance from the Sun and composed of diverse elements.  This proved ideal for generating just the right circumstances - or Goldilocks Conditions - for greater and greater complexity.  But early Earth was much different than the world we know now.  What changed and why?

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

How and why do theories become generally accepted?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

In this unit, students learn how elements combined to form new kinds of matter, creating the conditions required

for the emergence of more complex things including the Sun and planets like our Earth. The formation of the Earth

and our Solar System is the fourth threshold of increasing complexity in this course. Students learn what the young

Earth was like and how it has changed over 4.5 billion years to become the planet it is today. They also learn about

plate tectonics, and the important role that geologists play in understanding the history of the Earth.

The Formation of the Earth and Solar System

Unlike the very first stars, all later stars, including our Sun, developed from clouds of matter containing not just hydrogen and helium, but also small amounts of all the other elements. Like all stars, our Sun lit up when the center of a collapsing cloud of matter reached a temperature of about 10 million degrees Celsius. Although most of the matter in the collapsing cloud became part of the star, there was enough left over for the formation of planets and other objects. Once the Sun had formed, the remaining matter spun around it, flattening out like pizza dough. Energized by the heat of the Sun and hurled around by its gravitational pull, tiny particles of dust and ice joined together to form larger lumps, a bit like comets or asteroids. Lumps combined within each orbit to form huge planetesimals; eventually, all the matter in most orbits was absorbed within a single large object, a planet.

The Early Earth

Our Earth formed through the violent process of accretion. The young Earth was extremely hot, with its heat coming from three main sources: the large numbers of collisions with other bodies orbiting the Sun; the presence of large amounts of radioactive material; and increasing pressure as the Earth itself grew in size.

Plate Tectonics

The surface of the Earth is constantly changing. Like a cracked eggshell, the Earth’s crust is divided into a number of distinct plates that are carried across its molten mantle. Oceanic plates can dive under continental plates, plates can collide to form mountains, and plates can also grind past one another. Most earthquakes and volcanoes occur at the dividing lines between plates. We can roughly trace the historical movement of crustal plates and see that plates periodically gathered together into huge supercontinents, later breaking apart into the separate continents that we know today. These changes had a powerful impact on global climates and the distribution of living species.

The Discipline of Geology

Geologists are scientists who study the physical attributes of Earth. Often out in the field looking at rocks, fossils, and natural formations, geologists are interested in the history of the planet as well as in the processes in operation within the Earth itself. Understanding how geologists work, the type of questions they ask, and evidence they use to help answer those questions adds another dimension to understanding the interdisciplinary nature of Big History.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

4.0:  How did our Earth and Solar System form?

4.1:  What was young Earth like?

4.2:  Why is Plate Tectonics Important?

4.3:  How do we know about our Solar System and Earth?

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Explain why planets are more complex than stars.
  2. Use evidence to explain how the Earth and its atmosphere developed and changed over time.
  3. Explain the basic mechanisms and key pieces of evidence for plate tectonics, and how plate tectonics impacts life on Earth.
  4. Define geology, the types of questions geologists ask, and the tools they use to answer those questions.
  5. Explain why geology is important to understanding the history of the Earth.
  6. Understand how geologists can work with scientists and historians from other disciplines to form a deeper understanding of the history of the Earth.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

4.1:  4.1 Quiz

4.2:  4.2 Quiz

Benchmark 1 Review

Summative/ Benchmark

Unit 4 Assessment

Benchmark 1 Assessment

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 1 Assessments

1.0 Quiz - Max 10 points                               2.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

1.1 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  History of Me Assignment - Max 50 points

1.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  How did our View of the Universe Change? - Max 50 points

1.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  The Vatican Observatory - Max 50 points

1.4 Quiz - Max 10 points                               Unit 2:  Jacqueline Howard - Looking into the Past - Max 50 points

3.0 Quiz - Max 12 points                               4.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

3.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                               4.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

3.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                               4.4 Quiz - Max 12 points

3.4 Quiz - Max 12 points                               Unit 4:  Deadly Meteors - Max 132

Unit 3:  H2O Activity - Max 100 points           Unit 4:  The Sun - Max 132

Unit 3:  Gold Activity - Max 100 points

Unit 3:  Salt Activity - Max 100 points

Gold/Salt Activity - Max 100 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards         Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                           Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                               iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                       Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                              Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  4.0 Planet Card Sort / Threshold 4: Earth and the Solar System / How did Earth and the Solar System Form?

Day 2:  4.0 Accretion Simulation

Day 3:  4.1 What Was Young Earth Like? / The Early Atmosphere / 4.1 Quiz

Day 4:  4.2 Our Shifting Globe / Why We’re All Lava Surfers / 4.2 Quiz

Day 5:  4.3 Intro to Geology / Alfred Wegener & Harry Hess

Day 6 & 7:  Assessment 4

Day 8:  Benchmark Review

Day 9:  Benchmark Review Game

Day 10:  Benchmark 1 Assessment

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://school.bighistoryproject.com/

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

NJSLSA.R1

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences and relevant connections from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

NJSLSA.R2

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

NJSLSA.R3

Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

NJSLSA.R7

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

NJSLSA.R8

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

NJSLSA.R9

Analyze and reflect on how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA R1,R2, R3, R7, R8, R9

Science- Solar System and Elements

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home,work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 5 - Life

Timeframe 

14 Days

Unit Summary

What makes life so special?  Is there life elsewhere in the Universe?  And how exactly did life emerge and diversity?  In many ways these remain mysteries, but we do have enough evidence to explore some possible answers.  Our exploration will span more than 3.8 billion years of Earth’s history.  Defining life is harder than it seems.  What Goldilocks Conditions enabled life to prosper in so many diverse forms?  To help answer some of these questions, you’ll chart the remarkable journey of life on Earth. You’ll also explore the biosphere and the dynamic, sometimes catastrophic, relationship between life and Earth.  

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

     How does extinction drive evolution?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

In this unit, students learn what the Goldilocks Conditions were on Earth that allowed for the appearance of life, how life introduces a new dynamism and diversity to the Universe, and how to distinguish living versus nonliving organisms. Students consider seven of the most important turning points in the history of life on Earth. They learn how increasingly complex organisms appeared over almost 4 billion years, evolving into species more and more like us. Finally, they learn how the history of our Solar System, the Earth, and life are closely intertwined, and how astronomical, geological, and biological factors formed our biosphere.

Life vs. Nonlife

The appearance of life is the fifth threshold discussed in this course because living organisms represent a new type and level of complexity. Chemically, living organisms are much more complex than stars or planets. Life emerges only when very particular Goldilocks Conditions are in place and living things must constantly adjust the way they relate to their environments in order to survive. Because living organisms are constantly changing, they have generated far more diversity than any of the other structures we’ve studied to date.

Adaptation and Evolution

Darwin’s theory of natural selection explains how all species evolved from common ancestors and how life has changed and adapted over time due to environmental and biological influences. He found his evidence in fossils, which, he noted, recorded how species changed over time and how subtle differences between species showed how they were related. A century later, more evidence emerged to support his theories. Geologists realized that the Earth is old enough for evolutionary processes to have generated the huge variety of species we see around us today. Biologists learned how reproduction works and discovered that DNA was the key to understanding how species evolved. More recently, geneticists have learned how to sequence genomes in organisms’ DNA to understand the connections between a wide variety of species.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

5.0:  What is Life?

5.1:  How did life begin and change?

5.2:  How do Earth and Life interact?

5.3:  How do we know about life on Earth?

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Describe the conditions that made it possible for life to emerge on Earth.
  2. Explain the differences between life and nonlife.
  3. Describe the major events in the development of life on Earth and explain what is meant by the term biosphere.
  4. Use evidence to explain adaptation and evolution, including Darwin’s theory of natural selection and DNA.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

5.2:  A Year in the Life of a Species

Summative/ Benchmark

Project Based Learning - Invent a Species

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 2 Alternative Assessments

5.0 Quiz - Max 16 points                                          6.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.1 Quiz - Max 12 points                                          6.1 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                                          6.2 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                                          6.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.4 Quiz - Max 10 points                                          Unit 6: Below Zero - Max 100 points

Unit 5: Create Comic Strip - 20 pts. (Max 3)             Unit 6:  Create Comic Strip - 20 pts.  (Max 5)

Unit 5: Big History Pt. 1 Summary - Max 50 points    Unit 6: Change Over Time Essay - Max 100 points

Unit 5: Atmosphere and Life - Max 50 points

7.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

7.1 Quiz - Max 10 points

7.2 Quiz - Max 10 points

7.3 Quiz - Max 12 points

Unit 7: Horse Power - Max 100 points

Unit 7: Weapons - Max 100 points

Unit 7: Rise of Carnivores - Max 100 points

Unit 7: Mountains - Max 100 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards         Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                           Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                               iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                       Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                              Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  5.0 - How Closely are we Related? / A Big History of Everything

Day 2:  5.0 - Crash Course: The Origin of Life

Day 3:  5.1 - Spontaneous Generation / How did Life Begin and Change?

Day 4:  5.2 - How do Earth and Life Interact?  /  A Year in the Life of a Species

Day 5:  5.3 - Darwin, Evolution and Faith

Day 6 - 14:  PBL: Invent a Species

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://school.bighistoryproject.com/

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

NJSLSA.R1

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences and relevant connections from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

NJSLSA.R2

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

NJSLSA.R8

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

NJSLSA.R10

Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently with scaffolding as needed.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA R1, R2, R8, R10

Science-Life

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home,work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 6 - Early Humans

Timeframe 

17 Days

Unit Summary

Humans are unusual.  We walk upright and build cities.  We travel from continent to continent in hours.  We communicate across the globe in an instant.  We alone can build bombs and invent medicines.  Why can we do all these things that other creatures can’t?  What makes us so different from other species?  Investigating how early humans evolved and lived helps us answer these questions.  Most people give our big brains all the credit, but that’s only part of the story.  To more fully understand our success as a species, we need to look closely at our ancestors and the world they lived in.  You’ll learn how foraging humans prospered and formed communities, and you’ll uncover the uniquely human ability to preserve, share, and build upon each other’s ideas to learn collectively.  

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

What makes humans different from other species?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

How did our early ancestors evolve? Students tackle this topic in the first lesson and learn about human evolution. The  concentration here will be on how the genus Homo evolved from the order of primates into modern humans, or Homo sapiens. The next lesson reveals how the story of human evolution has many contributors, including archaeologists, anthropologists, and primatologists. Scientists and scholars from across a multitude of disciplines have worked on the topic of human evolution for many years to piece together a history of our species using verifiable evidence, such as fossil remains. One of this unit’s main focal points is the importance of collective learning and symbolic language. It is the combination of these two human feats that separates us from other species in the animal kingdom; it is what makes us different.

Human Evolution

All modern humans belong to a single species known as Homo sapiens. We’re also classified in the order of primates, the class of mammals, and the kingdom of animals. Biologists and paleontologists have worked together for years to correctly classify thousands of species. They’ve also been able to partly reconstruct our human ancestry by comparing fossils and identifying genetic relationships between living species by comparing their DNA. Genetic comparisons between chimpanzees and Homo sapiens suggest that we shared a common ancestor about 7 million years ago. However, unlike chimps, humans are hominines—apes that walk upright on two legs. Humans are the only surviving hominines in the world today, but in the past, there were others in this family including members of the genus Australopithecus, as well as other members of the genus Homo, including the species Homo habilis and Homo erectus.

Collective Learning and Symbolic Language

While early primates and hominines were like us in many ways, we have no evidence to suggest that their behaviors or the technologies they used changed significantly during their time on Earth. Like most animal species, they seem to have been limited in the number of ways they used their environment to produce the energy and resources needed to survive. Our species is different because our ancestors kept developing new ways of using the resources available in their environment. We are the only species that is able to do this without changing genetically, which means that we can adapt to changing conditions much faster than other species. The key to this is our use of symbolic language to share information and pass it on to future generations. It is our ability to collectively learn that allows Homo sapiens to migrate and flourish in all corners of the Earth. Many species of mammals and birds share information through mating calls and warning signals, but their language is not efficient enough to allow collective memories to accumulate information over long periods of time. Human language enables

us to exchange information so precisely and rapidly that it accumulates in the memory of entire groups, gradually increasing the store of knowledge available to each community.

How Did Early Humans Live?

In order to reconstruct how early humans lived an interdisciplinary approach is required. Archaeologists use the remains of individuals (including their skulls and parts of their skeletons) as well as the remains of things they ate, used, and made (such as stone tools). Anthropologists study modern human societies that are likely to be similar to societies of the Paleolithic era in order to learn about their technologies, social organization, and ideas about the world. Primatologists also gather helpful evidence: they study our close relatives, such as chimpanzees, to see what can be inferred about the earliest human societies. No single source of evidence is perfect, but together, the work of these scholars gives us an idea about the basic patterns of life in the Paleolithic era.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

6.0:  How did our ancestors evolve?

6.1:  How do we know about early humans?

6.2:  What is collective learning?

6.3:  How did the first humans live?

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Describe human evolution, using evidence and connection to other species of mammals.
  2. Explain whether or not symbolic language makes humans different.
  3. Describe how early humans lived.
  4. Explain collective learning.
  5. Understand what scholars from multiple disciplines know about a topic and the questions they can ask to gain an understanding of the topic from an integrated perspective.
  6. Show early human migration on a map.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

6.0 - Human Evolution

6.0 - Lucy and the Leakeys / Jane Goodall

6.1 - Anthropology and Archaeology

6.3 - Hunter Gatherer Menu

Summative/ Benchmark

6.3 - Investigation 6: How does language make humans different?

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 2 Alternative Assessments

5.0 Quiz - Max 16 points                                          6.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.1 Quiz - Max 12 points                                          6.1 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                                          6.2 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                                          6.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.4 Quiz - Max 10 points                                          Unit 6: Below Zero - Max 100 points

Unit 5: Create Comic Strip - 20 pts. (Max 3)             Unit 6:  Create Comic Strip - 20 pts.  (Max 5)

Unit 5: Big History Pt. 1 Summary - Max 50 points    Unit 6: Change Over Time Essay - Max 100 points

Unit 5: Atmosphere and Life - Max 50 points

7.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

7.1 Quiz - Max 10 points

7.2 Quiz - Max 10 points

7.3 Quiz - Max 12 points

Unit 7: Horse Power - Max 100 points

Unit 7: Weapons - Max 100 points

Unit 7: Rise of Carnivores - Max 100 points

Unit 7: Mountains - Max 100 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards         Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                           Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                               iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                       Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                              Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1:  6.0 - Early Ancestors Opening / Thresholds 6: Humans and Collective Learning

Day 2:  6.0 - Crash Course: Human Evolution

Day 3:  6.0 - Lucy and the Leakeys / Jane Goodall Readings and Discussion

Day 4:  6.1 - Introduction to Anthropology and Archaeology /  Historos Cave Activity

Day 5:  6.1 - Historos Cave Presentations and Debrief / Snap Judgement Activity / Common Man

Day 6:  6.2 - Early Evidence of Collective Learning / How did the First Humans Live?

Day 7:  6.3 - From Foraging to Food Shopping / Human Migration Patterns

Day 8 & 9:  6.3 - Hunter Gatherer Menu

Day 10 - 16: Investigation 6

Day 17:  National Geographic’s Geography Bee

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://school.bighistoryproject.com/

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

6.2.8.A.1.a

Compare and contrast the social organization, natural resources, and land use of early hunter/gatherers and those who lived in early agrarian societies.

6.2.8.B.1.a

Explain the various migratory patterns of hunter/gatherers that moved from Africa to Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas, and describe the impact of migration on their lives and on the shaping of societies.

6.2.8.C.1.b

Determine the impact of technological advancements on hunter/gatherer and agrarian societies.

6.2.8.D.1.a

Demonstrate an understanding of pre-agricultural and post-agricultural periods in terms of relative length of time.

6.2.8.D..1.b

Describe how the development of both written and unwritten languages impacted human understanding, development of culture, and social structure.

6.2.8.D.1.c

Explain how archaeological discoveries are used to develop and enhance understanding of life prior to written records.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA.R1.  Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences and relevant connections from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

NJSLSA.R4.  Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

NJSLSA.R7.  Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

NJSLSA.R8.  Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

NJSLSA.R9.  Analyze and reflect on how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

NJSLSA.R10.  Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently with scaffolding as needed.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 7 - Agriculture & Civilization

Timeframe 

22 Days

Unit Summary

Foraging is hard.  It takes a long time to find the food and materials needed to feed a village.  Foragers often have to walk long distances to get everything they need.  Throughout the year, they had to move from place to place as they used up resources or to follow the seasons.  It is not an easy life.  One day, someone came up with the idea of farming.  It is easy to assume farming always existed, but it hasn’t.  Humans invented agriculture.  Farming enabled people to grow all the food they needed in one place, with a much smaller group of people.  This led to massive population growth, creating cities and trade.  Since not everyone in a community was needed to run a farm, this freed up some people to specialize in other things, like government, armies, and the arts.  Civilizations were born.  Whether agriculture flourished, humans came together in larger populations, stockpiled resources, and developed complex infrastructures.  Farming radically transformed almost every aspect of human society.  

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

Was farming an improvement over foraging?

What makes human societies similar and different?

Why do societies collapse?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

In this unit, students learn how agriculture transformed human history and accelerated the pace of change.

As human societies accumulated greater resources, they got larger, more complex, more powerful, and more

dynamic, which led to the eventual rise of cities, states, empires, and agrarian civilizations. Students will begin

to realize that while farming definitely had its advantages, including the eventual formation of civilizations and an

increase in collective learning, foraging was the way of life for humans for most of their existence. In fact, students

will likely be surprised to learn that foragers were probably healthier than farmers, worked shorter hours, and

were exposed to fewer diseases. Students will compare a number of early agrarian civilizations and analyze why

many of them collapsed

The Rise of Agriculture

From the Big History perspective, agriculture is more than simply producing crops and raising livestock. First and foremost, agriculture signals an increased impact of humans on their environment. Over time, the favored (or domesticated) species of plants and animals change genetically, becoming even more useful to humans. This increased control over plants and animals gave humans greater control over the available energy in the biosphere and redirected it to support a single species, Homo sapiens. A second important impact was that agriculture also changed humans. The changes were not genetic, as they were in plants and animals; the changes in humans were technological, social, and cultural. Settling down, whether in villages or cities, was a new behavior for humans and had significant consequences, which gave rise to the emergence of specialists and social hierarchies.

The First Cities and States Appear

The increasingly large human communities that developed as a result of the adoption of agriculture led to an explosion of complexity in the way humans lived. This complexity can be seen clearly in the characteristics of agrarian civilizations. All agrarian civilizations share common features: cities and towns that extracted most of the food and other resources they needed from surrounding villages; rulers who extracted taxes from the population; large monumental buildings such as pyramids, temples, and palaces; specialists who focused on crafts or other work not related to farming, and whose value to society led to the development of ideas of hierarchy and class; markets in which farmers, artisans, and traders exchanged goods; organized armies; and literate officials or scribes. Agriculture gave humans access to the food necessary to support larger populations. In addition, the adoption of an agricultural lifestyle allowed humans to settle down in larger, denser communities. This provided individuals with increased opportunities for more diverse contacts with other humans. The development of trade further enhanced the possibilities for diverse contacts, as people in distant communities could exchange goods, ideas, foods, and diseases. Thus, agriculture made possible a dramatic acceleration in collective learning.

Ways of Knowing: Agriculture and Civilization

This unit continues the interdisciplinary approach of Big History by asking students to examine the history of agriculture and civilization from a variety of viewpoints including those of traditional history, archaeology, and anthropology. There are several new World History content pieces in this unit. The articles will help students gain a better understanding of the impact of agriculture on humans and civilizations while the activities will allow students to think critically about why early civilizations expanded and collapsed. There are also connections to other subjects as students learn about how humans harnessed the energy of the Sun to redirect it to certain plants and animals they wished to domesticate; thus exacting more energy for themselves.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

7.0:  How did agriculture rise?

7.1:  Where did the first cities and states appear?

7.2:  How do we know about early agriculture and civilizations?

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Define agriculture and describe where it emerged.
  2. Identify the features of agrarian civilizations.
  3. Understand the similarities and differences between the lifestyles of hunter-gatherers and farmers.
  4. Describe how early civilizations formed and their key features.
  5. Understand what scholars from multiple disciplines know about agriculture and civilization and the information they can derive from them using an integrated perspective.
  6. Describe how agrarian civilizations formed and analyze their key similarities and differences.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

7.1 - Comparing Maps then and now activity

7.1 - Comparing Civilizations

7.1 - Origin of Religions

7.1 - Supplemental Activity : Origins of Major Religions

Summative/ Benchmark

Benchmark 2 Assessment

Assessment 7

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 2 Alternative Assessments

5.0 Quiz - Max 16 points                                          6.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.1 Quiz - Max 12 points                                          6.1 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                                          6.2 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                                          6.3 Quiz - Max 10 points

5.4 Quiz - Max 10 points                                          Unit 6: Below Zero - Max 100 points

Unit 5: Create Comic Strip - 20 pts. (Max 3)             Unit 6:  Create Comic Strip - 20 pts.  (Max 5)

Unit 5: Big History Pt. 1 Summary - Max 50 points    Unit 6: Change Over Time Essay - Max 100 points

Unit 5: Atmosphere and Life - Max 50 points

7.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

7.1 Quiz - Max 10 points

7.2 Quiz - Max 10 points

7.3 Quiz - Max 12 points

Unit 7: Horse Power - Max 100 points

Unit 7: Weapons - Max 100 points

Unit 7: Rise of Carnivores - Max 100 points

Unit 7: Mountains - Max 100 points

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards         Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                           Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                               iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                       Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                              Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1: Units 1 - 6 Review Games and Activities

Day 2: Study Guide / Review Game

Day 3 - 4:  Benchmark 2 Assessment

Day 5: 7.0 - Threshold 7: Agriculture / Why Was Agriculture So Important?

Day 6: 7.0 - Jacqueline Howard: History of Domestic Animals / 7.1 - Map Comparisons

Day 7: 7.1 - Where did the First Cities and States Appear?

Day 8: 7.1 - Supplemental Activity - Slavery in Early River Valley Civilizations

Day 9 - 12:  7.1 - Comparing Civilizations

Day 13:  7.1 - The Origin of World Religions

Day 14 - 17: 7.1 - World Religions Jigsaw Activity

Day 18:  7.2 - Social Status, Power and Human Burials / Intro to History

Day 19:  7.2 - Origin of Agriculture in Africa

Day 20:  7.2 - Crash Course: Migrations and Intensifications

Day 21 - 22:  Assessment 7

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://school.bighistoryproject.com/

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

6.2.8.A.1.a

Compare and contrast the social organization, natural resources, and land use of early hunter/gatherers and those who lived in early agrarian societies.

6.2.8.C.1.a

Describe the influence of the agricultural revolution (e.g., the impact of food surplus from farming) on population growth and the subsequent development of civilizations.

6.2.8.C.1.b

Determine the impact of technological advancements on hunter/gatherer and agrarian societies.

6.2.8.D.1.a

Demonstrate an understanding of pre-agricultural and post-agricultural periods in terms of relative length of time.

6.2.8.A.2.a

Explain how/why different early river valley civilizations developed similar forms of government and legal structures.

6.2.8.A.2.b

Determine the role of slavery in the economic and social structures of early river valley civilizations.

6.2.8.B.2.a

Determine the extent to which geography influenced settlement, the development of trade networks, technological innovations, and the substantiality of early river valley civilizations.

6.2.8.B.2.b

Compare and contrast physical and political maps of early river valley civilizations and their modern counterparts (i.e. Mesopotamia and Iraq, Ancient Egypt and Modern Egypt; Indus River Valley and Modern Pakistan/India; Ancient China and Modern China), and determine the geopolitical impact of these civilizations, then and now.

6.2.8.C.2.a

Explain how technological advancements led to greater economic specialization, improved weaponry, trade, and the development of a class system in early river valley civilizations.

6.2.8.D.2.b

Analyze the impact of religion on daily life, government, and culture in various early river valley civilizations.

6.2.8.D.2.d

Evaluate the importance and enduring legacy of the major achievements of the early river valley civilizations over time.

6.2.8.A.3.c

Determine the foundational concepts and principles of Athenian democracy and the Roman Republic that later influenced the development of the United States Constitution.

6.2.8.A.3.d

Compare the status (i.e., political, economic, and social) of groups in the Ancient World to those of people today and evaluate how individuals perceived the principles of liberty and equality then and now.

6.2.8.A.3.e

Compare and contrast the American legal system with the legal systems of classical civilizations, and determine the extent to which these early systems influenced our current legal system.

6.2.8.B.3.b

Explain how geography and the availability of natural resources led to both the development of Greek city-states and to their decline.

6.2.8.D.3.a

Compare and contrast social hierarchies in classical civilizations as they relate to power, wealth, and equality.

6.2.8.D.3.d

Compare and contrast the tenets and various world religions that developed in or around this time (i.e., Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Sikhism, and Taoism), their patterns of expansion, and their responses to the current challenges of globalization.

6.2.8.D.4.g

Evaluate the importance and enduring legacy of the major achievements of the people living in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas over time.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA.R1.  Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences and relevant connections from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

NJSLSA.R4.  Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

NJSLSA.R7.  Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

NJSLSA.R10.  Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently with scaffolding as needed.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home,work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 8- Expansion and Interconnection

Timeframe 

31 Days

Unit Summary

Early humans had pretty small social networks. At most, they probably met only a couple hundred people who probably all lived very similar lives to their own. As people started farming, these networks got larger. People were increasingly specialized in their work and trade. Populations in cities got larger. Trade reached across longer distances, bringing together people with very different lives and ways of thinking. All of this sped up the process of collective learning. It’s not that humans necessarily got smarter. There were simply more of them, and they got better at sharing information. We developed ways to communicate in the form of writing, and eventually we were able to print large quantities of what we’d written. Our means of transportation became more sophisticated and included domesticated animals, ships, and systems of roads that made it easier to cover long distance.

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

  • What are the positive and negative impacts of interconnection?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

This unit focuses on how and why agrarian civilizations began to expand. Students are introduced to the four world zones and learn the differences among the resources in each of these zones. The Afro-Eurasian world zone began to interconnect faster, mainly because of migration: Homo sapiens first evolved in Africa, migrating into areas throughout this zone before journeying to the Australasian zone. They then migrated to the Americas, and finally to the Pacific world zone. There were also differences in resources among the zones, for example, Afro-Eurasia happened to have a number of animals capable of both doing work and serving as a protein source. The inequalities between the zones would allow areas of Afro-Eurasia to form large agrarian civilizations where collective learning increased exponentially. The rise of agriculture ushered in an era of increasing innovation in communication and transportation, which led different parts of the world to connect in entirely new ways.

Expansion, Exploration, Interconnection, and the Columbian Exchange

The voyages of Christopher Columbus connected Afro-Eurasia to the Americas and generated a massive movement of ideas, people, diseases, plants, and animals between the two hemispheres. The results of these exchanges were dramatic. Potatoes and corn, first cultivated in the Americas, quickly became crucial to the diets of people across Eurasia. Horses and cattle, unknown in the New World in 1492, quickly took on crucial roles in many societies in the Americas. The linking of the different world zones in this period and the exchanges that this linking made possible transformed the lifeways of the people and civilizations involved – and laid the foundation for modern exchange routes and the global balance of power.

What is an interconnected world? One definition of an interconnected world is one in which travel and communication take place very fast and over long distances. There have been many times in history when powerful civilizations have been able to move people and information quickly over long distances. The Persians, Romans, and Mongols, for example, valued roads and rapid communication and developed efficient systems for both. These innovations, though, often didn’t last once the empire fell; sustaining innovation is a challenge that all agrarian civilizations faced. In the last few hundred years, dramatic changes have occurred in the speed of transportation and communication, and each of these innovations has given rise to further innovations. Advancements in modern science and scientific inquiry have also furthered agrarian civilizations to this point and brought about new landscapes of expansion and interconnection.

Commerce and Collective Learning

Systems of exchange and trade had a powerful influence on the four world zones and played a huge role in connecting and empowering agrarian civilizations. In each of the four world zones, trade routes led to an increase in the sharing and spreading of goods, ideas, technologies, and diseases. How this impacted innovation and collective learning depended on the size, use, and connectivity of these systems. Some trade routes, as in the Afro-Eurasian world zone, were expansive and heavily used, leading to rapid and drastic increases in innovation and collective learning. Others, such as in the Pacific, were less so. The legacy of these influences is still visible today.

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

8.0: How and why civilizations expanded?

8.1: Why expansion and interconnection of the four zones was so important?

8.2: What role the Columbian Exchange played in expansion and interconnection?

8.3: How commerce and collective learning impacted the world as a whole?

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Analyze what propelled the expansion and interconnection of agrarian civilizations.
  2. Investigate the implications of interconnected societies and regions by looking at spread of people, plants, animals, disease, goods, and ideas.
  3. Explain how new networks of exchange accelerated collective learning and innovation.
  4. Describe the changing characteristics of societies in the four world zones before and after oceanic travel and the thickening of global networks.
  5. Use sentence starters to strengthen the use of texts as evidence in writing.
  6. Analyze complex historical event through the lens of causality.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

8.0: Classical Civilizations Project

8.0: Comparison and Contrast Feudalism in Europe and Japan

8.1: Age of Adventure Activity

8.1: Mini-Explorer Project

Summative/ Benchmark

Assessment 8

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 3 Alternative Assessments

8.0 Quiz - Max 10 points                                    

8.1 Quiz - Max 10 points                                          

8.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                                        

8.3 Quiz - Max 10 points                                      

Unit 8:  When Humans Became Inhumane - Max 100 points                                          

Unit 8:  Columbian Exchange Timeline - Max 200 points

Unit 8:  She Blinded Me With Science - Max 60 points

Unit 8:  Debate - Has the Scientific Revolution Ended? - Max 200 points

Unit 8:  Guns, Germs, and Steel - Max 200 points

Unit 8: Create Comic Strip - 25 pts. (Max 4) - Gunpowder, A Big History of Everything, Pangea, Horses.

             

Unit 9: Africa: Slavery and Empire - Max 100 points    

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards         Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                           Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                               iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                       Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                              Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000 Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

  • Day 1: 8.0 What Caused Expansion? AND Why did Civilization Expand?
  • Days 2-5: Classical Civilizations Project
  • Day 6: Feudalism in Europe
  • Day 7: Feudalism in Japan
  • Day 8: Comparison and Contrast Feudalism in Europe/Japan
  • Days 9-10: The Crusades (1001 Inventions and the Library of Secrets)
  • Day 11: 8.0 Crash Course: The Modern Revolution
  • Day 12: 8.0 World Zone Game
  • Day 13: 8.1 How Did the World Become Interconnected?
  • Day 14: 8.1 China: The First Great Divergence
  • Days 15-18: 8.1 An Age of Adventure and Activity
  • Day 19-20: Europe Trades with the East Map Activity/Introduce 8.1 Mini-Explorer Project
  • Day 21: 8.1 Mini-Explorer Project Cont’d
  • Day 22: 8.2 Columbian Exchange Snap Judgement Activity/Crash Course World History: The Columbian Exchange
  • Day 23: 8.2 Investigating the Consequences of the Columbian Exchange
  • Day 24: 8.3 One lump or Two? The Development of the Global Economy
  • Day 25: 8.3 Jacqueline Howard: The History of Money Systems of Exchange and Trade
  • Day 26: 8.3 The First Silk Road
  • Day 27: 8.3 Lost on the Silk Road
  • Day 28: 8.3 A Curious Case: African Agrarianism
  • Day 29: Assessment 8 Review
  • Day 30: Assessment 8
  • Day 31: Assessment 8

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://school.bighistoryproject.com/

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

6.2.8.C.2.a

Explain how technological advancements led to greater economic specialization, improved weaponry, trade, and the development of a class system in early river valley civilizations.

6.2.8.D.2.c

Analyze the factors that led to the rise and fall of carious early river valley civilizations and determine whether there was a common pattern of growth and decline.

6.2.8.A.3.a

Compare and contrast the methods (i.e. autocratic rule, philosophies, and bureaucratic structures) used by the rulers of Rome, China, and India to control and unify their expanding empires.

6.2.8.A.3.b

Compare and contrast the rights and responsibilities of free men, women, slaves, and foreigners in the political, economic, and social structures of classical civilizations.

6.2.8.A.3.c

Determine the foundational concepts and principles of Athenian democracy and the Roman Republic that later influenced the development of the United States Constitution.

6.2.8.A.3.d

Compare the status (i.e. political, economic, and social) of groups in the Ancient World to those of people today and evaluate how individuals perceived the principles of liberty and equality then and now.

6.2.8.A.3.e

Compare and contrast the American legal system with the legal systems of classical civilizations, and determine the extent to which these early systems influenced our current legal system.

6.2.8.B.3.a

Determine how geography and the availability of natural resources influenced the development of the political, economic, and cultural systems of each of the classical civilizations and provided motivation for expansion.

6.2.8.C.3.a

Analyze the impact of expanding land and sea trade routes as well as a uniform system of exchange in the Mediterranean World and Asia.

6.2.8.C.3.b

Explain how classical civilizations used technology and innovation to enhance agricultural/manufacturing output and commerce, to expand military capabilities, to improve life in urban areas, and to allow for greater division of labor.

6.2.8.D.3.a

Compare and contrast social hierarchies in classical civilizations as they relate to power, wealth, and equality.

6.2.8.D.3.b

Determine common factors that contributed to the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, Gupta India, and Han China.

6.2.8.D.3.c

Evaluate the importance and enduring legacy of the major achievements of Greece, Rome, India, and China over time.

6.2.8.D.3.d

Compare and contrast the tenets of various world religions that developed in or around this time period (i.e. Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Sikhism, and Taoism), their patterns of expansion, and their responses to the current challenges of globalization.

6.2.8.D.3.e

Determine the extent to which religion, economic issues, and conflict shaped the values and decisions of the classical civilizations, scientific thought and the arts.

6.2.8.D.4.a

Analyze the role of religion and economics in shaping each empire’s social hierarchy, and evaluate the impact these hierarchical structures had on the lives of various groups of people.

6.2.8.D.4.b

Analyze the causes and outcomes of the Crusades from different perspectives, including the perspectives of European political and religious leaders, the crusaders, Jews, Muslims, and traders.

6.2.8.D.4.c

Assess the demographic, economic, and religious impact of the plague on Europe.

6.2.8.D.4.d

Determine which events led to the rise and eventual decline of European feudalism.

6.2.8.D.4.e

Analyze the immediate and long-term impact on China and Europe of the open exchange between Europe and the Yuan (Mongol) Dynasty.

6.2.8.D.4.f

Determine the extent to which the Byzantine Empire influenced the Islamic world and western Europe.

6.2.8.D.4.g

Evaluate the importance of enduring legacy of the major achievements of the people living in Asia, Africa (Islam), Europe, and the Americas over time.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA.R1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences and relevant connection from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

NJSLSA.R2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

NJSLSA.R4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

NJSLSA.R7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

NJSLSA.R8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

NJSLSA.R10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently with scaffolding as needed.

 

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, homework, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.
  • 9.2.8.B.7 Evaluate the impact of online activities and social media on employer decisions.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.


Unit Title

Unit 9: Acceleration

Timeframe 

33 Days

Unit Summary

Just 500 years ago, humans lived in four separate world zones, each with distinct cultures and technologies. Now, humanity is linked within one interconnected network of information and commerce that spans the entire planet.

How did this happen so quickly? With increased volume and diversity of global exchange, commerce and collective learning accelerated. Competitive markets formed, and, with the discovery of fossil fuels, technological innovation surged and consumption of natural resources intensified. Humanity came to control so much of the planet’s energy that, for the first time in Earth’s history, a single species began to dominate the biosphere. Some argue that a new geologic epoch, the Anthropocene had begun.

Together, innovation, globalization, and new forms of energy drove an incredible transformation of human society. What challenges did acceleration bring and where will it lead us?

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

To what extent has the Modern Revolution been a positive or a negative force?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

Between 1500 and 1900 CE, the world became globally connected and rates of innovation grew faster than ever before. In this unit, students examine how the changes of recent centuries have led humans across a new threshold of complexity and generated entirely new types of societies, possibilities, and challenges. Human power over the biosphere has increased so rapidly that one scientist argues that we have entered a new era in the Earth’s history, the Anthropocene, or the era dominated by humans. In this era of human domination of the biosphere, there have been both positive and negative impacts. The Industrial Revolution issued forth a new age of acceleration including a huge increase in population and innovation. However, the increase in the use of fossil fuels, which fueled industrialism, has had a negative effect on the biosphere while the increase in innovation has generated new technological advancements that have made our lives easier and more dangerous.

Periodization

Historians have a number of different ways to periodize history. Human history can be periodized by breaking time into manageable chunks based upon politics, economics, or social and cultural movements. Big History periodizes the history of the Universe through thresholds of increasing complexity. Students will examine what this concept means and then attempt to periodize human history from their own perspectives.

Acceleration

In the last 500 years, the pace of change has accelerated dramatically. This acceleration has driven four main types of change:

  • The creation of the first global exchange networks.
  • The discovery of huge new sources of energy as a result of the fossil fuels revolution.
  • Technological and organizational innovation
  • A sudden increase in the military, economic, and technological power of the societies affected first by these changes.

While the pace of acceleration was dramatic in the first 400 years of this era, this acceleration became even faster in the twentieth century. A major source of evidence for this acceleration is statistics, which provide important evidence of the scale and pace of change.

The Anthropocene and Impacts on the Biosphere

Modern technologies have increased our collective power over the biosphere at an astonishing rate. As humans and human domesticates (including livestock and pets) use an increasing share of the Earth’s energy and resources, less is available for other species, so rates of extinction are rising and approaching those seen during some of the major extinction events of the past 600 million years. Through building, irrigation, and deforestation, humans are transforming landscapes, reducing the availability of fresh water, and undermining the fertility of soil in many regions. Nuclear weapons threaten virtually instant destruction, while the burning of fossil fuels is increasing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere and threatening the relatively benign climates that allowed human civilizations to thrive in recent millennia. The huge increase in human ecological power has persuaded some that in the last century or two, the Earth has entered a new era in its history – the Anthropocene.

Changing Economies

The connection of the four world zones allowed for the creation of a global network of exchange. Though this network was not built overnight, it emerged fairly quickly, and it increased the potential connections and diversity of connections for many members of the network, accelerating both collective learning and innovation. Commerce was an important driver of change in this global network. Because commerce began to take on greater significance for many societies, a number of important thinkers began to ask questions about the nature of the exchange of goods, the nature of productivity and efficiency, and the interests of the individual and the state in business, which gave birth to the discipline of economics. These economic thinkers shared a set of concerns and questions but often came up with very different answers to those questions. The articulation of the ideas of capitalism and communism were the most influential economic ideas generated in the course of the Modern Revolution.

Industrialization, Innovation, and Conflict in the Modern Era

Understanding why and how human populations began to grow like never before and the effect of that growth on the biosphere is important to understanding our world today. Industrialization and innovation led to population growth and more established societies, and although this has, for the most part, been highly beneficial to humans, it’s not necessarily beneficial to Earth. Today’s world is so complex and its technologies so powerful that the impacts of each are unpredictable. Without the historical knowledge of how we arrived where we are today, and the scientific knowledge to carefully measure the impacts of humans on the planet, we will move into the future somewhat blindly. In order for students to understand why humans in the last 250 years have witnessed incredible changes, it is necessary to examine the role of the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, and the impact of two world wars on our political, economic, and social interactions. Global changes and the emergence of new societal structures have massive consequences for our future – the more we understand about these, the better prepared we will be to move forward in a positive direction.

Modern States: Identities and Nationalism

The ideas of liberty and nationalism, once unleashed, became a global force that inspired people first on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean and then throughout the world. By the mid-nineteenth century, people throughout Europe and the Americas were demanding liberty from oppressive rule. Every country that tried was not necessarily successful in gaining independence, but these ideas were certainly spreading. By the beginning of the twentieth century, this revolutionary spirit had spread to parts of the Middle East and Asia.

Pros and Cons of Industrialization

Students may not realize that there were both benefits and drawbacks to industrialization. In order for students to begin to grasp these effects, they might brainstorm the pros and cons of industrialization. This can be done in small groups or as a class, with you writing the students’ ideas on the board. Statistics—presented in the form of lists, charts, and graphs—are an important part of the evidence presented in Unit 9. It’s quite easy to focus on country averages and lose sight of what important changes meant for the individual. For example, while England may have increased textile or steel production in a given period, which resulted in dramatic economic growth for the country overall, this growth would probably have been experienced very unevenly by individuals. The power and wealth that can come from an acceleration of innovation or economic growth will not usually be spread evenly among a country’s people.

Types of Governments and Their Impacts

Students might have trouble making connections between the acceleration of innovation and how this contributed to new forms of government. It will probably be helpful to provide students with some more detailed information about the different types of governments — monarchy, democracy, socialism, communism — and how new innovations in the Industrial Revolution led to imperialism, which in turn led to a number of revolutions in which people demanded greater rights and freedoms from their governments.

Understanding Economics

The article “Smith, Marx, and Keynes” can be difficult to understand when students have limited prior knowledge of economics. This article focuses on the ideas of three of the most influential thinkers of modern economics. For students who have never been asked to think about the key ideas of economics before, this new way of thinking might prove challenging. If further explanation is needed, a mini-lesson on the basics of economics — commerce, supply and demand, and the role of government — may be necessary.

Navigating the World Wars

The Crash Course videos about World War I and World War II are packed with insightful information regarding the causal relationships, alliances, battles, and outcomes of these wars. With minimal background knowledge of the world wars, students might be overwhelmed by the video clips. Set the scene for students by having discussions and introducing key ideas prior to watching the Crash Course videos.

Know

Knows/Dos are linked! They should reflect and support one another.

By the end of this unit, students will know

9.1: How the Four World Zones became connected and they will analyze the ways the interconnection has benefitted/hurt mankind?

9.2: What led to humans being the first species to dominate the planet?

9.3: What factors led to commerce, labor, and the global economy?

9.4: How Industrialization helped to create the  Modern World?

9.5: What events led to the creation of Modern States and Identities?

9.6: Why the Great Wars were fought and how their outcomes have impacted the world we live in?

9.8: What led to the Space Race and how it has impacted us today?

9.9: What sorts of energy options we have?

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Describe accelerating global change and the factors that describe it.
  2. Understand the key features that define the Anthropocene
  3. Describe the acceleration in world population, technology, science, communication, and transportation.
  4. Explain how they have benefited and threatened humanity.
  5. Explain the changes in the use, distribution, and importance of natural resources on human life.
  6. Use sentence starters to build skills in applying BHP concepts to writing.
  7. Analyze the causes and consequences of major revolutions in global political, economic, and social
  8. networks.
  9. Analyze the causes and consequences of shifts in world population, including the impact of industrialism
  10. and commerce.
  11. Analyze the causes, characteristics, and long-term consequences of World War I, the Great Depression and
  12. World War II.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

9.1: Industrial Revolution Activity

9.8: Surviving on Mars Activity

Summative/ Benchmark

Investigation # 9

Marking Period # 3 Benchmark

Assessment # 9

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 4 Alternative Assessments

9.0 Quiz - Max 12 points                                                              10.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

9.1 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              10.1 Quiz - Max 10 points

9.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              10.2 Quiz - Max 10 points

9.3 Quiz - Max 18 points                                                              10.3 Quiz - Max 12 points

9.4 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              Unit 10 Pocket Time - Max 146 points

9.5 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              Unit 10 PBL - What’s the Next Threshold? - Max 400 points

9.6 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              Unit 10 Investigation - Are Humans Still Evolving? - Max 400 points

9.7 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              

9.8 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              

9.9 Quiz - Max 12 points                                                              

Unit 9: Megastructures = Max 200 points

Unit 9:  Chemistry Through Time = Max 100 points

Unit 9: Create a Comic Strip = Max 20 points (Max 5 times)

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards         Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                           Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                               iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                       Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                              Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000+ Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

  • Day 1: 9.1 Appetite for Energy/Threshold 8: The Modern Revolution
  • Day 2: 9.1 Crash Course: The Industrial Revolution
  • Day 3: 9.1 The Industrial Revolution Article
  • Day 4: 9.1 How Did Change Accelerate?
  • Day 5: MP 3 Benchmark Review
  • Day 6: MP 3 Benchmark
  • Day 7: 9.2 Crash Course: The Anthropocene and the Near Future
  • Day 8: 9.2 The Anthropocene/Graphing Population Growth Activity
  • Day 9: 9.3 Collective Learning Article/Big History of Everything
  • Days 10-15: Investigation # 9
  • Day 16: 9.4 How Was the Modern World Changed?
  • Day 17: 9.4 Crash Course: World History: Globalization I: The Upside
  • Day 18: 9.5 Who are you? Braided Identities/Forming the Concept of Nationalism
  • Day 19: 9.5 You Say You Want a Revolution: Political Change on Both Sides of the Atlantic
  • Day 20: 9.5 Crash Course World History: Imperialism
  • Day 21: 9.5 Imperialism and Resistance Shape a Modern World: 1890-1914
  • Day 22: 9.6 Crisis and Conflict on the Global Stage/Understanding the Causes of WWII
  • Day 23: 9.6 Crash Course World History: Archdukes, Cynicism, and World War I
  • Day 24: 9.6 Crash Course World History: World War II
  • Day 25: 9.8 Surviving On Mars Activity/TED-Ed Who Won the Space Race?
  • Day 26: 9.8 Will We Ever Colonize Mars?
  • Day 27: 9.8 TED-Ed Could We Actually Live on Mars?/Surviving on Mars Part 2 Activity
  • Day 28: 9.9 Crash Course World History: Humans and Energy/Nuclear Energy: How Does it Work?
  • Day 29: 9.9 Benefits of Renewable Energy Use
  • Day 30: 9.9 Running on Renewable
  • Day 31: Unit 9 Assessment Review
  • Days 32-33: Unit 9 Assessment

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://school.bighistoryproject.com/

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

6.2.8.B.4.e

Analyze the motivations for civilizations to modify the environment, determine the positive and negative consequences of environmental changes made during this period, and relate these changes to current environmental changes.

6.2.8.B.4.f

Explain how the geographies and climates of Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas influenced their economic development and interaction or isolations with other societies.

6.2.8.C.4.a

Explain how and why the interrelationships among improved agricultural production, population growth, urbanization, and commercialization led to the rise of powerful states and kingdoms (i.e. Europe, Asia, Americas)

6.2.8.D.4.f

Evaluate the importance and enduring legacy of major achievements of the people living in Asia, Africa (Islam), Europe, and the Americas over time.

6.2.12.B.1.b

Determine the role of natural resources, climate, and topography in European exploration, colonization, and settlement patterns.

6.2.12.A.3.a

Explain how and why various ideals (e.g., liberty, popular sovereignty, natural rights, democracy, nationalism) became driving forces for reforms and revolutions, their influence on Latin American independence movements, and evaluate their impact on government, society, and economic opportunities.

6.2.12.A.3.b

Relate the responses of various governments to pressure for self-government or self-determination to subsequent reform or revolution.

6.2.12.A.3.c

Analyze the relationship between industrialization and the rise of democratic and social reforms, including the expansion of parliamentary government.

6.2.12.A.4.a

Explain the differences between socialism, communism, fascism, and explain the reasons for their spread in Europe and Asia.

6.2.12.A.6.a

Evaluate the role of international cooperation and multinational organizations in attempting to solve global issues.

6.2.12.A.6.b

Analyze the relationships and tensions between national sovereignty and global interest in matters such as territory, economic development, use of natural resources, and human rights.

6.2.12.B.6.a

Determine the global impact of increased population growth, migration, and changes in urban-rural populations on natural resources and land use.

6.1.12.B.16.a

Explain why natural resources (i.e. fossil fuels, food, and water) continue to be a source of conflict, and analyze how the United States and other nations have addressed issues concerning the distribution and sustainability of natural resources.

6.1.12.C.16.a

Evaluate the economic, political, and social impact of new and emerging technologies on individuals and nations.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA.R1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences and relevant connection from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

NJSLSA.R2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

NJSLSA.R3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

NJSLSA.R4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

NJSLSA.R7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

NJSLSA.R8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

NJSLSA.R9. Analyze and reflect on how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approached the authors take.

NJSLSA.R10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently with scaffolding as needed.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home,work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.7 Evaluate the impact of online activities and social media on employer decisions.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.

Unit Title

Unit 10: The Future

Timeframe 

19 Days

Unit Summary

What does 13.8 billion years of history tell you about yourself? How does knowing so much about the past change the way you think about the future? These may be the most important questions big history asks. How would you answer them? Big history is an unfinished story. In the final unit, you’ll put together everything you’ve learned so far about the past and use it to consider the future. What do you think life will be like in 10 years? In 50? How will we humans use innovation to meet our growing energy needs with limited natural resources? How will we balance complexity and fragility with sustainability? What role will you and your peers play in shaping the future? What will be the next major threshold of increasing complexity?

Learning Targets

Essential Questions

What is the next threshold?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

In Unit 10, the focus moves from the past and the present to the future. Historians are not accustomed to making

predictions about the future, as their work relies primarily on the analysis of documents and objects that already

exist. But because of the nature of Big History, the course does allow for different types of predictions about the

future. Predictions about trends in the near future are possible in a number of areas: resource availability, carbon

levels in the atmosphere, temperature change, and population growth are just some of the topics that allow for

predictions of future trends based on trends from the past and present. Predicting the remote future, ironically, can

be done with somewhat greater confidence. Scientists are quite confident, for example, about the characteristics of

our Sun, and as a result they can speak confidently about when it will run out of fuel and die. What students have

learned in earlier units of this course will allow them to approach predictions about both the near and distant future.

Reviewing the Last 13.8 Billion Years

We have seen how, over the past 13.8 billion years, more complex things appeared in the Universe. From the Big Bang, there emerged a small but rapidly expanding Universe with lots of dark energy and dark matter as well as a small amount of chemical elements, mainly in the form of hydrogen and helium atoms. Within about 200 million years, gravity had sculpted the first complex objects, stars, and within dying stars new elements were cooked, making the Universe more chemically complex, and allowing the formation of objects such as planets. Our Sun and Earth formed about 4.5 billion years ago. On our planet (and potentially on others, too!) where conditions were just right, complex chemicals combined to form living organisms. These organisms could reproduce and evolve as tiny changes were introduced in each generation. This process has been repeated for almost 4 billion years to generate the immense variety of species alive today, including our own species, Homo sapiens. We have turned out to be the only species capable of collective learning, and this has allowed our species to build on past achievements and develop new ideas, techniques, and technologies. This process has sped up the pace of societal change within our communities and the ecological impact of our species. Within just 200,000 years, our numbers have multiplied dramatically and spread into every region of the Earth. In the last few centuries, these processes have accelerated, and we have created the vast, complex global societies of today. We’ve created increasingly powerful technologies, increased our ability to control the environment, and, simultaneously, increased our impact on the biosphere.

Predicting the Near Future

What will life be like in the near future, say on the scale of a few decades or centuries from now? Of course, we cannot see into the future, but we can study those current trends that seem most likely to shape the future. At present, we can see both dangerous trends (such as global warming and the continued existence of nuclear weapons) and more positive trends (such as global collaboration in dealing with climate change, slowing in population growth, and acceleration in our knowledge about the biosphere). Can we imagine a future largely free of conflict, disease, and degradation, one in which some humans may even begin to migrate to other worlds as our Paleolithic ancestors migrated to other continents? Or are we in danger of undermining the foundations of today’s world, creating a more impoverished world of vicious conflict over scarce resources? The answers will depend on decisions taken by the generations of humans that are alive today at this critical moment in human history.

Predicting the Distant Future

What will life be like in the more remote future, say on the scale of millions or billions of years from now? Curiously, it is easier to predict the very remote future, the future of the Earth and the Universe, because here change is slower and there are fewer variables to calculate. The Sun will die in about 4 billion to 5 billion years’ time. At about the same time the Milky Way galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy will collide, and that event will have a profound impact on the stars in each galaxy. Evidence from distant galaxies suggests that the speed of the Universe’s expansion is accelerating, which in turn suggests that galaxies will slowly become more and more isolated until, eventually, all stars burn out. The Universe will then fill up with dying stars, which will get gobbled up by black holes, making it simpler and simpler. But this will not happen for billions of billions of years.

Why This Matters

An understanding of the evolution of the Universe is vital for providing context for why the Universe still exists today. It also provides the knowledge and evidence to help us make informed predictions about our future, the future of the Earth, and the Universe as a whole. It is always helpful to be prepared, and you cannot be ready for the unknown. While our historical knowledge cannot guarantee that we can accurately predict the future, we have a better chance of doing so using our scientific and historical understandings.

All Predictions Are the Same

Students may hold the view that all types of predictions are the same. It is important to emphasize with students that there is a difference between random prediction and scientific prediction. The former is based on gut instinct or feelings, whereas the latter is based on observation, evidence, and probabilities. Students should be trying to model scientific prediction. When they make scientific predictions in this unit, they will be using evidence and understandings from previous units. They will be grounding their predictions in concrete evidence as opposed to instinct.

Cumulative Content

This unit provides some greater content challenges than usual since the activities require them to think through problems that draw on knowledge from every unit in the course. A goal of Unit 10 is to ask students to think about issues that face humans and the biosphere in the near and remote futures. To grapple with such questions, students will need to draw on information from all units of the course. Students will have varying degrees of recollection of these units. This could both slow down their work, as they go back and review previous work, or it could frustrate them, as they try hard to remember where they might find information to help them address a specific question.

Little Big History

Finishing the Little Big History projects will require hard work and focus. Students have worked hard during the year. Although they’ve done important preliminary LBH project work in previous units, students will now be trying to learn new content at the same time that they’re working intensively to finish their LBH projects. You may need to provide extra encouragement to get them through it, despite your own fatigue!

Know

By the end of this unit, students will know

10.0: How/When everything started?

10.1: What issues the biosphere is currently facing and discuss possible solutions?

10.2: What’s next?

Do

By the end of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Explain the Big History story and its defining features and patterns.
  2. Identify important human and environmental issues that affect the future of our species and the biosphere.
  3. Propose a vision of the future based on new understandings of the past.

Evidence of Learning

Formative

10.2 Visions of the Future Activity

10.3 The Future of Our Planet

Summative/ Benchmark

Marking Period 4 Benchmark

Alternative Assessments

Gamified Instructional Practice:  Basic concept of enrichment and student choice in extending their learning outside of the classroom.

>>Students will be provided with a number of challenges to complete each marking period.  Points are awarded for completion and accuracy, which will be attached to incentives and prizes.

Marking Period 4 Alternative Assessments

9.0 Quiz - Max 12 points                                                              10.0 Quiz - Max 10 points

9.1 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              10.1 Quiz - Max 10 points

9.2 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              10.2 Quiz - Max 10 points

9.3 Quiz - Max 18 points                                                              10.3 Quiz - Max 12 points

9.4 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              Unit 10 Pocket Time - Max 146 points

9.5 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              Unit 10 PBL - What’s the Next Threshold? - Max 400 points

9.6 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              Unit 10 Investigation - Are Humans Still Evolving? - Max 400 points

9.7 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              

9.8 Quiz - Max 10 points                                                              

9.9 Quiz - Max 12 points                                                              

Unit 9: Megastructures = Max 200 points

Unit 9:  Chemistry Through Time = Max 100 points

Unit 9: Create a Comic Strip = Max 20 points (Max 5 times)

Incentives:  Badges with Leaderboards         Incentives:  Prizes  -  100 points = $1.00 Class Cash

10 - 99 Points = Apprentice                           Alternative seating for class period = $1.00

100 - 299 Points = Sleuth                               iPod during independent work time = $2.00

300 - 699 Points = Investigator                       Extra Bathroom Pass = $3.00

700 - 999 Points = Scholar                              Index Card “Cheat Sheet” during Test = $5.00

1000+ Points = Guru

Scholars & Gurus Pizza Party at the end of the Marking Period

Bank Accounts empty to zero at the end of the Marking Period

Learning Activities

Day 1: 10.0 The History of Everything-TED

Day 2: 10.1 Natural Disasters Activity

Day 3: 10.1 Globalization II- Good or Bad? Crash Course World History

Day 4: 10.1 The Atmosphere and Climate/Jacqueline Howard: A Day on Mars

Day 5: 10.2 Big History of Everything-H2

Day 6: 10.2 Complexity and the Future/Bill Gates: Visions of the Future

Days 7-9: 10.2 Visions of the Future Activity

Day 10: 10.2 Crash Course: The Deep Future

Day 11: Marking Period 4 Benchmark Review

Day 12: Marking Period 4 Benchmark

Days 13-15: 10.3 The Future of Our Planet

Days 16-19 Interstellar

Materials / Equipment / Resources

Core Instructional

Materials and Texts

https://school.bighistoryproject.com/

Equipment

LCD Projector / Smart Board / Google Chromebooks

Supplemental Resources

Standards

Content Statement

Indicator

6.2.12.A.6.a

Evaluate the role of international cooperation and multinational organization in attempting to solve global issues.

6.2.12.B.6.a

Determine the global impact of increased population growth, migration, and changes in urban-rural populations on natural resources and land use.

6.2.12.C.6.d

Determine how the availability of scientific, technological, and medical advances impacts the quality of life in different countries.

6.1.12.C.5.c

Assess the impact of the international arms race, the space race, and nuclear proliferation on international politics from multiple perspectives.

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

NJSLSA.R2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

NJSLSA.R3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

NJSLSA.R4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

NJSLSA.R7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

NJSLSA.R10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently with scaffolding as needed.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home,work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.6 Demonstrate understanding of the necessary preparation and legal requirements to enter the workforce.
  • 9.2.8.B.7 Evaluate the impact of online activities and social media on employer decisions.

Technology Standards - 8.1

6-8th Grade

A. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.

  • Understand and use technology systems.

8.1.8.A.1 Demonstrate knowledge of a real world problem using digital tools.

 

  • Select and use applications effectively and productively.

8.1.8.A.2 Create a document (e.g. newsletter, reports, personalized learning plan, business letters or flyers) using one or more digital applications to be critiqued by professionals for usability.

B. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and process using technology.

  • Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
  • Create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

8.1.8.B.1 Synthesize and publish information about a local or global issue or event (ex. telecollaborative project, blog, school web).

D. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.

  • Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.

8.1.8.D.1 Understand and model appropriate online behaviors related to cyber safety, cyber bullying, cyber security, and cyber ethics including appropriate use of social media.

  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.

8.1.8.D.2 Demonstrate the application of appropriate citations to digital content.

8.1.8.D.3 Demonstrate an understanding of fair use and Creative Commons to intellectual property.

  • Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

8.1.8.D.4 Assess the credibility and accuracy of digital content.

 

8.1.8.D.5 Understand appropriate uses for social media and the negative consequences of misuse.

E: Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry.
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
  • Process data and report results.

8.1.8.E.1 Effectively use a variety of search tools and filters in professional public databases to find information to solve a real world problem.

 

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by IEP’s.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

504s

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students when directed by 504 plans.
  • Modification of project dimensions or materials for students with special needs.
  • Provide students for multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings (e.g. multisensory techniques-auditory/visual aids; pictures, illustrations, graphs, charts, data tables, multimedia, modeling)
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.

ELLs

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newsela partnership
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible

G/T

  • Leveled Texts using Big History Project’s Newslea partnership
  • Game incentives to explore areas of interest.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.