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Course Number: CHH 300
Course Title: Church History
Term: Fall 2017

Time: Tuesdays/Thursdays 1:10 PM-2:25 PM

Fr. Peter Samuel Kucer MSA STD

pkucer@holyapostles.edu

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines the history of the Catholic Church as a point of evangelization. Topics to be examined will include development of the early Church, the Age of the Fathers, the Dark Ages, the Middle Ages, the Reformation period, and the Modern Era.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1: Catholic and non-Catholic Views of History and Historical Context of the Early Church

        Tuesday, August 29th 

                1. Syllabi Review

2. During this week think about a saint to write a research paper on. By the end of this week you need to choose a saint to write on. Inform me once you have chosen a saint.

3. The term paper is due on November 21st right after class begins.  The highest grade a later term paper can receive is an 80%. The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

                3. Lecture on Fr. Kucer’s Chapters 1 and 2

        Thursday, August 31st 

                1. Lecture on Fr. Kucer’s Chapters 1 and 2

                2. Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book - The Catholic Church through the Ages.  (Introduction vii-viii; The Early Church, Jewish Sources of Christianity, Roman Sources of Christianity, Influence of Jewish and Roman Sources on Christianity pages 1-9.)

Week 2: Catholic Church History and Early Christian Life

        Tuesday, September 5th 

                1. Quiz 1 and Quiz 2

2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 3 and 4

        Thursday, September 7th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 3 and 4

2. Optional Reading Required on the Graduate Level Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“Christian Sources”, “Paul”, 9-24; “Life of the Early Church” pages 36-42)        

Week 3: Early Christian Persecution, Catholic Orthodoxy and Heresy

        Tuesday, September 12th 

                1. Quiz 3 and Quiz 4

2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 5 and 6

        Thursday, September 14th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 5 and 6                

2. Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“Attacks on Christianity” pages 25-30; “Rival Religions, The Life of the Early Church, The End of the first Age, The Fathers of the Church, The Papacy, The First Christological Council, St. Augustine,” pages 31-72)        

Week 4: Fall, Rise, and Islam

        Tuesday, September 19th 

                1. Quiz 5 and Quiz 6

                2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 7 and 8

        Thursday, September 21st 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 7 and 8

                2. Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“The Veneration of the Saints, Canonization of the Saints, The Rise of Monasticism, The Spread of Monasticism, The End of the Second Age” pages 72-87; “The Dark Ages, and Islam pages 88-96)                

Week 5: Evangelization and East vs. West

        Tuesday, September 26th

1. Quiz 7 and Quiz 8

2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 9 and 10

Thursday, September 28th 

1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 9 and 10

2. Optional Reading Required on the Graduate Level Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“The Barbarians” pages 104-107; “The Byzantine Church and the Eastern Schism” pages 96-104.)

Week 6: Rise, Decline, Reform, Catholicism and Force

        Tuesday, October 3rd 

                1. Quiz 9 and Quiz 10

                2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 11 and 12

        Thursday, October 5th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapter 11 and 12

                2. Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“Charlemage” pages 107-111 and “the Papacy (955-1057)” pages 111-118)        

Week 7: Midterm Week

        Tuesday, October 10th 

                1. Quiz 11 and Quiz 12

                2. Student Midterm Presentations (See Rubrics)

The term paper is due on November 21st right after class begins.  Late papers will be automatically marked down one letter grade. The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

        Thursday, October 12th 

                1. Student Midterm Presentations

Week 8: Medieval Education and Sickness Within and Without

        Tuesday, October 17th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 13 and 14

Thursday, October 19th 

1. Lecture on Kucer’s 13 and 14.

2. Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“The New Religious Orders” and “Scholasticism” under section “IV. The Fourth Age of the Church (1000-1450): The High Middle Ages”; “Medieval Mysticism,” “The Medieval Inquisition,” “The Spanish Inquisition,” “Innocent III,” “The Decline of the Papacy,” and “The End of the Fourth Age” in the section “IV. The Fourth Age of the Church (1000-1450): The High Middle Ages”)        

Week 9: The Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation

        Tuesday, October 24th 

                1. Quiz 13 and Quiz 14

                2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 15 and 16

Thursday, October 26th 

1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 15 and 16

2. Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“The Renaissance" in the section “V. The Fifth Age of the Church (1450-1789): Reformations and Renaissance”; “The Reformation on the Continent” in the section “V. The Fifth Age of the Church (1450-1789): Reformations and Renaissance”)        

Week 10: The Catholic Reformation and Explorers/Missionaries

        Tuesday, October 31st 

                1. Quiz 15 and Quiz 16

2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 17 and 18

        Thursday, November 2nd 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 17 and 18

                2. Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“The Catholic Response” in the section “V. The Fifth Age of the Church (1450-1789): Reformations and Renaissance”; “The Missions” “The End of the Fifth Age” “Chronology of the Reformation” in the section “V. The Fifth Age of the Church (1450-1789): Reformations and Renaissance”        

Week 11: The Enlightenment and the French Revolution

        Tuesday, November 7th 

                1. Quiz 17 and Quiz 18

2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 19 and 20

        Thursday, November 9th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 19 and 20

                2. Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“The Enlightenment or the Age of Reason” in the section “VI. The Sixth Age of the Church (1789-Present): The Modern Age,”; section “The French Revolution” in the section “VI. The Sixth Age of the Church (1789-Present): The Modern Age”)        

Week 12: Empire/Nations and World Wars-The Church

The final date that your research paper may be handed in is November 21st right after class begins. The highest grade a paper can receive after this date is 80%. The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

        Tuesday, November 14th 

                1. Quiz 19 and Quiz 20

2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 21 and 22

        Thursday, November 16th 

                1. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 21 and 22

                2. Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“The Aftermath of Revolution” in the section “VI. The Sixth Age of the Church (1789-Present): The Modern Age,”; “War and Dictatorship” and “Nazi Germany and the Catholic Church,” in the section “VI. The Sixth Age of the Church (1789-Present): The Modern Age,”)        

Week 13: Vatican II and the Catholic Church in the USA November 21st to November 27th

        Hand in your papers on November 21st right after class begins. The highest grade a paper may receive after this date is 80%. The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

        Tuesday, November 21st 

                1. Quiz 21 and Quiz 22

2. Lecture on Kucer’s Chapters 23 and 24

                3. Read Selections from John Vidmar’s book (“Post-World War II Catholicism” in the section “VI. The Sixth Age of the Church (1789-Present): The Modern Age,”; “The Catholic Church in the United States” and “Social Catholicism,” in the section “VI. The Sixth Age of the Church (1789-Present): The Modern Age,”)

        Thursday, November 23rd 

                Thanksgiving Break – No Class        

Week 14: -------------------

        Tuesday, November 28th 

                1. Quiz 23 and Quiz 24

                2. (Possibly Some End of Term Presentations)

        Thursday, November 30th 

                1. Student Evaluations (Possibly Some End of Term Presentations)                

Week 15: Final Exam Week December 5th to December 9th

                1. End of Term Presentations

                 

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

        1. Quizzes: 20%

        2. Presentations: 35%

3. Paper: 45% *

        * Hand in your papers on November 21st. The highest grade a paper may receive after this date is 80%.  The term paper is to be 6-9 pages in length. 5 percentage points will be deducted for each page below or above the requested length.

5. REQUIRED READINGS:

6. SUGGESTED READINGS and RESOURCES:

Armenio, Peter V.  The History of the Church, A Complete Course.  Woodridge: Midwest        Theological Forum,         2007.  (BR145 .H597 2005)

Bellitto, Christopher M.  The General Councils: A History of the Twenty-One General Councils        from Nicea to Vatican II.  New York: Paulist Press, 2002. (BX825.B45)

Bettenson, Henry.  Documents of the Christian Church.  Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 1999.        (BR 141 .D63 1999)

Carroll, Warren Hasty.  The Founding of Christendom V. I.  Front Royal:  Christendom College        Press, 1985.

 _________________    Carroll, Warren Hasty. The Building of Christendom V. II.  Front Royal:

Christendom College Press, 1987.

_________________    Carroll, Warren Hasty.  The Glory of Christendom V. III.  Front Royal:  Christendom         College Press, 1993.

_________________    Carroll, Warren Hasty.  The Cleaving of Christendom V. IV.  Front Royal:  Christendom College Press, 2000.

Duffy, Eamon.  Saints & Sinners:  A History of the Popes.  New Haven:  Yale University Press, 2002.

Turpin, Joanne.  Women in Church History.  Cincinnati: St. Anthony Messenger Press, 1990.

7. EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

Grading Rubric for Term Papers

Writing and Expression

Outcome: An ability to use important conventions particular to expository essay writing, including the use of a clear thesis, effective paragraphing, & an organizational pattern, including effective transitions, that develops an idea over the course of an essay rather than simply listing supporting ideas.

5 Points

4 Points

3 Points

2 Points

Thesis

The statement is clear and offers a very specific idea that clearly sets the topic & limits its scope.

The statement is clear and sets out a clear topic, but might not clearly limit its scope.

The statement is clear, but offers only a vague or general point that may be taken in many directions.

The statement does not offer a clear point that can be developed.

Paragraph effectiveness

Each paragraph has a central stated or clearly implied point and develops it with clear details.  Each has an explicit or clearly implied connection to earlier paragraphs & the overall point of the essay.

Each paragraph has a central stated or clearly implied point and develops it with clear details.

Each paragraph has a central stated or implied point and the details in the paragraph are relevant to that point, though they may comprise a list rather than a development of the point.

Paragraphs lack a central stated or implied point.

Organization & Transition  

Transitions are fully developed and the paper fully develops a point.

Transitions move beyond the simple use of transition phrases and the paper demonstrates some attempt to develop and build a point rather than simply list ideas.

Inconsistent use of transition; or, transitions are provided, but tend to be mechanical.  The paper is organized simplistically – for instance, points are simply added to one another.

Little or no sense of transitions; connections between paragraphs and the overall organization of the paper is unclear.

Research

Outcome : An ability to use language that generally conveys meaning to readers & contains few errors; an ability to ethically & accurately use Turabian format to cite & document sources.

5 Points

4 Points

3 Points

2 Points

Correctness

Free of errors.

Few errors – fewer than one per page.

Errors may appear (fewer than three per page), but do not impede meaning.

Errors impede meaning or are too numerous – more than three per page.

Style

Meaning is very clear and the writer’s language enhances reader’s understanding.

Meaning is clear and the writer’s language is competent.

Meaning is sometimes clear to readers, but not consistently.

Meaning is unclear. Sentences may be wordy and/or vocabulary is limited or incorrectly used.

Use of Turabian/Chicago Format – See the HACS Style Sheet

All quotes are correctly introduced; quotes and paraphrases are correctly cited and formatted. The works cited page is correctly formatted and includes all resources.

All quotes are correctly introduced.  Only one or two citations for quotes or paraphrases are missing or incorrectly formatted, and/or the works cited page has minor formatting issues but includes all resources in the correct order.

Quotes are often not correctly introduced.  Only quotes (not paraphrases) are cited; or the works cited page completely disregards Turabian format.

Quotes are not correctly introduced.  Many citations are missing and may be incorrectly formatted OR there is no works cited page.

Church History 300 Presentation Rubric

 

Exemplary (4)

Proficient (3)

Developing (2)

Beginning (1)

Organization

Organizational pattern (specific introduction that provides in advance the logical steps the presentation will take, conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is clearly and consistently observable, is skillful, and makes the content of the presentation cohesive.

Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is clearly and consistently observable within the presentation.

Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is intermittently observable within the presentation.

Organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions) is not observable within the presentation.

Language/Delivery

Language choices are imaginative, memorable, and compelling, and enhance the effectiveness of the presentation. Language facilitates retention and attention by being unique to the oral channel. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness, lack of filler words “ums, ah, you know etc.” ) make the presentation compelling, and speaker appears polished and confident. Delivery appears natural and purposeful. There are no signs of speech anxiety.

Language choices are thoughtful and generally support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language includes choices that reflect an orally communicated message as opposed to a written message. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) make the presentation interesting, and speaker appears comfortable. Delivery generally appears natural and purposeful. Signs of speech anxiety are minimal and, if present, disappear as the speech begins.

Language choices are mundane and commonplace, and partially support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language helps minimally in promoting retention and attention of the audience. Language in presentation is appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) make the presentation understandable but delivery sometimes lacks purpose and, at times, appears rehearsed. Speaker appears tentative with signs of speech anxiety present intermittently.

Language choices are unclear and minimally support the effectiveness of the presentation. Language does not reflect the uniqueness of the oral channel. Language in presentation is not appropriate to audience.

Delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) detract from the understandability of the presentation. Delivery choices lack purpose and virtually any appearance of being natural. The speaker appears uncomfortable, being controlled by speech anxiety.

Central Message

Central message is compelling (precisely stated, appropriately repeated, memorable, and strongly supported.) Message is appropriate for purpose, context, and audience.

Central message is clear and consistent with the supporting material. Message is generally appropriate for purpose, context, and audience.

Central message is basically understandable but is not often repeated and is not memorable. Message may fall short of adhering to purpose, and lacks a consistent appropriateness for context and/or audience

Central message can be deduced, but is not explicitly stated in the presentation. Message is not clearly in line with purpose and lacks a consistent appropriateness to audience and context.

Time

Ten Minutes

 One minute below.

Two minutes below.

Three minutes below.

Oral Presentation Requirements and Rubric

        The two oral presentations are to be accompanied by outlines. The format of the outline is as follows.

Introduction

        The introduction needs to be written out with a minimum of ten grammatically correct sentences. In the introduction, you are to present your topic and the steps by which you will talk on your topic.

Body

        You only need to outline the body of your presentation, but grammar still will be corrected.

        Direct quotes need to be fully written out and properly footnoted. Include at least three direct quotes, preferably from primary sources.

Conclusion

        The conclusion needs to be written out in at least ten sentences. In the conclusion, you are to summarize and make a synthesis of your presentation steps.

Bibliography

        In Turabian format and a minimum of 5 sources with at least one primary source.

Outline Rubric

15 Points

12 Points

10 Points

8 Point

Introduction

In at least ten written out sentences, the main idea is introduced, and clearly stated, and the steps you will take are presented.

Although a main idea is clearly stated in the introduction, it is not the main idea present in the presentation.

The main idea is presented in an unclear, confusing manner.

The main idea is missing in the introduction.

Body

The essential supporting ideas are presented in a logical order.

Some essential supporting ideas are missing.

Those presented are explained in a logical order.

The essential supporting ideas are presented but an illogical, random manner.

Only some essential ideas are presented. These are presented in an illogical, random manner.

Conclusion

The main idea is restated in at least 10 sentences in a complementary but different way than it was in the introduction.

The main idea is restated but almost exactly as it was in the introduction.

The main idea is not restated in the conclusion.

A conclusion is missing.

Grammar

Error-free grammar and error-free citations/bibliography.

Very few (1-3) errors and those that appear do not obscure meaning.

Some (4-7) errors or lack of clarity of expression.

Many (over 7) errors.

8. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Disabilities Office Coordinator, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

        Students are expected to attend all classes unless they have been excused.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSORPeter Samuel Kucer

        Your instructor, Fr. Peter, is most eager to open your minds to Church History.  I hope my enthusiasm will lift your spirits up and, with the grace of God, we will mutually grow in wisdom and knowledge of sacred history.