Section Three: House Operations

  1. House Operations
  1. HOUSE POLICY

  1. Changes in the following house policies must come in writing to the Director of Housing by October 31st for the following Fall/Winter term and February 28th for the following Spring/Summer Term.  If any house wishes to change their policy after this date, the change must be approved by the Operations Management Committee.
  1. Animal Policy
  2. Food Policy
  3. Spring/Summer Boarding
  4. Gender Ratio
  5. Theme of the house
  6. Method for approving new members if applicable (ex. Non-grad approval, interview requirements, etc)
  1. FIRST HOUSE MEETING: All houses of the current term must have their first house meeting within one week of the first day of the contract period.  At this meeting it shall be required that the house:
  1. Elects all house officers.
  2. Discusses the Fire Policy and practices with house members
  3. Discusses House Safety and Sanitation with house members
  4. Review house policies
  5. Member will be notified of the Roof Policy (see Standing Rule 9.6)
  1. House Presidents will send the meeting minutes and the names of newly elected officers to the Education Committee within 24 hours of the meeting.
  1. HOUSE ROSTERS

Two house officers are to verify room assignments by signing and submitting a House Roster at least once per term. The Roster must be returned to the Housing staff by the house president, or a person designated by the president to act for the house, within 48 hours of room picks and update it as needed within 48 hours of any changes. This House Roster shall include the room number and the member(s) living in all rooms.

  1. HOUSE OFFICER EVALUATIONS

In order to ensure better house-level operation, every house must carry out evaluations of their officers (i.e., any elected position) in order to determine if officers have been completing the tasks as specified in their respective house constitutions. Regardless of what of evaluation is used, the results should be reported to the Operations Management Committee for record keeping, each house’s evaluation process must have the following traits:

  1. A. Evaluations must occur once per contract period and should be done with sufficient time for the officer to integrate feedback into their performance (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).
  2. B. The system used to evaluate the officers must guarantee anonymity for the evaluators (e.g. written ballots or an anonymous hand raised vote).
  3. C. The house meeting following the evaluation will include a discussion of the evaluation
  1. PET POLICY

Houses, Operations Management Committee, and the Board of Directors shall collaborate, as outlined below, to designate ICC houses as either pet-friendly or pet free. Un-caged pets are not allowed in any ICC houses with the exception of cats and dogs. Individual houses may implement stricter policy in their house constitutions. All animals entering the ICC and any subsequent violations of this policy shall be promptly reported to the Director of Housing and/or Operations Management Committee. Violations of this policy may result in fines, referral, expulsion and House Referral Status.

  1. AQUARIUM SIZE

  1. Tanks must be less than twenty (20) gallons in capacity.
  1. HOUSE PET STATUS

  1. Any house may be approved to be pet-free or pet-friendly.
  2. There must always be a minimum of five houses that are pet-free. Escher, Baker, and King cannot be counted to fulfill this quota.
  3. Pets are currently allowed at all ICC houses except: MichMinnies, Nakamura, Gregory, Debs, and Vail, along with Baker (not included in the quota).
  4. All houses must review and vote on their pet status every three years. Houses must submit a proposal to the Board if they wish to change their status from pet-free to pet-friendly, or pet-friendly to pet-free. Otherwise, a house’s pet status is frozen for three years.
  5. In any given three year cycle, at most two houses may be approved to change their pet status.
  1. LIMITS ON PETS

  1. Non-Apartment Style Houses
  1. A quarter (1/4) of the rooms may have pets in a pet-friendly house.
  2. Only one dog is permitted in a pet-friendly house.
  3. One cat is permitted for every ten contract spaces in a pet-friendly house.
  4. A maximum of two caged pets are permitted per room in a pet-friendly house subject to SR 12.4.3.A.
  1. Apartment Style Houses
  1. Each apartment is permitted to have at most two pets, caged or otherwise, only one of which may be a dog.
  1. PET CHARGES

  1. Owners of cats and dogs must pay $15 per month per pet in addition to their ICC and house charges.
  2. Owners of pets in pet enclosures must pay $15 per month per pet enclosure in addition to their ICC and house charges.
  3. All paid pet charges will flow into the Annual Maintenance budget.
  4. Due to restrictions on tank capacity, owners of aquatic animals and crustaceans are excluded from paying pet charges.
  5. Special cases regarding pet charges may be brought to the Facilities Management Committee.
  1. STANDARD PET APPROVALS

  1. Anyone who does not yet have a contract for the house they are planning on bringing a pet into may  request a pet approval from the house they are planning to move into before they sign a contract for that house. Pet approval granted in this way becomes active at the beginning of that member's contract period. (44/2010-2011)
  2. Members who have already signed a contract may request a vote of pet approval at any time during their contract period. Members who have a contract for a term(s) that has not yet started can request pet approval that will become active at the start of that term(s). (44/2010-2011)
  3. Houses shall be notified of a member’s desire to sign a contract with a Pet Addendum by a request for a vote of approval.
  4. Voting on pets will be conducted by secret written ballot. Ballots must be distributed to each member of the house with a set time to be turned in. Ballots that are not returned are considered abstentions. Abstentions are not counted in the vote
  5. No pet may reside on ICC property without at least 85% house approval, except service animals as required by law, or approved by the Operations Management Committee.
  6. North Campus houses may opt for simple majority house approval. 85% suite approval is mandatory.
  7. All active pet approvals expire at the end of the winter term. Members with pets who wish to sign contracts for terms after that time period must have their pets reapproved by the house. (44/2010-2011)
  8. House Presidents must submit minutes from all house approval meetings to the Housing office along with a complete roster of all pets – approved or unapproved – living in their house.
  9. Unregistered animals are subject to immediate removal by the ICC at the expense of the house and/or owner.  
  1. No pet may reside on ICC property without a completed Pet Addendum on file in the Membership Office and validated by Housing staff. A pet Addendum will not be validated without all written documentation of house and roommate approvals, all required supporting documentation, and the payment of all fees. Addenda must be signed for each academic calendar year (Sept. 1 – Sept. 1) that a pet resides in the ICC for any length of time.
  2. Addenda pertaining to cats and dogs, except service animals as required by law or approved by Operations Management Committee, require the following documentation for validation.
  1. All dog owners must provide proof of renter’s insurance covering their dog.
  2. All cats and dogs must be neutered or spayed with proof on file at the Membership Office.
  3. All cats and dogs must be current in their vaccinations with proof on file at the Membership Office.
  1. Violations of Pet Policy: Animals are considered a nuisance when they:

  1. Exhibit aggression.
  2. Are observed to be neglected or abused.
  3. Endanger the health or welfare of members of the public.
  4. Prevent a space in the house from being or remaining filled by a current or prospective member.
  5. Inhibit the use of house common space or grounds.
  6. Cause damage to house and/or property.
  7. Lack a validated Pet Addendum to owner’s membership contract.          
  1. Approval of any pet may be revoked and the animal’s immediate removal requested by the following means:
  1. In the event of a threat to human safety, the animal's immediate removal will be requested and enforced without notice.
  2. Approval of any pet may be revoked by a house, through a simple majority vote, if the pet becomes a nuisance.
  3. Approval of any pet may be revoked by the Operations Management   Committee if the pet becomes a nuisance.
  1. Any member may, and should, promptly report violations of this policy to the Director of Housing or the Operations Management Committee. Violations of this policy are subject to fines, referral, animal expulsion, member expulsion, and House Referral Status.
  2. Pet owners are liable for all damages caused by the pet. If the damages are not collectable from the owner. All members of the house are liable for all damages caused by the pet
  3. FINES

  1. For Houses with unregistered pets: In addition to fees charged under SR 12.4.4,
  1.  If a member signed for the Fall/Winter contract period does not have the documents for validation and fees in by October 1st the member will be   charged $50. After the initial fee of $50 the member will be charged $5  per day following the 1st for not turning in required validation documents and fees to the Director of Housing at the ICC office.
  2.  If a member signed for the Winter contract period does not have the   documents for  validation and fees in by February 1st the member will  be charged $50. After the initial fee of $50 the member will be charged $5 per day following the 1st for not turning in required validation documents and fees to the Director of Housing at the ICC office.
  3.  If a member signed for the Spring contract period does not have the documents for validation and fees in by June 1st the member will be charged $50. After the initial fee of $50 the member will be charged $5 per day following the 1st for not turning in required validation  documents and fees to the Director of Housing at the ICC office.
  4. If a member signed for the Summer contract period does not have the  documents for validation and fees in by August 1st the member will be  charged $50. After the initial fee of $50 the member will be charged $5  per day following the 1st for not turning in required validation documents and fees to the Director of Housing at the ICC office.
  1. For houses with unreported pets:
  1. Members are subject to fines of $100 per week, per unreported pet.
  1. The cost of a lost contract may be assessed to any house in which the presence of a pet in any way prevents a space in the house from being or remaining filled by a current or prospective member.
  2. Owners whose animals have been ordered removed from ICC property, or whose approval has been revoked, may petition the Contract Release Committee to be released from their contract within 30 days of notification of the decision. Such releases are not considered “automatic” but will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
  3. APPEALS: This policy is administered by the Director of Housing. Special situations may be appealed to the Operations Management Committee. Fines may be appealed to the Finance Committee.

  4. Houses may enforce more restrictive policies regarding pets as long as the house provides those policies to the Housing staff before the deadline for submitting the following year's policies and amenities. Houses may not enforce less restrictive pet policies.
  1. GUESTS

  1. DEFINITION OF PERSONAL GUEST: A personal guest is a person who is sponsored by a current member, stays overnight in the room of that member or a common room in an ICC house and has no contract.

  2. RIGHT OF REFUSAL:  The house or any person who would otherwise become a roommate of the personal guest has the power to refuse a personal guest.

  3. RESPONSIBILITY FOR PERSONAL GUESTS:  Personal guests must be sponsored by a current member. The sponsoring member is responsible for the conduct and any damages caused by their personal guest.

  4. HOUSE GUESTS:  Houses may approve house guests for up to two weeks, provided that there is room.  House guests may not prevent an ICC member with a signed contract for a space from occupying that space.

  5. LENGTH OF STAY RESTRICTION:  Personal or house guests may not stay for more than two weeks without signing a contract.

  6. ROOM CAPACITY AND GUESTS:  At no time may a room be booked over legal capacity due to personal or house guests.

  7. ICC CHARGES FOR GUEST OVERSTAYS:  Houses shall be assessed ICC charges for personal or house guests who stay more than two weeks in a semester.  The assessment shall be for the number of weeks the guest stays, rounded to the nearest week.  The house president and treasurer shall jointly be responsible for notifying the ICC Finance Coordinator and the Housing Staff of such guests; a statement signed by two members shall also serve as notification.  This policy does not imply that the ICC has given permission for the guest to stay.

  1. ICC PARTY POLICY

  1. Before holding a house-sponsored event at which more than ten non-ICC members may attend, the house must approve the party or event by a majority vote of all members, or in a manner otherwise consistent with the House Constitution. If approved, the House shall prepare a party plan, or may rely on an existing party plan, and take the following steps: Houses must turn in a completed ICC Party Checklist to the Operations Management Committee’s mailbox at least 24 hours prior to the event. (37/2010-2011)
  1. If alcohol is to be served,
  1. A process for ensuring that ICC Controlled and Illegal Substances Policy (SR 2.5) is observed.
  2. Persons under the age of 21 are not allowed to obtain or consume alcohol on the premises.
  3. No admission fees or other fees are to be charged to attendees.
  4. No alcohol shall be removed to or consumed on public rights-of-way.
  1. A safety team is appointed and a safety plan is created to:
  1. control admission;
  2. ensure member and guest safety;
  3. address crowd control;
  4. control excessive alcohol consumption;
  5. deal with medical emergencies;
  6. ensure house security to minimize theft, damage and vandalism to the house and to neighbors
  1. Establish contact with neighbors before the party in order to avoid unnecessary disturbance to the neighborhood, and give neighbors a contact person to call if the event is to be held outdoors or will project sound beyond the house property.
  2. Designate two or more house members or other ICC members to be the Party Manager(s) during the party, who will:
  1. remain sober
  2. help ensure safety and
  3. prepare a written report of any incident that occurs during the party involving injury to a person or property, including the name of those involved, the causes of the injury and remedial steps taken.
  1. ADVERTISING (6/14)

  1. Advertising of alcohol or controlled substances is prohibited.
  2. Inviting friends to a house party through social networking websites (i.e. Facebook, etc.) is allowed as long as invitations remain private and the party is not posted as a public event.
  3. ICC or committee-sponsored events may be advertised. Alcohol cannot be served at officially sponsored ICC or ICC committee events.
  4. Graphics, events posted on social media sites, posters, and/or fliers used to advertise house parties must be viewed and approved by at least  85% of house members prior to distribution outside the house.
  1.  SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS

  1. Violations of the Party Policy, including injury to persons or damages caused to the house or neighbors resulting from the party, may be brought to Operations Management Committee for an initial inquiry into any and all facts of the incident. Upon gathering and hearing all available information relevant to the incident, Operations Management Committee shall vote by a simple majority to request that CoCo hold a party policy sanction hearing with the house in question. If OpsCom votes to approve a hearing, they shall recommend to CoCo which party policy violations the house in question has violated. They shall report to CoCo their decision and include suggestions for the sanction.
  2. Party policy violations, as suggested by OpsCom, shall be brought before CoCo for a hearing.  At the hearing, OpsCom shall serve as the complainant, and the house involved in the hearing shall serve as the respondent. House representatives shall receive notice of the hearing at least one week prior to the hearing. CoCo may implement sanctions if they find that a violation of the Party Policy has occurred. The extent of the sanctions will reflect the severity of the violation. The hearing shall adhere to the protocols described in SR 16.2. In addition to CoCo, the following representatives shall be present as part of the hearing:
  1. The Vice President for Operations Management , serving as the representative for the complainant. They will not serve as a voting member of CoCo at the hearing.
  2. The house, represented by the house president, or a member appointed by the house president.
  3. A neutral facilitator
  4. Time observer
  5. Note-taker
  6. Witnesses who can testify to the facts of the case. Only ICC members may serve as witnesses
  1. Sanctions may include:
  1. Formal reprimand or warning
  2. ICC or House Service, including training or workshop attendance
  3. Fining the house an amount not to exceed $20.00 per house member, or actual costs of damages caused by the violation. Members of the house not in attendance at the party, or found not to be responsible for violations, may be excused from sanctions by CoCo.
  4. Prohibiting future parties for a duration to be determined by CoCo.
  5. House Referral Status per SR 12.11 if the violation is repeated or severe.
  6. Placement of individuals on referral
  7. Termination of individual contract
  8. Expulsion of individuals.
  1. House members, with permission granted in accordance with house rules, may hold small private parties, such as birthday parties, or other gatherings of less than ten non-ICC guests, that are not considered official house or ICC parties. House members holding such parties shall be personally responsible for any damages that occur during such events caused by violations of this policy, and may be sanctioned as stated in 12.16.3 C above.
  1. APPEALS

  1. Any house or individual may appeal CoCo’s decision in writing to the Board  within 7 days of the decision. The appeal shall be facilitated by the ICC President. Representatives from the initial sanction hearing may be present to  defend their position on the matter. The General Manager will also be present during the appeal. The Board shall vote on the appeal by a simple majority.
  2. Grounds for appeal are limited to:
  1. Errors regarding significant facts
  2. OpsCom or CoCo did not follow procedure
  3. Newly discovered information or evidence
  4. Sanctions that are excessive, considering the violation
  1. ICC FIRE POLICY

  1. DESIGNATED SMOKING AREAS (15/2009-2010)

  1. Pursuant to Michigan Compiled Law 333.12601 which takes effect May 1, 2010, smoking of any tobacco product is prohibited inside ICC buildings.
  2. Houses may designate exterior smoking areas only.
  3. All designated smoking areas must have an ashtray or butt receptacle designed specifically for cigarette smoking, which must be kept free of flammable materials. Empty food cans or bottles may not substitute.
  4. Flammable materials such as cardboard, lighters, matches shall not be stored on porches.
  5. Exterior doors of all houses must be posted with signs indicating "No Smoking," or the universal "no smoking" symbol.
  6. ICC members, officers, and staff are responsible for enforcing paragraphs A and E, above, and may be fined under Michigan State law for failure to enforce this ordinance. Failure to enforce G may be fined under Ann Arbor city law for failure to enforce this ordinance.
  7. Pursuant to Ann Arbor city code Title IX Chapter 106 Section 9:7, no house shall place, or permit to remain, upholstered furniture which is not intended or designed for outdoor use on exterior balconies, porches, decks, landings, or other areas exposed to the weather.
  1. FIRE PREVENTION

  1. House presidents must show all new members where fire extinguishers are located during house tours.
  2. Signs should be clearly posted around houses showing fire escape plans.
  3. At the first meeting of each semester the house must go through a routine fire drill.
  4. Nothing may be stored in boiler rooms.
  5. Burners shall not be left on and unattended.
  6. Grills may be stored but not used on any ICC porch.
  7. Grills shall not be operated less than 6 feet away from any ICC Building.
  1. ROOM CONDITION

Before new members move in, all rooms must be brought to a standard of cleanliness detailed below and further defined by Membership Policy. (68/06)

  1. EXPECTED CONDITION OF MEMBER ROOMS:

Upon signing a contract, new members shall be informed of the condition in which they should expect to find their rooms.  This information shall also be available at the houses at the beginning and end of each contract period.  If any members find their room in substandard condition, they should contact the house interim manager(s) or key holder, who will then contact the ICC Interim Coordinator or Director of Housing.  

  1. The minimum requirements for a member room:
  1. Room should be swept, mopped, and/or vacuumed.  Any removable carpet stains should be removed.
  2. Room should be free of trash and personal belongings.
  3. Desk and dresser drawers should be completely empty.
  4. Walls should be clean and clear
  5. The room should contain a bed, desk, chair and dresser for each resident.  
  1. EXPECTED CONDITION OF COMMON ROOMS:

Throughout the interim period, common rooms, including bathrooms and kitchens, shall adhere to the following minimum requirements.

  1. Room should be swept, mopped, and/or vacuumed.  Any removable carpet stains should be removed.
  2. Room shall be free of trash and personal belongings not authorized by the interim manager/key holder.
  3. Dishes are clean and available for members to use.
  4. Rooms should be maintained at an appropriate level of cleanliness as described by membership policy.
  1. ACCOUNTABILITY FOR VIOLATIONS:

If an incoming member notifies the ICC, whether through staff or a member of the Coordinating Committee, that they have decided not move into a house because of a violation of SR 12.8.1 or 12.8.2 above, then that house shall be responsible for paying the ICC charges that the new member would have paid until such time as the room is filled.

  1. The Contract Release Committee will determine whether a house is responsible for the ICC charges in contract release petitions where violations of SR 12.8 warrant a contract release.
  2. A house will not be assessed the cost of the vacated contract until the term in question has ended, and may appeal to the Finance Committee to reduce the total cost of the assessment if they feel there were extenuating circumstances that prevented the space being filled.
  1. ITEMS PROHIBITED

Unless noted otherwise in the rules of this chapter, all firearms, ammunition, explosives, and waterbeds are forbidden from the ICC owned property. Motorcycles are not allowed inside any ICC house. Pets are not allowed unless agreed to in writing by the ICC as indicated by a validated Pet Addendum to the member’s contract. For pet policies refer to SR 12.4. (25/07) (36/04)

  1. MEMBERS WITH DISABILITIES

  1. PURPOSE: The ICC is dedicated to promoting membership diversity, including members with disabilities.  The ICC will make all reasonable accommodations for members/prospective members with disabilities.  An Attorney and/or the Center for Independent Living should be consulted to determine legality.  For all accommodations, the following steps are recommended:
  1. Identify the problem (Is there a disability related limitation?)
  2. Ask the member/prospective member if they have encountered this problem in the past.
  3. Ask the member/prospective member how they overcame the obstacle in the past.
  4. Is the accommodation going to require a low-tech or high-tech solution?
  5. Determine which resources are available already.
  6. Ascertain if the member/prospective member can use the accommodation independently.
  7. Determine if the reasonable accommodation creates other obstacles.
  1. REASONABLE OR USUAL ACCOMMODATIONS: If a member or prospective member with disabilities requires accommodations enabling them to live within an ICC house, the member/prospective member may request these changes.  Physical changes requiring more than $500 will require Facilities Management Committee approval; all other changes will be coordinated by the office in a timely manner. The ICC considers the following accommodations to be reasonable:
  1. Physical changes enabling the member/prospective member to utilize the building.
  2. Installation of safety devices (e.g. flashing fire alarms)
  3. Installation of TDD phone access or other accommodation that enables the member/prospective member to utilize house services.
  4. Member/potential member requires a handicap accessible room due to disability: The member/potential member shall be allowed to occupy a handicap accessible room. House seniority lists shall be used to determine the members/potential members whose room picks shall be displaced.  However, during a contract period, members currently living in a room will not be moved without their consent.
  5. Member/potential member requires a single due to disability:  The member/potential member shall be allowed to occupy a single. The Operations Management Committee shall be allowed to vote whether to reduce the house capacity by one or allow the person to occupy a single.  House seniority lists shall be used to determine the members/potential members whose room picks shall be displaced.  However, during a contract period, members currently living in a room will not be moved without their consent.  
  1. OTHER ACCOMMODATIONS: If a member /prospective member requires an accommodation not listed above, the following process will be followed: (53/96)
  1. The member/prospective member will approach the house and inform them of   the accommodations required.  The house and the member/prospective member should work together to find a solution agreeable to all.  
  2. If the house and member/prospective member can not work out an agreeable solution and the ICC is legally required to make an accommodation, then the Operations Management Committee will intervene.  Before making a decision, the Operations Management Committee will meet at the house.  The committee will also meet with the member/prospective member as needed.  The committee will then make an appropriate decision.  If the solution requires physical changes above $500, then Facilities Management Committee approval is required.  If other expenditures are required in excess of $500, then Board approval is required.
  3. This process must be resolved in an expedient and timely manner.
  1. HOUSE REFERRAL STATUS

  1. DEFINITION: House Referral Status (HRS) is a process for assisting an ICC house that needs help with its governance or operations in accordance with the reasons listed below. It is an interpretation of Bylaw 6.2, which states, “The government and administration of the several co-ops shall be left to the members of the respective co-ops insofar as their actions do not jeopardize the interests of the membership as a whole or the interests of other co-ops.”

  2. REASONS FOR HOUSE REFERRAL STATUS Any member or the ICC Board of Directors may request that a house be considered for HRS for one or more of the following reasons:

  1. Problems with recruitment and/or retention – a house falls below 75% minimum capacity during a contract period and/or continually fails to retain a significant percentage of members.
  2. Problems with house governance – the majority of officer positions remain unfulfilled for extended periods of time, officers fail to complete required trainings, and/or officers significantly neglect their responsibilities.
  3. Problems with uncooperative behavior – house members do not complete their assigned work, follow house and ICC rules, and/or participate cooperatively and appropriate measures are not taken to enforce rules and encourage cooperative behavior.
  4. Problems with sanitation and/or maintenance – a house is not kept in a state of cleanliness that is welcoming to all members and/or there is significant damage due to abuse, misuse, or neglect.
  5. Problems with finances – house finances have been consistently mismanaged and/or debtors have not been dealt with effectively.
  6. Other important issues or concerns that indicate a house is failing to perform in accordance with the ICC Key Performance Indicators (KPIs).
  1. PROCEDURES

  1. Operations Management Committee is responsible for administering and facilitating HRS.
  2. Requests to consider a house for HRS should be sent to the Vice President for Operations Management, who will then arrange a meeting between house officers, the Operations Management Committee, and staff to discuss concerns about the house.
  3. Following this meeting, the house officers are responsible for discussing these issues with house members at a regular house meeting. Staff or Operations Management Committee members can be asked to attend these meetings. Minutes from this house meeting should be forwarded to the Vice President for Operations Management.
  4. Following the house meeting, the house will be given one (1) month to correct issues. The Operations Management Committee can assist the house with correcting these issues by coordinating communication between the house and appropriate staff or committees.
  5. If the concerns are not adequately addressed by the house and house leadership, the Operations Management Committee will hold a hearing for House Referral Status with the house. The Operations Management Committee should send an agenda that includes a detailed list of all the reasons the house is being considered for HRS to the house at least 7 calendar days before the scheduled hearing.
  6. The Operations Management Committee will facilitate the HRS hearing. An ad hoc committee of between 3 and 6 house presidents will also attend the meeting. The ad hoc committee will be selected randomly, but cannot include the president of the house under consideration for HRS.
  7. Within 48 hours of the hearing, the ad hoc committee of house presidents will vote, with a simply majority being required, to determine whether the house should be placed on HRS.
  8. If the ad hoc committee does vote to place the house on HRS, the committee must submit to the Operations Management Committee a list of reasons.
  9. If the ad hoc committee votes against placing the house on HRS, it must submit justifications to the Operations Management Committee. The house will still be monitored by the Operations Management Committee for one (1) month, during which time the house officers will be required to meet with the committee at least once.
  10. After the ad hoc committee votes on HRS, the Operations Management Committee will communicate the decision to the house along with the criteria for the house to be removed from HRS. The Operations Management Committee will also establish a timeline for the house to meet criteria and facilitate assistance between the house and the ICC.
  11. Once a house has met the established criteria, the Operations Management Committee will convene a meeting with the house and another ad hoc committee of between 3 and 6 house presidents. Within 48 hours of this meeting, the ad hoc committee will vote whether or not to remove a house from HRS.
  12. If the house is removed from HRS, it will be placed under probation for two (2) months, during which time house officers are required to meet with the Operations Management Committee on a monthly basis.
  13. If the house has failed to meet the criteria to be removed from HRS in a timely manner, the Operations Management Committee, in consultation with the ICC Board of Directors, will consider taking measures such as re-theming the house, approving new house members, or whatever else is deemed a reasonable and appropriate response to the situation.
  14. More information about procedures in cases of House Referral can be found in the Operations Management Committee Policies and Guidelines.
  1. POLICIES

  1. MEASURES If a house is placed on House Referral Status, the Operations Management Committee will not be limited to facilitating the following measures to help the house meet the criteria necessary to be removed from HRS:
  1. Hiring a house manager.
  2. Hiring cleaning services.
  3. Making house and/or maintenance improvements, which are not limited to disposing of unsightly furniture or trash, buying new furniture, painting or fixing things around the house, and/or approving special work projects.
  4. Requiring house officers and members to participate in educational or sanitation workshops.
  5. Recalling house officers and/or holding elections for new house officers.
  6. Placing members on referral by consensus of the Operations Management Committee and an ad hoc committee of between 3 and 6 house presidents.
  7. Other measures deemed reasonable and appropriate responses to the particular situation.
  1. FINANCES In certain cases, such as cleaning and/or repairing the house, the Operations Management Committee has the power to bill the house directly. However, if a house manager must be hired, the cost will be paid for by the ICC as a whole.
  1. APPEALS

  1. REASONS FOR APPEAL Any member may appeal a decision to place a house on HRS for the following reasons:
  1. OpsCom did not follow proper procedures.
  2. KPIs and/or other evidence of house performance does not support the decision  to place a house on HRS.
  1. PROCEDURE
  1. Appeals of HRS will be heard by the ICC Board of Directors (BOD).If a member wishes to appeal an HRS decision, they must inform the ICC President in writing within 7 calendar days of the house being placed on HRS.
  2. The  written appeal to the ICC President should include all necessary supporting documents.
  3. The ICC President will bring the appeal to the Coordinating Committee, who will place the appeal on the next BOD agenda.
  4. The BOD will hear the appeal and vote, with a simply majority being required, to overturn the decision to place a house on HRS.
  5. In the event that the BOD overturns the decision to place a house on HRS, the house officers are still required to meet with the Operations Management Committee at least once in the month following the appeal, as prescribed in SR 12.11.3.I.
  1. Summer Operations
  1. SUMMER OPERATIONS

  1. CONTRACTS and ROOMMATES:

  1. During the Spring and Summer contract period, every central campus contract will be for a single room and members will be charged the monthly rate for a single room. In order for members to be charged the double rate of 55% of ICC Spring/Summer Charges because they have a roommate(s), the member(s) must submit a Roommate Request Form to the ICC Housing Staff indicating that:
  1. They already have a roommate or
  2. They would like the ICC staff to advertise the space as available.
  1. Once members are contracted as roommates they will be charged the double rate of 55% of ICC Spring/Summer Charges, and 100% of the utility charge. If one of the roommates leaves the house each will remain responsible for their own contracts.  Also, if a member is signed for a double/triple room and they move into single rooms (by choice or are found to be), they will be charged the single rate (01/2012-2013).
  2. If a contract is lost due to a violation of this policy, the house can be fined up to the amount of the contract lost. Finance Committee will be the determining body for the fine and their decision is final.
  1. TRIPLES: ICC Charges per person for three people who choose to live together in one room during the spring-summer period will be one- half of the single rate.  

  2. SUMMER GENDER RATIOS: No gender ratios are specifically enforced during the summer session except that doubles will be filled with the same gender unless the ICC Director of Housing is notified through the house president of roommates of the opposite sex.

  3. FALL/WINTER RESPONSIBILITY FOR SPRING/SUMMER PLANS: Houses must comply with the following terms of this section by the specified date listed below.

  1. HOUSE OFFICERS: An interim officer must be elected no later than April 1st. If no officer is elected, the house will either be annexed to another house, or the Interim Assistance Committee may appoint a non-house member to be that House’s compensated Interim Officer. In the case that no officer is elected as there are no contracts for the house signed by April 1st, the house may be closed during the interim period with a recommendation from  the  Operations Management Committee to the Board of Directors for approval at the immediately following Board Meeting.  The interim officer will be responsible for overseeing the moving in / moving out process and will ensure the smooth running of the house until house officers are elected and begin their duties or an alternative management plan is implemented.   Possible alternatives include combined officer positions, combined government with another co-op nearby, or a compensated Summer House Manager.  (11/91)
  2. MEALS:
  1. The following houses will be designated boarding houses for the Spring/Summer contracting period: Black Elk, Michigan, Nakamura, and Escher.
  1. Members of Minnie’s will board at Michigan during the Spring and Summer contract periods.
  1. Houses will be responsible for defining the responsibilities of any boarders that may be signed there.
  2. Houses may change their boarding status for the next Spring/Summer at any time before January 16 of each year. By default all houses except the houses in 13.1.4.2 A are not boarding houses though all houses can elect to set their budget to cooperatively provide meals or food.
  1. SHORT TERM MEMBERS: (33/06) Before advance spring/summer short term contracts can be given out, the winter house must determine the method by which spring/summer short term contracts are approved no later than March 15th. If no approval method is chosen by the house, the method used in the previous year will be the default.  The house must inform the Director of Housing in writing by March 15th if they wish to elect a different option.  The House may opt for one of the following two methods:
  1. fall/winter house to approve short term spring/summer members and spring/summer house will take over this responsibility at the beginning of Spring Term.
  2. Fall/winter house to implement their own method of approval.
  1. DUTIES OF SPRING/SUMMER HOUSE MANAGER: The Spring/Summer House Manager shall be elected at the Spring/Summer room picks meeting.  This position is not intended to be a full officer position; therefore any rooming member or officer may hold this position.  The Spring/Summer house manager shall be responsible for communicating with the Operations Management Committee and/or appropriate staff members concerning the functioning of the house.  This communication shall include, but is not limited to submitting a monthly report to the Operations Management Committee concerning the condition of house finances, maintenance and general operations.  If the Spring/Summer House manager is unable to submit any of these reports, the house President shall stand in their stead. (27/96)
  1. HALF-FILLED ROOMS

  1. DEFINITION: A half-filled room is a room charged as a double (“RCD”) (see SR 5.4.11) in which only one member is living. Members living in a half-filled RCD shall pay 55% of ICC charges, and 100% of the utility charge, subject to the stipulations in SR 13.2.4 (Violations).
  2. HALF-FILLED ROOM RESIDENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Members living in half-filled RCDs are responsible for keeping their rooms open and inviting to prospective members. Specifically:
  1. The room must be sanitary and presentable in accordance with current city ordinances.
  2. Prospective members must not be discouraged from signing a contract.
  3. The proper furniture and proper number of beds must be in the room at all times as  defined by Facilities Management Policy Manual.
  4. The member must agree to allow the room to be shown to prospective members with 24 hours' notice.
  5. The current occupant(s) of the room must be able to move into a different room or, in the case of agreeable sex/genders, accept the prospective member as a roommate within 24 hours.
  1. ROOM CONSOLIDATION: At no time should there be more than one half-filled RCD per house or in all of Escher. If more than one half-filled RCD exists in a house, the members in those rooms must consolidate into one RCD.
  1. This rule is not applicable in the instance where there are two half-filled RCDs housing differently gendered house members. In such a case, two half-filled RCDs in a single house or in Escher are permissible.
  2. Half-filled doubles within Escher are filled by available RCD space rather than by house preference.
  3. In Escher non-student approval is not required if a non-student member moves to a different house in order to comply with SR 13.2.3.
  1. VIOLATIONS:  If a member violates any of the provisions in Standing Rule 13.2 then that member may be charged 100% of ICC charges until the half-filled RCD is filled. If a prospective member notifies the ICC that they have decided not to sign a contract based on a member's violation of a provision in Standing Rule 13.2, then that member shall be charged 100% of ICC charges until the half-filled RCD is filled. Alleged violations of Standing Rule 12.9 shall be evaluated by the Operations Management Committee. Appeals shall be heard by the Board of Directors.
  1. IN THE CASE OF A SPRING/SUMMER HOUSE SHUTDOWN

  1. If a house is reopened during Spring/Summer, than the Operations Management Committee shall make a good faith effort to inform members who signed for the previous or upcoming semester, and that process shall begin two weeks before others can sign contracts or waitlists begin. (13/01-02)


  1. Interim
  1. INTERIM ASSISTANCE COMMITTEE (IAC):

The Interim Assistance Committee (IAC) will be responsible, in conjunction with house interim managers and key holders, for monitoring the houses during interim periods at the end of Winter and Summer Terms.  During the interim between winter and spring contracts, IAC shall consist of the Vice President for Operations Management, Vice President for Facilities Management, and five other board members or interested members. At least two members of IAC must be from North Campus. IAC must elect a chair whose responsibilities will be to organize IAC meetings and distribute IAC resources.  During the interim period between summer and fall contracts IAC shall consist of the above stated members and the ICC interim coordinators.  IAC must be created at least three board meetings before the end of the term.  If the Vice President for Operations Management or Vice President for Facilities Management will not be present for a majority of the time, they must appoint a substitute.  The interim coordinators shall not serve as chair.  

  1. DUTIES DURING INTERIM: Duties during interim are distributed among the houses, IAC, staff, and members.

  1. HOUSE RESPONSIBILITIES: Houses are responsible for maintaining adequate room and house conditions as defined in SR 12.4. The house must elect their Interim Manager by the dates specified in SR 12.2.4.1. The house will also be responsible for submitting a request form to Maintenance for furniture needs and organizing a room switch day the day after move-out for all members changing rooms within or between houses. During times when IAC is not active, the House President/key holder is in charge of handling all incoming and exiting member.
  1. DEFINITION OF AN INTERIM MANAGER:
  1. The interim manager is the primary officer during the interim period. The House President and/or Board Representative may still be in their officer position(s) if their contract(s) is/are continuing into the next semester.
  2. An Interim Manager is any member of the ICC, including the House President and Board Representative, who has a contract for the two contracting periods adjacent to the interim period. At least one of the contracts must be for the house they will be managing.
  3. Interim Managers must receive training from the Director of Housing. Failure to receive training may result in fines.
  4. There may be more than one Interim Manager for a house, if the house so chooses.
  5. Some of these conditions may not apply if the Interim Manager is appointed by a body outside of the house, such as the Board of Directors.
  1. DUTIES OF THE INTERIM MANAGER include, but are not limited to:
  1. Assign work hours during the interim period
  2. Fine members who left their rooms in substandard condition or moved out without completing their work hours
  3. Assume or delegate all Officer tasks and responsibilities (for example: buying food, sorting mail, acting as Work Manager, etc)
  4. Ensure that all rooms are up to the standard set in SR 12.4 (Room Condition)
  5. Walk through house inspection with IAC. A list of members whose rooms will be checked will be provided by IAC before the inspection
  6. If the house does not pass inspection, ensure that necessary changes are made to rectify the problem(s)
  7. Assist with move in/move out
  8. Greet incoming members
  9. Distribute the necessary information and respond to requests and questions from new and current members about the move out and move in processes
  10. Inventory all furniture and report any needed items to maintenance
  11. Excluding B, D, E, F and I of SR 14.2.1.2, all other duties that have been enumerated here may be delegated to other house members at the Interim Manager’s discretion.
  1. IAC RESPONSIBILITIES:  IAC is a resource to help assist houses with the interim process.  IAC will assist the Education Committee in interim manager training.  IAC will check all common rooms and rooms of members who are new to the house.  IAC will follow guidelines of 12.3 and membership policy to assess if a room meets ICC standards.  If a member chooses to move in before the designated move-in date, they forfeit their right to have their room checked.  IAC will also be able to approve use of the minor maintenance budget during the interim periods when the Maintenance Committee is not active. For a more detailed description about Maintenance funds see SR 9.2.1 and maintenance policy manual.  

  2. ICC INTERIM COORDINATORS:  The Interim Coordinators are two temporary staff positions supervised by the Director of Housing.  Their titles shall be the Inspection Coordinator and the Cleaning Crew Coordinator (IC and CC). The IC duties will be to organize and supervise house check-ups and report to the interim committee.  The CC’s responsibilities will be to organize and supervise the cleaning crew and keep record of all cleaning reports.  Both Coordinators will be responsible for writing the interim evaluation and keeping in close communication with each other.

  3. STAFF RESPONSIBILITIES:  The GM will appoint appropriate staff members to assist with problems requiring ICC resources.  Move in and move out dates will coincide with contract begin and end dates.

  1. MOVE IN POLICY:  

Move-in officially begins on the start date of any ICC Membership and Occupancy Contract. Interim Managers are responsible for contacting incoming members in order to schedule the date and time of incoming members’ arrival, and to discuss any furniture or pets that incoming members wish to bring. During times when there is not an active Interim Manager or IAC, the House President or key holder is in charge of handling all arriving and exiting members (See SR 14.2.1). Members with contracts for two consecutive contract spanning an uncontracted interim period are considered “continuing members.”

  1. Early Arrivals:  Interim Managers may approve the early arrival of members wishing to move into their house prior to the start date of their contract. Early move-in approval is based on space availability, interim house labor needs, and other factors. House Interim Managers have sole discretion over early move-in approvals, including the dates and times of arrival, and space allocation.
  2. Continuing Members:  Continuing members are expected to follow all early move-in policies and procedures (See SR 14.3.3). Continuing members may retain occupancy in the ICC provided that appropriate space is available, and the member is in compliance with their house constitution and ICC standing rules.  Any continuing member switching rooms or houses, must be moved out of their original room by the room switch date.  
  3. Conditions of Early Move-in:  In order to move in before the start date of their contract and free of charge, all early move-ins, including members with consecutive contracts, must abide by the following conditions:
  1. they are responsible for requesting House Interim Manager approval well in advance of their anticipated arrival or contract expiration date,
  2. are required to contribute house labor hours to the interim effort as directed by the House Interim Manager or IAC representative,
  3. waive their right to a clean and completely furnished room, since the house or IAC may  not yet have had the opportunity to inspect and prepare the room properly for move-in,
  4. may be required to move into a temporary room until final room assignments have been completed for the term of their contract, and/or their room has been properly prepared for move-in,
  5. must allow reasonable access to the room by IAC and maintenance staff to inspect, clean, repair, and furnish the room (See Maintenance Policy Chapter 4),
  6. may not host guests during interim, and,
  7. may be fined, referred, or expelled for non-compliance with any of the above.
  1. OCCUPANCY INSPECTIONS:

IAC and ICC staff will perform occupancy inspections within 48 hours of the end of winter and summer terms.

  1. MOVE OUT POLICY:

The rights and duties of membership terminate with the end date of any membership contract. Members with expiring contracts are considered “exiting members” and are required to vacate the house premises by the end date stipulated on their current Membership and Occupancy Contract. Members with two consecutive contracts spanning an uncontracted interim period are considered “continuing members” and are exempt from this policy. (See SR 14.3.2). A member is considered moved out when:

  1. The member’s room is clean and meets the conditions listed in SR 12.8.1,
  2. all personal possessions have been removed from ICC premises unless otherwise arranged with the interim manager, and
  3. all ICC issued keys have been returned or accounted for.
  1. FAILURE TO VACATE:  

Holding over by exiting members is strictly prohibited.  Interim Managers will report members holding over within their houses to the IAC, Director of Housing, and to the Finance Department. These members shall be:

  1. fined $100,
  2. charged twice the daily amount of ICC and house charges, as according to their most recent contracting period, until their move out is complete and confirmed, and
  3. held responsible for any additional expenses or damages incurred by the ICC caused by their failure to vacate in a timely fashion. (See SR 12.5.13).
  1. INTERIM FINING POLICY:  Both the house and IAC have fining authority.  Houses should include personal fining policies in their house constitution or Standing Rules.  IAC only has authority to fine for rooms that they check, and will fine with regards the following policy.

  1. During any contract period, any member who fails to move out by the date required in SR 14.2.4 must be reported to IAC and the Director of Housing and may be fined up to $100.
  2. During times when IAC is active, the following fining policy will be in effect.  Upon initial check-up, will make a follow-up inspection appointment with the house within 72 hours of the initial inspection, giving them a chance to do any clean-up that is required. IAC shall inform the house at the second inspection whether the cleaning crew will be called in to do work.  During the second inspection IAC will fine the house an initial $40.00 for each common room not up to standard.  The house will be charged $30.00 per person hour of time spent by the cleaning crew.  If the house sufficiently cleans the room up to standard by the time the cleaning crew arrives, the cleaning crew may choose to charge for travel time as they see fit.  The house is at liberty to distribute the fines as they see appropriate.  
  3. Any funds remaining after the cleaning crew has been paid will be placed in the Additional Help Fund to offset the ICC Interim Coordinator salary. All matters relating to fines shall be handled by the Operations Management Committee.
  1. House Finances
  1. GENERAL: The house financial systems will be structured to emphasize continuity of the cooperative over time, simplify understanding of the financial obligations by members and prospective members, and simplify procedures for calculating rebates and assessments (64/86)

  1. BUDGETING FOR ICC CHARGES: There shall be an annual budgeting process, in January of each year, for the ICC Charges.
  2. PERIODS FOR CLOSINGS: Books shall be closed at the end of Fall/Winter and Spring/Summer contract periods. Savings on all except non-rebatable charges shall be rebated and losses assessed. Upon completion of a house closing the ICC shall submit corrected copies of the income and expense statement of each house to the respective house for posting.
  1. HOUSE ACCOUNTING

  1. HOUSE BOOKKEEPING STANDARDS: As stated in Bylaw 6.3, “The co-ops [houses]      shall be responsible for ... 8) maintaining house books according to standard ICC operating procedures...” Therefore, the Finance Committee may adopt such procedures as they see necessary to ensure the accuracy and timeliness of House Finances. See Finance Committee Policies for Standard of Bookkeeping for House Treasurers. (55/97)
  2. REIMBURSEMENT OF OUT-OF -POCKET EXPENSES BY MEMBERS: Houses shall repay members for out-of-pocket expenses for which receipts are provided (e.g., urgent ingredients for a meal, eating utensils urgently needed by the house) by issuing checks. (31/87) (6/06)
  3. HOUSE BANK ACCOUNT: The finance office will maintain a bank account for each house. The signatories to this account shall be the finance staff, the House President and the House Treasurer.
  4. HOUSE BUDGET: (06/2009-2010) (33/2010-2011) The house Treasurer, with assistance from other house officers, shall be responsible for compiling a house budget for the upcoming contract period. The house budget must be approved by the house in accordance with house policies. Failure by the Treasurer to submit a budget to the ICC Finance office within 21 calendar days of the start of the fall and winter contract period can result in a fine levied upon the house. The initial amount of the fine is $30 for missing the deadline and the total fine will increase by $3 for each business day that the budget is delayed, with a total fine cap of $99. If a Treasurer fails to provide a house approved budget by established deadlines, the Vice President for Finance will send email notification to the house’s President and Board Representative regarding the house Treasurer’s fine, the house will be given the previous year’s budget plus 5%, and the staff may cease transfer of funds to house accounts.
  1. Periodic Budget Review: (33/2010-2011) The house treasurer is responsible for ensuring the house budget is set at an appropriate amount. To ensure this after the initial budget is created the house treasurer is required to review their house budget at the beginning of January for it to be effective in February. If there are any issues with the budget those problems should be brought to the finance office for any adjustments that need to be modified before January 21st .
  1. TREASURER REPORTS: (06/2009-2010) (33/2010-2011) The house Treasurer is responsible for reporting expenses incurred by the house that are covered by the house budget. The house expense reports are to be submitted to the ICC Finance staff by the 15th of each month and on a monthly basis. Failure to submit expense reports to the ICC Finance staff can result in a fine levied upon the house Treasurer. The amount of the fine is $5 for each business day that the report is delayed with a maximum cap of $25. If a Treasurer fails to provide monthly treasurer reports by established deadlines, the Vice President for Finance will send email notification to the house’s President and Board Representative regarding the house Treasurer’s fine, and the staff may cease transfer of funds to house accounts.
  2. House Variance Reports: (33/2010-2011) To ensure that house treasurers monitor spending in their houses and that members are being charged an accurate monthly amount, treasurers are required to complete monthly variance reports.
  1. Monthly Variance Report: (33/2010-2011) The house treasurer is responsible for reporting monthly variance statements to their respective house at house meetings. The Finance Committee will provide an excel spreadsheet for generating monthly variance reports. The variance reports are important because they provide houses with information on how much they are spending relative to what they budgeted.
  1. Treasurer Notifications: (33/2010-2011) The house treasurer must send out a notification (e.g. Email) once a month on the 25th informing housemates that rent is due on the 1st of the month along with the monthly member report. The monthly member report is a document that informs members of how much they currently owe and who lives at the house.
  1. MEMBER ACCOUNTS

  1. DEPOSITS OF MEMBER PAYMENTS: All member payments will be deposited in a central account. (31/87)
  2. DISTRIBUTION FROM CENTRAL ACCOUNT: (37/91)
  1. At the end of each fiscal month, the house treasurer will prepare a report of amounts spent, including a reconciled checking account; the report will be supported by documentation for all checks.
  2. The ICC will reimburse the house for the total amount reported spent for the previous fiscal month.
  3. The ICC finance office will send a monthly report on member charges charged and paid to the house treasurer, house president and Finance Committee. (6/06)
  4. A house may choose to pass on certain incidental charges to individual members (for example, air conditioning). (6/06)
  1. PAYMENTS BY MEMBERS BOARDING AT HOUSES OTHER THAN THEIR ROOMING HOUSE: Members at all non boarding houses shall pay both their room and board charges at their rooming house. Distribution of boarding charges to the appropriate house shall be handled by the office; boarding charges shall be deducted from the amounts deposited by each house in the central account after money due to the ICC is deducted. Boarding houses affected by this shall receive monthly statements detailing which members had their boarding charges paid for by this method. (17/91) (55/97)
  1. HOUSE DEBTS AT THE END OF A PERIOD

The ICC implements the following bad debt system: (35/89)

  1. ROOM AND BOARD COLLECTION POLICY: Any Debt over the share amount left by a departing member will be divided equally among all ICC members. (55/97) (35/89) (23/07)
  2. FINANCIAL PERIODS FOR EXPENSING DEBTS: Fall/Winter and Spring/Summer are two separate periods. Each period is protected from the past periods’ bad debt, as each period is expensed for its entire debt. (35/89)
  3. ASSESSMENTS IN EXCESS OF THE SHARE DEPOSIT: If a house receives an assessment in excess of the share deposit for a financial period, the uncollectible amount of the assessment shall be considered a loan from the ICC. (The uncollectible amount of the assessment is the total debt owed to the house less the amount owed by current ICC members less the amount collectible from share deposits.) Until this loan is paid in full, the ICC shall receive as payments on this loan: (77/96)
  1. Any SBA rebates for the house in question
  2. Any debt collections from former members of the house in the time period in question
  3. $1 per member per month from future members of the house
  1. NO SHOWS

If someone fails to claim their contracted housing assignment at the beginning of any contract period, or lives in the ICC for 2 weeks or less while having a contract, the person is liable for all house and ICC charges until replaced. However, in the event of nonpayment, the house will not be responsible for the ICC charges. The ICC Staff will be responsible for collecting these charges. (50/03) (6/06)

  1. HOUSE AMENITIES FUNDS

  1. Money collected by the ICC from the houses for amenities funds shall be held in trust by  the ICC for the house as the House's Amenities Funds. Money shall accrue to the funds from: (40/89)
  1. Budgeted house amounts and other house revenue as determined by the house. (6/06)
  2. SBA rebates, provided that non-boarding houses paired with boarding houses would receive a proportional share of any rebate based on capacity.
  3. For King, money paid by former members on accounts which have already been expensed as bad debts. (13/92)
  1. SPENDING GUIDELINES: A house may spend their amenities funds on any physical assets for the house. Physical assets are non-consumable items such as entertainment equipment, interior decorating and additional physical assets to the house. (36/90) (41/92)
  1. LANDSCAPING

Houses are eligible for landscaping funds as determined by Maintenance policy. (6/06)

  1. MEMBERS WITH DEBTS (40/93)(23/06)

  1. LATE FEES: On the 5th of the month, any member who owes 50% of the amount of one month of Fall/Winter central campus ICC charges or more will be assessed a $15 late fee. The Finance Committee may waive this fee at their discretion. Also, the fine would be waived if the member is placed on a finance committee - approved payment plan by the 15th of that month, or is already on a finance committee - approved payment plan. All money resulting from these fines shall be recorded as ICC late fine income and shall be used to offset the cost of operating the ICC. (65/97)(67/98)(73/99)(81/03)(31/04) (23/06) (23/07)
  2. THE INITIAL POWER OF DECISION ON DEBT ACTION IS GIVEN SOLELY TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. By the 15th of every month a member must have their balance under 50% of the amount of one month of Fall/Winter central campus charges or have a payment plan approved by the finance committee. (23/07)
  3. IN THE CASE WHERE THE FINANCE COMMITTEE DOES NOT APPROVE A PAYMENT PLAN, A HOUSE MAY APPROVE ITS OWN PAYMENT PLAN AT A HOUSE MEETING. In that case, all individuals at the house are responsible for the potential bad debt. The payment plan approved by the house must include the potential per person charge for the bad debt. The finance department will fill out all payment plan forms with current debt and will list all the names of members and their potential individual liability. Meeting minutes, signed by the in-house president and treasurer, must be submitted with the payment plan form. (23/07)
  1. IN THE CASE WHERE THE FINANCE COMMITTEE IS NOT HAVING REGULAR MEETINGS. The Contract Release Committee will be responsible for voting on a payment plan within seven days of its receipt. (10/13)
  1. PAYMENT PLAN RESTRICTION: Plans must reduce debts by 50% within four weeks and reduce a member’s debt to $0 within eight weeks, including all intervening charges during that house chargeperiod. These rules may be modified with the approval of the finance committee.
  2. THE ICC ACTS FOR MEMBERS IN PROTECTING THEM FROM ACCUMULATION OF EXCESSIVE DEBT. If the member does not pay by the 15th and the house does not file a payment plan, the ICC shall begin eviction procedures. If the eviction has proceeded to legal action, any costs shall be assessed to the member. The house member can stop this procedure by having a payment plan approved by the house or finance committee or by providing proof that the house will discuss the payment plan before the end of the month. (23/06) (23/07)
  3. MISSED PAYMENTS: If a member misses a payment by more than three business days they shall be fined $20 and the ICC shall begin eviction procedures. (23/06)
  4. The Vice President for Finance will be responsible for follow up on payment plans
  1. HOUSE REFERRAL STATUS FOR FINANCE

This proposal is an interpretation of Bylaw 6.2 which states “The government and administration of the several co-ops shall be left to the members of the respective co-ops insofar as their actions do not jeopardize the interests of the membership as a whole or the interests of other co-ops.” House Referral Status establishes guidelines which dictate when the Finance Committee/Vice President for Finance shall be empowered to take over a house’s finances. In other words, these are guidelines under which the Finance Committee believes that steps must be taken in the interest of the ICC as a whole. (82/95)

  1. CONDITIONS WHEN HOUSE REFERRAL STATUS MAY BE ENACTED:

(any of the following) a warning letter will be sent to each member of the house when member debt reaches half the amount necessary to cause the finance committee to consider House Referral Status or within 24 hours after the Coordinating Committee approves a proposal to put a house on House Referral Status.

  1. through a board passed proposal
  2. If total member debt exceeds 50% of the total shares held by current house members and the members of the Finance Committee consense to take action, or (6/06)
  3. The following situations, considered financial emergencies, with Vice President for Finance’s approval (these are considered time critical problems):
  1. Embezzlement of house funds, or
  2. Direct-depositing of member charges to house bank accounts
  1. EFFECTS WHEN HOUSE REFERRAL STATUS IS ENACTED:

  1. The Director of Financial Services and the Vice President for Finance, through delegating responsibility to the Finance Committee and the house president, are responsible for all aspects of the house’s financial operations. They will replace the house treasurer. Their responsibility includes, but is not limited to:
  1. Check signing/payment of house bills
  2. Collection of house charges, fines and phone bills
  3. Good and complete accounting
  4. Notification of the house of the situation
  5. The checkbook may be seized and the house signer may be taken off the account.
  6. Approval of members’ debts under the 13.8 Members with Debt Policy. (86/96)
  1. The house is still responsible for the house’s financial problems. Assessments or refunds still continue as normal.
  2. The Finance Committee may require the selection of a new house treasurer, who will be trained by the Finance Committee to take responsibility of house finances after House Referral Status is removed.
  3. During House Referral Status, the Board of Directors must be notified at every Board meeting of the house’s financial situation, and
  4. The Finance Committee has the authority to place members of House Referral Status houses on referral for non-payment of more than one and one-half month’s fees
  1. CONDITIONS WHEN HOUSE REFERRAL STATUS IS REMOVED

  1. Through a board passed proposal, or
  2. By consensus of the Finance Committee that a long term solution to the problem   has been established which the House shall be able to implement effectively
  1. House-Level Dispute Resolution (06/2010-2011)
  1. HOUSE-LEVEL DISPUTE RESOLUTION: The ICC considers these procedures for resolving disputes a part of its educational mission and is committed to processes which provide both peer review and mediation. This chapter describes various pathways to conflict resolution available in the ICC. Members are expected to settle disputes and address uncooperative behavior at the House level whenever possible, using procedures outlined in their House constitutions and ICC Standing Rules. Typically one or more informal or alternative resolution options are attempted at the House level before more formal options are enacted.  Further resources regarding the conflict resolution process are provided in Chapter 6 of these Standing Rules and the Supplemental Conflict Resolution Guide, which can be found in the ICC office or by contacting members of Dispute Assistance and Resolution Team (DART). (See Standing Rule 4.14)

  1. The ICC endorses House’s use of an array of both alternative and adjudicative dispute resolution options:

Alternative Dispute Resolution Pathways

  1. Verbal warning

  1. Verbal communication issued by two House Officers, intended to make an individual aware that a violation has occurred, any remedial actions required, and possible consequences for noncompliance.
  1. Written warning or notice

  1. Written communication issued by two House Officers, intended to make an individual aware that a violation has occurred, any remedial actions required, and possible consequences for noncompliance.
  1. Penalty fines
  1. Financial compensation for loss or damages resulting from uncooperative behavior.
  1. Penalty labor

  1. Work compensation for loss or damages resulting from uncooperative behavior.
  1. Mediation

  1. Various methods of alternative dispute resolution carried out by a third party who facilitates communication between disputants in an attempt to help them to identify relevant issues, frame those issues constructively, and seek mutually satisfying agreements.
  1. Facilitated dialogue

  1. A conversation between two or more persons, guided by a neutral facilitator to increase the potential that the individuals will arrive at a mutually satisfying agreements
  1. Restorative justice

  1. Restorative Justice Circles are mediated gatherings that engage all stakeholders (complainants, respondents, affected House members. etc) in settling a dispute through discussion about the nature of the offense, the harm or loss caused, and the requirements for restoring all the relationships in the community to good standing.  Thus, restorative justice is a cooperative process that typically requires an apology from the offender, mutually agreed upon restitution for the offense, and forgiveness from the complainant, House or community.
  1. Hearing by House or Member Resolution Panel (Standing Rule 14.2, 14.3.4)
  1. A formal process for resolving allegations and/or determining responsibility for uncooperative behavior, including referrals and expulsions. In a hearing, a House or member panel considers testimony and evidence from both sides of a dispute and renders a decision, including remedies and sanctions.
  1. Referral

(Standing Rule 2.7)

  1. Referral is a temporary, probationary process that seeks:
  1. To provide an incentive for members to improve uncooperative conduct.
  2. To compensate any loss or damages caused by uncooperative behavior.
  3. To notify future Houses and ICC administration that a member might be a problem.  
  4. To document and interrupt patterns of chronic uncooperative behavior.
  5. To return a member to good standing and restore all the rights and responsibilities of ICC membership.
  1. Expulsion

(Standing Rule 2.8)

  1. Expulsion is the severest penalty that can be imposed on a member of the ICC.  Expulsion is the termination of a person’s membership in the ICC with all of the rights and responsibilities contained therein.

  1. DUE PROCESS: Houses are expected to respect due process rights of all parties involved in a dispute and to administer agreements, remedies and/or sanctions in a fair and consistent manner. (see SR 16.2.1.1)
  2. HOUSE SANCTIONS: Houses may apply any of the sanctions in Standing Rule 16.1.8 as an outcome of a resolution process.
  3. REQUESTS FOR ASSISTANCE: At any time outside of a house-level dispute proceeding, any member (not only the complainant or respondent) may request the assistance of the Dispute Assistance and Resolution Team (DART).  
  4. GENERAL MANAGER CONSULTATION: Houses are required to consult with the ICC President and the General Manager when enacting an expulsion hearing.
  5. DART CONSULTATION: Members and Houses are encouraged to work in consultation with DART in resolving the following situations:
  1. Situations involving sexual harassment or assault, discrimination or prejudicial behavior, mental health or ability issues.
  2. Situations which are legally sensitive.
  3. Situations in which a House Officer, including the President, is directly involved.
  4. Situations affecting recruitment or retention.
  5. Situations involving multiple Houses.
  6. Whenever a House feels strongly that they cannot deal with the situation adequately or fairly.
  7. Whenever either party directly involved in a dispute requests DART assistance.
  8. Situations which constitute a significant threat to the health, safety, or welfare of co-op members; whether or not such actions are also subject to penalties under civil or criminal law.
  1. EMERGENCIES: Any behavior which poses an imminent and immediate threat to the safety of ICC members or property should be promptly reported to the appropriate law enforcement authorities and the General Manager or ICC President. They in turn may activate an Emergency House Operation Team (EHOT). (See Standing Rule 4.16) 
  2. AGREEMENTS, REMEDIES, AND SANCTIONS: The ICC recognizes and endorses the following list of possible agreements, remedies and sanctions as common and appropriate outcomes of a dispute resolution process. Outcomes of a hearing should embody the interests of all parties involved and the ICC as a whole. Sanctions are designed to promote wellbeing, safety, education, and/or to deter future uncooperative behavior. Appropriate sanctions serve to allow a member to accept the consequences of their actions, make amends, and to be welcomed back into the community in good standing. The following remedial actions are considered appropriate outcomes of a dispute resolution process in the ICC:
  1. Formal reprimand
  2. Mediation
  3. Apology (public or private)
  4. ICC or House service
  5. Restitution or compensation
  6. Training or workshop attendance
  7. Restriction or removal from House Officer positions
  8. Restriction or removal  from Board and Committees
  9. Restriction from entering specific ICC Houses or properties
  10. Restriction from all forms of contact with certain person(s)
  11. Placement in another room or House
  12. Voiding of future contracts
  13. Restriction from signing future ICC contracts
  14. Restorative justice
  15. Restriction from specific uncooperative actions
  16. Referral
  17. Expulsion
  18. Compensatory fine
  19. Compensatory labor
  1. HEARINGS

A hearing is a formal process for resolving allegations and/or determining responsibility for uncooperative behavior, including referrals and expulsions. In a hearing, a House or Member Resolution Panel considers testimony and evidence from both sides of a dispute and renders a decision, including all necessary agreements, remedies and sanctions.
A member or body that initiates a complaint or action is known as a “complainant.” The accused member is known as the “respondent.” The ICC considers hearings to be a cooperative effort to reach appropriate resolutions to conflicts whenever informal dispute resolution strategies are inappropriate or ineffective. Further resources regarding the conflict resolution process are provided the Supplemental Conflict Resolution Guide, which can be found in the ICC office or by contacting members of Dispute Assistance and Resolution Team (DART).
(See Standing Rule 4.14)

  1. HEARING PROCESS:

A House or member resolution panel conducting a hearing may derive appropriate procedures as needed, provided that these procedures do not violate the protocols outlined below. The ICC shall recognize as fair and sufficient any hearing which adheres to the following protocols:

  1. DUE PROCESS: Houses are expected to respect due process rights of all parties involved in a dispute and to administer agreements, remedies and/or sanctions in a fair and consistent manner. The concept that no one should be assumed to have committed any violation of ICC rules, legal or ethical codes without having a fair hearing in front of people who can judge them impartially according to reasonable objective standards and without prejudice. Essential to the fairness of such a hearing is the idea that anyone accused has the right to face their accusers and defend themselves.
  2. NOTICE: 4 days advanced written or electronic notice must be given to the member respondents detailing the time and place of the hearing, the alleged grounds for the action, possible sanctions, hearing facilitators or Member Panelists. A copy of the notice must also be conspicuously posted in the member’s House(s).
  3. FACILITATION AND ATTENDANCE: The following should generally be present at ICC hearings:
  1. The complainant and respondent
  2. The facilitator
  3. A note taker
  4. Process observer/timekeeper
  5. Household or Member Resolution Panel
  6. The panel advisor
  7. Advisors to complainant and respondent
  8. Witnesses to the facts directly related to the grounds for the hearing.
  1. ADVISORS: Parties to a dispute may enlist the assistance of an advisor of their choosing in preparation for a hearing, or during a hearing. Advisors may not question witnesses or make presentations at a hearing. Respondents may ask for reasonable breaks during the hearing to consult with their advisor.
  2. CHALLENGE FOR BIAS: Members may challenge the selection of panelists or facilitator for bias within two days of notification. Bias is defined as prejudice in a general or specific sense, usually having a preference to one point of view or ideological perspective.
  3. EVIDENCE: Members may present information in the course of the hearing; including oral and written information and witnesses.
  4. CROSS EXAMINATION: A member respondent may challenge any information presented in a hearing and question any witnesses.
  5.  OPEN HEARINGS: Hearings must be open to all members of the House and other appropriate persons concerned with, or affected by, the issue, however, either party may request a closed hearing per Standing Rule 14.2.3.
  6. RESPONDENT ATTENDANCE: A member respondent may decline to attend a hearing. The proceedings will continue and the member will be bound by any determinations made.
  7. REFUSAL TO ANSWER: Member respondents may decline to answer any question. Silence will neither be used as evidence of responsibility for a charge, nor as evidence to invalidate the charges.
  8. FINDINGS AND PROOF: A finding of responsibility is only acceptable when there is proof that is clear and convincing.
  9. APPEAL: Member respondents may file an appeal of the hearing decision within 7 days of receiving notice of that decision.
  1. CLOSED HEARING:

To make the process as democratic and transparent as possible, hearings shall generally be open to all ICC members and other appropriate people affected by the case. Exception: ICC Bylaw 1.3 requires that all expulsion hearings be open.  In special circumstances, DART may decide to hold a closed hearing, using the following criteria as guidelines:

  1. Mutual Request of the complainant and respondent.
  2. If allegations in the case involve issues of sexual harassment or assault, discrimination or prejudicial behavior, mental health or ability.
  3. If there are legally sensitive reasons for requiring confidentiality.
  4. The following people may be present at a closed hearing and must be informed that the proceedings are confidential:
  1. The complainant and respondent
  2. The facilitator
  3. A note taker
  4. Process observer/time keeper
  5. Household or Member Resolution Panel
  6. The Panel Advisor
  7. Advisors complainant and respondent
  8. Witnesses to facts directly related to the grounds for the hearing
  1. ICC APPEAL PROCESS:

  1. An appeal is a process for requesting a formal change to an official decision. No decision to place a member on referral shall be overturned or otherwise set aside unless:
  1. It can be proven that there was a prejudicial error or omission in the procedures that seriously impacted the outcome of the case.
  2. It can be proven that the evidence clearly does not support the findings.
  3. Sanctions are insufficient or excessive relative to the violation.
  4. There is new evidence not reasonably available at the time of the hearing.
  1. Any member may file an appeal within 7 days of receiving a hearing decision.
  2. Hearing decisions by a House may be appealed to a DART Member Resolution Panel.
  3. Hearing decisions by Member Resolution Panel may be appealed to the Coordinating Committee.
  4. Members having prior direct experience with the case or proceedings under  appeal may not participate in the Appeal process, except as witnesses to the original hearing, or to testify in defense of the original decision
  5. Decisions on appeals must be rendered within 14 days of the appeal’s submission.
  6. All appeals rulings are final.
  7. If a decision is overturned on appeal, the appeals body may either:
  1. Modify the original decision, including any remedies, agreements, sanctions, or deadlines.
  2. Vacate the original decision and recommend a new hearing.
  3. Vacate the original decision and restore the respondent to good standing.  
  1. MEMBER RESOLUTION PANEL (MRP)

  1. Member Resolution Panel:  A Member Resolution Panel is an ad hoc judicial panel, convened by DART or EHOT. This panel consists of the CHR Chair, DART Chair, Member Assistance Representative and two House Presidents. If there are any vacancies in these positions, the panel will be filled by House Presidents. Panelists are selected to minimize conflicts of interest and to insure fairness and impartiality. Member Resolution Panels are convened on a case-by-case basis. In a MRP hearing, panelists consider evidence, and determine responsibility for the charges, including relevant sanctions, agreements and remedies.
  2. Member Resolution Panel hearings are subject to all ICC rules and policies pursuant to referral, expulsion, hearings and due process contained in these Standing Rules
  3. A Member Resolution Panel decision requires at least a 2/3 majority of voting members present to pass.
  4. The DART Member Resolution Panel may agree to hold a referral or expulsion hearing in lieu of a House hearing only in the following cases:
  1. REQUEST BY THE HOUSE: DART receives a request from a House vote or a petition signed by a majority of House members.
  2. REQUEST BY ANOTHER HOUSE: Another ICC House (where the individual is not a member) votes to request a hearing.
  3. ACTIONS WHICH JEOPARDIZE THE INTERESTS OF THE ICC: DART determines that the actions of the individual “jeopardize the interests of the membership as a whole or the interests of other co-ops”.
  4. PETITION BECAUSE OF INACTION: DART receives a petition of 20% of House members or 8 members, whichever is greater, requesting a hearing and the House has not or will not take action.
  5. Cases involving prejudicial behavior, sexual harassment, or other legally sensitive issues.
  1. REFERRAL: The ICC considers these procedures for resolving disputes a part of its educational mission and is committed to processes which provide both peer review and mediation. This chapter describes various pathways to conflict resolution available in the ICC. Members are expected to settle disputes and address uncooperative behavior at the House level whenever possible, using procedures outlined in their House constitutions and ICC Standing Rules. Typically one or more informal or alternative resolution options are attempted at the House level before more formal adjudicative options are enacted. Further resources regarding the conflict resolution process are provided in the Supplemental Conflict Resolution Guide, which can be found in the ICC office or by contacting members of Dispute Assistance and Resolution Team (DART). (See Standing Rule 4.14) 

  1. REFERRAL DEFINED: Referral is a temporary probationary process that seeks to notify a member that their behavior is out of conformance with ICC or House rules and inform them of the steps they must take to return to good standing. The goals of referral are:

  1. To provide an incentive for members to improve uncooperative conduct.
  2. To compensate any loss or damages caused by uncooperative behavior.
  3. To notify future Houses and ICC administration that this member might be a problem.
  4. To document and interrupt patterns of chronic uncooperative behavior.
  5. To return a member to good standing and restore all the rights and responsibilities of ICC membership.
  1. GROUNDS FOR REFERRAL Specific grounds for referral shall be:

  1. FOR NON-WORK: Failure to do work
  2. FOR NON-PAYMENT: Failure to pay charges
  3. FOR UNCOOPERATIVE BEHAVIOR:
  1. Abuse of community or ICC property
  2. Infringement on the privacy and/or property of others
  3. Actions which threaten the health, safety or welfare of co-op members.
  4. Prejudicial behavior
  5. Sexual Harassment
  6. Generally uncooperative behavior
  1. CONSEQUENCES OF REFERRAL

  1. A member placed on referral has one week to file an appeal. After one week, any future contracts signed previous to the referral are void. If the member files an appeal, their space will be held during the appeal process.
  2. House approval is required for any member currently on referral to place a standard hold on a space or sign a future contract. The body or House which placed the member on referral must be consulted and have an opportunity to send a representative to the meeting where the member is being voted into the House.
  3. A referral process may result in a variety of agreements, remedies or sanctions that must be satisfied to return the member to good standing as listed in Standing Rule 16.1.8.
  1. HOUSE REFERRAL: Members may be “referred” to their House Officers or to DART for corrective action because of uncooperative behavior.  Houses typically hold referral hearings at House meetings. It is important for Houses to interrupt uncooperative behavior early, and to consider referral when alternative dispute resolution options have been attempted and failed, or been deemed inappropriate. Houses are expected to respect due process rights of all parties involved in any resolution process and to administer agreements, remedies and sanctions in a fair and consistent manner. (See Standing Rule 16.1)

  2. REFERRAL METHODS A House or organizational body may place on referral, any of its members with a current ICC contract; or, any its former members, within 90 days of the end of their last contract. Members may be placed on referral by the following methods:

  1. FOR NON-PAYMENT: By the House Treasurer and one other House Officer.
  2. FOR NON-WORK: By the Work Manager and one other House Officer.
  3. FOR UNCOOPERATIVE BEHAVIOR: By a vote of the House at a House meeting. In this case, the accused member must be notified in writing, including email, at least 4 days  in advance stating the specific reasons for the referral and a reasonable attempt must be made to allow the member to attend and speak in their defense. When a vote of the House is to be taken in cases concerning harassment, prejudicial behavior, criminal behavior or other legally sensitive issues, a representative of the ICC to be appointed by the General Manager shall be present.  
  4. REFERRAL BY PETITION: For any of the above offences by a petition. The petition must:
  1. Be presented to the member under concern prior to its posting or circulation.
  2. A copy of the petition must be conspicuously posted in the House.
  3. Be signed by a simple majority, or 20 House members, whichever is lower.
  4. List the specific grounds for referral
  5. List the specific requirements for removal from referral and all relevant Standing Rules, including any relevant time- or deadlines.
  1. REFERRAL BY MEMBER PANEL: The Dispute Assistance and Resolution Team or EHOT may agree to convene a Member Resolution Panel to hear a referral in lieu of a House hearing per SR 16.4.4.
  1. NOTICE OF REFERRAL FORM: A Notice of Referral Form must be given to any member placed on referral. The Notice must explain the specific grounds (actions, incidents, …) for referral, all agreements, remedies and sanctions required for removal from referral and the earliest date at which removal from referral will be considered. A copy of the Notice of Referral Form must be given to the Director of Member Services to be placed in the member’s file.

  2. REFERRAL APPEALS: An appeal is a process for requesting a formal change to an official decision. An appeals process is an essential safeguard for an imperfect human process that attempts very hard to be fair. The appeal process is available to each party in a dispute. No decision to place a member on referral shall be overturned or otherwise set aside unless:

  1. It can be proven that there was a prejudicial error or omission in the procedures.
  2. It can be proven that the evidence clearly does not support the findings.
  3. Sanctions are insufficient or excessive relative to the violation.
  4. There is new evidence not reasonably available at the time of the hearing.
  1. Any member placed on referral may file an appeal within 7 days of receiving a decision.
  2. Referrals by a House may be appealed to DART.
  3. Referrals by Member Panel may be appealed to CoCo.Members having prior direct experience with the case or proceedings under appeal may not participate in the appeal process, except as witnesses to the original hearing, or to testify in defense of the original decision.
  4. All appeals decisions are final.
  1. REMOVAL FROM REFERRAL:

  1. A member may be eligible for removal from referral at any time by vote of the body that placed the member on referral. Removal from referral may take place in the following ways:

  1. A vote at a House meeting, according to House voting rules.
  2. By the approval of two House Officers- in the case of non-payment or non-work.
  3. By a vote of a member panel, for member panel referral.
  1. REFERRAL REMOVAL FORM: Any House or Member Panel removing a member from referral must have its presiding Officer fill out a Referral Removal Form.  A copy of the form must be given to the Director of Member Services to be placed in the member's file.
  2. Spring-Summer House decisions (votes) to remove a member from referral who was placed on referral during fall or winter must be approved by Member Resolution Panel. (See Standing Rule 16.4, MRP)
  3. Fall-Winter House decisions (votes) to remove a member from referral who was placed on referral during spring-summer term must be approved by Member Resolution Panel. (See Standing Rule 16.4, MRP)
  1. EXPULSION

  1. EXPULSION INTRODUCTION:  Expulsion is the severest penalty that can be imposed on a member of the ICC.  Expulsion is the termination of a person’s membership in the ICC with all of the rights and responsibilities contained therein. Any member with a current contract or within 90 days of the end of their last contract may be considered for expulsion. The ICC General Manager must be consulted whenever expulsion is being considered.

  2. GROUNDS FOR EXPULSION:  

  1. Failure to do work
  2. Failure to pay charges
  3. Abuse of community or ICC property
  4. Infringement on the privacy and/or property of others
  5. Actions which threaten the health, safety or welfare of co-op members.
  6. Prejudicial behavior
  7. Sexual Harassment
  8. Generally uncooperative behavior
  1. CONSEQUENCES OF EXPULSION: An individual who has been expelled by the ICC or an ICC House:

  1. Has their membership in the ICC terminated.
  2. May not be reinstated as a member of the ICC.
  3. Will be evicted if still residing on ICC property.
  4. Surrenders all rights and responsibilities of membership in the ICC including, but not limited to:        
  1. Living in an ICC House
  2. Boarding in at an ICC House
  3. Using any House or facilities
  1. Will be considered a trespasser if present on ICC property after the membership termination date.
  1. HOUSE EXPULSION PROCESS:

  1. Any House seeking to expel must consult with the General Manager and DART for assistance prior to a hearing.
  2. An Expulsion Hearing Notice Form must be served on the member under concern at least 4 days prior to a hearing date. Copies of this form must be given to the ICC General Manager and DART.
  3. A member may be expelled by a vote at a House meeting or hearing, according to House voting rules.
  4. Hearings will be considered fair and sufficient provided they do not violate the  provisions of the hearings process. (See Standing Rule 16.2)
  5. The General Manager, or their appointee, shall be present at any House expulsion hearing to witness and advise the proceedings as needed.
  6. The DART may agree to convene a member resolution panel to hear an expulsion in accordance with Standing Rule 16.4, MRP
  7. No person’s membership shall be terminated except after an open hearing, per ICC Bylaw 1.3.
  1. HOUSE EXPULSION APPEALS:  

  1. An appeal is a process for requesting a formal change to an official decision. An appeals process is an essential safeguard for an imperfect human process that attempts very hard to be fair. The appeal process is available to each party in a dispute (the House or the accused members.) No decision to expel shall be overturned or otherwise set aside unless:
  1. It can be proven that there was a prejudicial error or omission in the procedures that seriously impacted the outcome of the case.
  2. It can be proven that the evidence clearly does not support the findings.
  3. Sanctions are insufficient or excessive relative to the violation.
  4. There is new evidence not reasonably available at the time of the hearing.
  1. House expulsion decisions may be appealed to the Coordinating Committee, in writing, within 7 days of notification.
  2. Members having prior direct experience with the case or proceedings under appeal may not participate in the appeal process, except as witnesses to the original hearing, or to testify in defense of the original decision.
  3. All appeals decisions are final.
  4. The Coordinating Committee has 7 days to rule on an appeal.  If more than three members of the committee are unable to hear an appeal, either for personal reasons or because of a conflict of interest in the case, the ICC President shall select alternate Officers. Only other Officers of the ICC shall be considered alternates in the appeal process.
  5. The expelled member may not have access to any ICC buildings, Houses, property services or facilities except during the period of appeal, and with the  expressed permission of the House.
  6. If the expulsion is overturned, the Coordinating Committee may reduce the sanction to referral, or return the member to good standing.

ICC Official Standing Rules

Section Three: House Operations