GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Content Area:

Visual & Performing Arts

    Grade Level:

5

Module Title:

Visual Art

     

LEARNING TARGETS

NJ  STUDENT LEARNING STANDARDS

1.1  The Creative Process:  All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and

       principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

1.2 History of the Arts and Culture: All students will understand the role,

      development, and influence of the arts throughout history and across cultures.

1.3  Performance:  All students will synthesize those skills, media, methods, and technologies

       appropriate to creating, performing, and/or presenting works of art in dance, music, theatre, and

       visual art.

1.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies pertains to all four arts

      disciplines, and is comprised of two strands related to the mode of response: A. Aesthetic

      Responses and B. Critique Methodologies. This standard addresses two ways students may

      respond to the arts, including (1) the study of aesthetics and (2) the application of

      methodologies for critique

Content Statement

CPI#

Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI)

Understanding the function and purpose of the elements of art and principles of design assists with forming an appreciation of how art and design enhance functionality and improve quality of living.

1.1.5.D.1

Identify elements of art and principles of design that are evident in everyday life.    

The elements of art and principles of design are universal.

1.1.5.D.2

Compare and contrast works of art in various mediums that use the same art elements and

principles of design.

Art and culture reflect and affect each other.

1.2.5.A.1

Recognize works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art as a reflection of societal values and

beliefs.

Characteristic approaches to content, form, style, and design define art genres.

1.2.5.A.2

Relate common artistic elements that define distinctive art genres in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

Sometimes the contributions of an individual artist can influence a generation of artists and signal the

beginning of a new art genre.

1.2.5.A.3

Determine the impact of significant contributions of individual artists in dance, music, theatre, and visual art from diverse cultures throughout history.

The elements of art and principles of design can be applied in an infinite number of ways to express personal responses to creative problems.

1.3.5.D.1

Work individually and collaboratively to create two- and three-dimensional works of art that make cohesive visual statements and that employ the elements of art and principles of design.

Contextual clues to culturally specific thematic content, symbolism, compositional approach, and stylistic nuance are prevalent in works of art throughout the ages.

1.3.5.D.2

Identify common and distinctive characteristics of artworks from diverse cultural and historical eras of visual art using age-appropriate stylistic terminology (e.g., cubist, surreal, optic, impressionistic), and experiment with various compositional approaches influenced by these styles.

Each of the genres of visual art (e.g., realism, surrealism, abstract/non objective art, conceptual art, and others) is associated with appropriate vocabulary and a stylistic approach to art-making.

1.3.5.D.3

Identify common and distinctive characteristics of genres of visual artworks (e.g., realism, surrealism, abstract/non objective art, conceptual art, and others) using age-appropriate terminology, and experiment with various compositional approaches influenced by these genres.

The characteristics and physical properties of the various materials available for use in art-making present infinite possibilities for potential application.

1.3.5.D.4

Differentiate drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture, printmaking, textiles, and computer imaging by the physical properties of the resulting artworks, and experiment with various art media and art mediums to create original works of art.

There are many types of aesthetic arrangements for the exhibition of art. Creating or assembling gallery exhibitions requires effective time management and creative problem-solving skills.

1.3.5.D.5

Collaborate in the creation of works of art using multiple art media and art mediums, and present the completed works in exhibition areas inside and outside the classroom.

Works of art may be organized according to their functions and artistic purposes (e.g., genres, mediums, messages, themes).

1.4.5.A.1

Employ basic, discipline-specific arts terminology to categorize works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art according to established classifications.

Formalism in dance, music, theatre, and visual art varies according to personal, cultural, and historical contexts.

1.4.5.A.2

Make informed aesthetic responses to artworks based on structural arrangement and personal, cultural, and historical points of view.

Criteria for determining the aesthetic merits of artwork vary according to context. Understanding the

relationship between compositional design and genre provides the foundation for making value judgments about the arts.

1.4.5.A.3

Demonstrate how art communicates ideas about personal and social values and is inspired by an individual’s imagination and frame of reference (e.g., personal, social, political, historical context).

Identifying criteria for evaluating performances results in deeper understanding of art and art-making.

1.4.5.B.1

Assess the application of the elements of art and principles of design in dance, music, theatre, and visual artworks using observable, objective criteria.

Decoding simple contextual clues require evaluation mechanisms, such as rubrics, to sort fact from opinion.

1.4.5.B.2

Use evaluative tools, such as rubrics, for self-assessment and to appraise the objectivity of critiques by peers.

While there is shared vocabulary among the four arts disciplines of dance, music, theatre, and visual art, each also has its own discipline-specific arts terminology.

1.4.5.B.3

Use discipline-specific arts terminology to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

Levels of proficiency can be assessed through analyses of how artists apply the elements of art and

principles of design.

1.4.5.B.4

Define technical proficiency, using the elements of the arts and principles of design.

Artists and audiences can and do disagree about the relative merits of artwork. When assessing works of

dance, music, theatre and visual art, it is important to consider the context for the creation and performance of the work (e.g., Who was the creator? What purpose does the artwork serve? Who is the intended audience?)

1.4.5.B.5

Distinguish ways in which individuals may disagree about the relative merits and effectiveness of artistic choices in the creation and performance of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.

Grade 5 Students will…

  • Distinguish parallel lines in everyday life and known two and three-dimensional works of art from various cultures that emphasize the convergence of lines to create the illusion of perspective (e.g., photographs by Ansel Adams, Edward Hopper’s paintings, the art and architecture of Filippo Brunelleschi etc.).  Create artwork in various mediums emphasizing line as a tool for perspective.
  • Compare and contrast shape & form found in everyday life with artists and architects that utilize shape and form as the dominant element (e.g., the architecture of Frank Gehry or Antonio Gaudi, buildings or consumer products by Michael Graves, Simon Rodia’s Watts Towers, Russian Babushka dolls, Hopi Katchina dolls etc.).  Combine geometric and organic shapes in the design and creation of original three-dimensional forms.  
  • Compare and contrast complementary colors of differing values found in the natural world and utilized in diverse two and three-dimensional works of art (e.g., Vincent van Gough, Georges Seurat, Henri Russo, Elizabeth Murray, Roy De Forest, Christo and Jeanne Claude, Mexican Day of the Dead triptychs etc.) create works of art that emphasize complimentary color and value.  
  • Compare and contrast visual texture and implied texture evident in everyday life (i.e., actual texture vs. the illusion of having physical texture).  Create two-dimensional artwork that has the perception of actual texture. Compare and contrast visual texture and implied texture evident in everyday life (i.e., actual texture vs. the illusion of having physical texture).  Create two-dimensional artwork that has the perception of actual texture.
  • Compare and contrast how geometric, organic, abstract and kinetic forms exist in the environment and incorporated in masterworks of art from diverse cultures and historical eras (e.g., George Rickey, Alexander Calder, Tim Hawkinson, Louise Bourgeois, Richard Serra, Anish Kapoor, Tom Friedman, Barbara Hepworth, Teresita Fernandez etc.).  Experiment with the application of a variety of forms in original works of art.
  • Identify symmetrical and asymmetrical vertical and horizontal balance in everyday life and works of art in diverse mediums and design and create kinetic sculptures demonstrating symmetrical and asymmetrical vertical and horizontal balance.
  • Explain ways mathematical proportions are used in master works of art in various mediums (e.g., Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, Albrecht Durer’s etchings, Salvador Dali’s The Sacrament of the Last Supper) and use the Golden Mean in the creation of an original artwork.
  • Analyze visual rhythm found in nature and artwork of different mediums created through the repetition of form (e.g., sculptures by Auguste Rodin or Eva Hess, installations by Cornelia Parker or Anne Hamilton, Aztec & Mayan headdresses, Native American Totem Poles, Medieval sculpture, Tilgnit screens etc.).  Design and create original three-dimensional artworks employing repletion of form to create visual rhythm.
  • Compare and contrast emphasis and unity/harmony in two and three-dimensional works of art from various cultures and historical eras created by the combination of shape, line, and texture (e.g., Rene Magritte, Jasper Johns, Martin Ramirez, Russian knotted carpets, Canadian textiles and American Folk Art quilts etc.). Integrate shape, line, and texture for emphasis and to create unity and harmony in original artwork.
  • Identify images used by business and industry, politics and popular culture used to influence messages and describe how repetition, variety, proportion, balance, and emphasis are used to support the persuasive power of visual images.  Replicate the use of these principles of design in the creation of original artwork intended for persuasive purpose.
  • Work individually and collaboratively in small groups to design and execute a mural, either painted or mosaic, that responds to a posed problem or theme.
  • Research works of art from various historical periods and use this research to create an original work of art that illustrates a particular theme or image in the styles researched.
  • Collaborate with classmates in the creation of works and presentation of a multiple art media art exhibition by contributing work along a common theme and assume various roles in the coordination of the exhibit (e.g., curator, publicist, art critic, installer, documentary person etc.).
  • Using age-appropriate terminology, identify common and distinctive characteristics of masterworks from various genres of visual artworks (e.g., realism, surrealism, abstract/non objective art, conceptual art etc.) and experiment with various compositional approaches influenced by these genres art to create original two-dimensional artworks.
  • Describe various physical properties that differentiate drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture, printmaking, textiles, and computer imaging, and create two and three-dimensional artworks that demonstrate knowledge of those differences and stylistic influences (e.g., realism, surrealism, non objective art, conceptual art etc.).
  • Employ basic, discipline-specific arts terminology to see how artistic pieces can serve a useful purpose in daily lives.
  • Make informed aesthetic responses to artworks based on structural arrangement (Formalism) and know the characteristics that classify artwork as formal.
  • Identify how art communicates ideas about personal and social values and is inspired by an individual’s imagination and frame of reference in self-generated, peer and masterworks of art from diverse cultures and eras.
  • Assess the application of the elements of art and principles of design in self-generated, peer and masterworks of visual artworks using measurable criteria.
  • Use evaluative tools, such as rubrics, for self-assessment and to appraise the objectivity of critiques by peers (e.g., the application of the design elements and principles as the basic for formal structure).
  • Use discipline-specific arts terminology to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of master works of visual art from various cultures as well as self-generated and peer artwork.
  • Use evaluative tools to evaluate the technical proficiency and application of the elements of art and principles of design in self-generated, peer and professional artworks.
  • Distinguish ways in which individuals may disagree about the relative merits of artwork based on the personal, cultural and historical traditions and describe the purpose of the artwork and its intended audience.  
  • Discuss how artists utilize subject matter, symbols and themes to communicate meaning and purpose in art.
  • Demonstrate visual art as a reflection of societal values and beliefs by utilizing symbols (marks agreed upon by a culture as having specific meaning or connotations) into original works of art.
  • Utilize contextual information pertaining to distinctive stylistic methodologies to investigate, interpret and analyze the viewpoint of the culture where the art was created.  Identify through the elements and principles of design how art can help analyze art works (e.g., line creating the illusion of space; shapes and form being organic, geometric, abstract and kinetic; the use of visual and implied texture, color, various types of balance, the use of rhythm, repetition, variety, proportion and emphasis from objects found in nature) and serve as a record of time for that culture.
  • Discuss how interpretations of artwork change as culture evolves (e.g., North Rose Window, Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris; Ishtar Gate, Babylon;  Arches of the Great Mosque, Cordoba; Man with a Guitar, Lipchitz; Family, Henry Moore; Little Dancer Fourteen Years Old, Degas) .
  • Analyze the distinguishing characteristics of various artists whose significant contribution to the art world has had an impact on their peer and future generations of artists (e.g., Leonardo Da Vinci, Jackson, Pollack, Andy Warhol, Anne Hamilton, Jeff Coons, Chen Woo, Rene Magritte etc.).  

EVIDENCE OF LEARNING

 Assessment:  

  • Formative Assessment strategies
  • Rubrics
  • Unit Assessments
  • Performance Assessments 

Equipment Needed:

  • Color Wheel poster, or printout  
  • School and town libraries  
  • Various internet websites for art education.
  • ART Supplies

  • Pinterest, Pinterest.com  
  • Artsonia, Artsonia.com  
  • The Getty Institute, getty.edu  
  • WebArt, webart.com  
  • Internet,
  • Virtual Museum Tours
  • Hand-outs  
  • YouTube videos related to art history, artists, or art creation.

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Projects are designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student needs.
  • Shortened assignments
  • Provide multiple grouping opportunities for students to share their ideas and to encourage work among various backgrounds and cultures (e.g. multiple representation and multimodal experiences)
  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities

504s

  • Mnemonic aids/devices
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Review/testing matched to student pace
  • Test directions read/explained thoroughly
  • Oral, short-answer, modified tests
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Student choice of texts, projects, writing prompts, etc.
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities

ELLs

  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time is allotted for students
  • Visuals/video provided where possible
  • Electronic translators
  • Provide work for completion or understanding to ELL teacher to continue during ELL class

G/T

  • Projects are designed so teacher may extend criteria based on student needs.
  • Structure learning around explaining or solving a social or community-based issue
  • Provide electronic games, lessons, etc to encourage students to expand or move ahead of class learning.

At-Risk Failure

  • Projects designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student need
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities and support
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills based on student needs
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Directions written and read/explained thoroughly and in chunks
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers and other organizational aides
  • Student Success Team and implementation of RTI Interventions
  • Set goal plan with reachable goals and pathways and collaboration with parents
  • One-on-one conference with teacher to include feedback on work and progress toward meeting goals

21st Century Skills and Themes

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and

      Preparation 

ELA: NJSLSA.R4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,

connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

NJSLSA.R7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and

quantitatively, as well as in words.

NJSLSA.W1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

NJSLSA.W2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

NJSLSA.SL1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. NJSLSA.SL2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

NJSLSA.SL4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 NJSLSA.SL5. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP3. Attend to personal health and financial well-being.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP5.Consider the environmental, social and economic impacts of decisions.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.
  • CRP12.Work productively in teams while using cultural global competence.

By the end of 8th grade,

  • 9.2.8.B.1 Research careers within the 16 Career Clusters and determine attributes of career success.
  • 9.2.8.B.2 Develop a Personalized Student Learning Plan with the assistance of an adult mentor that includes information about career areas of interest, goals and an educational plan.
  • 9.2.8.B.3 Evaluate communication, collaboration, and leadership skills that can be developed through school, home, work, and extracurricular activities for use in a career.
  • 9.2.8.B.4 Evaluate how traditional and nontraditional careers have evolved regionally, nationally, and globally.
  • 9.2.8.B.7 Evaluate the impact of online activities and social media on employer decisions.

Unit 1 Overview Unit one focuses on the Elements of Art: line, shape, color, form, space, value, and texture. (8 Weeks)


 This is a review unit that should be gone over quickly, focusing mainly on how to incorporate all the elements into artwork and process.

Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 1:  

o Naming all seven elements.

o Defining and explaining all seven elements.

o Using all seven elements in an exercise that reviews previous knowledge and prepares students for new endeavors.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing the elements of art students will be able to:

Unit 2 Overview Unit two focuses on perspective drawing. (8-12 Weeks)


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 2:  

o Defining what perspective drawing is.

o Explaining why artists use perspective drawing.

o Describing the difference between a one-point perspective and a two-point perspective.

o Explaining the different parts of a perspective, and how to set it up.

o Creating a perspective drawing.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing perspective drawing students will be able to:

Unit 3 Overview Unit three focuses on sculpture. (10-12 Weeks)


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 3:  

o Defining what a sculpture is.

o Being able to describe the difference between two-dimensional and three-dimensional art.

o Using techniques learned to work with a new medium.

o Creating a sculpture.

o Adding color to their sculpture.

Enduring Understanding  

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing sculpture students will be able to:

Unit 4 Overview Unit four focuses on the art of printmaking. (8 Weeks)


Exit Skills

By the end of Unit 4:  

o Explaining what printmaking is.

o Describing the difference between prints and a plate.

o Demonstrating the ability to create a plate, ink the plate, and produce a print.

o Properly signing and numbering their print(s)

Enduring Understanding

Essential Questions  

Learning Objectives

After completing printmaking students will be able to:

                                                                                                                                   

 Grades 5