GATEWAY GROUP CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Grade 1

Social Studies

My School and Family

6.1 U.S. History: America in the World: All students will acquire the knowledge and skills to think analytically about how past and present interactions of people, cultures, and the environment shape the American heritage. Such knowledge and skills enable students to make informed decisions that reflect fundamental rights and core democratic values as productive citizens in local, national, and global communities.

6.3 Active Citizenship in the 21st Century All students will acquire the skills needed to be active, informed citizens who value diversity and promote cultural understanding by working collaboratively to address the challenges that are inherent in living in an interconnected world.

Focus of this Unit:

  • Students will explore the need for rules and laws created by community, state, and national governments. They will explore these elements through historical narratives, community responses, and individual experiences.  From these exposures students will understand what it means to be an active citizen.  Students will compare their communities, states, and national governments to others in order to gain a cultural perspective.
  • Students will be exposed to geographic tools that will encourage spatial awareness.  They will understand the organization of people, places, and the environment as well as their physical and human properties.  They will learn how human activity can accommodate or endanger these properties.  These activities cause regions to form and change.
  • Students will learn how people make decisions based on their needs, wants, and the availability of resources.  They will learn how technology influences local, national, and global economies.
  • Students will recognize key historical events, documents, symbols, and individuals that led to the development of our nation.  Students will participate in discussions about American culture based on specific traditions, values, and beliefs that have been influenced by different cultural groups living in the United States.

NJ STUDENT LEARNING STANDARDS

6.1.4.A.1 Explain how rules and laws created by community, state, and national governments protect the rights of people, help resolve conflicts, and promote the common good.                                                    

6.1.4.A.2 Explain how fundamental rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights (i.e., freedom of expression, freedom of religion, the right to vote, and the right to due process) contribute to the continuation and improvement of American democracy.

6.1.4.A.3 Determine how “fairness,” “equality,” and the “ common good” have influenced change at the local and national levels of United States government.

6.1.4.A.4 Explain how the United States government is organized and how the United States Constitution defines and limits the power of government.

6.1.4.A.5 Distinguish the roles and responsibilities of the three branches of the national government.

6.1.4.A.7 Explain how the United States functions as a representative democracy, and describe the roles of elected representatives and how they interact with citizens at local, state, and national levels.

6.1.4.A.8 Compare and contrast how government functions at the community, county, state, and national levels, the services provided, and the impact of policy decisions made at each level.

6.1.4.A.11 Explain how the fundamental rights of the individual and the common good of the country depend upon all citizens exercising their civic responsibilities at the community, state, national, and global levels.

6.1.4.A.12 Explain the process of creating change at the local, state, or national level.

6.1.4.B.1 Compare and contrast information that can be found on different types of maps, and determine when the information may be useful.

6.1.4.B.2 Use physical and political maps to explain how the location and spatial relationship of places in New Jersey, the United States, and other areas, worldwide, have contributed to cultural diffusion and economic interdependence.

6.1.4.B.4 Describe how landforms, climate and weather, and availability of resources have impacted where and how people live and work in different regions of New Jersey and the United States.    

6.1.4.B.6 Compare and contrast characteristics of regions in the United States based on culture, economics, politics, and physical environment to understand the concept of regionalism.   

6.1.4.B.7 Explain why some locations in New Jersey and the United States are more suited for settlement than others.     

6.1.4.B.10 Identify the major cities in New Jersey, the United States, and major world regions, and explain how maps, globes, and demographic tools can be used to understand tangible and intangible cultural differences.

6.1.4.C.1 Apply opportunity cost to evaluate individuals’ decisions, including ones made in their communities.  

6.1.4.C.2 Distinguish between needs and wants and explain how scarcity and choice influence decisions made by individuals, communities, and nations.             

6.1.4.C.3 Explain why incentives vary between and among producers and consumers.

6.1.4.C.7 Explain how the availability of private and public goods and services is influenced by the global market and government.

6.1.4.C.8 Illustrate how production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services are interrelated and are affected by the global market and events in the world community.

6.1.4.C.9 Compare and contrast how access to and use of resources affects people across the world differently.         

6.1.4.C.10 Explain the role of money, savings, debt, and investment in individuals’ lives.                                         

6.1.4.C.11 Recognize the importance of setting long-term goals when making financial decisions within the community.

6.1.4.C.14 Compare different regions of New Jersey to determine the role that geography, natural resources, climate, transportation, technology, and/or the labor force have played in economic opportunities.  

6.1.4.C.16 Explain how creativity and innovation resulted in scientific achievement and inventions in many cultures during different historical periods.

6.1.4.C.17 Determine the role of science and technology in the transition from an agricultural society to an industrial society, and then to the information age.   

6.1.4.D.11 Determine how local and state communities have changed over time, and explain the reasons for changes.

6.1.4.D.12 Explain how folklore and the actions of famous historical and fictional characters from New Jersey and other regions of the United States contributed to the American national heritage.

6.1.4.D.14 Trace how the American identity evolved over time.

6.1.4.D.15 Explain how various cultural groups have dealt with the conflict between maintaining traditional beliefs and practices and adopting new beliefs and practices.     

6.1.4.D.17 Explain the role of historical symbols, monuments, and holidays and how they affect the American identity.    

6.1.4.D.18 Explain how an individual’s beliefs, values, and traditions may reflect more than one culture.

6.1.4.D.19 Explain how experiences and events may be interpreted differently by people with different cultural or individual perspectives.

6.1.4.D.20 Describe why it is important to understand the perspectives of other cultures in an interconnected world.

6.3.4.A.1 Evaluate what makes a good rule or law.

6.3.4.A.3 Select a local issue and develop a group action plan to inform school and/or community members about the issue.

6.3.4.B.1 Plan and participate in an advocacy project to inform others about environmental issues at the local or state level and propose possible solutions.         

6.3.4.D.1 Identify actions that are unfair or discriminatory, such as bullying, and propose solutions to address such actions.

Essential Questions

  • How do citizens, civic ideals, and government institutions interact to balance the needs of individuals and the common good?
  • How have economic, political, and cultural decisions promoted or prevented the growth of personal freedom, individual responsibility, equality, and respect for human dignity?
  • How do physical geography, human geography, and the human environment interact to influence or determine the development of cultures, societies, and nations?
  • How can individuals, groups, and societies apply economic reasoning to make difficult choices about scarce resources? What are the possible consequences of these decisions for individuals, groups, and societies?
  • How have scientific and technological developments over the course of history changed the way people live and economies and governments function?
  • How do our interpretations of past events inform our understanding of cause and effect, and continuity and change, and how do they influence our beliefs and decisions about current public policy issues?
  • How can the study of multiple perspectives, beliefs systems, and cultures provide a context for understanding and challenging public actions and decisions in a diverse and interdependent world?

Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Core Content/Objectives

Instructional Actions

Concepts

What students will know

Skills

What students will be able to do

Activities/Strategies

Learning Activities/ Differentiation

Interdisciplinary Connections

Assessment

How learning will be assessed

  • How do we get along in school?
  • Children learn ways to get along in school.  They discover the value of cooperating to complete a task. Students will identify four ways they can practice getting along in school.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 1

  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, illustration of examples of how to get along in school (example: SSA activity 1.3)

  • Why do schools have rules?
  • Children will identify four reasons for school rules.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 3

  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, illustrate the cause and effect of following and not following school rules (example: SSA activity 3.3)
  • Why is it important to learn from each other?
  • Children explore their similarities and differences and discover the importance of learning from and accepting each other.

  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 2

  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create and present a glyph for a classmate (example: SSA activity 2.5)
  • How are we good helpers in school?
  • Children discover they can make valuable contributions at school by helping others, respecting school property, being positive and solving problems.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 5
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create awards for people who have been good helpers at their school (example: SSA activity 5.5)
  • What do good neighbors do?
  • Children learn about neighbors and neighborhoods
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 14
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, make text to self connections and describe ways in which they have been good neighbors (example: SSA activity 14.4)
  • Who helps us at school?
  • Children learn about the typical duties of a school teacher, principal, secretary, and custodian, and discover how each contributes to the school community
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 4
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create a class book that illustrates the jobs within a school

Geography, People, and the Environment

Core Content/Objectives

Instructional Actions

Concepts

What students will know

Skills

What students will be able to do

Activities/Strategies

Learning Activities/ Differentiation

Interdisciplinary Connections

Assessment

How learning will be assessed

  • What are family traditions?
  • Children explore their own family traditions and learn about the traditions of others.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 13

  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create a display that will visually represent family traditions (example: SSA activity 13.5)

  • What is a map?
  • Children learn about maps.  They create a map based on a story setting.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 6
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create their own unique map (example: SSA activity 6.5)
  • How are families special?
  • Children learn that all families are special in different ways.  They read about family members, homes, and activities, and then create a book about their own family members, homes, and activities.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 9
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create a book about their family and share with classmates (example: SSA activity 9.7 & 9.8)
  • How do family members care for each other?
  • Children learn about ways family members care for each other.  They will categorize pictures illustrating family members into three categories of caring for one another.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 11
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create a scroll showing how they will help their family members (example: SSA activity 11.6)

Economics, Innovation, and Technology

Core Content/Objectives

Instructional Actions

Concepts

What students will know

Skills

What students will be able to do

Activities/Strategies

Learning Activities/ Differentiation

Interdisciplinary Connections

Assessment

How learning will be assessed

  • What do families need and want?
  • Children learn what families need and want.  Students will categorize needs and wants in a problem solving group work activity.  They will justify why they selected these needs and wants.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 10
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, make a diorama that depicts what families need and want.  (example: SSA activity 10.7)

  • Why is it important to learn from each other?
  • Children explore their similarities and differences and discover the importance of learning from and accepting each other.  

  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 2
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create and present a glyph for a classmate (example: SSA activity 2.5)
  • How do family members care for each other?
  • Children learn about ways family members care for each other.  They will categorize pictures illustrating family members into three categories of caring for one another.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 11
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create a scroll showing how they will help their family members (example: SSA activity 11.6)
  • Why do schools have rules?
  • Children will identify four reasons for school rules.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 3

  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, illustrate the cause and effect of following and not following school rules (example: SSA activity 3.3)
  • How are families special?
  • Children learn that all families are special in different ways.  They read about family members, homes, and activities, and then create a book about their own family members, homes, and activities.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 9
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create a book about their family and share with classmates (example: SSA activity 9.7 & 9.8)
  • How do families change?
  • Children learn about ways families change over time. They discover what happens when people grow older. They also learn how families change size.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 12
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, participation in a visual discovery activity.  Students will create drawings that depict how their own families have changed (example: SSA activity 12.4)
  • What was school like long ago?
  • Children discover what school was like long ago and compare them to schools today. They view and read about school objects from the past, discussing their identities and use.

  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family:  Lesson 7
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, design a school object that might be used in the future (example: SSA activity 7.6)

History, Culture, and Perspectives

Core Content/Objectives

Instructional Actions

Concepts

What students will know

Skills

What students will be able to do

Activities/Strategies

Learning Activities/ Differentiation

Interdisciplinary Connections

Assessment

How learning will be assessed

  • How do families change?
  • Children learn about ways families change over time. They discover what happens when people grow older. They also learn how families change size.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 12
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, participation in a visual discovery activity.  Students will create drawings that depict how their own families have changed (example: SSA activity 12.4)
  • What was school like long ago?
  • Children discover what school was like long ago and compare them to schools today. They view and read about school objects from the past, discussing their identities and use.

  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family:  Lesson 7
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, design a school object that might be used in the future (example: SSA activity 7.6)
  • How are we good helpers in school?
  • Children discover they can make valuable contributions at school by helping others, respecting school property, being positive, and solving problems.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 5
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create awards for people who have been good helpers at their school (example: SSA activity 5.5)
  • What do good neighbors do?
  • Children learn about neighbors and neighborhoods
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 14
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, make text to self connections and describe ways in which they have been good neighbors (example: SSA activity 14.4)

  • What groups do we belong to?
  • Children learn about groups they may belong to in their family, school, and community. They identify and categorize types of groups.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 8
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, students will apply new knowledge by drawing pictures of the three groups to which they belong (example: SSA activity 8.4)
  • What are family traditions?
  • Children explore their own family traditions and learn about the traditions of others.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 13

  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create a display that will visually represent family traditions (example: SSA activity 13.5)
  • Who helps us at school?
  • Children learn about the typical duties of a school teacher, principal, secretary, and custodian, and discover how each contributes to the school community
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 4
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create a class book that illustrates the jobs within a school
  • Why is it important to learn from each other?
  • Children explore their similarities and differences and discover the importance of learning from and accepting each other.  
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 2
  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, create and present a glyph for a classmate (example: SSA activity 2.5)
  • Why do schools have rules?
  • Children will identify four reasons for school rules.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 3

  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, illustrate the cause and effect of following and not following school rules (example: SSA activity 3.3)
  • How do we get along in school?
  • Children learn ways to get along in school.  They discover the value of cooperating to complete a task. Students will identify four ways they can practice getting along in school.
  • Social Studies Alive! My School and Family: Lesson 1

  • Formative:  teacher observations, student participation, illustration of examples of how to get along in school (example: SSA activity 1.3)

                Evidence of Learning

Assessment:

  • Formative Assessment Strategies
  • Rubrics
  • Unit Assessments
  • Performance Assessments

Equipment Needed:

  • Social Studies Alive – My School and Family
  • Thank You Sarah: The Woman Who Saved Thanksgiving
  • Me on the Map
  • Abe Lincoln’s Hat
  • George Washington’s First Victory
  • A Lesson for Martin Luther King Jr.
  • The White House
  • Statue of Liberty
  • The Bald Eagle
  • American Flag

Teacher Resources:

Social Studies Alive! My School and Family

Modifications/Accommodations

IEPs

  • Flexible grouping  
  • Pairing of students of similar ability  
  • Student centered activities  
  • Learning stations  
  • Small group discussions  
  • Problem solving situations
  • Adaptive Equipment

504s

  • Flexible grouping  
  • Pairing of students of similar ability  
  • Student centered activities  
  • Learning stations  
  • Small group discussions  
  • Problem solving situations
  • Adaptive Equipment

ELLs

  • teaching key aspects of a topic.
  • Eliminate nonessential information .
  • using videos, illustrations, pictures, and drawings to explain or clarify.
  • allowing products (projects, timelines, demonstrations, models, drawings, dioramas, poster boards, charts, graphs, slide shows, videos, etc.) to demonstrate student’s learning; .
  • allowing students to correct errors (looking for understanding) .
  • allowing the use of note cards or open-book during testing .
  • decreasing the amount of work presented or required

G/T

  • teaching key aspects of a topic. Eliminate nonessential information .
  • using videos, illustrations, pictures, and drawings to explain or clarify.
  • allowing products (projects, timelines, demonstrations, models, drawings, dioramas, poster boards, charts, graphs, slide shows, videos, etc.) to demonstrate student’s learning;
  • allowing students to correct errors (looking for understanding) .
  • allowing the use of note cards or open-book during testing . decreasing the amount of work presented or required

At-Risk Failure

  • Projects designed so teacher may add or omit criteria based on student need
  • Shortened assignments
  • Extended time allotted for students
  • Structure lessons around questions that are authentic, relate to students’ interests, social/family background and knowledge of their communities
  • Collaborate with after-school programs or clubs to extend learning opportunities and support
  • Various online learning opportunities to reinforce skills based on student needs
  • Provide students multiple choices for how they can represent their understandings
  • Additional time for test preparation
  • Directions written and read/explained thoroughly and in chunks
  • Emphasis on successes
  • Graphic organizers and other organizational aides
  • Student Success Team and implementation of RTI Interventions
  • Set goal plan with reachable goals and pathways and collaboration with parents
  • One-on-one conference with teacher to include feedback on work and progress toward meeting goals

Interdisciplinary Connections

Career Ready Practices

9.2 Career Awareness, Exploration, and Preparation  

8.1 Educational Technology: All students will use digital tools to access, manage, evaluate, and synthesize information in order to solve problems individually and collaborate and to create and communicate knowledge.

LA.1.RI.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. LA.1.RI.1.2 Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. LA.1.RI.1.3 Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text. LA.1.RI.1.4 Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text. LA.1.RI.1.5 Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text. LA.1.RI.1.6 Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text. LA.1.RI.1.7 Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas. LA.1.W.1.3 Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure. LA.1.W.1.5 With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers and self-reflection, and add details to strengthen writing and ideas as needed. LA.1.W.1.6 With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. LA.1.W.1.7 Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of “how-to” books on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions). LA.1.W.1.8 With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. LA.1.SL.1.1 Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. LA.1.SL.1.1.A Follow agreed-upon norms for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). LA.1.SL.1.1.B Build on others’ talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges. LA.1.SL.1.1.C Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion.

  • CRP1. Act as a responsible and contributing citizen and employee.
  • CRP2. Apply appropriate academic and technical skills.
  • CRP4.Communicate clearly and effectively and with reason.
  • CRP6.Demonstrate creativity and innovation.
  • CRP7.Employ valid and reliable research strategies.
  • CRP8.Utilize critical thinking to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • CRP9.Model integrity, ethical leadership and effective management.
  • CRP10. Plan education and career paths aligned to personal goals.
  • CRP11. Use technology to enhance productivity.

By the end of 4th grade,

  • 9.2.4.A.1 Identify reasons why people work, different types of work, and how work can help a person achieve personal and professional goals.  
  • 9.2.4.A.2 Identify various life roles and civic and work‐related activities in the school, home, and community.
  • 9.2.4.A.3 Investigate both traditional and nontraditional careers and relate information to personal likes and dislikes.
  • 9.2.4.A.4 Explain why knowledge and skills acquired in the elementary grades lay the foundation for future academic and career success.

Grade 1