SBHS Core Values and Beliefs

In 2013 SBHS began a series of neighborhood learning conversations with the goal of revisiting our school’s graduation requirements.  Students, staff and community members engaged in discussion to answer the question, “What should our high school graduates know?”  The list of recommendations helped SBHS frame our initial construction of the Proficiency-based Graduation Requirements (PBGRs).  Those conversations were also the beginning of the identification of our Core Values and Beliefs. In 2016-17, SBHS faculty extended the conversations by identifying what we value and believe about our learning community. Core Values and Beliefs manifest themselves in research-based, school-wide 21st century learning expectations.  

Every component of the school is driven by the Core Values and Beliefs and supports all students’ achievement of the school’s learning expectations.  

We value and believe in:

EQUITY

OPPORTUNITY

COMMUNITY

INDIVIDUALITY

TENACITY

INTEGRITY

CREATIVITY

It’s our RESPONSIBILITY...to Build a Proud Tradition

Student Learning Expectations

South Burlington High School’s Student Learning Expectations (SLE) are transferable skills that reach across the content areas and prepare students for college, career and life in general.  Educators use a diverse array of proficiency-based assessment tools to measure both content and the SLEs throughout the year and report on the SLEs via proficiency-based reporting (class of 2020 and beyond).  

Clear and Effective Communication

Self-Direction

Creative and Practical Problem Solving

Responsible and Involved Citizenship

Informed and Integrative Thinking

Contents

SBHS Core Values and Beliefs        2

Student Learning Expectations        2

General Information        5

South Burlington High School        5

2019-2020 School Board and Administration        5

South Burlington School District Mission Statement        5

South Burlington High School Non-Discrimination Statement        5

Graduation Requirements/Academic Credits        6

Student Learning Expectations (SLEs)        7

Student Learning Expectations        7

Where they are        7

being assessed        7

Student Academic Plan Requirements        7

Course Section Levels        8

Appealing Student Placement        8

Schedule Changes        8

Balancing Class Sections        8

Penalty for Dropping Courses        8

Policies on Issuing Partial Credit        8

Changing Levels in Courses        9

Repeating Courses        9

Policy on Credit/Placement for Outside Study        9

Credit for non-SBHS Courses        9

Auditing        9

Technology Resources        9

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)        10

Title IX Regulations        10

School Counseling Department        11

Note for Seniors        11

Guidance Course Descriptions        11

Courses of Study        11

Alternative Programs and Student Support Programs        11

Alternative Programs        11

Student Support Programs        11

Driver Education        12

English Language Learning Program        13

English Department        14

Family and Consumer Science Department        17

Mathematics Department        18

Physical Education Department        22

Science Department        26

Social Studies Department        29

Technology Department        33

Visual and  Performing Arts        36

World Language Department        40

Flexible Pathways: SBHS EXPLORE!        45

Project Lab        45

Career Development Center (CDC)        45

Big Picture        46

Dual Enrollment & Early College        46

Vermont Virtual Learning Cooperative – Online Courses        46

Technical Center Programs        46

Burlington Technical Center        46

Center for Technology, Essex        47


General Information

South Burlington High School

South Burlington High School is a public 9-12 institution serving the community of South Burlington, Vermont, and those of many nearby towns. South Burlington High School is approved by the State Department of Education and is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Our school is a comprehensive high school, offering a variety of educational programs, which are open to all enrolled students. This Programs of Study booklet is designed to assist SBHS students and parents as they research, plan, and realize a comprehensive high school academic program. Offerings and programs described in this booklet are subject to change based upon student needs and interests and the availability of supporting resources. The electronic version of the Programs of Study is available on the Internet under “Resources” on the school website at: http://sbhs.sbschools.net/

2019-2020 School Board and Administration

Board of School Commissioners: 

Mrs. Elizabeth Fitzgerald, Chairperson

Mr. Martin LaLonde, Clerk 

Ms. Bridget Burkhardt 

Mr. Alex McHenry 

Mr. Brian Minier

 

Superintendent: Mr. David Young 

Principal: Mr. Patrick Burke 

Assistant Principal: Mr. John Craig 

Assistant Principal: Ms. Lissa McDonald 

Director of Student Activities: Mr. Michael Jabour 

9th Grade Dean: Ms. Denise Weaver 

Telephone numbers: 

Superintendent’s Office 652-7250 

High School Main Number 652-7000         

Principal’s Office 652-7001 

Attendance Office 652-7002 

Guidance Office 652-7060

South Burlington School District Mission Statement

The mission of the South Burlington School District, a community committed to excellence in education, is to ensure that each student possesses the knowledge, skills, and character to create a successful and responsible life. We will do this by building safe, caring, and challenging learning environments, fostering family and community partnerships, utilizing global resources, and inspiring life-long learning.

South Burlington High School Non-Discrimination Statement

The South Burlington School District fully supports the philosophy and intent of Title VI, Section 504, Title IX and all federal regulations promulgated therein; and to that end the District will not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, creed, sex, national origin, sexual orientation or disability in all matters related to the operation of and the programs offered by the public schools of the City of South Burlington, Vermont.


Graduation Requirements/Academic Credits

In accordance with Vermont education law and South Burlington School District Graduation Policy, SBHS students will meet the requirements for graduation when the student demonstrates evidence of proficiency in academic content-areas and student learning expectations (SLEs) which outline student’s skills and habits across content areas.

Students will be introduced to graduation proficiencies through courses and experiences during their first two years of high school and assessed at the graduation level via courses and experiences during their final years of high school in the following areas:

Student Learning Expectations (SLEs):

In order to be assessed at the graduation level South Burlington High School[1] students typically enroll in the following program minimums.  Department specific distribution recommendations and requirements are explained in each department’s section of this document.

Department                         Number of Years

English Language Arts                 4

Social Studies                         3

Mathematics                         3

Science                                3

Physical Education                 1.5

Visual and Performing Arts        1

Health                                 0.5

Information Technology                 0.5

Many post-secondary institutions require a course of study that exceeds the minimum program described above. Students should be sure to discuss post-secondary plans with their school counselor as part of the course registration process.


Student Learning Expectations (SLEs)

South Burlington High School’s Student Learning Expectations (SLEs) are transferable skills that reach across the content areas and prepare students for college, career and life in general.  Educators use a diverse array of proficiency-based assessment tools to measure both content and SLEs throughout the year and report on the SLEs via proficiency-based reporting.

Student Learning Expectations

Where they are

being assessed

SB1

Clear & Effective Communication

English

Math

Science

Social Studies

Music

World Language

SB2

Self Direction

Health

Math

Physical Education

Technology & Business

Music

Visual Arts

World Language

SB3

Creative & Practical Problem Solving

Health

Math

Physical Education

Science

Technology & Business

Music

Visual Arts

SB4

Responsible & Involved Citizenship

Health

Social Studies

World Language

SB5

Informed & Integrative Thinking

English

Physical Education

Science

Social Studies

Technology & Business

Visual Arts

Student Academic Plan Requirements

All students should have a challenging academic plan that advances them toward graduation in a timely manner and takes advantage of the myriad opportunities for learning that exist at South Burlington High School.


Course Section Levels

At South Burlington High School, those courses with multiple sections may be divided into different levels, based upon the depth and breadth of concepts explored, the pace at which the course progresses, and the amount of independent work required of students in pursuing their studies. Teachers familiar with students’ achievement levels will make a recommendation for placement in the next sequential course. (Recommendations from teachers at both the high school and the middle school will be used for initial placement.)

Definition of Course Levels

Honors (H) /Accelerated (ACC)/Advanced Placement (AP): Comprehensive courses that require learning at an ambitious pace using critical analysis and independent inquiry. 

Level 1 (L1): In depth courses that require independent work, critical analysis, and the ability to assimilate new material at a fast pace. 

Level 2 (L2): These courses progress at a more deliberate pace, incorporating fewer fundamental concepts in greater depth and providing more in-class support.

Appealing Student Placement

During the registration period teachers make recommendations for student placement in sequential courses. Requests for a change of placement are initiated via a “Request for Change in Course Level Placement” form available in the high school Guidance Office. A transfer student will be placed in course levels at the discretion of the Guidance Department based on his/her previous academic records.

Schedule Changes

Students may change their schedules during an adjustment period of two weeks at the beginning of the first semester and one week at the beginning of the second semester. Since ample time has been allowed during these periods and throughout the spring for changing schedules, students will only be allowed to make schedule changes outside of these times in very unusual circumstances. To implement a schedule change, a student must:

  1. Discuss the proposed change with their current teacher.
  2. See their school  counselor to request an add-drop form.
  3. Discuss the proposed change with a parent or guardian and have him/her sign the form.
  4. Secure the required teacher’s signature.
  5. Return change request form to the Guidance Office within 24 hours of the time it is picked up.
  6. Students must remain in their current courses until they have been notified that the change has been completed.

Balancing Class Sections

In order to insure optimal instructional situations, the school reserves the right to adjust student schedules to balance classes.

Penalty for Dropping Courses

The process of academic planning represents a great deal of effort on the part of students, parents, staff members and administrators. Therefore, students are strongly encouraged to remain in the courses that are on their schedule at the beginning of the school year. In cases where a course drop is necessary, the student’s academic record will be affected in the following manner:

  1. No first-semester or full-year course may be dropped without penalty after the last day of the first marking period of the school year.
  2. No second-semester course may be dropped without penalty after the last day of the third marking period of the school year.
  3. No quarter course may be dropped without penalty after the fourth week of the marking period.
  4. Courses dropped before this time will not appear on the student’s record
  5. Courses dropped after these deadlines will be recorded as a WF (withdrawn failing) on the student transcript (Exceptions to this practice may only be made with administrative approval

Policies on Issuing Partial Credit

Generally, no partial credit will be given for full-year, semester, or quarter courses. Exceptions to this policy are as follows:

  1. when a student finishes graduation requirements at the end of the first semester and stops attending school;
  2. when the Program of Studies indicates that the course may be taken for partial credit;
  3. in the fine and applied arts when scheduling will not permit the student to attend the full duration of the course.

Changing Levels in Courses

Students who find it necessary to change levels in a full-year course should arrange to do so no later than the close of the first semester. Typically, students who change courses within an academic discipline at SBHS during the school year will have grades and attendance records follow them into the new course.

Repeating Courses

Courses that have been previously taken and passed may not be repeated for additional credit. If a course is repeated either here at SBHS, or through an approved correspondence school, the new grade will appear on the transcript for purposes of GPA calculation and total credits earned. The original grade will remain on the transcript but will not count towards the cumulative GPA.

Policy on Credit/Placement for Outside Study

Credit will only be given and listed on the transcript for programs of study from accredited institutions and in cases where this credit is being used toward meeting the requirements for graduation. (See Credit for non-SBHS Courses) Students will receive only placement (as opposed to credit applied toward graduation) from tutoring during the summer.[2]

Credit for non-SBHS Courses

Students planning to take courses through institutions other than SBHS, for which they wish to receive credit, must fill out a request form in the Guidance Office and gain approval for credit prior to taking the course. In addition:

  1. Courses must be through a secondary or post-secondary institution accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges or regional equivalent.
  2. Students must provide evidence of successful completion of the course, including the name of the institution, the dates enrolled, the grade, and the credit earned to the SBHS Guidance Department.
  3. High School level coursework taken through an accredited institution other than SBHS or associated technical centers will be transcripted, after course completion, provided that related documentation is submitted to the guidance office by the student. The determination as to whether such course fulfills any specific requirements for distribution credits will made by SBHS.

Auditing

Students who wish to take courses for enrichment without receiving credit may enroll on an audit basis.  Students will be expected to attend class on a regular basis, and they will be responsible for completing and submitting all assignments.  Tests and quizzes will be at the student’s option.  A note from the student’s parents/guardian indicating approval of the audit should be placed in the student’s file.

Technology Resources

Thanks to continued technology funding by the community, SBHS has taken great strides toward increasing the accessibility and usability of technology to enhance our students’ education. In line with recognized high school “best practices,” technology is both integrated into the content of our departmental offerings and is also a content area focus in the Technology Department, particularly through that department’s Business, Imaging, and Networking Labs.

Four years ago, South Burlington High School embarked on an exciting information technology/learning initiative. The 2019-20 school year marks the eight year of the district’s “one-to-one” program in which every high school student is provided with a personal learning device of his or her own. In concert with this, teachers and students are making active use of NEO, a flexible learning management system that enriches both teaching and learning experiences. This system fosters independent student work, as well as providing the opportunity for collaborating with others, both in and out of school. NEO also includes communication components that allow students, teachers, and parents to collaborate and monitor progress to support student learning.

The high school offers both wired and wireless network access in all academic areas, and the local area network features a high-bandwidth connection to the Internet, making educational resources on the Internet accessible from any networked device in the building. All students are provided with free email services that can be accessed from any computer (on or off campus) with an Internet connection. Parental approval is required before students may send or receive email from outside the school network. Most academic areas have mounted projectors that display a computer’s output to the entire class, and many of the classrooms have interactive whiteboards and other educational technology devices.

The nationally recognized Comolli Center for Art & Technology has 24 workstations running 3D design, animation, and video editing applications. The Library has a state-of-the-art on-line card catalogue that can be accessed via the Internet as well as 14 workstations for student use.

For more information about SBHS and SBSD technology resources, visit the district website at http://www.sbschools.net.

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)

ATTENTION STUDENT-ATHLETES!

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) requires student-athletes who aspire to “practice, compete, and/or receive athletic scholarship as a freshman in college” at either Division I or II schools, to meet the following requirements:

  1. Graduation from high school
  2. Complete 16 NCAA-approved core courses, earn a minimum GPA and earn an ACT or SAT score that matches your core-course GPA.

Please refer to the NCAA eligibility center website for a breakdown of Div I and Div II core course and GPA requirements.

While the NCAA Eligibility Center has approved many courses offered at SBHS, it is important to note that the following were NOT APPROVED for 2020-21. Students-athletes enrolling in these classes in 2020-21 may not use them to meet NCAA “Core GPA” requirements:

All offerings in the following departments and programs are not approved:

It is the responsibility of the student to assure that the courses in which they enroll will be acceptable to the NCAA and that they meet the other requirements as defined by that association. If a student or parent is unsure of a course’s approval status, they should check with their school counselor prior to enrolling in the class.

Any student-athlete aspiring to play college Division I or Division II athletics is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED to access registration materials on-line at https://web3.ncaa.org/ecwr3/.

Title IX Regulations

Pursuant to the intent of Federal legislation (i.e., Title IX of the Educational Amendments), the South Burlington School District will not discriminate on the basis of sex in all matters related to the operation of and the programs offered by the public schools of the City of South Burlington. Citizens desiring information relating to Title IX or wishing to fi le a complaint of sex discrimination within the South Burlington School District may do so by contacting The Superintendent of the South Burlington School District or the designated Title IX Complaint Officer at 550 Dorset Street, South Burlington, VT 05403. Telephone 802-652-7250.


School Counseling Department

The South Burlington High School Counseling Department serves the school through providing personal counseling, consultation, academic planning, college planning, career awareness, and preventive education. Adolescents progress through significant developmental changes during their high school years, and the School counselors provide programming to address those developmental needs as well as the availability to address individual issues as they arise. Most students are assigned a school counselor according to their last name. Students are able to have the same counselor all four years.

School Counselors: 

Ms. Halina Gangi

Ms. Lindsey Hudson

Mr. Chuck Soule 

Ms. Nikki St. Mary

Ms. Meghan Sweet - Director of Guidance

Note for Seniors

For many students, college matriculation is the end goal of their high school education. The college application process requires pre- planning and excellent organization. Seniors who plan on applying to colleges and who desire a letter of recommendation from their school counselor need to have turned in completed supporting materials from their college application packet three weeks (in-session school weeks) before the first college application deadline. These include blue teacher recommendation forms, yellow senior activity sheets, and pink transcript release form

Guidance Course Descriptions

COLLEGE BOUND

The College Bound program is designed for “first generation” college bound students interested in attending college. A “first generation” student is defined as being from a family in which neither parent has graduated from a four year college or university. The purpose of the program is to provide support to these sophomores and juniors in developing and attaining their future goals. What are your strengths, challenges and interests? What are the steps involved in researching and selecting colleges? How does a student pay for college? What other options are available after high school? The group meets during FACE time once a week throughout the school year. The group also participates in team building activities, family informational dinners, several field trips to area colleges and an overnight trip to colleges in southern New England. Students who identify themselves as “first generation” students are invited to apply at the beginning of their sophomore year.

Courses of Study

Alternative Programs and Student Support Programs

Alternative Programs

The SBHS-BHS Horizon School Program

The Horizon School is an alternative school, offered to SB students through cooperation between South Burlington and Burlington Schools. It is for students who have had difficulty succeeding in the traditional school setting and are better able to meet SBHS academic requirements through small classes and individualized instruction in an off-campus, non-traditional setting. Students who are interested in pursuing placement in this program should consult with their school counselor for further information.

Student Support Programs

Special Education Program

The Special Education program aims to develop the skills and independence of students with disabilities who are in need of specialized instruction. In order to receive special services a student must meet Vermont State eligibility requirements for special education. Each student’s program is based on an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), which is developed with parents, students, regular and special education teachers. Special education students work towards mastering the goals outlined in their IEPs. Special educators and other trained staff provide instruction in the basic skill areas of reading, math, written and spoken language. Support is also provided to help students meet regular course content requirements. The program also recognizes the importance of developing students’ executive functioning skills, especially during the 9th grade year. Executive functioning skills include the ability to: plan, organize, prioritize, manage time, self-evaluate and adjust. Coordinated support in regular classes is provided by special educators. The special education program also offers transition planning, and community-based experiences for many students.


Literacy and Math Labs

LABS Literacy and Math Labs are small classes taught by trained special educators where students receive direct instruction in areas of individualized need. Literacy labs provide individualized instruction in areas including: basic reading skills, reading comprehension, written expression, oral expression and listening comprehension. Math labs provide individual instruction in areas including math calculation and problem solving. Students may earn credit in the relevant subject area for Literacy and Math labs.

Enhanced Study

Enhanced Study Sessions are located in regular classrooms and are staffed by the special education department. Nearly all Enhanced Study Sessions include students with disabilities who are on IEPs or Section 504 plans. Enhanced Study Sessions provide a structured academic environment where students receive support with their regular coursework and homework, organization and study skills, and assistance with accommodations on tests. The ultimate goal of the program is to teach students the skills needed for academic independence and success. Students do not earn credit for participation in Enhanced Study Sessions.

Progressive Program

The Progressive Program is an alternative to the mainstream school setting, and provides academic and behavioral support to students. Students may be part of the core group or participate in different aspects of the program. Academic instruction in English, Social Studies, Science, study skills and social skills is offered. Students usually take math at their level in mainstream classes. There is a general focus on self-exploration and team building in order to provide students with the skills they need to succeed in general education at the high school. Ongoing parental involvement is an important component of this program, and there is a referral process to participate in this program.

Leap Program

The LEAP Program is an alternative mainstream educational environment for 11th and 12th grade students designed to provide intensive academic support. LEAP offers alternative courses in English, Public Issues, U.S. History, Algebra, and Consumer Math. The courses are organized by a personal contract so that each student can work at his/her own pace. LEAP also offers supported study sessions for students taking mainstream classes. The focus of LEAP is to provide additional support and structure that some students need in order to learn and meet graduation requirements.

Driver Education

Driver Education

Course 091: .25 credit

An increase in RISK creates a decrease in SAFETY. How, then, does a driver reduce risk? A responsible driver is a defensive driver, and the best driver is a proactive (and not reactive) driver. In the state of Vermont, Driver Education is mandatory for a junior operator’s license. Driver Education is offered at South Burlington High School during the academic year as a .25 credit course, and the following qualifications and stipulations apply:

  1. In situations involving over enrollment, priority for the opportunity will be given in descending order with senior students having first priority, juniors second, and so on. Within a class, priority will be given on an age basis with the older students receiving first priority.
  2. It will be necessary to schedule student’s driving time during their unscheduled periods of the school day.
  3. Because the specified amount of time for course qualification is six DRIVER EDUCATION PROGRAM actual hours of “behind-the-wheel” experience, students should expect to give out-of-school time to this need if necessary.
  4. Since the state of Vermont mandates thirty hours of classroom instruction, students cannot miss more than four classroom instruction periods for non-school related reasons.
  5. Students must obtain permits prior to the first class. Placement in Driver Education courses cannot be guaranteed by the time students are eligible for a license.

If you wish to be considered for participation in the Driver Education Program and you meet the qualifications which apply, sign up for this course on your registration form as you would for any other course.

HOMEWORK EXPECTATIONS FOR DRIVER EDUCATION It is strongly recommended that each student receive an additional 50 hours of supervised (parental) behind-the-wheel practice to supplement the six hours received during school. In addition, the student should expect to spend 30 minutes reading assigned materials for each class.


English Language Learning Program

The ELL Center offers support to students from diverse language and cultural backgrounds. The center is staffed with instructors who get to know the students and help advocate for them in this new environment. We offer a program that parallels mainstream courses in order to provide support with the language and skills needed for success in high school. Professional interpreting is arranged for parents when communication with teachers is needed.

ELL US History Literacy

Course 118: .5 credit

This class is a companion to the US History class. It supports the content and assignments of the course. It specifically instructs the language, concepts, and strategies needed to be successful in a parallel US History course.

ELL ESS Literacy

Course 120: .5 credit

This class is a companion to the Earth Science Systems class offered in alternate years. It supports the content and assignments of the course. It specifically instructs the language, concepts, and strategies needed to be successful in a parallel ESS course.

ELL PIWA Literacy

Course 121: .25 credit

This class is a companion to the required PIWA class. It supports the content and assignments of the course. It specifi cally instructs the language, concepts, and strategies needed to be successful in a parallel PIWA course.

ELL Living Systems Literacy

Course 116: .5 credit

This class is a companion to the Living Systems class offered in alternate years. It supports the content and assignments of the course. It specifically instructs the language, concepts, and strategies needed to be successful in Living Systems course.

ELL Lab

Course 126: .5 or 1 credit

This is an individualized English Language Learning course. An assessment of English language skills is conducted. A plan for addressing and practicing specific skills is designed and revisited regularly. Students work with the instructor, in small groups, and with software and workbooks.

ELL Enrichment

Course 117: (credit is optional)

This is a supported study time where students receive individual help with their language development and homework help for their content classes.


English Department

11th & 12th Grade Semester Courses

Reading

Language

Writing

Listening

& Speaking

Clear & Effective Communication

Informed & Integrative Thinking

Engaging with Literature

X

X

X

X

Grammar & Editing

X

X

X

X

British Literature

X

X

X

X

Poetry

X

X

X

X

X

Public Speaking

X

X

X

X

Advanced Composition

X

X

X

X

X

Advanced Composition:  Memoirs

X

X

X

X

AP Language & Composition

X

X

X

X

X

X

AP Literature & Composition

X

X

X

X

X

X

Holocaust Studies

X

X

X

X

X

X

Cont. Health Issues in Fiction

X

X

X

X

X

X

Literature and Composition

X

X

X

X

X

X

Courses for Freshmen:

        Grade                No.        Course

        9                141        English 9

Courses for Sophomores:

        Grade                No.        Course

        10                150        Honors American Studies

        10                151        English 10

        10                 152        English 10 Honors

Full-Year Electives:

        Grade                No.        Course

        11                 160         Advanced Placement Language and Composition

11-12                 163         Holocaust Studies (Team-taught for credit in English and Social Studies)

12                 170         Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition

10-12                 191         Cont. Health Issues in Fiction (Team-taught for credit in English and in Health)

11-12                 171         Literature and Composition

Semester Electives

Grade                No.        Course

11-12                 192         Engaging with Literature

11-12                 176         Grammar and Editing

11-12                 175         British Literature

11-12                 183         Poetry

11-12                 186         Public Speaking

11-12                185        Integrative Project Seminar

11-12                 187         Advanced Composition

11-12                 139         Advanced Composition: Writing Memoirs


English 9

Course 141: 1 credit

This heterogeneously-grouped course will provide students the opportunity to practice skills that will lead them to proficiency. Our goal is to continue developing students’ reading, writing, speaking, listening, analysis and critical thinking skills. Students will craft narratives, literary analysis essays, and arguments, and write informally to explore ideas; read classic and contemporary literature to better understand themselves and their places in the world; and read books of their own choice with the goal of fostering a community of readers. Students will be pushed to stretch their learning to the best of their abilities.

Honors American Studies (Grade 10)

Course 150: 2 credits (1 credit English /1 credit Social Studies)

How do literary works reflect history? Do the times create the people or do the people create the times? Honors American Studies is an intensive, interdisciplinary pre-AP course in which students learn through group cooperation, writing, and critical thinking. This course endeavors to reinforce the role literature plays in telling the story of American history. Students should expect a rigorous content level and pace. This course demands greater independence and responsibility, focusing on deeper learning and the development of higher level thinking skills. This course uses an AP level textbook.

English 10

Course 151: 1 credit

All stories ask a question and then try to answer it. What questions are relevant to your own life? This course focuses on literature from the American canon (traditional list of famous American novels) as a basis for critical reading and writing of both fiction and nonfiction. Personal reading lists are developed to strengthen and reinforce reading skills and apply learning. Writing skills are emphasized, particularly using evidence to support an argument, position, or idea.

Honors English 10

Course 152: 1 credit

Time period plays a crucial role in human development. Consequently, how does a historical period affect individuals? This course focuses on American literature and how we see ourselves and our community through that writing. It examines whether individuals conform or not to the values of a specific society, how gender roles are constructed, and why it’s important to write. Through thematic study of American literature, students learn and improve on critical reading and writing skills as well as language use and vocabulary. This is an intensive pre-AP course in which students learn through group cooperation, writing, and critical thinking. As an honors course, students should expect a rigorous content level and pace. This course demands greater independence and responsibility, focusing on deeper learning and the development of higher level thinking skills.

Advanced Placement Language and Composition

Course 160: 1 credit (Grade 11)

How have writers of the past and present used nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama to communicate ideas? How can we employ the methods of these writers in our own communication? How can the process of writing lead to insight and meaning? Students start their work reading books during the summer and finish with an opportunity to earn college credit by taking a national three-hour examination given by the College Board. This course focuses on the development and revision of evidence-based analytic and argumentative writing and the analysis of nonfiction texts. Through discussion, writing, and presentations, we will build on the knowledge students bring to the course as well as prepare them for future courses in college. Self-discipline and reliability in completing homework are recommended skills for the course. (It is very strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Holocaust Studies

Course 163: 1 credit (.5 credit English/.5 credit Social Studies) (Grades 11-12)

Socrates stated, “It is better to suffer an injustice than to commit one.” Is that always true? How does this apply to the victimization of Jews by Nazi Germany? This course examines the complex and indefinable nature of human behavior as well as the social, political and economic factors that helped Hitler, and other oppressors in history, rise to power. We stretch our thinking by considering why genocides continue to occur and if we are we obligated to work to stop oppression. Why do genocides continue to occur? Are we obligated to work to stop oppression? Holocaust Studies explores human behavior from a historical and literary perspective.

Advanced Placement English Literature

Course 170: 1 credit (Grade 12)

How does understanding what we read help us understand ourselves, others, and life? Advanced Placement English Literature requires students to go beyond comprehension to an understanding of how writing achieves its effects. Students start their work reading at least two books during the summer and finish with an opportunity to earn college credit by taking a national three-hour examination given by the College Board. The course presumes students’ willingness to work to understand sophisticated prose and poetry from the late 16th century to the present. Students should also look forward to the challenge of sustained analysis of texts and frequent participation in full-class discussion. Students write some long essays on literary topics, and they write many timed essays to prepare themselves for the AP examination, always remembering writing means what it says. It is recommended that students enrolling in AP Literature possess strong writing skills and a willingness to become a better reader. (It is very strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Literature and Composition

Course 171: 1 credit (Grade 11-12)

This course will focus on reading, writing and language skills. The purpose of this course is to explore the ways literacy skills can support cross-disciplinary learning and have real-world applications, primarily around student-selected topics. Students will identify and read literature of many varieties, and set goals around reading growth. Students will maintain a volume of independent reading that includes a range of genres, authors, and purposes, and increases in complexity over the course of the school year. A major facet of this course includes independent inquiry research around various topics of interest, as well as project-based applications of that research. Students are expected to craft thoughtful and insightful pieces of writing in a variety of genres with careful attention to the conventions of the English language. Seeking and responding to feedback on reading, writing, and learning skills is expected, and most work will be taken through the revision process.

Contemporary Health Issues in Fiction

Course 191: 1.0 credit English and satisfies Health requirement (Grades 11-12)

How do the decisions people make impact the quality of their lives? Students will understand that health is not just the absence of disease and that mindful practices enrich all aspects of wellness. Interpersonal communications and coping skills will be taught to aid students in making decisions about self-concept, goals, diet, stress, sexuality, substances, wellness and peers. Through literature, informational texts and discussions, students will examine issues that are going on in their daily lives. Completion of this course satisfies the health graduation requirement and 1 credit in English. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may sign up for this course.

Engaging with Literature

Course 192: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)

What does it mean to be part of a literate community? What is the importance of the author’s craft? In this course, learn how reading is a multifaceted process that promotes understanding of the world and use writing to express your thoughts and opinions. Choose your own books to exercise your reading skills, build reading strategies, as well as form a habit of reading for pleasure.

Grammar and Editing

Course 176: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)

What are the basic grammatical structures of English, and how do speakers and writers use these structures to communicate? How can an understanding of grammar, language structures, and ways of linking words lead to the editing of drafts of writing? What are the basic approaches to editing? This course includes units of study that will familiarize students with grammatical structures and analysis of sentences. Editing practice will connect grammatical knowledge and readers’ needs to the editing of real student-written drafts. Skills will be sharpened for making drafts clear and easy to read.

British Literature

Course 175: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)

This course will be offered every other year. It will be available 2017- 18. Why have certain pieces of literature written in England, from long ago to the present, continued to communicate to readers down through the ages? What is it about this literature that still attracts and influences readers and writers of our own time? We will talk about how culture affects literature and how literature influenced or was influenced by ideas of human equality and historical events. We will practice ways to approach reading this type of literature and poetry, and we will find meaning in short stories through the writing process. Through discussion, writing and presentations, we will build on the knowledge students bring to the course as well as prepare them for future courses in college.

Poetry

Course 183: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)

Poetry – spoken aloud – preceded written language. It is with this understanding that students enrolled in this course approach the poetry of the past, right alongside contemporary written and spoken poetry. Students answer essential questions like, What makes a poem a poem? How does poetry differ from prose? How do people write poetry, and who are the writers in the canon of the past? In order to write their own poetry, students read widely and deeply, asking, What are the different styles of poetic forms? and What place or importance does poetry have in my life?”

Public Speaking

Course 186: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)

Why is it important to speak well in public? What characterizes constructive criticism? How do we know when we are effective listeners? How can we improve our speaking skills? Students who take this course determine their own goals and use teacher feedback and peer feedback to help reach those goals. This course includes various speaking activities, formal speeches including a public reading and tribute as the exam.

Integrative Project Seminar

Course 185: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)

A student-driven English course designed around independent project cycles. The students bring the topics; the teachers provide the structure. Students independently move through the project process: project proposal, calendar, research notes, application (product), assessment, and reflection. This is a semester course offered for .5 English credit and can be taken multiple semesters. Reading, writing, communication, and integrative thinking PBGRs are addressed.

Advanced Composition

Course 187: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)

Students strengthen their writing skills by learning how to express their ideas and experience in logical, convincing, and meaningful ways. Students explore new ideas pertaining to their writing: How do audience and purpose influence writing? What are the differences between drafting, revising, and editing? How can I engage my readers’ attention? Reading and discussing examples of effective writing develops skills. Students participate in a public reading as part of the final exam.

Advanced Composition: Writing Memoirs

Course 139: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)

Why is it important for us to share our stories? What does it mean to bear witness? To not only tell the story but also have the story be heard and acknowledged? Memoir writing focuses on the relationship between the writer and a particular person, place, animal or object. It incorporates pieces of who we are and where we come from as it celebrates culture and diversity. Become part of a community of writers focused on discovering the art and process of creating a memoir, learning about others and sharing our commonalities and differences. Students read memoirs as models for their own writing and use professional writers as models for learning about author’s craft. This writing intensive course may require participation in activities outside of the school day and culminates in the public sharing of memoirs. Advanced Composition I is not a prerequisite for this course.

Family and Consumer Science Department

The Family and Consumer Science Department is a place where you can practice your human relations and communications skills, learn more about healthy physical, mental, emotional and social development, and practice independent living skills that will help you now, on the job and in the future when you are on your own. You can test out your ideas about marriage, family life, child rearing, and family stress such as divorce and family violence.

The Family and Consumer Science Department supports the philosophy that homework assignments will be used to reinforce class work where appropriate. The expectation is that homework will be assigned in most elective classes one to two times per week.

Courses:

        Grade                No.        Course

10-12                 758         Health and Human Development Issues (Required for Graduation)

11                 760         Peer Leadership I

12                 781        Peer Leadership II

10-12                 191         Contemporary Health Issues in Fiction[3]

9-12                 794         Independent Living

9-12                 754         Sustainable Food

Health and Human Development Issues

Course 758: .5 credit

How do you best help yourself and help a friend? When do you need to ask for help, and to whom should you turn? Throughout this one- semester class, students will learn that the decisions they make will impact the quality of their lives and the lives of others. Interpersonal communication and coping skills are taught to aid students in making decisions about such issues as wellness, diet, stress, sexuality, and relationships; and that mindfulness enriches all aspects of wellness. Completion of this course satisfies the Health graduation requirement.

Peer Leadership I

Course 760: .5 credit

Participants in the Peer Leadership I class will prepare to become SLAM leaders in their senior year. Interested students must submit an application when they register for Peer Leadership I (available on NEO). Participants will experience and lead team-building activities and consider ‘where should we look for ideal leadership?’ See Ms. Randall- Mullins, Mr. Jones, or Ms. Dransfield for details.

Peer Leadership II

Course 781: 1 credit

Participants in the Peer Leadership class become co-facilitators of the Freshman SLAM (Student Leadership Advisory Meetings) groups. Members of the class participate in a two-day retreat prior to the opening of school, assist with Freshman orientation, meet outside of class to prepare and process SLAM sessions, and facilitate SLAM groups. Participants will consider ‘What makes an effective leader?’ Participants for Peer Leadership II must be seniors and are selected through an application process (applications available on NEO). See Ms. Randall- Mullins, Mr. Jones, or Ms. Dransfield for details.

Contemporary Health Issues in Fiction

Course 191: 1.0 credit English (satisfies Health requirement)

How do the decisions people make impact the quality of their life? Students will understand that health is not just the absence of disease and mindful practice enriches all aspects of wellness. Interpersonal communications and coping skills will be taught to aid students in making decisions about such issues as self-concept, goals, diet, stress, sexuality, substances, wellness and peers. Through readings and discussions students will examine issues that are going on in their daily lives. Completion of this course satisfies the Health graduation requirement and 1 credit in English. Juniors, and seniors may sign up for this course.

Independent Living

Course 794: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

What do you need to learn before you start living on your own? What skills are necessary to survive and thrive in the “real world”? How do lifestyle, education and goals influence career choice? All this and more in Independent Living! Students will experience and practice future living skills such as meal planning & preparation, buying a vehicle, managing a bank account and credit/debit card, preparing a 1040EZ, basic clothing upkeep and renting an apartment; just to name a few. The Independent Living course is designed to provide valuable, hands-on information that will be useful for a lifetime! (This course is less math intensive than Personal Finance)

Mathematics Department

Out-of-class Assigned Work Policy: With few exceptions, out-of-class work will be assigned to students for each period that a math class meets. Out-of-class assigned work is as important as class interaction. Proper out-of-class preparation improves class participation due to increased student confidence. Out-of-class preparation:

  1. promotes independent learning,
  2. fosters more productive class discussions and work sessions,
  3. expedites the learning process. The length of out-of-class assignments will vary with the course.

Technology: Calculators and laptops are used to enhance the learning experience throughout the mathematics curriculum. Laptops are provided via the SBHS 1:1 program. The SBHS Math Department recommends students in Math 1 and higher buy their own graphing calculator. Specifically, we recommend the Texas Instruments TI-84 Plus. Students who are unable to buy their own graphing calculator will be provided with a loaner.

Courses:

        No.        Course

        425         Foundations for Proficiency

430        Math Lab 1

431        Math Lab 2

434         Math 1 (Level 1)

435         Math 1 (Level 2)

441        Math 2 (Level 1)

438         Math 2 (Level 2)

439        Math 3 (Level 1)

440         Math 3 (Level 2)

455         Math 4

465         Statistics 1

466        Statistics 2

464         Advanced Placement Statistics

470         Advanced Placement Calculus (AB)

471         Calculus-Level 1

490         Advanced Placement Calculus (BC)

467        Creative Ways of Counting

468        Essential Math for College & Careers (EMC2)

Foundations for Proficiency

Course 425: 1 credit

Students who take this course will understand that arithmetic skills provide a gateway to advanced mathematics. As they become proficient with skills involving rational numbers, they will also learn how mathematical models and reasoning relate to situations outside of the classroom. At the successful conclusion of this course, a student will be prepared for Mathematics 1 (Algebra modeling, Statistics, and Geometry). Recommended Prep: Completion of Grade 8 Math and teacher recommendation.

Math 1 Level 1 (Algebra modeling, Statistics, and Geometry)

Course 434: 1 credit

Students will develop an understanding of foundational algebraic, geometric, and statistical reasoning through examinations of applied problems. They will learn how to represent many practical circumstances with mathematics and understand connections between mathematics and their world. Additionally, they will become familiar with statistical methods used to communicate trends and patterns that they encounter. This course is the first in a series of three. It will prepare students for their post-secondary plans as stated in the College and Career Readiness Standards. Students in this level 1 course will be provided with the opportunity to become proficient with the relevant Plus Common Core State Standards in Math. Recommended Prep: Minimum grade of A- in Grade 8 Math.

Math 1 Level 2 (Algebra modeling, Statistics, and Geometry)

Course 435: 1 or 2 credits

Students will develop an understanding of foundational algebraic, geometric, and statistical reasoning through examinations of applied problems. They will learn how to represent many practical circumstances with mathematics and understand connections between mathematics and their world. Additionally, they will become familiar with statistical methods used to communicate trends and patterns that they encounter. This course is the first in a series of three. It will prepare students for their post-secondary plans as stated in the College and Career Readiness Standards. Students in this level 2 course have extra time to become proficient with the curriculum because it meets every day. Students in this level 2 course will be provided with the opportunity for extra time to become proficient with the curriculum. In addition to learning the mathematical content, students who enroll in this level 2 course will work to further develop their executive functioning skills. Recommended Prep: Satisfactory completion of Grade 8 Math and teacher recommendation.

Math Lab 1

Course 430: 1 credit

Students who take this course focus on content mastery of learning targets defined by their parallel math course. This course is structured through self-assessment, additional varied resources, and pre-teaching of future content standards. This course is not a study hall. Students also focus on the development of their executive functioning skills. Students will be assessed on their proficiency in communication, problem solving and self-direction aligned with the South Burlington High School graduation standards. This course is co-taught with a math teacher and special educator to support students in mastery of content and executive functioning skills.

Math 2 Level 1 (Algebraic Solutions, Statistics, and Geometry)

Course 441: 1 credit

Students will be solving linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential equations and inequalities (where appropriate). Additionally, students will learn how to create good surveys, collect valid data and continue their study of geometry. This course is the second in a series of three. It will prepare students for their post-secondary plans as stated in the College and Career Readiness Standards. Students in this level 1 course will be provided with the opportunity to become proficient with the relevant Plus Common Core State Standards in Math. Recommended Prep: Minimum grade of B Math 1 Level 1.

Math 2 Level 2 (Algebraic Solutions, Statistics, and Geometry)

Course 438: 1 or 2 credits

Students will be solving linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential equations and inequalities (where appropriate). Additionally, students will learn how to create good surveys, collect valid data and continue their study of geometry. This course is the second in a series of three. It will prepare students for their post-secondary plans as stated in the College and Career Readiness Standards. Students in this level 2 course will be provided with the opportunity for extra time to become proficient with the curriculum. In addition to learning the mathematical content, students who enroll in this level 2 course will work to further develop their executive functioning skills. Recommended Prep: Satisfactory completion of Math 1 and teacher recommendation.

Math Lab 2

Course 431: 1 credit

Students who take this course focus on content mastery of learning targets defined by their parallel math course. This course is structured through self-assessment, additional varied resources, and pre-teaching of future content standards. This course is not a study hall. Students also focus on the development of their executive functioning skills. Students will be assessed on their proficiency in communication, problem solving and self-direction aligned with the South Burlington High School graduation standards. This course is co-taught with a math teacher and special educator to support students in mastery of content and executive functioning skills. Math Lab 2 is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

Math 3 Level 1 (Algebraic Applications, Statistics, and Geometry)

Course 439: 1 credit

Students will be building on their mathematical learning by interpreting and analyzing a variety of equations and inequalities with a focus on trigonometry. Theorems and construction will be the main geometric themes as students learn about similarity, congruence, and transformations. Additionally, students will explore the ideas of independence and conditional probability. This course is the third in a series of three. It will prepare students for their post-secondary plans as stated in the College and Career Readiness Standards. Students in this level 1 course will be provided with the opportunity to become proficient with the relevant Plus Common Core State Standards in Math. Recommended Prep: Minimum grade of B in Math 2 Level 1.

Math 3 Level 2 (Algebraic Applications, Statistics, and Geometry)

Course 440: 1 or 2 credits

Students will be building on their mathematical learning by interpreting and analyzing a variety of equations and inequalities with a focus on trigonometry. Theorems and construction will be the main geometric themes as students learn about similarity, congruence, and transformations. Additionally, students will explore the ideas of independence and conditional probability. This course is the third in a series of three. It will prepare students for their post-secondary plans as stated in the College and Career Readiness Standards. Students in this level 2 course will be provided with the opportunity for extra time to become proficient with the curriculum. In addition to learning the mathematical content, students who enroll in this level 2 course will work to further develop their executive functioning skills. Recommended Prep: Satisfactory completion of Math 2 and teacher recommendation.

Math 4

Course 455: 1 credit

This course is built around two goals: 1. Help students who enjoy math but do not feel prepared for calculus or statistics have an opportunity to improve their skills, and 2. show new ways that mathematics connects to real-world situations.  This is a year-long course that will be structured in a problem solving format which will promote assisted discovery, communication of process and examination of alternate solution routes.

Statistics 1

Course 465: 1 credit

Students will learn how to sift through raw data and make informed decisions about the world around them. While the course does follow the course of studies recommended by the College Board (exploratory analysis, planning and conducting a study, probability and statistical inference) the pace is more moderate than that of the AP class and does not include AP specific topics. In order to better their understanding, students will also learn to use the TI-83 Plus graphing calculator and Fathom statistical analysis software. Recommended Prep: Minimum C in Math 2

Statistics 2

Course 466: 1 credit

This course covers commonly used statistical inference methods for numerical and categorical data. Students will learn how to set up and perform hypothesis tests, interpret p-values, and report the results of analysis by hand and with computer output. This is a continuation of Statistics 1, which is a prerequisite for this course.

Advanced Placement Statistics

Course 464: 1 credit

This largely project-based course emphasizes crafting thoughtful, contextual narrative in response to the problems encountered as well as using the tools and techniques of data analysis. The AP Statistics course follows the College Board Advanced Placement curriculum, divided into four major themes: exploratory analysis, planning and conducting a study, probability, and statistical inference. Students will explore each of these areas in depth. Technology will be an integral part of the course with students using graphing calculators and statistical analysis software, specifically Fathom, on a regular basis. Recommended Prep: Minimum B in Math 3 Level 1. (It is very strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Advanced Placement Calculus (AB)

Course 470: 1 credit

Calculus AB follows the College Board Advanced Placement course curriculum, spending equal time on differentiation and integration. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Students enrolled in AP Calculus AB will be expected to complete a summer assignment. Recommended Prep: Minimum B+ in Math 3 Level 1 and teacher recommendation. (It is very strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Calculus Level I

Course 471: 1 credit

This course is offered to the capable mathematics student who does not require the accelerated pace and theoretical aspects of Calculus 470. The course is founded upon the idea that the limit is the cornerstone of calculus. With this important idea, we establish that differentiable functions are locally linear. The course focuses on the shapes of functions. Through differentiation we explore rates of change, and through integration we explore displacement. In both cases the course applies these concepts to mathematical models of the physical world. Graphing calculators are used in this course. Recommended Prep: Minimum A in Math 3 Level 2 or minimum B in Math 3 Level 1.

Advanced Placement Calculus (BC)

Course 490: 1 credit

Calculus BC follows the College Board Advanced Placement course curriculum. It covers all topics covered in AP Calculus AB in addition to those found in a second-year calculus course. This is a fast-paced, highly rigorous course. In addition to daily homework, there are weekly long-term assignments. All students enrolled in AP Calculus BC will be expected to complete a summer assignment which covers the first chapter of the textbook. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The TI-89 graphing calculator is used in this course. Recommended Prep: Minimum A in Math 3 Level 1 and teacher recommendation. (It is very strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Creative Ways of Counting

Course 467: 1 credit

This course in discrete mathematics will draw from topics in the following areas of study: basic counting methods, the binomial theorem, recursion and generating functions, graph theory, logic and truth tables, Latin squares, set theory, inclusion-exclusion, and fair division & voting. This is a year-long course that will be structured in a problem solving format which will promote assisted discovery, communication of process and examination of alternate solution routes.

Essential Math for College & Careers (EMC2)

Course 468: 1 credit

This course provides juniors or seniors an opportunity to improve their skills and alleviate the need for remediation in college. The Vermont State Colleges System (VSCS) has agreed that successful completion of this course will qualify students to enroll in credit bearing college math at any VSCS school without the need for remediation or an Accuplacer test score. This course will help Vermont high school students achieve college and career readiness before leaving high school. In addition, EMC2 will provide an opportunity for students to achieve graduation proficiency in critical math content and practices. Using principles from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), and supported by the Math Association of America (MAA), this course is designed to be project/task based with guided student discussion and ‘debate’. Concepts are not taught by giving students algorithms but rather by discovering those algorithms within the tasks presented. The curriculum is also designed to have a ‘gradual release’ process whereby teachers guide the process early, set up classroom climate and expectations, and gradually the units are more and more student led. This model strengthens student skills for post-secondary endeavors. Students will be asked to assess their own understanding, learn where and how to seek support when necessary, and gradually become more independent learners.


Physical Education Department

Please Note:

  1. Students need to complete 1.5 credits of Physical Education in order to graduate. Students may take any course in the PE course listing to fulfill that requirement. There are no prerequisites.
  2. The only course with a grade restriction is Virtual PE. You must be a second- semester sophomore, junior, or first-semester senior in order to sign up for the course

Courses:

        Grade                No.        Course

9-12                 057        Personal Fitness - Muscular Fitness

9-12                 058         Personal Fitness - Speed/Agility

9-12                 069         Fitness Walking

9-12                078         Recreational Sports

9-12                 079         Self-Defense

10-12                 071         Virtual Personal Fitness[4] - Fall (up to .25 credits)

10-11                 072         Virtual Personal Fitness - Winter (up to .25 credits)

10-11                 073         Virtual Personal Fitness - Spring (up to .25 credits)

9-12                 068         Yoga

9-12                 052         Women’s Crisis Prevention

9-12                 065         TAPS/Basketball Games

9-12                 074         Arena Football

9-12                 075         Indoor Soccer

9-12                 070         Team Handball

9-12                060         Floor Hockey

9-12                 080         Tennis

9-12                 076         Badminton

9-12                 077         Volleyball

9-12                 054         Ultimate Frisbee

9-12                 061         Period 0 Fitness[5] - Basketball

9-12                 062         Period 0 Fitness - Ice Hockey

9-12                063        Period 0 Fitness - Speed School

9-12                 064         Period 0 Fitness - Recreational Sports

Personal Fitness – Muscular Fitness

Course 057: .25 credit

What effect does personal fitness have on my total well-being? What are the principles behind physical fitness? This course provides training in three of the five aspects of health-related fitness: muscular strength, muscular endurance, and body composition. Students will participate in a developmentally appropriate training program designed to achieve and maintain a level of muscular strength and endurance within a healthy fitness zone. Training will include instruction and participation in a variety of activities that support muscular strength and endurance. The academic component of the course will focus on the principles of training as they apply to these areas of fitness and their application by the individual.

Personal Fitness – Speed/Agility

Course 058: .25 credit

What effect does personal fitness have on my total well-being? What are the principles behind physical fitness? This course provides training in two of the five aspects of health-related fitness: muscular endurance and flexibility. This course will incorporate many different tools and techniques to develop speed and agility. Students will be expected to move quickly and consistently in class as they train daily for improvement. Straight-ahead speed, lateral speed, static and dynamic balance, reaction time, and explosiveness will be the highlights of this course. The academic component of the course will focus on the principles of training as they apply to these areas of fitness and their application by the individual.

Fitness Walking

Course 069: .25 credit

What effects does regular physical activity have on my body? How can walking help develop and maintain physical fitness? This quarter-long Fitness Walking course will provide the participants opportunities for personal enjoyment, challenges, self-expression, and social interactions. The participant will realize that fitness walking will allow for their creativity in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The fitness walker will understand why physical fitness is important in living a healthy lifestyle beyond this course. The walker will learn how to measure their fitness levels and how to maintain their optimal level of fitness.

Recreational Sports

Course 078: .25 credit

What are some different activities that will improve my overall personal well-being? What is the relationship between these activities and physical/emotional fitness? Recreational Sports is designed to provide opportunities for the students to elect individual and team activities that have carryover value associated with them. These lifetime activities allow for mixed grade, co-educational participation and will provide a variety of life and leisure time offerings. The Recreational Sports objectives include assisting students in the development of physical fitness and motor ability; aiding the student’s physical, mental, and social growth; and offering activities which facilitate meeting these program objectives. Activities may include: Field Hockey, Lacrosse, Golf, Tennis, Frisbee, Bowling, Soccer, Flag Football, Volleyball, Personal Fitness, Aerobics, Badminton, Table Tennis, Lacrosse, Indoor Soccer, Cross-Country Skiing, Racquetball, Pickleball, Team Handball, and Gatorball.

Self-Defense

Course 079: .25 credit

What alternative approach is there for me to develop my physical fitness and learn a helpful tool? What is the relationship between self-defense and well-being? This course is geared for those who have little or no knowledge of combative activities. Students are taught simple karate skills such as punches, kicks, pokes, and/or releases easily utilized if there is a simple physical threat. Emphasis is placed on preventative measures for personal protection.

Virtual Personal Fitness

Course 071, 072, 073: .25 credit

Can I receive credit for something I do outside the school day? How can I relate athletics and outside activity to the standards set by the SBHS PE Department? What is the value of what I do in my own time? The Physical Education Department will give PE credit toward graduation for participation in SBHS interscholastic activities or specific out-of- school activities which meet certain criteria consistent with departmental practice and philosophy. This credit is only available to second-semester sophomores, juniors, and first-semester seniors who achieve PE objectives while involved in interscholastic athletics and are on the final team rosters at the end of each sport season or students who demonstrate and participate in a rigorous, consistent, and supervised physical activity outside of the school day. The objectives of this course include improving physical development, hand-eye coordination, physical strength, and general motor ability. Individual programs will be designed to meet the student’s specific needs and will be online based. Students will be required to do readings, complete assignments, and document activity. One-quarter (.25) credit can be earned per sport season, or per out-of-school activity, to a maximum of one-half (.50) credit (two sport seasons).

Yoga

Course 068: .25 credit

How can I learn to better understand my body? How does spatial awareness and self-reflection help develop personal well-being? This class will be centered on a consistent Yoga practice to further enhance strength, flexibility, and balance. We will deeply explore the ancient practice of Yoga in a variety of poses and styles. We will use a variety of strength-training equipment including stability balls, medicine balls, and giant rubber bands. Students will develop a personal training program centered on a healthy lifestyle and work towards achieving their own strength, flexibility, and balance-related goals.

Women’s Crisis Prevention

Course 052: .25 credit

Is there a relationship between physical education and crisis prevention/ safety? What skills can you learn to help you react in crisis situations? This course is a self-defense course specifically designed for learning tools and techniques to keep women safe. Students will be taught strategies to avoid and resolve conflict effectively and quickly.

TAPS / Basketball Games

Course 065: .25 credit

This fitness-based basketball course is designed for the student looking to enhance personal fitness in a recreational basketball setting. Students will be able to develop their muscular fitness, cardiovascular speed, agility, and balance. This basketball-based approach to improved fitness will be centered on recreational TAPS game play for students of all skill levels.

Arena Football

Course 074: .25 credit

How can I learn to better understand the game of football? What are some different activities that will improve my overall personal well- being? What is the relationship between these activities and physical/ emotional fitness? Arena Football is designed to provide opportunities for the students to elect team activities that have carry-over value associated with them. Arena Football objectives include assisting students in the development of physical fitness and motor ability; aiding the student’s physical, mental, and social growth; and offering an activity which facilitates meeting these program objectives.

Indoor Soccer

Course 075: .25 credit

How can I learn to better understand the game of soccer? What are some different activities that will improve my overall personal well-being? What is the relationship between these activities and physical/emotional fitness? Indoor Soccer is designed to provide opportunities for the students to elect team activities that have carry-over value associated with them. Indoor soccer objectives include assisting students in the development of physical fitness and motor ability; aiding the student’s physical, mental, and social growth; and offering an activity which facilitates meeting these program objectives.

Team Handball

Course 070: .25 credit

How can I learn to better understand the game of Team Handball? What are some different activities that will improve my overall personal well- being? What is the relationship between these activities and physical/ emotional fitness? Team Handball is designed to provide opportunities for the students to elect team activities that have carry-over value associated with them. Team Handball objectives include assisting students in the development of physical fitness and motor ability; aiding the student’s physical, mental, and social growth; and offering an activity which facilitates meeting these program objectives.

Floor Hockey

Course 060: .25 credit

How can I learn to better understand the game of Floor Hockey? What are some different activities that will improve my overall personal well- being? What is the relationship between these activities and physical/ emotional fitness? Floor Hockey is designed to provide opportunities for the students to elect team activities that have carry-over value associated with them. Floor Hockey objectives include assisting students in the development of physical fitness and motor ability; aiding the student’s physical, mental, and social growth; and offering an activity which facilitates meeting these program objectives.

Tennis

Course 080: .25 credit

How can I learn to better understand the game of Tennis? What are some different activities that will improve my overall personal well- being? What is the relationship between these activities and physical/ emotional fitness? The Tennis class is designed to provide opportunities for the students to elect an individual activity that will have lasting value associated with lifetime fitness. Tennis objectives include assisting students in the development of physical fitness and motor ability; aiding the student’s physical, mental, and social growth; and offering an activity which facilitates meeting these program objectives.

Badminton

Course 076: .25 credit

How can I learn to better understand the game of Badminton? What are some different activities that will improve my overall personal well- being? What is the relationship between these activities and physical/ emotional fitness? Badminton is designed to provide opportunities for the students to elect team activities that have carry-over value associated with them. Badminton objectives include assisting students in the development of physical fitness and motor ability; aiding the student’s physical, mental, and social growth; and offering an activity which facilitates meeting these program objectives.

Volleyball

Course 077: .25 credit

How can I learn to better understand the game of Volleyball? What are some different activities that will improve my overall personal well-being? What is the relationship between these activities and physical/emotional fitness? The volleyball class is designed to provide opportunities for the students to elect team activities that have carry-over value associated with them. Volleyball objectives include assisting students in the development of physical fitness and motor ability; aiding the student’s physical, mental, and social growth; and offering an activity which facilitates meeting these program objectives.

Ultimate Frisbee

Course 054: .25 credit

How can I learn to better How can I learn to better understand the game of Ultimate Frisbee? What are some different activities that will improve my overall personal well-being? What is the relationship between these activities and physical/emotional fitness? The Ultimate class is designed to provide opportunities for the students to elect team activities that have carry-over value associated with them. Ultimate Frisbee objectives include assisting students in the development of physical fitness and motor ability; aiding the student’s physical, mental, and social growth; and offering an activity which facilitates meeting these program objectives.

Period Zero Fitness - Basketball

Course 061: .25 credit

This fitness-based basketball course is designed for the student looking for time in their schedule to enhance personal fitness in a recreational basketball setting without the time constraints of the normal school day. Students will be able to develop their muscular fitness, cardiovascular speed, agility, and balance training before the school day begins. This basketball based approach to improved fitness will be centered on recreational game play for students of all skill levels.

Period Zero Fitness – Ice Hockey

Course 062: .25 credit

This fitness-based ice hockey course is designed for the student looking for time in their schedule to enhance personal fitness without the time constraints of the normal school day. Students will be able to develop their muscular fitness, cardiovascular speed, agility, and balance before the school day begins. This course will be a comprehensive fitness program developed for the athlete within all of us. This course will take place at Cairns Arena. Proper equipment is required.

Period Zero Fitness – Speed School

Course 063: .25 credit

This fitness-based speed/agility course is designed for the student looking for time in their schedule to enhance personal fitness without the time constraints of the normal school day. Students will be able to develop their muscular fitness, cardiovascular speed, agility, and balance before the school day begins. This course will be a comprehensive fitness program developed for the athlete within all of us.


Science Department

Courses:

        Grade                No.        Course

9                 341         Earth/Space Systems (ESS)

10                 351         Living Systems

9-10                385        Research & Design Seminar 1

11-12                 360         AP Chemistry

11-12                 361         Chemistry: Life, The Universe, and Everything

10-12                 364         Exploring the Human Machine

10-12                 365         Exploring the Physical World

11-12                 367         Weather, Climate, and Atmospheric Studies

11-12                 369         Environmental Studies

11-12                 370         AP Environmental Science

10-12                 371         Biology for the Medical Profession

11-12                 380         AP Physics

10-12                 381         Physics

11-12                 382         Physical Geography and Geologic Hazards

11-12                383        Research & Design Seminar 2

10-12                384         Astronomy

11-12                 390         AP Biology

10-12                391        School of Rock: Physics of Sound, Music, and Musical Instruments

graduation level achievement in all content area proficiencies (PBGRs) and Student Learning Expectations (SLEs).

All students will be required to take ESS & Living Systems prior to taking other science courses. Exceptions to this may be granted by the Curriculum Area Supervisor (CAS).

Earth/Space Systems (ESS)

Course 341: 1 credit

Students will explore how forces change the interactions among different Earth/Space systems. Students will investigate fundamental physical science principles in order to model and explain these systemic changes. Alternative Energy and climatic patterns will also be studied. These fundamentals will be used to understand earth and space systems such as earthquakes, plate tectonics, stellar evolution, and space travel.  This will allow students to become better stewards of our planet, be able to care for ourselves, and appreciate the world around us.

Living Systems

Course 351: 1 credit

Living Systems is an in-depth study of biological principles through inquiry-based laboratory investigations and outside readings as well as classroom activities.  Successful completion of ESS is required.

Research and Design Seminar 1
Course 385: 0.5 OR 1.0 credit

Students take this class if they are passionate about science, technology and engineering and want to work on a self-designed independent research project in addition to their current science class.  Students will periodically set goals and check in with their instructor.  Some direct instruction on specific relevant skills will be provided.  Students can register for this course either Fall or Spring semester or both.  2nd semester 9th grade students may gain access to this class pending available space and with CAS approval.

Advanced Placement Biology

Course 390: 1.5 credits

AP Biology is a college-level life science offering. This course offers an in-depth study of molecular and cellular biology as well as genetics, evolution, and populations through laboratory investigations, group projects, individual research, and classroom activities. A comprehensive look at bioethical issues and the impact of science on society will be at the forefront. Students in this class should be passionate about the subject area, have disciplined independent work habits, and be prepared for assignments to be completed over the summer. Prerequisites: Confident completion of ESS, Living Systems, and Chemistry and/ or CAS approval. (It is strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Biology for the Medical Profession

Course 371: 1 credit

Students will have authentic, hands-on opportunities to actively explore areas that are integral to health care-related careers including current methods, technology, terminology, and specific content knowledge. This course is designed for students interested in pursuing careers in Nursing, Physical Therapy, Emergency Medicine, Radiology, Veterinary Medicine, as well as other general health care-related occupations. Prerequisite: Students are expected to have successfully completed ESS and be concurrently taking or have confidently completedLiving Systems.

Advanced Placement Chemistry

Course 360: 1.5 credits

AP Chemistry is taught at the college level and adheres to the expectations of the College Board for an AP course in both content and structure as a second year offering. AP Chemistry uses a college-level textbook, offers a rigorous laboratory program, has a strong emphasis on calculations and principles, and covers core topics with a high level of depth. Students who wish to take this class must be committed to maximizing their time in class and to individual work time outside of class.  Students are expected to have confidently completed a full-year high school chemistry course (or equivalent) and be concurrently enrolled in Math3 or Calculus throughout the year. (It is strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Chemistry

Life, The Universe, and Everything

Course 361: 1.5 credits

This course covers the main themes and skills that scientists use to explain and explore natural phenomena at its smallest scales. In addition to gaining laboratory skills, students will learn: structure and characteristics of matter, how matter changes, how knowledge of these concepts is obtained, and how that knowledge can be used. Diagrams, calculations and written explanations will be created by students to explain some of the phenomena that occur around them every day in surprising ways.  Successful completion of ESS & Living Systems is required. Enrollment in Math3 is recommended.

Advanced Placement Physics

Course 380: 1.5 credits

Advanced Placement Physics follows a national curriculum that is approved by the College Board and is designed to be equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics as well as to prepare students for the national AP Physics Year 1 Exam. AP Physics uses a college-level textbook, offers a rigorous laboratory program, has a strong emphasis on calculations and principles, and covers core topics with a high level of depth. Students who wish to take this class must be committed to maximizing their time in class and individual work time outside of class. No prior coursework in physics is necessary for students to enroll in AP Physics. The AP Physics curriculum utilizes algebraic manipulations as well as the basic use of trigonometric functions. Students should learn these skills in either a prior or concurrent math (Math 3 or Calculus) course and will practice and apply them within the course itself.  Successful completion of ESS & Living Systems is required.  (It is strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Physics

Course 381: 1.5 credits

Physics is a lab-based study of kinematics, forces, momentum, energy, basic wave motion, sound and light behavior, the electromagnetic spectrum, static and current electricity, and magnetic and electric fields. Computers are used to capture and analyze data as well as to create models to match the observed data. Students’ development as independent learners is emphasized. Students should be confident with their mathematical skills and be enrolled in Math 3. Successful completion of ESS & Living Systems is required.

School of Rock: The Physics of Sound, Music, and Musical Instruments

Course 391: .5 Credit

In this course students will learn about the specific physics concepts related to sound waves and resonance and how they pertain to how musical instruments work.  This will be done through a cadre of hands-on labs.  In addition, students will be required to design and construct (and perform with) their own instrument (string, wind, or percussion).  This will provide an opportunity for students to learn, develop, and practice their STEM skills.  Digital design, 3d printing, laser cutting, and the use of a CNC router will be encouraged.  This course is open to any student who is currently enrolled in or has successfully completed Living Systems.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science

Course 370: 1.5 credits

This is a cross-disciplinary course incorporating elements of study from biology, chemistry, earth science, and environmental studies. APES is a college level class that stresses scientific practices with a strong laboratory component. The course follows a curriculum approved by the College Board designed to provide students with the principles, concepts, and methodologies needed to understand the natural world and to analyze environmental issues. Topics will be addressed through discussions, role-plays, field trips, and consultants. This course is open to juniors and seniors who have confidently completed Living Systems and Math 2. (It is strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Environmental Studies

Course 369: 1 credit

Environmental Studies is an elective full-year course for the student interested in the science of human impact on local and global ecosystems. The successful student will have a keen interest in the environment, especially Vermont’s, and an interest in solving individual and political environmental problems. It is a lab-based and field work-oriented science class where data will be collected and analyzed. Formal lab reports will be produced along with considerable outside reading with both written and oral analysis. All areas of human and environmental interaction will be considered, including some basic science review. Topics will cover ecology, earth science, weather, water, soil, air, population, energy, alternative energy, and case studies illustrating current attempts to correct and prevent environmental damage. Local resources will be called upon to demonstrate many of the concepts and issues presented in the class. This course is open to juniors and seniors who have successfully completed Living Systems and Math 2.

Research and Design Seminar 2

Course 383: 0.5 OR 1.0 credit

This course is designed to support self-motivated junior and senior students in their project-related efforts connected to other science classes.  Students will mostly use this time to independently work on scientific research or engineering design projects with periodic check-ins with their teacher.  Some direct instruction on specific relevant skills will be provided.  Students can register for this course either Fall or Spring semester or both and may enroll more than once.


Weather, Climate, and Atmospheric Studies

Course 367: 1 credit

This course is focused on developing a basic understanding of the atmosphere and the processes that constantly shape and change it. Topics of study will be climate, global warming, weather prediction, and a look at extreme weather phenomena, including hurricanes, El Nino, and tornados. This course is open to juniors and seniors who have successfully completed Living Systems and Math2.

Physical Geography and Geologic Hazards

Course 382: .5 credit

Credit Physical Geography provides an opportunity to understand the complex physical environment in which human beings live. Students will study the dynamics of land formation, soil science, and watershed processes. Throughout the course, students look at patterns of human activity that respond to and often change the landscape. This includes a study of valuable earth resources and the potential hazards posed by geologic processes such as earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, and tsunamis. Students will also learn about the current applications of cartography with special emphasis on digital mapping, and GIS. This course is open to sophomores,juniors and seniors who have successfully completed or are currently taking Living Systems. The mathematics involved is limited to topics learned in Math 1 and 2 plus a few skills that will be taught within the course.

Exploring the Human Machine

Course 364: .5 Credit

Are you looking for an opportunity to make life science relevant to your daily life? This hands-on, project-oriented course will use authentic technological tools to study and model the fundamental functions and systems of the human body, life systems, and the environment. Structure, function, maintenance, and first aid of human body systems will be the central focus of the learning.

Exploring the Physical World

Course 365: .5 Credit

Are you looking for an opportunity to make physical science more relevant to your daily life? Using various technologies ranging from simple hand tools to cutting-edge data collection equipment and computer models, this hands-on, project-oriented course is for you. Concepts related to forces, energy, light, and electricity will be explored through in-depth investigations, projects, and discussion focused on the latest developments in science and technology. Students are encouraged to enroll in both of these courses (364 and 365) for a full-year experience; however, credit may be earned at the successful completion of each semester.

Astronomy

Course 384: .5 credit

Astronomy is a one-semester course designed to continue where ESS leaves off.  Students will learn how to identify planets and stars in the night sky and will uncover new fascinating details about those celestial objects.  Learning activities include recreations of famous astronomical experiments, film analysis, and a computerized night sky simulation.The mathematics involved is limited to topics learned in Math 1 and 2 plus a few skills that will be taught within the course.

Social Studies Department

Grade 9 students are required to take World History. Students in grade 10 will take United States History since 1867, Honors United States History or Honors American Studies. Upon completion of the required grade 10 course, a student will be eligible to take any of the elective courses available in grades 11 and 12. Students must take PIWA during the senior year. Students must pass a total of three credits in Social Studies.

10th Grade Courses

Inquiry

History

Geography

Civics, Government &  Society

Grade 10 US History Courses

X

11th & 12th Grade Courses

Inquiry

History

Geography

Civics, Government &  Society

AP European History

x

X

X

AP Psychology

X

x

X

Holocaust Studies

X

X

X

Semester Courses

American History Through Film

X

X

X

AP Government & Politics

X

X

X

Economics

X

X

Global Studies

X

X

X

Psychology

X

X

PIWA

X

X

Race & American Society

X

X

X

Women’s Studies

X

X

X

Required Courses:

        Grade                No.        Course

9                 241         World History

10                 250         Honors American Studies

10                 252         Honors US History

10                 251         US History

12                 271/272 Public Issues & World Affairs (S1/S2)

Elective Courses:

        Grade                No.        Course

10-12                264         American History Through Film: 1915 to Modern Movies

11-12                 263         Holocaust Studies

11-12                267         Economics

11-12                 270         AP US Gov’t. & Politics

11-12                 281         AP Psychology

11-12                 290         Psychology

11-12                 287         Global Studies

11-12                 280         AP European History

11-12                 257         Women’s Studies

11-12                 265         Race and American Society

World History

Course 241: 1 credit

World History is a required ninth grade social studies course. Successful completion of World History gives you one credit toward graduation. World History will explore past and present civilizations and cultures in many places around the world. Topics will include, but are not limited to, technology, government, religion, literature, science, cultural values and the roles of men and women. Essential questions explored in this course are, for example: What does it mean to be civilized? How is progress measured across time and culture? How do different elements of culture both unify and divide a society?

Honors American Studies

Course 250: 2 credits (1 credit English / 1 credit Social Studies)

How do literary works reflect history? Do the times create the people or do the people create the times? Honors American Studies is an intensive, interdisciplinary pre-AP course in which students learn through group cooperation, writing, and critical thinking. This course endeavors to reinforce the role literature plays in telling the story of American history. Students should expect a rigorous content level and pace. This course demands greater independence and responsibility, focusing on deeper learning and the development of higher level thinking skills. This course uses an AP level textbook.

Honors U.S. History

Course 252 1 Credit

U. S. History is a year-long course in which students focus on American history from the post-Civil War time period until the present. Students will understand how historical events have shaped the American experience and their own lives. A variety of teaching techniques and strategies are used throughout the course to help students seek answers to fundamental questions such as: What is the role of the individual in creating change in America? How have Americans defined and redefined the concepts of freedom and rights throughout our history? As an honors course, students should expect a rigorous content level and pace. This course demands greater independence and responsibility, focusing on deeper learning and the development of higher level thinking skills. This course uses an AP level textbook.

U.S. History

Course 251: 1 credit

U. S. History is a year-long course in which students focus on American history from the post-Civil War time period until the present. Students will understand how historical events have shaped the American experience and their own lives. A variety of teaching techniques and strategies are used throughout the course to help students seek answers to fundamental questions such as: What is the role of the individual in creating change in America? How have Americans defined and redefined the concepts of freedom and rights throughout our history?

American History Through Film: 1915 to Modern Movies

Course 264: .5 credit

American History Through Film is a Social Studies elective which explores the relationship between the social and cultural history of the United States and American movies. Students will learn how to view American films as a mass audience text to help us better understand ourselves and our shared perspectives on our history. Students will develop answers to the essential question: How have American films both reflected and shaped American history and culture? The culminating event will be a student presentation about an individual actor, director, genre, or series chosen by the student which connects to American cultural history.

Holocaust Studies

Course 263: 1 credit (.5 credit Social Studies/.5 credit English)

Socrates stated it is better to suffer an injustice than to commit one. Is that always true? How does this apply to the victimization of Jews by Nazi Germany? This course examines the complex and indefinable nature of human behavior as well as the social, political and economic factors that helped Hitler, and other oppressors in history, rise to power. Why do genocides continue to occur? Are we obligated to work to stop oppression? Holocaust Studies explores human behavior from a historical and literary perspective.

Economics

Course 267: .5 credit

Economics is a semester-long course covering topics such as economic systems, how markets work, the relationship between business and labor, stock market, government in the economy, the global economy, and current economic events. During this semester, students will examine questions such as: How are economic systems chosen? How are economic decisions made? How does the relationship between supply and demand affect prices? What is globalization? What are the economic impacts of one commodity on history and the current global economy? What criteria do you consider when making personal economic choices?

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Course 270: .5 credit

This course attempts to explore the definition of a democracy and how the organization of our government promotes those democratic ideals. Students will investigate the impact of political parties, the media, and the major institutions of our government – the Presidency, the Congress, and the Supreme Court. Two of the most relevant questions addressed are: How can a citizen be an effective participant in the democratic system? What is the proper balance between the preservation of civil liberties and the need for order and security? (It is very strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

AP Psychology

Course 281: 1 credit

AP Psychology is a year-long course that investigates the scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students will learn about core psychological principles, influential theorists, and each of the major subfields within psychology. Additionally, students will discover the ethics and methods that psychologists use in their science and practice. Within each unit of study, students will address essential questions that will guide their understanding; for example: How do groups impact individuals? How does stress influence health and behavior? What motivates human behavior? (It is very strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.) 

Psychology

Course 290: .5 credit

Psychology is a semester course covering topics such as emotions, learning, how behavior is influenced, how the brain works, abnormal psychology, gender differences, and perception. During the semester, students will examine questions such as: What is normal versus abnormal behavior? What does my personality say about me? How does stress affect my life? What factors affect behavior and why? How do expectations influence what one sees?

Global Studies

Course 287: .5 credit

How do nations interact? How do citizens influence their nation’s goals? What is the U.N.’s role in the global community? Global Studies is a semester course that examines how a particular nation’s culture and geography influence their role in the global community. This course will emphasize how nations act on self-interest and influence each other’s decisions. Throughout this process students will look closely at the workings of the U.N. since 1953, thus enriching their understanding of how the U.N. functions within global affairs. For students interested in Model U.N., Global Studies is a valuable foundation for resolution writing and persuasive thinking.

AP European History

Course 280: 1 credit

AP European History is a year-long course which traces the evolution of modern Europe from a medieval framework into a union of independent nation states. Students will investigate the development of modern states and the theories of government, the relationship between church and state, and the role of war and conflict. Students will seek answers to the fundamental question: How has European history been impacted by social, political, religious, intellectual, technological, and economic forces? (It is very strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Women’s Studies

Course 257: .5 credits

Women’s Studies is a semester course covering topics such as feminism, feminist theory, history of the women’s movement, patriarchal v. matriarchal systems, as well as women in politics, religion, and the law. Students will explore these topics through history and current events in a local, state, national, and global context. Students will answer questions such as: What are the conditions of women around the world? How do the experiences of others inform our own? What is my responsibility to women of the world? How do the various definitions of femininity differ through cultures? How does being female affect daily experience worldwide?

Race and American Society

Course 265: .5 credit

Race and American Society is a semester long course covering topics related to human cognition, the origins of race as a concept, American law-making, media, celebrating influential people, and current issues related to immigration, mass incarceration, and inequality in pursuing quality of life. Students will be encouraged to think critically about the role of race in American society and to explore current issues through the lens of historical context. Students will attempt to answer questions such as: How does the mind create racist thinking? What is race? How and when did the concept of race come to be? How have laws in the United States reflected current societal attitudes towards race? What has been the impact of laws related to race? How does media reinforce racial stereotypes and confirm bias? How does race function in the lives of individuals?

Public Issues and World Affairs (PIWA)

Courses 271, 272: .5 credit

PIWA is a required one-semester course that covers local and world affairs by examining how societies define themselves, what action democratic societies take to accommodate differing perspectives of their citizens, and how the past influences future affairs. Each student will spend the semester completing Project Citizen, which will help students address the questions: How do I use my voice as a citizen? What are the rights and responsibilities of an American citizen? Students will take practical action working to implement and change public policy based on their own research.

Technology Department

Students must successfully complete one semester or equivalent in order to demonstrate graduation level content level proficiency in Technology.  Technology content area proficiencies and the Student Learning Expectations (SLEs) are embedded in all technology courses.

Gender Equity Statement: The Technology Department is committed to gender equity. The Department recognizes the excellent career opportunities for both females and males in careers that require technological knowledge and skill. No favoritism is made in any course for or against individuals, regardless of gender. All students are encouraged to enroll in our exciting diversity of courses.

Homework Statement: The philosophy of the high school regarding homework is that “every teacher has the right to expect that their students will complete assigned homework; such homework is largely independent practice in skill building and content acquisition that supports the teachers’ learning objectives for their students.” While homework is not assigned for every class period, many Technology Department classes include satisfactory completion of assignments as a component of student assessment.

Teaching Assistants: Motivated students are encouraged to talk with an instructor about the possibility of earning credit as a teaching assistant in any Technology Department courses. Credit can be earned through the Career Development Center.

Courses:

        Grade                No.        Course

Business Strand

9-12                 808        Introduction to Business

9-12                 807         Build Your Own Business

11-12                812         Personal Finance

Comolli Center for Art and Technology Lab Strand

9-12                  820           3D Studio

9-12                  824           Character and Game Design

9-12                  822           Digital Video

10-12                 829          Advanced Digital Video

9-12                   827          Fashion and Apparel Design

9-12                   828          Creating Graphic Novels

Technology Education Strand

9-12                 831         Green Architectural Design

9-12                 832         CAD and Engineering

9-12                 847         Graphic Design

9-12                 837         Robotics and Engineering

9-12                 838         PC Hardware and Software

9-12                 839         Intro to Computer Science

10-12                 849         AP Computer Science Principles[6]

9-12                   841         Digital Photography

10-12                 843         Advanced Digital Photography

10-12                 844         Yearbook

Introduction to Business

Course 808: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

What is unique about business ventures in the 21st century? Have you ever wondered about what makes a business successful and sustainable? What can we learn from ‘Shark Tank’ and ‘The Apprentice’? This introductory class helps students learn basic business concepts and then apply these skills in hands-on projects that solve real-world situations. Students will also practice these techniques with case studies, computer simulations, field trips and other interactive methods. This is an excellent class for any student who may be interested in a future in business or who wants to be more successful in DECA while earning a technology credit.


Build Your Own Business

Course 807: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

 Have you ever thought of starting or owning your own business? When you hear ‘Shark Tank’ do you think of successful business moguls and hopeful entrepreneurs? Here is an opportunity to learn how to build your own business. This project-based class will combine entrepreneurship, marketing, and accounting with a focus on sustainability. Students will explore a variety of business concepts, identify a market niche and construct an authentic individual business plan. This is an excellent class for any student who is creative, resourceful, and considering a career in business. Intro to Business would be a great preliminary course to Build Your Own Business but not required.

Personal Finance

Course 812: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)

Do you want to get better at handling your personal finances? Do you want to learn to manage your money instead of having your money (or lack thereof) control your life? Every student should take this class! Students will navigate through real-life financial situations using case studies, computer simulations, and other interactive methods. Topics include banking, investments, credit cards, car loans, housing, taxes, insurance, budgeting and having enough left at the end of the month to save for a vacation! Don’t be caught not knowing how to make ends meet once you leave high school! Instead, get a jump start on making and keeping your first million.

Character and Game Design

Course 824: .5 Credit (Grades 9-12)

Dating back to prehistoric times, games have played a dynamic part in social structures. Games reflect the values and expectations of a cultural norm while influencing the surrounding society. Character and Game Design introduces students to a curriculum of creative choice using a structured set of communication rules. Students use these math and language rules to develop custom applications that demonstrate game play functions. The skills are then reworked into a game designed by the student, developing rules, challenges, and interactions for a community presentation.

3D Studio

Course 820: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

How has the computer impacted society and culture? Creating realistic or surrealistic 3D worlds like those you see in “Interstellar” or “Frozen” requires a strong sense of observation, a creative flair, the ability to solve problems effectively, and the right computer technologies. 3D Studio will help you learn these important skills that will help you with whatever you choose to do. 3D Studio offers you the chance to create virtual 3D environments and characters and use animation to tell stories about the worlds you’ve designed. Be prepared to immerse yourself in a classroom world unlike any you have experienced.

Digital Video

Course 822: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

What makes a film memorable? Is it the casting, the shots, the musical score, or all of the above? How can you create a fi lm that will make people think, long after they’ve watched it? Today, anyone can become a cinematographer with the purchase of a camcorder and the press of a button; but what makes an appealing video, and what distinguishes good cinematography and digital video work from the bad? In this course, students gain new perspective as filmmakers, starting with the basics of fi lm work, from storyboarding to shot lists and treatments to cinematic execution and final editing. Students will work in a variety of video genres including informational documentation, narrative storytelling, commercial and experimental work. Students will gain new perspectives in working behind the camera, empowering them as active storytellers and viewers, able to critically assess fi lm validity. Technologies including studio lighting setups, camera mounts, audio equipment, and computer editing programs will be used in conjunction with each project, allowing students ownership over a complete process, from conception to audience impact.

Fashion and Apparel Design

Course 827: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

The world of fashion design is a competitive and creative market that historically has been the basis of popular culture and trendsetting. Why do certain clothing trends stick? Who decides what’s “in” and what’s “out?” How easy is it to become a fashion designer? This course introduces students to the construction and business components in fashion and apparel design, allowing students to become designers themselves, using industry design software. Students will learn about the history of fashion design, create fashion drawings, attain pertinent concepts in cloth and textile design, learn sewing and color approaches to apparel construction, and bring ideas to final form.

Creating Graphic Novels

Course  828: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

This course will provide students with advanced knowledge of techniques and skills in the application of digital/computer/web technologies using industry-standard software.  The integration of technical skills and aesthetic expression are emphasized along with a study of different comic themes, comic art, and emerging/existing technologies to create graphic novels.  Projects will require research, collaboration, experimentation, and editing.  Students will develop skills necessary to create unique graphic novels.  Each student will produce a series of individual and collaborative graphic novels covering a variety of subject matter that will be printed, published, and promoted.

Computer-aided Design and Engineering

Course 832: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

Virtually every object that is created by professionals is completely modeled in 3D using professional CAD software. Proficiency with these complex programs is a requirement for engineers, architects, designers, and even many technicians. In this course, you will not only learn how to use advanced CAD software, you will learn how engineers work within a design process to ensure the success of the product. You will also see your designs come to life through 3D printing and CNC machine tools.

Green Architectural Design

Course 831: .5 credit (Grades 9-12) 

What is meant by “green” design? What does a building that is both green and beautiful look like? How can I design a building that meets functionality and cost goals yet also have it be energy efficient? In this course, you will develop valuable skills in the use of powerful, commercial 3D CAD software as you learn how to design structures that have useful, efficient floor plans, are pleasing to look at, and utilize current advances in energy efficiency. Whether you are a budding architect, builder, realtor, or just plan to own your own home someday, you’ll find learning about green design to be both interesting and useful.

Robotics and Engineering

Course 837: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

How would you design a robot to perform a specific task or solve a problem? How do you create and program a robot so that it responds to its surroundings? This course provides opportunities for students to engage in a challenging, practical, team-based approach to solving engineering problems and to develop critical thinking, research, leadership, and communication skills for application in science, engineering, and technology. Students will use robotics as the environment to learn that design is accomplished most effectively when a design process is followed; that computer programs incorporate logic to control circuits that cause a robot to perform specific tasks and to allow the robot to interact with its environment; and that problem-solving strategies are applied to develop solutions to design challenges. This course provides excellent preparation for the First Robotics Technical Challenge competition.

PC Hardware and Software

Course 838: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

What makes one computer fast and another slow? How can you make a sick computer run like new again? How can you harden your computer against all the security threats it faces when you go online? This course will help you gain an in-depth understanding of computer hardware and operating systems. You will learn how modular approaches to technological systems make them easier to upgrade and repair, while encouraging innovation; that computer problems are best solved by following a problem-solving process; that security is an essential part of the design and operation of every aspect of a computer system; and that computer technicians must be able to work effectively and efficiently with people as they help them get their computers running again.

Introduction to Computer Science

Course 839: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

How are computer programs written? Where do you start when you want to write a program to solve a problem? Computer science is one of the hottest career fields, with more jobs available than applicants and salaries that outpace most other occupations. CS is not only for programmers and geniuses, however--most people can benefit from mastering the logical, sequential thinking strategies that are critical for good program design. It doesn’t matter if you don’t know that Python is not a snake, this course will give you a solid start on learning what the world of coding is all about. This course is a great choice for anyone who loves solving puzzles or who wants to learn how to think logically, as a computer must.

AP Computer Science Principles (Alternating year course, offered in the 2020-2021 school year)

Course 849: 1 credit (Grades 9-12)

AP Computer Science Principles introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. With a unique focus on creative problem solving and real-world applications, AP CS-P prepares students for college and career. Whether it’s 3-D animation, engineering, music, app development, medicine, visual design, robotics, or political analysis, computer science is the engine that powers the technology, productivity, and innovation that drive the world. CS experience has become an imperative for today’s students and the workforce of tomorrow. The goal of AP CS-P is to create leaders in computer science fields and to attract and engage students who are traditionally underrepresented in CS careers. AP CS-P has no prerequisite course, and may be taken before, after, or instead of AP Computer Science (A). (It is very strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

AP Computer Science (A) (Alternating year course not offered 2020-2021)

Course 840: 1 credit (Grades 10-12)

How does one “think logically?” How do you apply a logical approach to solving a problem? How do you break up seemingly insurmountable problems into solvable component parts? In AP Comp Sci, you will learn how programming languages are like human languages and that object-oriented languages focus on defining reusable data and logic structures. You will learn how to create and use software objects as you work with the most popular modern programming language, JavaTM. This course is for all students who want to improve their ability to think logically, not just future programmers. Programming is one of the few growth career fields right now; and if you find you like it, you’ll have a head start on a college degree! (It is very strongly recommended that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses take the Advanced Placement exam.)

Digital Photography

Course 841: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

What does a “good” photograph look like? Is a picture really worth a thousand words? Students in Digital Photography will spend the semester exploring these questions by taking their own photographs and viewing and discussing those created by their classmates. This course uses photography as a means to investigate the students’ world by exploring the design process, from idea through execution to critical evaluation.

Advanced Digital Photography

Course 843: .5 credit (Grades 10-12)

Imagine what life would be like if forms of technology currently common did not exist? Technology has made photography easier than ever. From cell phones to professional SLR cameras, there are now many ways to use photographs to communicate in our society. Advanced Digital Photography provides the student with knowledge, techniques, and skills in the application of electronic and digital/ computer technologies to all areas of photography. Students are expected to show a great deal of individual focus and direction with their work, with the objective to develop and refine technical and conceptual practices, while creating a strong portfolio of work. Recommended prep: minimum B in Digital Photography

‘Chat, ‘Gram, and ‘Tweet the Yearbook

Course 844: 1 credit (Grades 10-12)

How can social media plus technology be used to create, promote and communicate all at the same time? Using photography, layout and design you will produce the Lupos, South Burlington High School’s yearbook. Yearbook staff members, will also use multiple social media platforms to promote school activities that will be also highlighted in the yearbook. The capability to work independently as well as within a group, and the ability to multitask while meeting deadlines, are essential qualifications for success in this course. Students must be willing to dedicate time outside of class to fulfill responsibilities and meet deadlines.

Graphic Design

Course 847: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)

Ever feel your pulse quicken while looking at a snowboard catalog? Well, it isn’t just because of the pretty people. By understanding the demographics of their intended audience, savvy designers craft the principles and elements of design to create graphics that market all types of products and services. Effective graphic design can stir emotions, grab attention, provide detail, offer information and, yes, even excite us. Now you, too, can learn the techniques of the experts using industry standard software to develop graphics that just might get people to take action.

Visual and  Performing Arts

South Burlington offers a variety of courses to expose students to the aesthetic, creative, and intellectual opportunities available by participating in the visual and performing arts. The following courses allow students to experience and gain knowledge in visual art, music and drama. . A sequence of classes is offered to teach students in each of the art forms. Introductory Level courses are offered to students entering the high school arts programs and provide the fundamental skills needed to continue into the Intermediate and Advanced courses. Intermediate Level classes are directed toward the students who would like to specialize their study (drawing/painting, pottery, jazz, chamber ensembles). Advanced Level courses are designed for the highly motivated student who wishes to refine  skills with the option of developing a high-quality personal portfolio or prepare for auditions.

It is advised that students preparing for visual art portfolio review (architecture, graphic design, computer arts, fashion, interior design, or specializing their study in creative problem solving using a variety of art forms and processes, etc.) complete at least Art I and Art II. Homework may be assigned in all visual and performing arts classes.


Art Courses:

        Grade                No.        Course                Level

        9-12                 700         Art I                 Intro

9-12                 705         Draw It                Intro

9-12                 703         3-D Art                Intro

9-12                 702        Pottery                 Intro

9-12                 704         Painting                 Intermediate

10-12                 710         Art II                 Intermediate

9-12                 712         Pottery II         Intermediate

11-12                 720         Art III                 Advanced

11-12                 725         Art IV                 Advanced

Art I (Introductory Level Course)

Course 700: 1 credit

How does art help develop intuition, reasoning, and imagination? This introductory course will help you develop traditional art skills and your own sense of creativity through a variety of assignments. You will learn how to make connections between art, history, various cultures and your own life. Art 1 is recommended for students curious about art for personal interests and as  preparation for further study in the visual arts. Students will begin to develop individual technique and create early portfolio pieces.

Draw It

Course 705: .5 credit

Have you always wanted to learn how to draw? This fun, “hands-on” and “how-to” course teaches the tricks and strategies for drawing. Participants will develop basic drawing and observational skills. Students can expect to work with pencils, ink, charcoal, pastels, and more. Representational, abstract, and expressive drawing will be encouraged. If you are looking for an experiential learning opportunity, this introduction to visual arts course is for you! This is a one-semester course. No prerequisite is required.

3-D Art

Course 703: .5 credit

Are you a “hands-on” learner? Do you like to cut, glue, bend, shape, and assemble materials? Then this sculpture course is designed for you. The focus will be on creating three-dimensional forms using a variety of media. Paper Mache, clay, wood, and wire are just some of the materials that will be used. Demonstrations and practice exercises will ensure your work has strong visual appeal. This is a one-semester course. No prerequisite is required.

Pottery (Introductory Level Course)

Course 702: .5 credit

Art helps us engage in the creative process and to understand the connections between different cultures in the world. This course is designed for students interested in a “hands-on” approach to making art. Traditional clay hand-building techniques such as slab, pinch, and coil will be covered. Students will also learn basic pottery terminology and glaze applications. The elements of art will be used to guide the assignments and to ensure that the work has a strong visual appeal.

Painting (Intermediate Level Course)

Course 704: .5 credit

Express yourself!! This is a one-semester course offered to students who have an interest in exploring painting as a specific medium. Students will work from life and refer to artists from the 20th century in realistic, abstract, and nonrepresentational styles to create their own expressive paintings. Recommended Prep: Art I or Draw It.

Art II (Intermediate Level Course)

Course 710: 1 credit

 Engage and apply your creativity to foster self-expression and artistic skill. Art II is designed for those students who wish to pursue art for personal interest, in college, or as a career. It provides preparation for further study in the visual arts (design, architecture, computer graphics, etc.). Students will develop advanced skills and create works of art to build their portfolios. Sketchbook assignments help students reinforce concepts and develop individual style. Recommended Prep: Art I, Draw It, or by teacher recommendation.

Pottery II (Intermediate Level Course)

Course 712: .5 credit

Learn to integrate the traditional techniques of pottery with your own personal development as a clay artist. Discover and develop your own style. Pottery II is designed for students interested in further exploration of clay as a three-dimensional medium. Some sculpture, hand building, and wheel work will be covered in assigned individual and group projects. Recommended Prep: Pottery/3D Studio.

Advanced Art III - Course 720: 1 credit (Advanced Level)

Advanced Art IV - Course 725: 1 credit (Advanced Level)

Apply skills and techniques to discover your own artistic hand. These courses are designed for those students who wish to pursue art in college, as a career, or for personal interest. They provide excellent preparation for further study in visual arts, design, architecture, or computer art. Students often have more freedom and choice of subject matter, media, and approach within the structure of assignments. This class helps students prepare portfolios for art school admission. Art III is open to juniors and seniors who have completed Art II. Art IV is designed for those students who have completed Art III. Recommended Prep: Art II for course 720, Art III for course 725.

Music Courses:

        Grade                No.        Course

9-12                 971         Jazz Explorations

9-10                 963         Concert Band

9-12                 966         Mixed Chorus[7]

9-12                 964         Jazz Ensemble

9-12                 965         Symphonic Band

10-12                 962         Concert Chorus[8]

10-12                 973         Chamber Singers

9-12                 980         Wind Ensemble

9-12                 969         World Drumming

9-12                 982         Creating Music Using Tech.

9-12                 968         Music Theory and Piano

9-12                 706         Drama 101 - Acting 101

9-12                985        Music Appreciation

Jazz Explorations

Course 971: .5 credit per semester

Jazz Explorations is a class designed to teach jazz music to all students who would like to begin or improve on reading skills and improvisation in the jazz tradition. Designed for freshmen and sophomores, but not excluding juniors and seniors, this class provides the opportunity for a more relaxed approach to learning jazz, blues, Latin, and funk music than Jazz I. This class will be a great way to build on skills and technique in order to progress into Jazz Ensemble. Jazz Explorations is open to all instrumentalists and vocalists.

Concert Band

Course 963: 1 credit

This is a large instrumental ensemble open to all 9th and 10th grade woodwind, brass, and percussion players without an audition. The Concert Band rehearses and performs music of all styles and performs three to four concerts each year, including participation in a music competition.

Mixed Chorus

Course 966: 1 credit

A small, full-year choral ensemble open to all 9th graders and first-year choral students. No previous experience is required. This course will focus on learning and performing standard choral repertoire, refining basic musicianship, theory skills, and choral technique. This ensemble will prepare its own music as well as the Concert Chorus music for performance at least three times per school year. Grades will be assigned on an individual basis based on classroom work, work outside of class, and skill assessment. Students enrolled in this ensemble also have the opportunity to participate in All-State, New England, and District Choral Festivals.

Jazz Ensemble

Course 964: 1 credit or .5 credit

Open to all students by audition. Rehearsals occur during the school day with occasional Thursday evenings. Concerts are in the evenings three to four times per school year. Students who pass the audition will be expected to attend all rehearsals, concerts, and two jazz festivals. Students take part in fundraising performances at their choice in small combo settings. This class is intended for serious instrumental and vocal students.

Symphonic Band

Course 965: 1 credit or .5 credit

This is a large instrumental ensemble open to woodwind, brass, and percussion players in grades 9-12 by audition only. Students in this ensemble will learn challenging wind ensemble literature and work on refining individual as well as ensemble musical skills. The Symphonic Band performs in three to four concerts each year, including participation in a music competition. Students are expected to practice their music assigned for performance as well as classroom assignments.

Concert Chorus

Course 962: 1 credit or .5 credit

Concert Chorus is a large, four-part vocal ensemble concerned with the study and performance of standard choral literature. Students enrolled in this class will also continue refining basic musicianship and theory skills and their individual vocal and choral technique. There are usually three concert performances per school year in addition to participation options in All-State, New England, and District Choral Festivals. Students are expected to practice the music assigned for performance as well as any written assignments. This is a full-year, performance- based offering. Students are graded on an individual basis. Open to students in grades 10-12 who have had prior choral experience. If you are new to the district or to the choral program, you must interview with the director. Grade 9 students are welcome to audition following completion of one year in mixed chorus.

Chamber Singers

Course 973: 1 credit

A smaller choral ensemble concerned with the study of more challenging repertoire, ranging from Renaissance to Jazz. The members of this ensemble are chosen through an audition process at the end of the previous school year. It is a year-long commitment. These singers have performed for WCAX Channel 3, Dessert Night, Graduation, faculty meetings, and dedications. In addition, this ensemble participates in VT American Choral Directors Association Mid-Winter Madrigal Festival. It is recommended that students be enrolled in Concert Chorus and have a basic knowledge of music theory and choral technique. Students will be graded on an individual basis according to classroom rehearsal and skills practice.

Wind Ensemble

Course 980: 1 credit

A small, select wind ensemble open to anyone in grades 9-12 by audition only. A “catch-all” class focused on intense musical study in every aspect, including theory, ear training, challenging wind ensemble, and chamber music repertoire. This class is recommended for the serious instrumental student who would like a challenge.

World Drumming

Course 969: 1 credit

World Drumming involves the study and practice of West African drumming, singing, and dancing. This is designed as an enjoyable, interactive performance class in which students of all musical abilities feel comfortable. Self-discipline, respect, teamwork, and good listening skills are all integral components in this class. There are several performances each year, including visits to the elementary schools and community outreach concerts. Students are graded on participation and preparation of material. Open to anyone in grades 9-12.

Creating Music Using Technology

Course 982: .5 credit

Have you ever had an idea for a song but no way to re-create it? Have you ever made a cool video and wanted to put your own music to it? Maybe you’ve wondered how your favorite song was remixed. In this music technology course, you will use laptop computers and electronic pianos to unleash your creativity and imagination through recording, editing, and mixing. You will also learn to sync your original music to video and know the copyright guidelines involved. Come join the class for one semester and take your music as far as it can go! All levels of music experience are accepted. No past experience needed, just a desire to make music. Students who have already taken this class may sign up again as an on-going course (earning new credit). In 2017-18, advanced song writers will have an additional component offered during this course, as the Creating Music Class and the Advanced Digital Video Class will team up for a “Real World Experience”; Work side by side combining your music and their video!

Music Theory and Piano

Course 968: .5 credit

You don’t need to already play the piano or read music to take this class. If you don’t play the piano but always wanted to learn, this is your chance! If you already play and want to learn more about music theory and harmony, this is for you. This class will be divided into two groups: those who cannot read music and those who can. You’ll feel comfortable practicing on a digital piano with headsets without others hearing you. Curriculum will include learning to read music and understand music theory while playing simple pop songs of your choice with two hands. Every Friday is “Fun Friday” where you’ll experience interesting and amazing things happening in the music world.

Music Appreciation

Course: 985: .5 credit

Music Appreciation is a class designed to give students an introduction to musical styles, families of instruments, and music of the world. It is available to all students regardless of their experience with music. Students will have hands-on experience making an instrument, learning musical styles from around the world, and end the class with a broad knowledge of what music looks like in different part of the world and in different cultures.

Drama 101 – Acting 101

Course 706: 0.5 credit (first semester)

Drama 101 will focus on the actor as performer. This is a place to learn beginning acting skills; all performances are completed in class. Students will include script and scene study, characterization, physicality and movement in character. Students may choose to apply learned skills in straight acting or musical theatre. This class  will be a safe space for actors to explore creative options in performance practice, as well as opportunities for collaboration with other students. Grading is based on Performing Arts PBGRs and three ESLs: Clear and Effective Communication, Self-Direction, and Creative and Practical Problem Solving. You will receive 1/2 Arts credit for this class.

World Language Department

The most effective way to learn a second language is to be exposed to it for a sustained period of time. Most students need a minimum of four years of study to become comfortable in that language. During the first two years, students are given many fundamentals; however, it is during the third and fourth years that they begin to gain command of the language. In addition to learning further basic elements, they are also given a chance to express themselves more freely with much of what they have learned. Therefore, the World Language Department encourages students to consider following at least a four-year course of study. Teachers of world languages focus on the principles set forth in the ACTFL Oral Proficiency guidelines and the National Standards so that our curriculum may help students function as accurately as possible in the situations they are most likely to experience. These guidelines, developed by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, consist of a series of descriptions of proficiency levels for speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture in a foreign language. They have been undertaken in response to a recommendation of the President’s Commission on Foreign Language and International Studies to establish “language proficiency achievement goals for the end of each year of study at all levels, with special attention to speaking proficiency.”

Exchange programs with students from other countries are offered by the World Language Department with support from faculty members in many other departments. These programs include three-week exchanges where students live with families in German, French, Spanish, and Japanese environments; and longer, academic-year experiences at our partner schools, or through third parties such as the Rotary. Requirements for admission and costs for the programs vary. Programs are publicized through oral and written announcements at the high school well in advance of the application deadlines. Interested students and parents should feel free to contact the TIE coordinator, Theresa Mazza-Anthony, tmazza@sbschools. net, for further information.

NOTE: Middle school students who have successfully completed French/ Spanish 8 have the advantage of being able to enroll in the 2nd or 3rd level at the high school; however, no high school credit is awarded for middle school courses.


Courses:

        Grade                No.        Course

9-12                 501         Spanish 1

9-12                 502         Spanish 2

9-12                 503         Spanish 3

10-12                 506         Spanish 4

11-12                 515         Spanish 5

11-12                 516         Spanish 6

9-12                 510         French 1

9-12                 512         French 2

9-12                 513         French 3

9-12                 517         French 4

11-12                 518        French 5

11-12                 519         French 6

9-12                 531         German 1

10-12                 532         German 2

10-12                 533         German 3

12                534        German 4

9-12                 541         Latin 1

10-12                 542        Latin 2

10-12                 543         Latin 3

11-12                544         Latin 4

9-12                 560        Japanese 1

10-12                 561         Japanese 2

10-12                562        Japanese 3

10-12                 563         Japanese 4

Spanish 1

Course 501: 1 credit

Students learn why it is important to understand another culture and how one can use Spanish to enrich one’s life outside the classroom. This course is an introduction to the language and culture of the Spanish- speaking world. A high level of student participation is expected through the use of materials and activities designed to enable the student to use the language for communication. Special emphasis is placed on the national standards for communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Spanish 2

Course 502: 1 credit

Students learn: 1) how cultural legacies shape behavior and world views in the multiple countries and regions where Spanish is spoken; 2) how knowing a world language enhances career opportunities; 3) how learning another language increases understanding of one’s native language. This course is a continuation of previous courses. Emphasis is placed on helping the student to communicate orally according to the basic national standards. Continued guided practice on grammatical structures and vocabulary expansion is used to increase novice-level proficiency in all skill areas.

Spanish 3

Course 503: 1 credit

Students learn: 1) that the world is moving toward a global community; 2) it is increasingly important to attain proficiency in another world language; 3) to engage in conversations, interpret authentic materials, and present concepts in another language. This course is a continuation of Spanish, presenting the more complex structures of intermediate Spanish, increasing the student’s communicative vocabulary, and expanding the broad cultural themes of Spanish. Students use all simple tenses. This class is taught primarily in Spanish.

Spanish 4

Course 506: 1 credit

Students learn that the study of a world language not only serves as a vehicle to explore foreign cultures and ways of thinking, but also as a frame of reference for better understanding English and American “cultures” by comparison. This is a continuation of the Spanish 3 program. The emphasis is placed on the study of more advanced grammatical topics. Rapid acquisition of active and passive vocabulary through selected readings is also a major objective of this course. Written compositions based on the reading selections are required. Students work throughout the year with materials which are specifically designed to correlate with the ACTFL oral proficiency guidelines and the national standards. Students are expected to communicate successfully in basic survival situations. The class is conducted in Spanish.

Spanish 5

Course 515: 1 credit

Spanish 5 focuses on developing communication skills in Spanish in an immersion environment. Students in Spanish 5 can expect to increase their vocabulary, as well as their oral and written proficiency levels, through small-group work and conversation, while speaking and hearing Spanish 100% of the time. Topics of study are the future, travel, food and dining, and the natural world.

Spanish 6

Course 516: 1 credit

Spanish 6 focuses on developing high-level communication skills in Spanish in an immersion environment. Students in Spanish 6 can expect to increase their vocabulary, as well as their oral and written proficiency levels through small-group work and conversation, while speaking and hearing Spanish 100% of the time. Topics of study are identity, urban- rural living, art appreciation, media in the contemporary world, and Mesoamerican civilization.

French 1

Course 510: 1 credit

Students learn that it is important to participate in a global community where basic needs are expressed and met and information is exchanged. The primary purpose of this course is to establish the importance of participating in a global community. Effective communication skills help students express their basic needs and have these needs met. Students learn the present and near future while focusing on vocabulary acquisition. Reinforcement of classwork is done through the exploration of a variety of cultural topics ranging from Francophone geography to regional French cuisine.

French 2

Course 512: 1 credit

Students learn about other traditions and customs to increase their awareness of cultural perspectives. They learn how cultural legacies shape behavior and world views in the multiple countries and regions where French is spoken. Special emphasis is placed on the national standards for communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. Most classwork is conducted entirely in French with emphasis on increasing conversational skills. The cultural focus builds on topics covered in previous courses with a greater focus on everyday life, Paris, the chateaux of France, and Francophone countries and regions.

French 3

Course 513: 1 credit

Students learn: 1) that the world is moving toward a global community; 2) it is increasingly important to attain proficiency in another world language; 3) to engage in conversations, interpret authentic materials, and present concepts in another language. This course is a continuation of previous French courses, presenting the more complex structures of intermediate French, increasing the student’s communicative vocabulary, and expanding the broad cultural themes of French 1 and 2. This class is taught primarily in French.

French 4

Course 517: 1 credit

Students learn that the study of a world language not only serves as a vehicle to explore foreign cultures and ways of thinking, but also as a frame of reference for better understanding English and American “cultures” by comparison. This is a continuation of the French 3 program. The emphasis is placed on the study of more advanced grammatical topics. Rapid acquisition of active and passive vocabulary through selected readings is also a major objective of this course. Written compositions based on the reading selections are required. Students work throughout the year with materials which are specifically designed to correlate with the ACTFL oral proficiency guidelines and the national standards. Students are expected to communicate successfully in basic survival situations. The class is conducted in French.

French 5

Course 518: 1 credit

Students learn that literature and cinematography are vehicles for understanding universal themes (social class, racial identity, gender roles, philosophy, etc.) Much time is spent on increasing the students’ proficiency according to the ACTFL guidelines and national standards. Above all, at this advanced level, the aim is to perfect the students’ speaking as well as their writing ability. Students are exposed to many authentic, culturally rich experiences. Students will write short compositions, often through the acquisition of new French vocabulary. Emphasis is on group discussions, debates and small group presentations, often using multimedia. All classwork is in French.


French 6

Course 519: 1 credit

Students learn: 1) that the study of foreign cultures helps us better understand our own by comparison; 2) that cultural objectivity promotes tolerance and compassion; 3) what determines cultural identity. This course is equivalent to a second-year college course and is taught exclusively in French. It is intended for those students who have chosen to continue to develop their language proficiency in the four skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are prepared to analyze critically the form and content of authentic works, have discussions on current topics, write essays in different formats, and hold daily conversations, all in French.

German 1

Course 531: 1 credit

Students learn that it is important to participate in a global community where basic needs are expressed and met and information is exchanged. The primary purpose of this course is to establish the importance of participating in a global community. Effective communication skills help students express their basic needs and have these needs met. Students learn basic tenses while focusing on vocabulary acquisition. Reinforcement of classwork is done through the exploration of a variety of cultural topics.

German 2

Course 532: 1 credit

Students learn about other traditions and customs to increase their awareness of cultural perspectives. They learn how cultural legacies shape behavior and world views in the multiple countries and regions where German is spoken. Special emphasis is placed on the national standards for communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. Most classwork is conducted entirely in German with emphasis on increasing conversational skills. The cultural focus builds on German 1 with greater focus on everyday life: shopping, going to movies, mailing a letter, buying a train ticket, and talking about past events.

German 3

Course 533: 1 credit

Students learn: 1) that the world is moving toward a global community; 2) it is increasingly important to attain proficiency in another world language; 3) to engage in conversations, interpret authentic materials, and present concepts in another language. The course is taught primarily in German. Upon completion of German 3, students will have learned all the basic German grammar. Emphasis is still primarily on the oral mastery of material, but students write compositions and Nacherzaehlungen regularly. Topics include travel, living in a German- speaking country, and how Germans celebrate holidays.

German 4

Course 534: 1 credit

Students learn that the study of a world language not only serves as a vehicle to explore foreign cultures and ways of thinking, but as a frame of reference for better understanding English and American “cultures” by comparison. Students are given a thorough review of German grammar. Students work throughout the year with materials which are specifically designed to correlate with the ACTFL oral proficiency guidelines and the national standards. Students are expected to communicate successfully in basic survival situations. Longer works of German literature are read and discussed including plays, short stories, opera selections, and articles on contemporary problems in the German speaking countries. Compositions are regularly written. German 4 is taught exclusively in German.

Latin 1

Course 541: 1 credit

Latin 1 provides the necessary background in the language to enable the student to read simple Latin. An attempt to understand how language (any language) operates is revealed through a comparison of a highly inflected language like Latin with a much less inflected language, English. In building vocabulary, the importance of English derivatives is constantly stressed. Basic grammar of declensions of nouns and conjugations of verbs plus other points of syntax are covered. The readings cover a broad overview of ancient Roman daily life and culture and form a basis for discussion of its influence on American and English culture. Additional cultural material includes the mythology of Ovid, Livy, and Vergil. Included are hands-on projects to learn about the culture of the ancient Roman world as well as to give students opportunities to acquire skills for real-world experiences. All work aligns with the Standards for Classical Language Learning.

Latin 2

Course 542: 1 credit

Latin 2 builds on the student’s knowledge from Latin 1 in an effort to read adapted Latin and gain perspective on Modern culture. This will be done through adapted source readings and modern readings based on daily life and popular mythology of the Romans; in particular, the entertainment and the great heroic myths. Grammar will focus on declining nouns and adjectives from all declensions and the conjugation of verbs in the present, perfect and future tenses; the passive and active voices; and the use of participles. Culture and history will be taught through readings which focus on the deeds of the Great Romans involved in the Punic Wars, the Rise and Fall of Caesar, and the creation of the Roman Empire. English vocabulary will be built through close attention to etymology and the use of prefixes and suffixes from Latin. Latin 2 addresses many of the common core principles in English Language Arts as well as various math and science standards.

Latin 3

Course 543: 1 credit

Latin 3 will focus on building the student’s ability to read adapted reading from native sources. Building on the topics covered in Latin 2, students will progress from the Ecce Romani text to using a variety of open-source readings on the myths and Deities of the Roman people. Grammar content will include advanced and more specific uses of all cases, the use of pronouns, and irregular adjectives in all declensions. Heavy emphasis will be placed on learning the hortatory and jussive subjunctive moods, as well as indirect commands, purpose and result clauses. Culture will cover the geography of the eastern Empire, and the heroes of the Republic, and Early Empire through level appropriate, adapted readings. Students will continue to investigate the English derivatives from Latin roots, suffixes, and prefixes, as well as a small selection of Greek derivatives also via roots, suffixes, and prefixes.

Latin 4

Course 544: 1 credit

Latin 4 will continue to build the student’s ability to read adapted selections from native sources, with a transition to reading original texts. Grammar content will include advanced uses of the ablative and dative cases, introduction of the passive mood, and review of the hortatory and jussive subjunctive moods. New material will include the uses of the subjunctive in the present and imperfect tenses. We will work towards the goal of translating authentic Latin in poetry, drama and prose. Culture will cover the geography of the Northern Empire with a focus on reading Caesar’s De Bello Gallico and selections of Livy’s History of Rome.

Japanese 1

Course 560: 1 credit

Students learn that it is important to participate in a global community where basic needs are expressed and met and information is exchanged. The primary purpose of this course is to establish the importance of participating in a global community. Effective communication skills help students express their basic needs, and have these needs met. This class is designed to get students speaking Japanese. Students can expect to be able to negotiate greetings; to describe family, hobbies, and daily routines. Students talk about food, prices, and schedules and learn two of three writing systems used in Japan (Hiragana and Katakana with 46 symbols each). There will be much emphasis on cultural context to support communication and interaction with native speakers.

Japanese 2

Course 561: 1 credit

Students learn about other traditions and customs to increase their awareness of cultural perspectives. They learn how cultural legacies shape behavior and world views in the multiple countries and regions where Japanese is spoken. Special emphasis is placed on the national standards for communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. This course expands the student’s communication skills in spoken Japanese and builds a basic (50-80) repertoire of Kanji. Topics from Japanese 1 are reviewed with more in-depth vocabulary and structures. New topics in language and culture include regional divisions and specialties within Japan, school subjects and grades, folktales, and language necessary for participating in travel and entertainment in Japan.

Japanese 3

Course 562: 1 credit

Students learn: 1) that the world is moving toward a global community; 2) it is increasingly important to attain proficiency in another world language; 3) to engage in conversations, interpret authentic materials, and present concepts in another language. This course expands the student’s intermediate communication intermediate skills in spoken Japanese and builds a larger repertoire of Kanji. Topics from Japanese 2 are reviewed with more in-depth vocabulary and structures. New topics in language and culture include target language survival level skills.

Japanese 4

Course 563: 1 credit

Students learn that the study of a world language not only serves as a vehicle to explore foreign cultures and ways of thinking, but also as a frame of reference for better understanding English and American “cultures” by comparison. This course is designed for students to review and reinforce previously learned structures of Japanese and acquire additional ones for successful oral and written communication. The course includes a thorough review of the writing systems introduced in Japanese 1, 2, and 3 and introduces a significant number of new kanji with an aim toward developing fluent reading comprehension of authentic written materials.

The International Experience (TIE)

Course 587: .25 credit

Four student foreign exchange programs are sponsored by the World Language Department with interdepartmental support from throughout the school. Students spend approximately 21⁄2 weeks living with families, attending our partner schools, and participating in activities planned by our hosts. Students participating in the French or Spanish programs must be enrolled at least in French 2 or Spanish 2. All TIE students must have and maintain a 2.5 grade point average. They must prepare reports on some aspect of life in the U.S. to be presented abroad. Regular attendance at orientation sessions and in classes at the foreign school is also required. Adherence to all TIE and SBHS program policies and the SBHS student handbook is required. Interested students submit an application form to a TIE selection committee in the spring preceding the school year in which students travel abroad.

Flexible Pathways: SBHS EXPLORE!

Stand out from the crowd by creating your own pathway while exploring careers, content, and projects that are meaningful to you. Students who want to personalize their educational pathway and step outside of the classroom are encouraged to consider one or more of the following available options.  All are credit bearing and/or have embedded proficiencies.

Project Lab

PROJECT LAB:  IDEAS TO ACTION

CourseBP 4    Credit: .5 - 1 (depending on experience)

Do you have an interest or idea that you’d love to pursue? Do you have a passion for something that you can’t find a course to fit? This flexible and student-driven course is for you! Students take any topic they are interested in learning more about and turn it into a project for school credit.  A teacher advisor guides you through the process of developing a project plan, individualized learning goals and evaluation methods. Students can connect with an expert in the local or global community, who acts as a project consultant. Through this course, you get to decide what you want to learn and how you want to learn it!

Career Development Center (CDC)

INTERNSHIP: Skills  

Course 33       Credits: .25

A course to prepare students for internships in local businesses and organizations. Focus is on writing resumes,interviewing, professional communication, self branding and giving and getting feedback. Student’s readiness for placement is determined by the level of engagement in this prep course and their demonstration of “work readiness skills”: Positive Work Ethic, Integrity, Self Representation, and Teamwork.

INTERNSHIP: Field Placement*

Course 36         Credits: .25

This course holds flexible space in your schedule for you to meet the 40 hours field based requirement for an internship experience. Students will be assisted in finding placements starting with informational interviews, shadow days, and the drafting of an Internship Agreement once an appropriate site is found. They will have to complete an Anthropology and Mentor Profile and gather other required components for an Apprenticing Portfolio. Mentors will be asked to provide mid-point and final feedback that will be reviewed at a meeting with CDC staff and the student present.  A portfolio review will function as the Culminating Activity/Assessment for this course.

*Prerequisite- students need to have successfully completed the Internship Skills course to placement.

SENIOR CHALLENGE

Course 035         Credit: .50

The Senior Challenge Project, is a way to bring your high school experience to a special conclusion and a chance for you to break new ground: to be curious, to take a risk, to expand your horizons, and to make a difference in your community.  You will also write a significant research paper on the topic of interest. This is a FANTASTIC experience for the types of writing you may be doing if you plan to go on to college. The research is a critical component to implementing a project as it allows us to focus on “solidarity versus charity.” The most meaningful and helpful interventions take the needs of the group served into consideration. What will your legacy be?

EXTENDED LEARNING OPPORTUNITY (ELO)

Course 0037               Credit: .5 - 1 (depending on experience)

Are you taking part in co-curricular activities or pursuit outside of the school day where you know you are learning a ton! You are able to gain proficiencies and school credit for this work.  An agreement is completed between you and an ELO Advisor to detail the logistics and learning goals.  Once this is in place you simply continue with your co-curricular activity/program and include reflections and evidence in your PLP/Portfolio.  

Big Picture

BIG PICTURE PROGRAM

Course BP70        Credit:  4-8 (depending on student’s schedule)

This innovative program has been at SBHS for over 10 years, allowing students to take full control over their education.  BPSB is part of a network of over 200 schools worldwide and allows you to build a flexible schedule that fits your interests and goals.  The work in BPSB is hands-on, through student-driven projects, community-based internships, service learning and travel. You will work independently within a supportive community of like-minded learners.  Teacher advisors provide the structures and supports for students to learn beyond the classroom.  Assessment is proficiency-based, through portfolios and exhibitions. Students can enter the program in any grade-level and can continue taking up to 4 SBHS or college classes.  

 *Admission process required:  see website for application

Dual Enrollment & Early College

DUAL ENROLLMENT

The Flexible Pathways Initiative, the Vermont Dual Enrollment program includes up to two college courses for eligible Vermont high school students. The Agency of Education has oversight of the dual enrollment program and will work with partner institutions of higher education to manage the delivery to students. Dual enrollment courses provided for in this legislation can be offered on a college campus and on-site at a participating high schools.

*See school counselor for information

*Students must get approval for their participation from their high school principal or designee

*Dual enrollment courses are put on the students’ SBHS transcript and the final grade is factored into the cumulative GPA

EARLY COLLEGE

Through the Flexible Pathways Initiative, Vermont's Early College Program (ECP) has made funds available to students accepted into full-time programs that are developed and operated by one of the Vermont State Colleges or an accredited private postsecondary school located in Vermont, and that are approved for operation by the Secretary of Education.

*See school counselor for information

*Students must get approval for their participation from their high school principal or designee

Vermont Virtual Learning Cooperative – Online Courses

The Vermont Virtual Learning Cooperative (VTVLC) offers SBHS students access to over 50 different free online courses. Courses, facilitated by licensed Vermont teachers and meet rigorous national standards .. Here is a sample of course offerings during the 2020-21 academic year: Algebra 1 and 2, Geometry, AP Statistics, AP Macroeconomics, Psychology, Marine Science, Physics, English 10, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, Game Design, Life Management Skills, and Personal Fitness.

For more information about VTVLC and the 2020-21 course catalog, talk with your school counselor or visit www.vtvlc.org.

Technical Center Programs

Students from South Burlington High School who wish to enroll in a technical program may do so at either the Burlington Technical Center or Center for Technology, Essex, depending on the chosen course. The tuition is paid for by the South Burlington School District and The State Department of Education. These programs are open to juniors and seniors with the exception of the Essex Pre-Tech Program, which is open to sophomores. Programs taught at the Burlington Technical Center are half day in length and may be held in either the morning or the afternoon. Programs taught at the Center for Technology, Essex are full-day programs, with students returning to SBHS for a class at the end of the day.

Any student or parent/guardian interested in learning more about a particular program should contact their school counselor at the high school. There is a special application that students need to complete  for these programs.

Burlington Technical Center

The Burlington Technical Center offers high school juniors and seniors the opportunity to develop the technical, academic, and employability skills needed to start careers either through employment after high school or by continuing on to college. BTC partners with area businesses and organizations to provide career exploration and develop technical and employability skills through job shadows, internships, or paid work experiences.

Students attend the Burlington Technical Center for 2 hours and 15 minutes, either in the morning or afternoon, and may earn a total of 3 credits each year toward graduation. They are able to return to their home schools for other academic courses. BTC programs are designed to be completed in two years, although some students attend for one year to begin an introduction to a career field. Many programs offer transcripted college credits through dual enrollment programs at Community College of Vermont and Vermont Technical College.

BTC Courses:

Auto Body RepairI

Auto Body RepairII

Automotive Science and Technology I

Automotive Science and Technology II

Aviation & Aerospace Technology I

Aviation & Aerospace Technology II

Criminal Justice I

Criminal Justice II

Culinary Arts I

Culinary Arts II

Design and Illustration I

Design and Illustration II

Digital Media Lab I

Digital Media Lab II

Health Sciences Academy I

Health Sciences Academy II

Human Services I

Human Services II

Programming & Computer Science I

Programming & Computer Science II

Welding & Metal Fabrication I

Welding& Metal Fabrication II

Visit the BTC website at http://www.burlingtontech.info for additional information and consult your school counselor to see how a BTC program might fit into your schedule.

Center for Technology, Essex

The Center for Technology, Essex (CTE) operates a full-day, flexible block schedule. This schedule allows juniors and seniors to complete a technical program in one year. Most students attend CTE daily, from 9:40 a.m. - 2:05 p.m. Every program offers two to three academic credits (math, science, English, social studies, etc.) as well as up to four elective credits toward high school graduation. In addition, some students take separate academic courses (e.g. algebra, chemistry) at CTE, Essex High School, or a local college to meet graduation or college entry requirements.

The primary objective of our CTE programming is to provide each student with specific knowledge, skills, and theory to enable him/her to either obtain employment upon completion of the program and/or to enter college. All eligible students participate in a “Career Work Experience” (internship) related to their technical field during their program at CTE. For successful students, this may evolve into a paid work (co-op) position. Industry credentials and/or licenses are affiliated with all programs.

College Connection: Many CTE programs qualify for dual enrollment credits that award eligible students college credit for their CTE program. These agreements include college transcripts and transferable credit. CTE students are also offered the opportunity to take other college courses for free or at a reduced rate at area colleges.

CTE Full-day Courses for 11th and 12th Grade Students:

Automotive Technology I & II

Building Technology: Residential

Building Technology: Systems

Childhood Education/Human Services I & II

Computer Animation and Web Page Design I & II

Computer Systems Technology I & II

Cosmetology Arts and Sciences I & II

Dental Assisting

Design and Creative Media I & II

Engineering/Architectural Design I & II

Health Informatics

Natural Resources Technology: Mechanical Science

Natural Resources Technology: Forestry

Professional Foods I & II

CTE Full-day Courses for 10th Grade Students:

Pre-Tech Explorations - Health & Human Services

Pre-Tech Education: Building Arts and Small Engine Systems

Pre-Tech Explorations: Information Technology, Design, Engineering, and Arts

Pre-Tech Explorations: Natural Resources

Pre-Tech Explorations: Professional Foods & Hospitality

Visit the CTE website at http://www.gocte.org for program/ curriculum details.

Special thanks to

Alyssa Cady (‘22) for designing this year’s front cover and

 Aria Austin (‘22) for designing the back cover


[1] Although school personnel will make every effort to communicate with students and families, it is the student’s responsibility to insure that requirements for graduation are met.

[2] When a student takes a course not needed to meet graduation requirements, typically at an institution of higher education for academic enhancement, the transcript of the college or university shall be sole evidence of the student’s advanced standing and will not appear on the SBHS transcript. The exception to this is that any course taken through the Vermont Dual Enrollment Program will appear with a grade on the high school transcript.

[3]team-taught for Health & English credit; meets Health graduation requirement

[4] to include independent credit (led by qualified instructor) and athletics

[5] to be a fitness-based class that would incorporate activity-based units

[6] Alternating year course next offered in the 2020-2021 school year

[7] Jazz Explorations, Concert Band, and Mixed Chorus will be offered as one-credit courses for a block period of time (80 minutes). These three courses will be offered at the same time, making it possible for students to enroll in two courses for .5 credit each. For students who enroll in two of these courses, each group would meet for a single 40-minute class period.

[8] Jazz Ensemble, Symphonic Band, and Concert Chorus will be offered as one credit courses for a block period of time (80 minutes). These three courses will be offered at the same time, making it possible for students to enroll in two courses for .5 credit each. For students who enroll in two of these courses, each group would meet for a single 40-minute class period.