Kindergarten Math At Home Activities

Counting and Cardinality

  • Find objects you can count at home. (Shoes, beans, legos, books, cars, the number of clothes going into laundry, etc.) Count the objects. Group them by five. Group them by 10.
  • Move and count. How many groups of 10 movement activities can you do? Can you get to 100? Can you go higher? Below are some examples:
  • Do 10 jumping jacks.
  • Do 10 arm circles.
  • Hop 10 times.
  • Walk forward 10 steps.
  • Walk backward 10 steps.

  • Use comparative language to group objects. Put objects into two groups and count and compare how many in a group (Example- I have 4 forks and 5 spoons. I have more spoons than forks. I have less forks than spoons OR use the term equal if they are the same).
  • Practice counting on by starting with a given number (other than one). Count on from that number. Repeat. (Example- Start at 12 and count on, start at 36 and count on, etc.)
  • Line up at least 4 toys or objects and tell which item is first, next, beside, between, and last. Rearrange the objects and repeat. You can also rearrange the objects to practice the positional words: above, below, under, on, in, in front of, behind.
  • Practice writing your numbers 1-20. Can you make rainbow numbers using different colors of crayons?

Measurement and Data

  • Together with your child create a yes/no question. (Example: Do you like ice cream?) Ask friends & family.  Record the data and analyze it. (Sample in appendix) Examples of ways to analyze...What do people like most vanilla or chocolate? Which kind did people like least? How many more people liked ___________ than ____________? Together create other questions for your family & friends and then analyze the data you gather.
  • Use a shoe and find  at least 2-3 objects that are longer and shorter than the shoe. Order the objects from longest to shortest.  
  • Gather several shoes. Put them in order from longest to shortest. Now put them in order from shortest to longest.
  • Choose two objects. Compare the measurement of two objects (Use language like this: lighter than, heavier than, longer than, shorter than). Examples of objects…. 2 different food boxes, toys, etc....

Geometry

  • Go on a shape walk at your house. What shapes do you see? Name each shape. Record/Draw them on a sheet of paper.
  • Describe the shapes of simple objects around your house. (Example: Our table top is a circle, Our TV screen is a rectangle, etc...)
  • Collect items and put them into groups of 2 dimensional (2D) or 3 dimensional (3D) shapes. (Example of 2D shapes: circles, triangles, rectangles, squares, hexagons) (Examples of 3D shapes: spheres (a ball), cone (traffic cone), cylinder (a can of beans), & cube (dice)).

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • Make a tower with 10 objects (blocks, Legos, cans). Decompose (break) the tower into 2 smaller parts. Tell how many objects are in each part and how many objects there were all together. Put the tower back together and break it in a different place. Repeat several times.  
  • Use stuffed animals to act out a story problem. (Example: Three teddy bears came to the park. Two more joined. How many bears are at the park?  3 baby dolls were on the chair, I took one off. How many dolls are on the chair?)
  • Show ways to make a number. Using forks and spoons, make the number 5.  How many forks do you have? How many spoons? How many different combinations can you make? (Example:  I have 3 forks.  I have 2 spoons.  I have 5 all together. OR I have 4 forks and 1 spoon.  I have 5 altogether.)  Choose another number from 1-10 and repeat.

Movement and Math

  • Click the words “click here” to access a number and movement activity. Roll the di (one dice). Complete the movement activity that matches the number you rolled. Example - If you roll a 3, jog in place or take a lap in an open area like a hallway. Be sure there is a clear path for you to jog. Repeat.

First Grade Math At Home Activities

Number and Operations in Base 10

  • Count collections of objects (cars, Legos, buttons,etc). How many groups of tens can you make?
  • Represent numbers 1-120 using words, numbers, pictures and objects. Write your numbers as high as you can go. How do you spell the number word for 100?  Can you draw groups of 10 circles until you reach 120? Choose a number, write that number every way you can (Example: 18, eighteen, ******************)
  • Play a number game.  Choose any number. Tell what number is 1 more/1 less.  Tell a number that is 10 more/10 less. Repeat with a new number.  Reference the 120 chart if needed. (See appendix).
  • Choose a 2 digit number. Starting with that number, do jumping jacks adding 10 with each jump. ( Example: 24, 34, 44, 54).
  • Count by 10s up to a given multiple of 10. Example - Count saying 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 while, jumping, hopping, skipping, touching toes, etc. Can you make it to 150 with the same exercise?  How about with different exercises?

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • Draw a number line. Count on from a given number. Next, count back from a given number. Example - Start with 4 and count on to 10. Count 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. Next, start with 9, and count back to zero (8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0). Number line example to draw:

 

  • Play an Addition game. Collect a small pile of objects (cereal, pennies, Legos, etc).  Split the objects into three groups. Say or write an equation to represent the groupings of objects. For example, “I have 16 beans. I can split the beans into groups of 5, 7, and 4. So, 5+7+4=16.” Put the piles back together and split the objects again in a different way. Repeat until you’ve found as many combinations as possible!

Measurement and Data

  • Create a survey question and collect data from friends and family in a tally chart. Examples of survey questions include: What is your favorite __________ (example - holiday)? How do you get home from school? Interpret (ask and answer questions about) the data. Example - I noticed that more family members chose Christmas as their favorite holiday.
  • Collect data by sorting objects around the house by category (cereal, toys, clothes, etc). Interpret (ask and answer questions about) the data. For example, I have 7 shirts and 9 socks.  How many pieces of clothing do you have altogether? How many more socks do you have than shirts?  
  • Choose an appropriate non-standard unit (pennies, cereal, footsteps, etc.) and measure the lengths of objects around the house.
  • Discuss the importance of measurement in everyday life. For example, discuss how at the doctor’s office, the doctor measures the height, weight, and temperature of a patient.  
  • Measure a jump! Mark a starting point on the ground and jump forward and mark the landing point. Select an appropriate non-standard unit and measure the length of the jump. Jump two more times and measure the length of each jump using the same non-standard unit.
  • Compare the three jumps using vocabulary such as “shortest” and “longest.”
  • Create a schedule for a perfect day. Draw clocks to show the times for each event.  
  • Write and illustrate a story about a town where time doesn’t exist. For example, being able to play with a friend without having a time limit. Share the story with family members!  
  • Draw a clock to show a time that represents a favorite time of day. Share the clock with family members and discuss the importance of that time.  

Geometry

  • Go on a 2-dimensional shape scavenger hunt around the house. Draw the shapes you find. Count them. Compare the different amounts of shapes you found.  Example…. I found more _______________ than_______________.
  • Create an original shape museum! Collect and display 3-dimensional shapes found around the house in a shape museum. Examples include boxes, cans, balls, etc. Invite a family member to the shape museum and describe each shape.
  • Go on a partition hunt! Find real world objects that are partitioned/divided into equal parts. Examples include window panes, road ways, dressers, pizza, and sandwiches.  
  • Help with laundry! Fold towels into halves and quarters. Discuss the change in shape and size of the towel.

Movement and Math 

  • Click the words “click here” to access a number and movement activity. Roll a set of dice. Complete the movement activity that matches the number you rolled on each di (one dice). Example - If you roll a 3 on one di, jog in place or take a lap in an open area like a hallway. Be sure there is a clear path for you to jog. Next, complete the activity that matches the number on the second di. After round 1, repeat the step while rolling the dice again.  

Second Grade Math Take Home Activities

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • Show different strategies to add and subtract numbers from 0-20. Use playing cards (1-10) to collaborate with friends or family members to practice adding or subtracting numbers. (See appendix for cards 1-10).
  • Find odd and even numbers in the environment (ex. at the grocery store, at home, in the neighborhood, magazines or newspapers). Tell why it is an odd or even number.  
  • Write an addition or subtraction word problem and teach a family member a new strategy to solve it.  
  • Create “compare” word problems using experiences at home. (Example of a “compare” word problem:  Jon and Sam were practicing jumping.  

Jon jumped 23 inches. Sam jumped 35 inches.  How many more inches did Sam jump than Jon?)

  • Create a math game: Draw pictures of objects on paper or flash cards up to the number 10. Pick two cards, decide whether to add or subtract, and create a number sentence. Create word problems to match the number sentences. Example - If you picked a 7 and a 4, you could choose to add them. The word problem could be: I found 7 pennies before lunch. Then I found 4 pennies after dinner. How many pennies did I find all together?
  • Use small household items (macaroni, cookies, toothpicks, cotton balls, etc.) to make rectangular arrays (a set of objects arranged in equal rows and columns).
  • Use playing cards (1-10), dice, etc. to add or subtract numbers mentally to practice fluency. Example - If you chose a 4 and an 8 quickly say the sum. If you can’t say it quickly. Think of ways to decompose and add. For example, 4 can be decomposed to 2 and 2. Think...2 and 2 and 8 to add next. 8 and 2 is 10, by adding 2 more you get 12...so, 8 and 4 is 12 (8 + 4= 12).

Number and Operations in Base 10

  • Jump rope or hop while counting forwards by 1s, 5s and 10s to practice fluency. Then, jump rope or hop counting by 2s, 5s, 10s and 20s.
  • Practice counting by tens from any 3-digit number. Example - 240, 250, 260, 270...
  • Look at nutrition labels and explain how to compare the different categories.  
  • Use dice to generate 3-digit numbers and discuss place value strategies to make the largest or the smallest number.  
  • Play a game of mental math. Identify a number between 100-900 and metally add or subtract 10 or 100 from your identified number. Repeat.
  • Practice solving addition and subtraction problems using materials found at home (cereal, pasta, beans, popcorn, beads). Determine how to use those materials to compose or decompose a ten (glue a set of 10 Cheerios™ on a popsicle stick to represent a ten). Roll two dice to generate 2-digit numbers (if you roll a 6 and a 3, you can make the numbers 36 or 63. Then, roll the dice again to make another 2-digit number). Decide whether to add or subtract. Analyze to determine if it is necessary to compose or decompose a ten when solving the problem.  
  • Gather household items to create and represent addition and subtraction equations (13 toy cars + 12 toy trucks = how many vehicles?)  
  • Look at the newspaper or online for the sports scores. Write an equation to tell the sum of the points scored or write an equation to tell the difference between the two scores.
  • Use chalk, markers, crayons, etc. to draw a number line with equal spacing and use it to solve addition and subtraction problems.
  • Practice counting combinations of bills and coins that equal the same amount. Explain why the sets are equal. Example: Forty-three cents can be made with 1 quarter, 1 dime, 1 nickels and 3 pennies. Or, forty-three cents can be made with 1 quarter, 3 nickels and 3 pennies.
  • Practice identifying and counting different coins. Create your own store at home. Make a price tag for each item. Round 1 - Make the money amounts for each item. Round 2 - Make the money amounts for each item in a different way.    

Measurement and Data

  • Think about measuring distances. Roll dice 2 times. Each roll will be the distance a friend of family member jumped. Compare the distances by creating an equation. Example - Jack jumped 10 inches. Jill jumped 12 inches. The equation could be 12 inches - 10 inches equals 2 inches. Jill jumped 2 inches further than Jack. Repeat 3 times comparing and writing equations for each time.    
  • Practice telling time to the nearest five minutes. Keep a log of what you’re doing during the following times. Write the time in more than one way. Times: 11:15 am, 2:45 pm; 4:30 am; 6:25 pm. Draw the time as it would appear on both digital and analog clocks..  
  • Practice telling and writing time in different ways (8:45 can also be said as quarter ‘til nine, eight forty-five, or forty-five minutes after eight).
  • Use the paper ruler (See appendix) to measure at least 6 items around your house to the nearest inch. Record your findings on a plain sheet of paper.  

Geometry

  • Look for examples of items in the environment that are partitioned into equal shares. Some examples may be found in your kitchen, in the grocery store, at sporting events, or in magazines.  
  • Look around the community or in your home for objects that contain 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional shapes. Discuss the attributes.  
  • Construct shapes using play-dough, clay, toothpicks, pipe cleaners, etc. and identify the attributes.  
  • Find and cut out 2-dimensional shapes (triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, and hexagons) from magazines, the newspaper or grocery store sale papers. Put the shapes together to make a picture. Count how many of each shape were in the picture.  
  • Create a geometry riddle for a family member. For example: “I have 4 sides and 4 corners. What shape am I?”  
  • Classify shapes from books, magazines, and the internet as 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional. Explain how to classify the shapes and figures.  
  • Locate a 3-dimensional shape at home. Describe the shape using the following vocabulary...faces, edges, and vertices.

Movement and Math

  • Click the words “click here” to access a number and movement activity. Roll a set of dice. Complete the movement activity that matches the number you rolled on each di (one dice). Example - If you roll a 3 on one di, jog in place or take a lap in an open area like a hallway. Be sure there is a clear path for you to jog. Next, complete the activity that matches the number on the second di. After round 1, repeat the step while rolling the dice again.  

Appendix

Yes/No Recording Sheet

Question____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

Yes

No

Five Frames

Ten Frames

Deck of Cards/Playing Cards

 

        

Manipulatives

Alternative to use in place of objects like beans or macaroni. Cut them apart and use them to help solve some of the problems.

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Sample 2D and 3D Shapes

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