Expedition Content Map Overview for Manzanita SEED 2014-2015

Grade

Topic

Topic

Topic

Topic

TK

Social Studies:

My family and I

All About Me

Social Studies:

Important Americans:

President Obama, Martin Luther King, Cesar Chavez, and Rosa Parks

America the Beautiful

K

Social Studies:

Family and Family Roles

My Family/Mi familia

Science:

Trees and Animals Two by Two

Tree Homes

Science/Social Studies:

Bird Behavior, Adaptations and How Human Behavior Affects Wildlife at Lake Merritt

Birds of Lake Merritt

1st

Science:

Plants and Animals

The Ground Beneath My Feet

Science:

Air and Weather

Under the Weather

2nd

Science and Social Studies:

Cycles of Life

Bugs Made my Pizza

Science:

Balance and Motion

Round and Round, Up and Down

Science:

Pebbles, Sand, and Silt

Once Upon A Rock

3rd

Science/Social Studies:

Structures of Life, Adaptations and Ohlone Life

For Everything: Turn, Change, Adapt--There is a Reason

Science/Social Studies:

Matter and Energy and Conserving Energy Resources in our Neighborhood

Energy is All Around Us

Science/Social Studies:

Sun, Moon, and Stars and the Ethics of Space Exploration

Planets, and Moons, and Stars, Oh My!

4th

Social Studies and Science:

 Gold rush, migration, Rock Cycle, weathering.

Minerals and Migration

Science:

Magnetism and Electricity

The Engineering Challenge!

Social Studies & Science:  

The Californios, the Missions, and Ohlone Life with Magnetism and Electricity

Magnetic California!

Science and Social Studies:

Environments, energy, matter, decomposition.

El medio ambiente

5th

Science:

Living Systems

La biología

Science:  

Mixtures and Solutions

La experimentación en acción

Science/Social Studies:

The Water Cycle, Managing Water Resources and Environmental Justice

The Water Planet

Declaracion de los Derechos Humanos - Esperanza Renace

Social Studies:  

Activists who recognize injustice and address the need for change

Changemakers

Transitional Kindergarten:  Detailed Expedition Content Map

Topic/ Content

Social Studies:

My family and I

All About Me

Social Studies:

Important Americans:

America the Beautiful

Case Studies

Me in our School Community

Me at Home

President Obama

Martin Luther King

Cesar Chavez

Rosa Parks

Guiding Question(s)

What makes me special?

How does my body work?

What does my body need?

How am I at school?

  Who else is at school with me?

How am I at home?

  How is my neighborhood special?

What makes someone an American hero/heroine?

How can Americans make America more beautiful?

What can we learn from these beautiful Americans?

Why should we teach others about these beautiful Americans?

Content  Standards and Long-term Learning Targets

(Science and Social Studies)

Life Sciences:

LS.2.a I can observe and describe similarities and differences in the appearance and behavior of animals

LS.2.b I can describe when stories sometimes give plants and animals attributes they do not really have.

LS.2.c I can describe the parts of a person or animal (arms, legs, eyes, etc).

Social Studies:

K.4 I can compare and contrast the locations of people, places, and environments and describe their characteristics.

K.4.1I can describe the locations of objects using the terms near/far, left/right, and behind/in front.

K.4.2 I can locate general areas in historical legends and stories.

K.4.4 I can collaborate to make maps and models of neighborhoods.

K.4.5 I can locate and describe the school’s layout, environs, and the jobs people do there.

Social Studies:

K.6. I can explain how history relates to events, people, and places of other times.

K.6.1 I can describe why people and events  are honored, including the human struggles that were the basis for the events.

K.6.2 I can describe the triumphs in American legends and historical accounts.

k.6.3 I can describe how people lived in earlier times and how their lives would be different today.

Reading Standards and Long-term Learning

Targets:

● Informational Text

● Literature

R.I..1 I can ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

R.I.2 I can identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

R.I.7 I can describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts).

R.I.9 I can identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

R.I.10 I can actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

R.I. 1 I can ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

R.I.2 I can identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

R.I.3 I can describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

R.I.7 I can describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts).

R.I. 8 I can identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.

R.I.9 I can identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

R.I.10 I can actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

Anchor Texts

What I Like About Me! by Allia Zobel Nolan and Miki Sakamoto

All About Me by Lynn Burwash and Cie McMullin

National Geographic Kids Look and Learn:  All About Me

My Neighborhood:  Places and Faces by Brandon Reibeling

Helpers in My Community by Bobbie Kalman

Of Thee I Sing:  A Letter to My Daughters by Barack Obama and Loren Long

Who is Barack Obama? by Roberta Edwards and Nancy Harrison

A Picture Book of Martin Luther King, Jr. by David A. Adler and Robert Casilla

I am Martin Luther King, Jr. (Ordinary People Change World)by Brad Meltzer and Christopher Eliopoulous

Martin’s Big Words:  The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Doreen Rappaport and Bryan Collier

Harvesting Hope:  The Story of Cesar Chavez by Kathleen Drull and Yuyi Morales

A Picture Book of Cesar Chavez by David A. Adler and Michael S. Adler

Rosa by Nikki Giovanni and Bryan Collier

I am Rosa Parks (Ordinary People Change World) by Brad Meltzer and Christopher Eliopoulous

If a Bus Could Talk:  The Story of Rosa Parks by Faith Ringgold

Writing Standards and Long-term Learning Targets

W.2.I can draw and write (informational text) about the topic.

W.5 I can respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen my writing.

W.7 I can explore books by the same author and express opinions about them.

W.8 I can remember information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

W.1 I can draw and write about the book we are reading and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is...).

W.2 I can draw and write (informational text) about the topic.

W.3 I can draw and write about an event or a series of events and what I thought about what happened.

W.5 I can respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen my writing.

W.7 I can explore books by the same author and express opinions about them.

W.8 I can remember information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

Writing Formats/ Modes

Dictating/Interactive Writing to create charts and posters

Guided writing for labeling and class books

Dictation and/or Independent writing for class books and posters

Dictating/Interactive Writing to create charts and posters

Guided writing for labeling and class books

Dictation and/or Independent writing for class books and posters

Product/

Product Format

Self Portrait

3-D Neighborhood Map

Portraits of Important Americans

My Dream Poster

High-Quality Work:

  • Complexity

  • Craftsmanship

  • Authenticity

Self-Portrait

Craftsmanship:

  • attention to accuracy, detail, beauty
  • multiple drafts

Authenticity:

  • connects academic standards with local people and places
  • the work matters to students

3-D Neighborhood Map

Complexity:

  • transfer of understanding to new contexts (shapes and measurement)

Craftsmanship:

  • attention to accuracy, detail, beauty
  • multiple drafts

Authenticity:

  • formats and standards from the professional world
  • work matters to students and the larger school community

Portraits

Complexity:

  • exceeds the expectations defined by grade level standards
  • connects to the big concepts

Craftsmanship:

  • attention to accuracy, detail, beauty
  • multiple drafts

Authenticity:

  • connects academic standards with local people and places
  • the work matters to students

My Dream Poster

Craftsmanship:

  • attention to accuracy, detail, beauty
  • multiple drafts

Authenticity:

  • connects academic standards with local people and places
  • the work matters to students and the community

Art Infusion

  • Directed drawing using shapes
  • Perfecting details using lines, curves, and shading
  • Mastering watercolor wash techniques
  • Cutting and assembling 3-D model pieces
  • Estimating and measuring to make buildings and streets to scale
  • Directed drawing using shapes
  • Perfecting details using lines, curves, and shading
  • Collecting and composing images for a collage

Experts, Fieldwork, Service

Interviewing members of the school community

Fieldwork exploring different areas of the school

Picking up trash and recyclables around the school

Community walk to pick up trash and recyclables

Speaking and/or Listening

Opportunities

Interviewing partners, the teacher, and other school community members.

Whole Class Academic Discussions following read alouds, interviews of school community members, and to debrief fieldwork

Whole Class Academic Discussions following read alouds.

Small group Academic Discussions to share opinions with others.

Small group collaboration to gather ideas for My Dream Posters

Kindergarten:  Detailed Expedition Content Map

Topic/ Content

Social Studies:

Family and Family Roles

My Family/Mi familia

Science: Wood and Paper

Trees and Animals Two by Two

Arbol, mi arbol/Tree Homes

Science/Social Studies:

Bird behavior and adaptations and How Human behavior affects wildlife at Lake Merritt

The Birds of Lake Merritt

Case Studies

Family Members

Family Roles

A Loving Family

Apple tree and Apples

Oak tree

Redwood tree

Pine Tree

Squirrels

Possums

Ducks

Geese

Pelicans

Egrets

Flamingos

Guiding Question(s)

What makes us a family?

Why do we belong together?

What does it mean to love?

Who cares for me?

Why are trees special?

Why should we protect trees?

How do trees help us and other animals?

What do birds need to survive?

How can we help birds be healthy?

Why is it important that birds eat healthy foods?

Content Standards and Long-term Learning Targets: (Science,Social Studies, Math)

Social Studies:

K.1.1 I can follow rules and know the consequences of breaking them.

K.3 I can match the work that people do with the names of the jobs.

NG Science Standards:

K-LS1-1 I can observe and describe what happens in the natural world when I answer a question.

K-ESS2-2 I can use evidence to explain how plants and animals can change the environment to meet their needs.

Math:        

K.MP.2 I can reason abstractly and quantitatively.

K. MP.4 I can create models to explain math.

K.CC.1-3 I can use number names correctly to count in sequence.

K.MD.1 I can describe the measureable attributes of objects (length, width, weight, etc.)

K.MD 2 I can compare two objects with a common measurable attribute to see which has mor or less of the attribute, and describe the difference.

K.MD.3 I can classify objects into given categories and sort the categories by count.        

NG Science Standards:

K-LS1-1 I can observe and describe what happens in the natural world when I answer a question.        

K-ESS2-2 I can use evidence to explain how plants and animals can change the environment to meet their needs.

Social Studies:        

K.4 I can compare and contrast the locations of people, places, environments and describe their characteristics.        

Math:.

K.MP.2 I can reason abstractly and quantitatively.

K. MP.4 I can create models to explain math.

K.CC.1-3 I can use number names correctly to count in sequence.

K.MD.1 I can describe the measureable attributes of objects (length, width, weight, etc.)

K.MD 2 I can compare two objects with a common measurable attribute to see which has mor or less of the attribute, and describe the difference.

K.MD.3 I can classify objects into given categories and sort the categories by count.        

Reading Standards and Long-term Learning Targets:

  • Informational Text
  • Literature

RL & RI.1 I can ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

RL.2 I can retell familiar stories with key details.

RI.3 I can describe the connections in a text.

RL & RI.7 I can describe the relationship between illustrations and text.

RI.9 I can identify the similarities and differences between 2 texts on the same topic.

RL & RI.10 I can actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

RL & RI.1 I can ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

RL.2 I can identify characters, settings and major events in a story.

RL.5 I can recognize common types of texts (storybooks, poems, fantasy, realistic text)

RL & RI.7 I can describe the relationship between illustrations and text.

RI.3 I can describe the connections in a text.

RL & RI.10 I can actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

RL & RI.1 I can ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

RL.2 I can identify characters, settings and major events in a story.

RI.3 I can describe the connections in a text.

RL.5 I can recognize common types of texts (storybooks, poems, fantasy, realistic text)

RL & RI.7 I can describe the relationship between illustrations and text.

RI.3 I can describe the connections in a text.

RL & RI.10 I can actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

Anchor Texts

The Family Book by Todd Parr

Who’s in My Family by Robie H. Harris and Nadine Bernard Westcot

We Belong Together by Todd Parr

Weekly Poems and Songs by K teachers in English and Spanish

Big Book:  Apples

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

The Life Cycle of an Apple Tree by Linda Tagliaferro

A Tree is a Plant by Clyde Robert Bulla and Stacey Schuett

Possum Magic by Mem Fox

Opossums by Mary R. Dunn

Weekly Poems and Songs by K teachers in English and Spanish

Waddles by David McPhail

Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey

The Story about Ping by Marjorie Flack and Kurt Wiese

Weekly Poems and Songs by K teachers in English and Spanish

Writing Standards and Learning Targets

W.K.2 I can write and illustrate informational texts about a specific topic.

W.K.3 I can write about and illustrate a single event or a sequence of several loosely linked events and provide a reaction to what happened.

W.K.8 I can recall information from shared experiences to answer a question.

W.K.2 I can write and illustrate informational texts about a specific topic.

W.K.3 I can write about and illustrate a single event or a sequence of several loosely linked events and provide a reaction to what happened.

W.K.5 I can respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

W.K.8 I can recall information from shared experiences to answer a question.

W.K.1 I can write and illustrate opinion pieces about a topic or book. W.K.2 I can write and illustrate informational texts about a specific topic.

W.K.3 I can write about and illustrate a single event or a sequence of several loosely linked events and provide a reaction to what happened.

W.K.5 I can respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

W.K.8 I can recall information from shared experiences to answer a question.

Writing Formats/ Modes

Illustrated pages with informational text about my family

Friendly Letter for Thank you cards

Dramatic Play linked to realistic fiction writing with illustrations (interactive to independent)

Informational Essays for book pages;

Illustrations with captions for brochure;

Instructions for poster.

Product/

Product Format

  • Class Book: The Family Book
  • Class Book:  Me cuida ___ (___ Cares for Me)
  • Thank you cards:  to family members

  • Labelled illustration of the parts of an oak tree
  • Shape drawing of a squirrel
  • Labelled illustration of an opossum
  • Informational text with illustrations of an opossum
  • Individual Student Books:  Birds
  • Brochure:  How can we reduce our environmental impact
  • Poster:  Do’s and Don’t’s for Bird care at Lake Merritt

High-Quality Work:

  • Complexity

  • Craftsmanship

  • Authenticity

Complexity:

  • rigorous including higher-order thinking

Craftsmanship:

  • accuracy, detail, and beauty
  • rehearsals with critique (whiteboard versions)

Authenticity:

  • original, creative thinking and authentic personal voice and ideas
  • work matters to students and families

Craftsmanship:

  • accuracy, detail, and beauty
  • perseverance to refine work with critique from others.

Authenticity:

  • original, creative thinking and authentic personal voice and ideas
  • work matters to students and families

Complexity:

  • rigorous including higher-order thinking

Craftsmanship:

  • accuracy, detail, and beauty
  • rehearsals with critique (whiteboard versions)

Authenticity:

  • original, creative thinking and authentic personal voice and ideas
  • formats and standards from the professional world
  • work matters to students and families

Art Infusion

Shape drawing and composition for family portraits

Guided drawing to introduce lines, curves, and shading

Collage for collective construction of classroom tree

Exploration of using lines and curves in addition to basic shape drawing

Exploration of watercolor wash techniques

Mastery of lines, curves, and shading (independent detailed  illustrations of geese and other birds for Bird Book)

Watercolor wash techniques for Poster)

Experts, Fieldwork, Service

Interviews with family members

Schoolyard walk to identify, draw, and describe trees.

Neighborhood walk to discover different trees and the creatures living in them.

Neighborhood Birdwatching Walk;

Fieldwork at Lake Merritt;

Putting up Bird Care Do’s and Don’t’s at Lake Merritt

Handing out brochures to community members

Naturalist at Lake Merritt Rotary Club visit

Speaking and/or Listening

Opportunities

Whole class discussions based on anchor texts.

Presenting information from interviews with family members

Whole class discussions of information gained from anchor texts.

Small group discussions including teacher or other adult to debrief fieldwork

Presenting information following fieldwork.

Academic Discussions based on shared texts.

Presentations and explanations while distributing brochures

Engaging with the community while distributing posters

Performing Poems and Songs for the School community

1st Grade:  Detailed Expedition Content Map

Topic/ Content

Science:

Plants and Animals habitats, growth, and consumption

The Ground Beneath My Feet

Science:

Air and Weather

Under the Weather

Case Studies

Wheat

Worms

Pillbugs

Terrariums

Sun (weather and evaporation)

Clouds

Seasons

Guiding Question(s)

What do living things need to survive?

How do living things need each other?  

How does an animal’s habitat help it survive?

In what ways do humans experience air? How do humans use air?

How are the components of weather related?

How does weather affect humans?

Content Standards and Long-term Learning Targets (Science and Social Studies)

Life Science:

2.a. I can explain why different plants and animals inhabit different environments and have external features that help them thrive.

2.b. I can explain why both plants and animals need water, animals need food, and plants need light.

2.c. I can explain why animals eat plants or other animals for food and may also use plants or even other animals for shelter and nesting.

2.d. I can infer what animals eat from the shapes of their teeth.

2.e. I can explain how roots transport water and soil nutrients and green leaves make food from sunlight.

Investigation and Experimentation:

4.a. I can draw pictures showing some features of the thing being described.

4.b. I can record observations and data with pictures, numbers, or written statements.

4.c. I can record observations on a bar graph.

4.d. I can describe the position of objects by using two references (e.g., above and next to, below and left of).

4.e. I can make new observations if I find differences between the same object or phenomenon.

Earth Science:

3.a I can use simple tools (e.g., thermometer, wind vane) to measure weather conditions and record changes from day to day and across the seasons.

3.b. I can explain how the weather changes from day to day but that trends in temperature or of rain (or snow) tend to be predictable during a season.

3.c. I can explain how the sun warms the land, air, and water.

Investigation and Experimentation:

4. a. I can draw pictures that portray some features of the thing being described.

4.b.  I can record observations and data with pictures, numbers, or written statements.

4.c. I can record observations on a bar graph.

4.d. I can describe the relative position of objects by using two references (e.g., above and next to, below and left of).

4.e. I can make new observations when discrepancies exist between two descriptions of the same object or phenomenon.

Social Studies:

1.2.4 I can describe how location, weather, and physical environment affect the way people live, including the effects on their food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and recreation.

Reading Standards and Long-term Learning Targets

  • Informational Text
  • Literature

RI & RL.1 I can ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

RI.2 I can identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

RI.3 I can describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

RI.4 I can ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.

RI.6 I can distinguish between information from illustrations and text.

RI.7 I can use illustrations and details in a text to describe key ideas.

RI.9 I can identify basic similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

RI.10 I can read complex informational texts for grade 1.

RL 1.2 I can retell stories, including details, and the central message or lesson.

RL 1.3 I can describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

RL 1.5 I can explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information.

RL 1.7 I can use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

RL 1.9 I can compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

RL 1.10 I can read prose and poetry for grade 1.

RI & RL.1 I can ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

RI.2 I can identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

RI.4 I can ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.

RI.5 I can recognize and use text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.

RI.6 I can distinguish between information from illustrations and text.

RI.7 I can use illustrations and details in a text to describe key ideas.

RI.8 I can identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.

RI.9 I can identify basic similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

RI.10 I can read complex informational texts for grade 1.

RL 1.2 I can retell stories, including details, and the central message or lesson.

RL 1.3 I can describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

RL 1.4 I can identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

RL 1.5 I can explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information.

RL 1.6 I can identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.

RL 1.7 I can use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

RL 1.9 I can compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

RL 1.10 I can read prose and poetry for grade 1.

Anchor Texts

Worms by Planet Collection

Diary of a Worm by Doreen Cronin and Harry Bliss

I’m a Pillbug by Yukihisa Toduda

Mrs. Spitzer’s Garden by Edith Pattou

Weekly Poems and Songs by 1st grade teachers in English and Spanish

The Sun is my Favorite Star by Frank Asch

Snowy Fun under the Sun by N.S. Esther

The Cloud Book by Tomie dePaola

Clouds by Anne Rockwell and Frane Lessac

Weather Words and What they Mean by Gail Gibbons

One Rainy Weekend by Beatrix Gold

A Book of Seasons by Alice Provensen

Seasons by Blexbolex

Weekly Poems and Songs by 1st grade teachers in English and Spanish

Writing Standards and Long-term Learning Targets

W.1.1 I can write opinion pieces about the topic or book with evidence and a conclusion.

W.1.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts about a topic with supporting evidence and a conclusion.

W.1.5 I can focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen my writing as needed.

W.1.7 I can do research and then produce similar writing projects with my group (e.g., explore a number of "how-to" books on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions).

W.1.8 I can recall information from experiences or other sources to answer a question.

W.1.1 I can write opinion pieces about the topic or book with evidence and a conclusion.

W.1.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts about a topic with supporting evidence and a conclusion.

W.1.3 I can write narratives with two or more sequenced events, details about what happened, temporal words and a conclusion.

W.1.5 I can focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen my writing as needed.

W.1.7 I can do research and then produce similar writing projects with my group (e.g., explore a number of "how-to" books on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions).

W.1.8 I can recall information from experiences or other sources to answer a question.

Writing Formats/ Modes

Informational Writing with detailed labelled illustrations

Illustrated Opinion essays based on informational text

Product/

Product Format

Informational picture book about the growing and maintenance of plants on SEED’s campus

Tree for all seasons mixed media

Weather Survival Guide

High-Quality Work:

  • Complexity

  • Craftsmanship

  • Authenticity

Complexity:

  • exceeds the expectations of grade-level standards and challenges students throughout a long project.

Craftsmanship:

  • writing and illustrations are accurate, detailed, and beautiful
  • multiple drafts and peer/teacher editing

Authenticity:

  • standards from the professional world
  • work matters to students and the community

Complexity:

  • exceeds the expectations of grade-level standards and challenges students throughout a long project.

Craftsmanship:

  • writing and illustrations are accurate, detailed, and beautiful
  • multiple drafts and peer/teacher editing

Authenticity:

  • standards from the professional world
  • work matters to students and the community

Art Infusion

Directed shape drawing

Multiple drafts to improve control of lines, curves, and shading

Watercolor with ink

Mixed media tree for all seasons

Mastery of line and curve

Mixed media for labeled cloud posters

Watercolor and Ink for cityscape

Experts, Fieldwork, Service

Fieldwork on campus and at local nurseries.

Expert interview of school and family gardeners.

Service by tending campus plants

Fieldwork at the Exploratorium

Ice skating to experience a winter sport

Presenting Weather Survival Guide to the SEED Community

Speaking and/or Listening

Opportunities

Whole class science discussions

Small group guided and independent academic discussions with teacher or other adults.

Presentation of informational book to school community

Interviewing family about weather and the seasons

Whole class science discussions

Small group discussions following investigations and fieldwork

Presentation of Weather Survival Guide

2nd Grade:  Detailed Expedition Content Map

Topic/ Content

Science and Social Studies:

Cycles of Life

Bugs Made my Pizza

Science:

Balance and Motion

Round and Round, Up and Down

Science:

Pebbles, Sand, and Silt

Once Upon A Rock

Case Studies

Mealworms

Painted Lady Butterfly

Honey bees

Ladybugs

Simple and Complex Tools

Balance

Motion

Magnetism

Volcanic Rocks

Volcanoes

Fossils

Dinosaurs

Extinction theories

Guiding Question(s)

What makes an organism an insect?

How are life cycles different and the same?

How do plants and insects affect the environment?

How do we get the food we eat?

What factors affect the food supply?

How does our current food system affect different people?

What is balance? What is motion? How do different forces affect balance and motion? How do you measure motion? Why do people use tools?  How do you know if a tool is simple or complex? How do tools affect our lives? What is sound? How does sound travel? What is magnetism?

What makes a rock?  Where do rocks come from? How can rocks change?  How do people use rocks? How are living and non-living things in an environment impacted by geological events?  How do fossils tell us about the past? How are fossils formed? What can you infer about a dinosaur’s life by observing its remains?

Content Standards and Long-term Learning Targets (Science and Social Studies)

Life Science:

LS.2.a I can observe and describe the life cycle in order of a living organism.

LS.2.b I can describe how the offspring of a specific insect (mealworm, butterfly, ladybug) resemble their parents and one another.

LS.2.c I can carefully observe, describe, and illustrate the changes I observe in an organism (mealworm, butterfly) during its life cycle.

LS.2.d I can compare and contrast two or more specimens of the same organism and describe their attributes.

 

Social Studies:

2.4.1 I can describe food production and consumption long ago and today, including  the roles of farmers, processors, distributors, weather, and land and water resources.

Physical Science:

PS2.1  I can observe, measure and describe the motion of objects.

PS2.1a  I can describe the position of an object by locating it in relation to another object or to the background.

PS2.1b. I can describe an object’s motion by recording the change in position of the object over time.

PS2.1c I can explain that the way to change how something is moving is by giving it a push or a pull. The size of the change is related to the strength, or the amount of force, of the push or pull.

PS2.1e  I can explain how and why objects fall to the ground unless something holds them up.

PS2.1f  I can explain how magnets can be used to make some objects move without being touched.

PS2.1g I can describe how sound is made by vibrating objects in terms of pitch and volume.

Investigation and Experimentation:

IE2.4b.  I can measure length, weight, temperature, and liquid volume with appropriate tools and express those measurements in standard metric system units.

IE2.4e. I can construct bar graphs to record data, using appropriately labeled axes.

I&E2.4g I can follow oral instructions for a scientific investigation.

Earth Science:

ES2.3 I can explain that the Earth is made of materials that have distinct properties and provide resources for human activities.

ES2.3a. I can compare the physical properties of different kinds of rocks and know that rock is composed of different combinations of minerals.

ES2.3b. I can explain how smaller rocks come from the breakage and weathering of larger rocks.

ES2.3c I can explain how soil is made partly from weathered rock and partly from organic materials and that soils differ in their color, texture, capacity to retain water, and ability to support the growth of many kinds of plants.

ES2.3d. I can explain how fossils provide evidence about the plants and animals that lived long ago and that scientists learn about the past history of Earth by studying fossils.

Investigation and Experimentation:

IE2.4a I can make predictions based on observed patterns and not random guessing.

IE2.4c.         I can compare and sort common objects according to two or more physical attributes (e.g., color, shape, texture, size, weight).

IE2.4d. I can write or draw descriptions of a sequence of steps, events, and observations.

IE2.4f. I can use magnifiers or microscopes to observe and draw descriptions of small objects or small features of objects.

IE2.4g. I can follow oral instructions for a scientific investigation.

Reading Standards and Long-term Learning Targets:

2.RL & RI.1 I can ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 

                        

2.RI.2. I can identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.

                

2.RI.3 I can describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.

2.RI.4 I can determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.

2.RI.8 I can describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.                                 

RL & RI.2.10 I can read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 2–3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

RL & RI.2.1  I can ask and questions (who, what, where…)  to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. 

RI.2.2  I can identify the main topic of a multi-paragraph text as well as the focus of a specific paragraph in a text.

RI.2.7  I can explain how specific images (i.e. a diagram) contribute to and clarify a text.

RI.2.8 I can describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.

RI.2.9 I can compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.

RL & RI.2.10  I can read and comprehend informational texts in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

RL & RI.2.1 I can ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

RL.2.3 I can describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

RL.2.5 I can describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action.

RL.2.6 I can acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

RL.2.7 I can use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.

RL & RI.2.10 I can read and comprehend literature, including stories and poetry, in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

RI.2.2 I can identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.

RI.2.3 I can describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.

RI.2.4 I can determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.

RI.2.5 I can identify and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.

RI.2.6 I can identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

RI.2.8 I can describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.

RI.2.9 I can compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.

Anchor Texts

FOSS Science Textbook

Mealworms by Donna Schaffer

Mealworms: Raise them, watch them, see them change by Adrienne Mason

The Life Cycle of a Butterfly by Bobbie Kalman

Painted Lady Butterflies (Life Cycles) by Donna Schaffer

The Bees by DC Swain

The Very Quiet Cricket by Eric Carle

The Very Lonely Firefly by Eric Carle

The Very Clumsy CLick Beetle by Eric Carle

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 2nd grade teachers in English and Spanish

Weekly Poems and Songs by 2nd grade teachers in English and Spanish

FOSS Science Textbook

Big Books:

Balance and Motion (Sp)

Push and Pull (Sp)

Magnetism

Simple Machines

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 2nd grade teachers in English and Spanish

Weekly Poems and Songs by 2nd grade teachers in English and Spanish

FOSS Science Textbook

Peter and the Rock

Rocks:  Hard, Soft, Smooth, and Rough by Natalie M. Rosinsky

National Geographic Readers:  Rocks and Minerals by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld

Volcanoes by Seymour Simon

Volcanoes! (National Geographic Readers) by Anne Schreiber

The Magic School Bus Blows its Top:  A Book about Volcanoes by Gail Herman and Bob Ostrom

Big book of Dinosaurs by DK Publishing

Dinosaur Hunters by Kate McMullan and John R. Jones

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 2nd grade teachers in English and Spanish

Weekly Poems and Songs by 2nd grade teachers in English and Spanish

Writing Standards and Long-term Learning Targets:

W.2.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts with a topic, facts and definitions to develop points, and a concluding statement or section.

                                

W.2.4. I can produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. 

W2.1  I can write opinion pieces about a topic or book, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement.

W2.2  Write informative and explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

W2.3  Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

W2.5  I can focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

W2.6  I can use a variety of digital tool to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

W2.7  I can participate in shared research and writing projects.

W2.1  I can write opinion pieces about a topic or book, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement.

W2.2  Write informative and explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

W2.3  Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

W2.5  I can focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

W2.6  I can use a variety of digital tool to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

W2.7  I can participate in shared research and writing projects.

Writing Formats/ Modes

Published Books (Table of Contents, Recipe, Informational Text, Glossary)

ABC book format with detailed illustrations

Informational Essays with labeled detailed illustrations

Steps in a process

Realistic Fiction

Informational Essays with labeled detailed illustrations

Product/

Product Format

A Bug Made My Pizza (English) Recipe and food origin book

ABC book of Life Cycles (Spanish)

Insect collage (Eric Carle Study)

Investigation Steps in a process

Before, During, and after the Volcano Eruption Realistic Fiction

Super Herbivore or Carnivore

Dinosaur Encounter

Extinction Theory

Layers of the Earth pastel

3-scene Asteroid Strike pastel

High-Quality Work:

  • Complexity

  • Craftsmanship

  • Authenticity

Complexity:

  • rigorous: aligns with or exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards
  • prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts

Craftsmanship:

  • care and precision; attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty

Authenticity:

  • demonstrates the original, creative thinking of students
  • formats and standards from the professional world
  • work matters to students

Complexity:

  • prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts

Craftsmanship:

  • care and precision; attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty

Complexity:

  • rigorous: aligns with or exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards
  • prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts

Craftsmanship:

  • care and precision; attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty

Authenticity:

  • demonstrates the original, creative thinking of students
  • formats and standards from the professional world
  • work matters to students

Art Infusion

Watercolors of Insects,

Eric Carle Illustrator and author study, and technique for insect collage

Pizza collage for Book

Watercolor and ink for ABC Book

Watercolor and ink drawings for simple machines

Pastels technique for Core of the Earth

Pastels Before, During, After an asteroid struck the Gulf of Mexico.

Paper mache’ and clay sculpture for volcano

Line, curve, shading with pencils for paleontological dino part drawings

Experts, Fieldwork, Service

Beekeeper

Chabot Space and Science Center Environmental Science class

Walking field trip to local mercado

Walking field trip to observe insects

Service:  planting and maintaining a butterfly garden at SEED

Parent interviews

Chabot Space and Science Center

Chabot Space and Science Center; Paleontology Department at UC Berkeley; Neighborhood walk to see how rocks are used;

Interview of UC Berkeley Paleontology graduate student

Speaking and/or Listening

Opportunities

Interview and discussion with Bee keeper;

Interview and discussion with shopkeeper

Academic Discussions based on Complex texts in small groups and whole class

Academic Discussions based on Complex texts in small groups and whole class

Whole class and small group peer editing and rubricking discussions

Interview and discussion with graduate student

Academic Discussions based on Complex texts in small groups and whole class

Whole class and small group peer editing and rubricking discussions

3rd Grade:  Detailed Expedition Content Map

Topic/ Content

Science/Social Studies:

Structures of Life (Animal Adaptations) and How the Ohlone People adapted to and adapted their environment

For Everything: Turn, Change, Adapt--There is a Reason

Science/Social Studies:

Matter and Energy, and How we can save Energy and resources in our Neighborhood

Energy and Matter Matter

Science/Social Studies:

Sun, Moon, and Stars and the ethics of space travel and experimenting on animals

Planets, and Moons, and Stars, Oh My!

Case Studies

Crayfish

Landsnails

Ohlone People

Oakland 200 years ago (flora and fauna)

Sun

Renewable and Nonrenewable energy sources

Hybrid and Electric cars

Liquids, Solids and Gases

Sun

Moon and Moon Cycle

Mars

Jupiter

Pluto

Guiding Question(s)

What happens to living things when the environment changes?

How do people and environments change over time?

Why do people and environments change?

How do people and other living things adapt to their environment?

How did the Ohlone adapt and adapt to their environment?

How did Ohlone beliefs influence daily life?

How did Ohlone people adapt within their roles?

Where does energy come from?

How is energy converted? Where is energy stored?

How does energy travel?

Why should we conserve energy?

How are liquids, solids, and gases alike and different?

How can matter change?

Content Standards and Long-term Learning

Targets

(Science and Social Studies)

Life Science:

3.3 I can explain how adaptations in physical structure or behavior may improve an organism’s chance for survival.

3.3.a. I can explain how plants and animals have structures that serve different functions in growth, survival, and reproduction.

3.3.b. I can identify and discuss examples of diverse life forms in different environments, such as oceans, deserts, tundra, forests, grasslands, and wetlands.

3.3.c. I can explain how and why living things cause changes in the environment in which they live: some of these changes are detrimental to the organism or other organisms, and some are beneficial.

3.3.d. I can identify and discuss why when the environment changes, some plants and animals survive and reproduce; others die or move to new locations.

3.3.e. I can explain how and why some kinds of organisms that once lived on Earth have completely disappeared and that some of those resembled others that are alive today.

Social Studies:

3.1.1. I can identify geographical features in our local region (e.g., deserts, mountains, valleys, hills, coastal areas, oceans, lakes).

3.1.2. I can trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local region and modified the physical environment (e.g., a dam constructed upstream changed a river or coastline).

3.2 I can describe the American Indian nation in our local region long ago and in the recent past.

3.2.1. I can describe national identities, religious beliefs, customs, and various folklore traditions.

3.2.2. I can discuss the ways in which physical geography, including climate, influenced how the local Indian nations adapted to their natural environment (e.g., how they obtained food, clothing, tools).

3.2.3. I can describe the economy and systems of government and their relationship to federal and state governments.

3.2.4. I can discuss the interaction of new settlers (Spanish missionaries, Spanish, and Californios) with the already established Indians of the region.

Life Science:

3.3.c. I can explain how and why living things cause changes in the environment in which they live: some of these changes are detrimental to the organism or other organisms, and some are beneficial.

Physical Science:

3.1.         Energy and matter have multiple forms and can be changed from one form to another. As a basis for understanding this concept: a. Students know energy comes from the Sun to Earth in the form of light. b. Students know sources of stored energy take many forms, such as food, fuel, and batteries. c. Students know machines and living things convert stored energy to motion and heat. d. Students know energy can be carried from one place to another by waves, such as water waves and sound waves, by electric current, and by moving objects. e. Students know matter has three forms: solid, liquid, and gas. f. Students know evaporation and melting are changes that occur when the objects are heated. g. Students know that when two or more substances are combined, a new substance may be formed with properties that are different from those of the original materials. h. Students know all matter is made of small particles called atoms, too small to see with the naked eye. i. Students know people once thought that earth, wind, fire, and water were the basic elements that made up all matter. Science experiments show that there are more than 100 different types of atoms, which are presented on the periodic table of the elements. 2.         Light has a source and travels in a direction. As a basis for understanding this concept: a. Students know sunlight can be blocked to create shadows. b. Students know light is reflected from mirrors and other surfaces. c. Students know the color of light striking an object affects the way the object is seen. d. Students know an object is seen when light traveling from the object enters the eye.

Investigation and Experimentation:

3.5         Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will: a.         Repeat observations to improve accuracy and know that the results of similar scientific investigations seldom turn out exactly the same because of differences in the things being investigated, methods being used, or uncertainty in the observation. b.         Differentiate evidence from opinion and know that scientists do not rely on claims or conclusions unless they are backed by observations that can be confirmed. c. Use numerical data in describing and comparing objects, events, and measurements. d. Predict the outcome of a simple investigation and compare the result with the prediction. e. Collect data in an investigation and analyze those data to develop a logical conclusion.

Earth Science:

3.4. Objects in the sky move in regular and predictable patterns. As a basis for understanding this concept: a. Students know the patterns of stars stay the same, although they appear to move across the sky nightly, and different stars can be seen in different seasons. b. Students know the way in which the Moon’s appearance changes during the fourweek lunar cycle. c.         Students know telescopes magnify the appearance of some distant objects in the sky, including the Moon and the planets. The number of stars that can be seen through telescopes is dramatically greater than the number that can be seen by the unaided eye. d. Students know that Earth is one of several planets that orbit the Sun and that the Moon orbits Earth. e. Students know the position of the Sun in the sky changes during the course of the day and from season to season.

Reading Standards and Long-term Learning

Targets:

● Informational Text

● Literature

RL & RI.3.1 I can ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.2 I can recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

RL.3.3 I can describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events

RL.3.4 I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

RL.3.6 I can distinguish my own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

RL & RI.3.10 I can read and comprehend literature and informational text at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

RI.3.2 I can determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

RI.3.3 I can describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

RI.3.4 I can determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.

RI.3.5 I can use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

RI.3.6 I can distinguish my own point of view from that of the author of a text.

RI.3.7 I can use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

RI.3.8 I can describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).

RI.3.9 I can compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

RL & RI.3.1 I can ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.2 I can recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

RL.3.3 I can describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events

RL.3.4 I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

RL.3.5 I can refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

RL.3.6 I can distinguish my own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

RL.3.7  I can explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)

RL & RI.3.10 I can read and comprehend literature and informational text at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

RI.3.2 I can determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

RI.3.3 I can describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

RI.3.4 I can determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.

RI.3.5 I can use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

RI.3.6 I can distinguish my own point of view from that of the author of a text.

RI.3.7 I can use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

RI.3.8 I can describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).

RI.3.9 I can compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

RL & RI.3.1 I can ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

RL.3.2 I can recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

RL.3.3 I can describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events

RL.3.4 I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

RL.3.5 I can refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

RL.3.6 I can distinguish my own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

RL.3.7  I can explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)

RL.3.9 I can compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series)

RL & RI.3.10 I can read and comprehend literature and informational text at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

RI.3.2 I can determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

RI.3.3 I can describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

RI.3.4 I can determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.

RI.3.5 I can use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

RI.3.6 I can distinguish my own point of view from that of the author of a text.

RI.3.7 I can use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

RI.3.8 I can describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).

RI.3.9 I can compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

Anchor Texts

The Ohlone Way

The Snake that Lived in the Santa Cruz Mountains & Other Ohlone Stories by Linda Yamane

From Seed to Plant by Gail Gibbons

The Life Cycle of a Crayfish

by Bobbie Kalman

Are you a Snail? by Judy Allen

Websites on the Ohlone People

FOSS Textbook

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 3rd grade teachers in English and Spanish

Weekly Poems and Songs by 3rd grade teachers in English and Spanish

Energy Makes Things Happen by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

Energy Island:  How one community harnessed the wind and changed their world by Allan Drummond

Energy from the Sun by Allan Fowler

Icarus

FOSS Textbook

Renewable and Nonrenewable Energy interactive websites

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 3rd grade teachers in English and Spanish

Weekly Poems and Songs by 3rd grade teachers in English and Spanish

Gerald McDermott Author Study:

Arrow to the Sun

Coyote

Raven

The Magic School Bus Lost in the Solar System by Joanna Cole

Postcards from Pluto: A Tour of the Solar System by Loreen Leedy

The Moon Book by Gail Gibbons

Astronaut:  Living in Space by Deborah Lock

Moonwalk:  The First Trip to the Moon by Judy Donnelly

Interactive, Nasa, and National Geographic websites for research

FOSS Textbook

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 3rd grade teachers in English and Spanish

Weekly Poems and Songs by 3rd grade teachers in English and Spanish

Writing Long-term Learning

Targets

3.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

3.2 I can write informative/ explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

3.3 I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

3.4 I can produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

3.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

3.6 I can use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

3.7 I can conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.

3.8 I can recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.

3.10 I can write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

3.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

3.2 I can write informative/ explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

3.3 I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

3.4 I can produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

3.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

3.6 I can use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

3.7 I can conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.

3.8 I can recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.

3.10 I can write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

3.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

3.2 I can write informative/ explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

3.3 I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

3.4 I can produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)

3.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

3.6 I can use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

3.7 I can conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.

3.8 I can recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.

3.10 I can write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Writing Formats/ Modes

Expository Essay

Informational Essay

Opinion Writing (Survival adaptations: Raccoon or Snail)

Realistic Fiction

Myths in the style of Native Americans

Posters

Poster

Friendly Letter

Opinion Writing

Friendly Letters

Illustrated Opinion Essay

Expository Essay and Analysis

Realistic Fiction

Product/

Product Format

A Day in the Life (Ohlone group books)

Creation Myths (Sp)

Germination Posters

Oak Life Cycle Poster

Fossil Fuel Poster for High School Buddies

Energy Saving Posters for the Neighborhood

Advice Letter to High school buddies (Hybrid or Electric Car)

Illustrated Postcard from Mars

Letter from Jupiter

How Mae Jemison’s Character

Helped her reach her goals

Illustrated and labeled Armstrong/Aldrin moonwalk investigation and analysis

Illustrated Animal in Space narrative (HAM or Laika)

High-Quality Work:

  • Complexity

  • Craftsmanship

  • Authenticity

Complexity:

  • includes higher-order thinking by challenging students to apply, analyze, evaluate, and create during daily instruction and throughout longer projects.
  • Complex work prioritizes consideration of multiple perspectives.
  • application of higher order literacy skills through the use of complex text and evidence-based writing and speaking.

Craftsmanship:

  • attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty.
  • multiple drafts or rehearsals with critique from others.

Authenticity:

  • original, creative thinking of students—authentic personal voice
  • work matters to students and ideally contributes to a larger community as well.

Complexity:

  • exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards and includes higher-order thinking
  • connects to the big concepts that undergird disciplines or unite disciplines.
  • prioritizes consideration of multiple perspectives.

Craftsmanship:

  • attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty.
  • multiple drafts or rehearsals with critique from others.

Authenticity:

  • Authentic work demonstrates the original, creative thinking of students—authentic personal voice and ideas.
  • connects academic standards with real-world issues,.
  • work matters to students and is created for and shared with an audience beyond the classroom

Complexity:

  • exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards and includes higher-order thinking
  • connects to the big concepts that undergird disciplines or unite disciplines.
  • prioritizes consideration of multiple perspectives.
  • application of higher order literacy skills through the use of complex text and evidence-based writing and speaking.

Craftsmanship:

  • multiple drafts or rehearsals with critique from others.

Authenticity:

  • original, creative thinking of students
  • connects academic standards with real-world issues,
  • work matters to students

Art Infusion

Guided shape drawing

Development of line, curves, shading with pencil and color

Watercolor wash

Lines, curves, shading and depth with pencils and watercolors

Pastel work developed with guest art teacher

Watercolor wash

Lines, curves, shading, and depth using pencils and pastels

Experts, Fieldwork, Service

Neighborhood Walk to Sausal Creek to examine local flora and fauna

Oakland Museum of California

Docent interview

Clorox Chemists Presentation and interview

Environmental Scientist Hands-on investigations interview

Chabot Space and Science Center

Service:  Energy Saving Tips Posters around the neighborhood, Fossil Fuel Hazard Posters for display at Envision High School, Hybrid or Electric Car advice letters to High School Buddies

Chabot Space and Science Center

Speaking and/or Listening

Opportunities

Docent interview and small group discussions

Academic Discussions based on complex text and shared research experiences with small groups.

Class discussions and presentations of HQSW

Interviews of Experts

Presentations of investigations with SEED Community

Academic Discussions based on complex text and shared research experiences with small groups.

Class discussions and presentations of HQSW

Presentations of investigations with SEED Community

Academic Discussions based on complex text and shared research experiences with small groups.

Class discussions and presentations of HQSW

4th Grade:  Detailed Expedition Content Map

Topic/ Content

Social Studies and Science:

Gold rush, migration, Rock Cycle, weathering.

Minerals and Migration

Science:

Magnetism and Electricity

The Engineering Challenge!

Social Studies & Science:  

The Californios, the Missions, and Ohlone Life with Magnetism and Electricity

Magnetic California!

Science and Social Studies:

Environments, energy, matter, decomposition.

El medio ambiente

Case Studies

Silver

Gold

Mining

Migration

Projects great and small

Collateral benefits and costs

Ohlone life

California Missions and Missionaries

Californios past present and future

Relationships among organisms in an environment (producers and consumers)

The environments around me

Guiding Question(s)

Why is migration both the solution and the problem?

How does each wave of new Californians affect earlier generations?

How has California’s mineral wealth enriched and endangered Californians?

How and why do we assign value to a rock?

How do magnetism and electricity affect engineering?

How can challenges both enrich and frustrate us?

How do the costs (material, environmental, and human) affect engineering decisions?

Why was and is California able to attract different groups of people?

How has electricity affected California?

Why is magnetism so important to California’s past and future?

What is an environment?

How do different organisms affect each other in an environment?

How do organisms impact their environments?

How do human beings affect their environments?

Content Long-term Learning

Targets

(Science and Social Studies)

Earth Science:

4.4. I can analyze the properties of rocks and minerals reflect the processes that formed them.

4.4a. I can differentiate among igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks by referring to their properties and methods of formation (the rock cycle).

4.4.b. I can identify common rock-forming minerals and ore minerals by using a table of diagnostic properties.

4.5. I can explain how waves, wind, water, and ice shape and reshape Earth’s land surface.

4.5.a. I can explain how some changes in the earth are due to slow processes, such as erosion, and some changes are due to rapid processes, such as landslides, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes.

4.5.b.         I can describe how natural processes, including freezing and thawing and the growth of roots, cause rocks to break down into smaller pieces.

4.5.c.         I can explain how moving water erodes landforms, reshaping the land by taking it away from some places and depositing it as pebbles, sand, silt, and mud in other places.

Investigation and Experimentation:

4.6. I can explain how scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations.

4.6.a. I can differentiate observation from inference (interpretation) and know scientists’ explanations come partly from what they observe and partly from how they interpret their observations.

4.6.b. I can measure and estimate the weight, length, or volume of objects.

4.6.c. I can formulate and justify predictions based on cause-and-effect relationships.

4.6.d. I can conduct multiple trials to test a prediction and draw conclusions about the relationships between predictions and results.

4.6.e. I can construct and interpret graphs from measurements.

4.6.f. I can follow a set of written instructions for a scientific investigation.

Social Studies:

4.3.3 I can analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physical environment.

Investigation and Experimentation:

4.6. I can explain how scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations.

4.6.a. I can differentiate observation from inference (interpretation) and know scientists’ explanations come partly from what they observe and partly from how they interpret their observations.

4.6.b. I can measure and estimate the weight, length, or volume of objects.

4.6.c. I can formulate and justify predictions based on cause-and-effect relationships.

4.6.d. I can conduct multiple trials to test a prediction and draw conclusions about the relationships between predictions and results.

4.6.e. I can construct and interpret graphs from measurements.

4.6.f. I can follow a set of written instructions for a scientific investigation.  

Physical Science:

4.1. I can explain how electricity and magnetism are related effects that have many useful applications in everyday life.

4.1.a. I can design and build simple series and parallel circuits by using components such as wires, batteries, and bulbs.

4.1.b. I can build a simple compass and use it to detect magnetic effects, including Earth’s magnetic field.

4.1.c. I can explain how electric currents produce magnetic fields and I know how to build a simple electromagnet.

4.1.d. I can analyze the role of electromagnets in the construction of electric motors, electric generators, and simple devices, such as doorbells and earphones.

4.1.e. I can explain how electrically charged objects attract or repel each other.

4.1.f. I can explain that magnets have two poles (north and south) and that like poles repel each other while unlike poles attract each other.

4.1.g. I can explain how electrical energy can be converted to heat, light, and motion.

Social Studies:

4.2 I can describe the social, political, cultural, and economic life and interactions among people of California from the pre-Columbian societies to the Spanish mission and Mexican rancho periods.

 

4.3.2. I can compare how and why people traveled to California and the routes they traveled.

4.3.3. I can analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physical environment.

4.3.4. I can research and describe the lives of women who helped build early California (e.g., Biddy Mason).

Life Science:

4. 2. I can explain shy all organisms need energy and matter to live and grow.

4.2.a. I can explain why plants are the primary source of matter and energy entering most food chains.

4.2.b.         I can explain how producers and consumers (herbivores, carnivores, omnivores, and decomposers) are related in food chains and food webs and may compete with each other for resources in an ecosystem.

4.2.c.         I can explain how decomposers, including many fungi, insects, and microorganisms, recycle matter from

dead plants and animals.

4.3 I can describe how and why living organisms depend on one another and on their environment for survival.

4.3.a. I can describe how ecosystems can be characterized by their living and nonliving components.

4.3.b. I can explain why some kinds of plants and animals survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all in a specific environment.

4.3.c. I can explain why many plants depend on animals for pollination and seed dispersal, and animals depend on plants for food and shelter.

4.3.d. I can explain why most microorganisms do not cause disease and that many are beneficial.

Social Studies:

4.1.55. I can use maps, charts, and pictures to describe how communities in California vary in land use, vegetation, wildlife, climate, population density, architecture, services, and transportation.

Reading Long-term Learning

Targets:

● Informational Text

● Literature

RL.4.1 I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RL.4.2 I can determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

RL.4.3 I can describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text.

RL.4.4 I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology.

RL.4.5  I can explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

RL. 4.6 I can compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

RL.4.7 I can make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

RL.4.9 I can compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

RL & RI.4.10 I can read and comprehend literature and informational text of 4-5 complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

RI.4.1 I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RI.4.2 I can determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

RI 4.3 I can explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

RI.4.4 I can determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.

RI.4.5 I can describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

RI.4.6 I can compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

RI.4.7 I can interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

RI.4.8 I can explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.

RI.4.9 I can integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

RL.4.1 I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RL.4.2 I can determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

RL.4.3 I can describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text.

RL.4.4 I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology.

RL.4.5  I can explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

RL. 4.6 I can compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

RL.4.7 I can make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

RL.4.9 I can compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

RL & RI.4.10 I can read and comprehend literature and informational text of 4-5 complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

RI.4.1 I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RI.4.2 I can determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

RI 4.3 I can explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

RI.4.4 I can determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.

RI.4.5 I can describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

RI.4.6 I can compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

RI.4.7 I can interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

RI.4.8 I can explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.

RI.4.9 I can integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

RL.4.1 I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RL.4.2 I can determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

RL.4.3 I can describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text.

RL.4.4 I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology.

RL.4.5  I can explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

RL. 4.6 I can compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

RL.4.7 I can make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

RL.4.9 I can compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

RL & RI.4.10 I can read and comprehend literature and informational text of 4-5 complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

RI.4.1 I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RI.4.2 I can determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

RI 4.3 I can explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

RI.4.4 I can determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.

RI.4.5 I can describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

RI.4.6 I can compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

RI.4.7 I can interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

RI.4.8 I can explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.

RI.4.9 I can integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

RL.4.1 I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RL.4.2 I can determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

RL.4.3 I can describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text.

RL.4.4 I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology.

RL.4.5  I can explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

RL. 4.6 I can compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

RL.4.7 I can make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

RL.4.9 I can compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

RL & RI.4.10 I can read and comprehend literature and informational text of 4-5 complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

RI.4.1 I can refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RI.4.2 I can determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

RI 4.3 I can explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

RI.4.4 I can determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.

RI.4.5 I can describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

RI.4.6 I can compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

RI.4.7 I can interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

RI.4.8 I can explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.

RI.4.9 I can integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

Anchor Texts

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 4th grade teachers in English and Spanish

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 4th grade teachers in English and Spanish

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 4th grade teachers in English and Spanish

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 4th grade teachers in English and Spanish

Writing Long-term Learning

Targets

4.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

4.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

4.3 I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

4.4 I can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

4.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

4.6 I can use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

4.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

4.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

4.3 I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

4.4 I can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

4.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

4.6 I can use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

4.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

4.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

4.3 I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

4.4 I can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

4.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

4.6 I can use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

4.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

4.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

4.3 I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

4.4 I can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

4.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

4.6 I can use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

Writing Formats/ Modes

Product/

Product Format

High-Quality Work:

  • Complexity

  • Craftsmanship

  • Authenticity

Complexity:

  • Complex work is rigorous: it aligns with or exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards and includes higher-order thinking by challenging students to apply, analyze, evaluate, and create during daily instruction and throughout longer projects.
  • Complex work often connects to the big concepts that undergird disciplines or unite disciplines.
  • Complex work prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts.
  • Complex work prioritizes consideration of multiple perspectives.
  • Complex work may incorporate students’ application of higher order literacy skills through the use of complex text and evidence-based writing and speaking.

Craftsmanship:

  • Well-crafted work is done with care and precision. Craftsmanship requires attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty.
  • In every discipline and domain, well-crafted work should be beautiful work in conception and execution. In short tasks or early drafts of work, craftsmanship may be present primarily in thoughtful ideas, but not in polished presentation; for long-term projects, craftsmanship requires perseverance to refine work in conception, conventions, and presentation, typically through multiple drafts or rehearsals with critique from others.

Authenticity:

  • Authentic work demonstrates the original, creative thinking of students—authentic personal voice and ideas—rather than simply showing that students can follow directions or fill in the blanks.
  • Authentic work often uses formats and standards from the professional world, rather than artificial school formats (e.g., students create a book review for a local newspaper instead of a book report for the teacher).
  • Authentic work often connects academic standards with real-world issues, controversies, and local people and places.
  • Authenticity gives purpose to work; the work matters to students and ideally contributes to a larger community as well. When possible, it is created for and shared with an audience beyond the classroom.

Complexity:

  • Complex work is rigorous: it aligns with or exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards and includes higher-order thinking by challenging students to apply, analyze, evaluate, and create during daily instruction and throughout longer projects.
  • Complex work often connects to the big concepts that undergird disciplines or unite disciplines.
  • Complex work prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts.
  • Complex work prioritizes consideration of multiple perspectives.
  • Complex work may incorporate students’ application of higher order literacy skills through the use of complex text and evidence-based writing and speaking.

Craftsmanship:

  • Well-crafted work is done with care and precision. Craftsmanship requires attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty.
  • In every discipline and domain, well-crafted work should be beautiful work in conception and execution. In short tasks or early drafts of work, craftsmanship may be present primarily in thoughtful ideas, but not in polished presentation; for long-term projects, craftsmanship requires perseverance to refine work in conception, conventions, and presentation, typically through multiple drafts or rehearsals with critique from others.

Authenticity:

  • Authentic work demonstrates the original, creative thinking of students—authentic personal voice and ideas—rather than simply showing that students can follow directions or fill in the blanks.
  • Authentic work often uses formats and standards from the professional world, rather than artificial school formats (e.g., students create a book review for a local newspaper instead of a book report for the teacher).
  • Authentic work often connects academic standards with real-world issues, controversies, and local people and places.
  • Authenticity gives purpose to work; the work matters to students and ideally contributes to a larger community as well. When possible, it is created for and shared with an audience beyond the classroom.

Complexity:

  • Complex work is rigorous: it aligns with or exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards and includes higher-order thinking by challenging students to apply, analyze, evaluate, and create during daily instruction and throughout longer projects.
  • Complex work often connects to the big concepts that undergird disciplines or unite disciplines.
  • Complex work prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts.
  • Complex work prioritizes consideration of multiple perspectives.
  • Complex work may incorporate students’ application of higher order literacy skills through the use of complex text and evidence-based writing and speaking.

Craftsmanship:

  • Well-crafted work is done with care and precision. Craftsmanship requires attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty.
  • In every discipline and domain, well-crafted work should be beautiful work in conception and execution. In short tasks or early drafts of work, craftsmanship may be present primarily in thoughtful ideas, but not in polished presentation; for long-term projects, craftsmanship requires perseverance to refine work in conception, conventions, and presentation, typically through multiple drafts or rehearsals with critique from others.

Authenticity:

  • Authentic work demonstrates the original, creative thinking of students—authentic personal voice and ideas—rather than simply showing that students can follow directions or fill in the blanks.
  • Authentic work often uses formats and standards from the professional world, rather than artificial school formats (e.g., students create a book review for a local newspaper instead of a book report for the teacher).
  • Authentic work often connects academic standards with real-world issues, controversies, and local people and places.
  • Authenticity gives purpose to work; the work matters to students and ideally contributes to a larger community as well. When possible, it is created for and shared with an audience beyond the classroom.

Complexity:

  • Complex work is rigorous: it aligns with or exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards and includes higher-order thinking by challenging students to apply, analyze, evaluate, and create during daily instruction and throughout longer projects.
  • Complex work often connects to the big concepts that undergird disciplines or unite disciplines.
  • Complex work prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts.
  • Complex work prioritizes consideration of multiple perspectives.
  • Complex work may incorporate students’ application of higher order literacy skills through the use of complex text and evidence-based writing and speaking.

Craftsmanship:

  • Well-crafted work is done with care and precision. Craftsmanship requires attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty.
  • In every discipline and domain, well-crafted work should be beautiful work in conception and execution. In short tasks or early drafts of work, craftsmanship may be present primarily in thoughtful ideas, but not in polished presentation; for long-term projects, craftsmanship requires perseverance to refine work in conception, conventions, and presentation, typically through multiple drafts or rehearsals with critique from others.

Authenticity:

  • Authentic work demonstrates the original, creative thinking of students—authentic personal voice and ideas—rather than simply showing that students can follow directions or fill in the blanks.
  • Authentic work often uses formats and standards from the professional world, rather than artificial school formats (e.g., students create a book review for a local newspaper instead of a book report for the teacher).
  • Authentic work often connects academic standards with real-world issues, controversies, and local people and places.
  • Authenticity gives purpose to work; the work matters to students and ideally contributes to a larger community as well. When possible, it is created for and shared with an audience beyond the classroom.

Art Infusion

Experts, Fieldwork, Service

Speaking and/or Listening

Opportunities

5th Grade:  Detailed Expedition Content Map

Topic/ Content

Science:

Living Systems

Sistemas de seres vivos

Science:  

Mixtures and Solutions

La experimentación en accion

Science/Social Studies:

The Water Cycle, Managing Water Resources and Environmental Justice

The Water Planet

Social Studies:  

Activists who recognize injustice and address the need for change

Changemakers

Case Studies

Water shapes the land

Water shapes our lives

Historical figures who have overcome adversity

People who have made positive world changes

Guiding Question(s)

How do natural resources sustain life?

How are single-cell and multi-cellular organisms alike and different?

How are organs and systems alike and different?

How can cells receive all the resources necessary to keep them alive?

How are our circulatory system and a plant’s vascular system alike and different?

How does water shape our Earth?

How does water shape our lives?

How and why does water move and change forms through the water cycle?

How does land build up, wear down, and change over time?

What causes weather, what are its effects, and how can we predict it?

What have people had to overcome?

How have people changed the world for the better?

How can I be a Changemaker?

Content Long-term Learning

Targets

(Science and Social Studies)

PS 1b I can describe how all matter is made of atoms which combine to form molecules.

ES 3a I can explain that most of Earth's water is salty ocean water covering 71% of Earth

ES 3b I can describe how and when water evaporates, condenses, and solidifies.

ES 3c I can explain how water vapor can form clouds which can fall as rain, snow, or hail.

ES 3d I can explain why fresh water is limited, but can be reduced and recycled to extend its availability.

ES 3e I can describe the origin of our local community's water supply.

ES 4a I can explain why uneven heating of Earth by the Sun causes wind and weather.

ES 4b I can explain how  the ocean and water cycle drive all weather on Earth.

ES 4c I can describe the causes and effects of extreme weather.

ES 4d I can explain how to use weather maps to predict weather.

Social Studies:

SS 5.1  I can describe how people adapted to different climates and regions.

SS 5.1 I can describe how people adapted to different climates and regions.

SS 5.4 I can describe how institutions that evolved in the Colonial Era.

SS 5.5 I can explain the causes of the American Revolution.

SS 5.7 I can explain the role of the Constitution in American government.

Reading Long-term Learning

Targets:

● Informational Text

● Literature

R 1.1 I can understand, explain, and apply figurative language.

R 2.1  I can understand and apply structural features of expository text.

R 2.3  I can discern main ideas and support for them.

R 2.4  I can draw inferences and support with evidence.

R 1.1 I can understand, explain, and apply figurative language.

R 2.1 I can understand and apply structural features of expository text.

R 2.3 I can discern main ideas and support for them.

R 2.4 I can draw inferences and support with evidence.

Anchor Texts

FOSS Textbook

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 5th grade teachers in English and Spanish

FOSS Textbook

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 5th grade teachers in English and Spanish

FOSS Textbook

Environmental Justice articles on the web and in print.

Original sources regarding water use in California and throughout the world

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 5th grade teachers in English and Spanish

Autobiographies, memoirs, and biographies for research

Original sources and accounts by contemporaries of changemakers

Articles and analyses available on the web.

Complex and Leveled Texts written or adapted by 5th grade teachers in English and Spanish

Writing Long-term Learning

Targets

5.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

5.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

5.3 I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

5.4 I can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

5.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

5.7 I can conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

5.8 I can recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.

5.9 I can draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

5.10  I can write routinely over extended time frames and shorter time frames for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences

5.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

5.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

5.3 I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

5.4 I can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

5.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

5.7 I can conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

5.8 I can recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.

5.9 I can draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

5.10  I can write routinely over extended time frames and shorter time frames for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences

5.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

5.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

5.3 I can write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

5.4 I can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

5.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

5.7 I can conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

5.9 I can draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

5.10  I can write routinely over extended time frames and shorter time frames for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

5.1 I can write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

5.2 I can write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

5.4 I can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

5.5 I can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

5.7 I can conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

5.8 I can recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.

5.9 I can draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

5.10  I can write routinely over extended time frames and shorter time frames for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences

Writing Formats/ Modes

Expository Essays

Illustrated and annotated timelines

Posters

Fiction

Illustrated and annotated timelines

Newspaper

Poetry

Product/

Product Format

Water Cycle, Geology, Native American Adaptations, Lake Merritt Timelines

Journey of a Water Droplet story

Colonial history, Revolutionary War, Constitution expository essays and newspaper

Oratorical Fest original poems and presentations

Living Museum

High-Quality Work:

  • Complexity

  • Craftsmanship

  • Authenticity

Complexity:

  • Complex work is rigorous: it aligns with or exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards and includes higher-order thinking by challenging students to apply, analyze, evaluate, and create during daily instruction and throughout longer projects.
  • Complex work often connects to the big concepts that undergird disciplines or unite disciplines.
  • Complex work prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts.
  • Complex work prioritizes consideration of multiple perspectives.
  • Complex work may incorporate students’ application of higher order literacy skills through the use of complex text and evidence-based writing and speaking.

Craftsmanship:

  • Well-crafted work is done with care and precision. Craftsmanship requires attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty.
  • In every discipline and domain, well-crafted work should be beautiful work in conception and execution. In short tasks or early drafts of work, craftsmanship may be present primarily in thoughtful ideas, but not in polished presentation; for long-term projects, craftsmanship requires perseverance to refine work in conception, conventions, and presentation, typically through multiple drafts or rehearsals with critique from others.

Authenticity:

  • Authentic work demonstrates the original, creative thinking of students—authentic personal voice and ideas—rather than simply showing that students can follow directions or fill in the blanks.
  • Authentic work often uses formats and standards from the professional world, rather than artificial school formats (e.g., students create a book review for a local newspaper instead of a book report for the teacher).
  • Authentic work often connects academic standards with real-world issues, controversies, and local people and places.
  • Authenticity gives purpose to work; the work matters to students and ideally contributes to a larger community as well. When possible, it is created for and shared with an audience beyond the classroom.

Complexity:

  • Complex work is rigorous: it aligns with or exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards and includes higher-order thinking by challenging students to apply, analyze, evaluate, and create during daily instruction and throughout longer projects.
  • Complex work often connects to the big concepts that undergird disciplines or unite disciplines.
  • Complex work prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts.
  • Complex work prioritizes consideration of multiple perspectives.
  • Complex work may incorporate students’ application of higher order literacy skills through the use of complex text and evidence-based writing and speaking.

Craftsmanship:

  • Well-crafted work is done with care and precision. Craftsmanship requires attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty.
  • In every discipline and domain, well-crafted work should be beautiful work in conception and execution. In short tasks or early drafts of work, craftsmanship may be present primarily in thoughtful ideas, but not in polished presentation; for long-term projects, craftsmanship requires perseverance to refine work in conception, conventions, and presentation, typically through multiple drafts or rehearsals with critique from others.

Authenticity:

  • Authentic work demonstrates the original, creative thinking of students—authentic personal voice and ideas—rather than simply showing that students can follow directions or fill in the blanks.
  • Authentic work often uses formats and standards from the professional world, rather than artificial school formats (e.g., students create a book review for a local newspaper instead of a book report for the teacher).
  • Authentic work often connects academic standards with real-world issues, controversies, and local people and places.
  • Authenticity gives purpose to work; the work matters to students and ideally contributes to a larger community as well. When possible, it is created for and shared with an audience beyond the classroom.

Complexity:

  • rigorous: it aligns with or exceeds the expectations of higher-order thinking
  • connects to the big concepts.
  • prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts.
  • prioritizes consideration of multiple perspectives.
  • application of higher order literacy skills

Craftsmanship:

  • care and precision; attention to accuracy, detail, and beauty.
  • perseverance to refine work in conception, conventions, and presentation,

Authenticity:

  • original, creative thinking of students—authentic personal voice and ideas.
  • formats and standards from the professional world
  • connects academic standards with real-world issues,
  • purpose to work; contributes to a larger community

Complexity:

  • aligns with or exceeds the expectations defined by grade-level standards
  • connects to the big concepts that undergird disciplines or unite disciplines.
  • prioritizes transfer of understanding to new contexts.
  • consideration of multiple perspectives.
  • application of higher order literacy skills through the use of complex text and evidence-based writing and speaking.

Craftsmanship:

  • accuracy, detail, and beauty.
  • perseverance to refine work in conception, conventions, and presentation, Authenticity:
  • demonstrates the original, creative thinking of students
  • formats and standards from the professional world
  • matters to students and ideally contributes to a larger community

Art Infusion

Independent drawing from life with pencils at Lake Merritt and Sausal Creek

Line, shape, curves, shading and color for portraits of changemakers

Experts, Fieldwork, Service

Kyle Winslow at Lake Merritt and Megan Hess at Sausal Creek guide us in our fieldwork and service learning.

Students will do Sausal Creek restoration for 3 days

Students will be clean up at Lake Merritt for 2 days

Fieldwork at Lake Merritt and Sausal Creek

Speaking and/or Listening

Opportunities

Weather Reports, News Reports, Discussions to share Inferences about Water in small groups and whole class

Whole class and small group discussions of texts and concepts.

Presentations for Living Museum