HACS-logo-master-small

Course Number: ENG 410
Course Title: The Works of J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis
Term: Fall 2017

Professor

Joseph Pearce, jpearce@holyapostles.edu, Phone: 864 862 9530

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will examine the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis, enabling a deeper understanding of the works on the level of theology, philosophy, and historical and literary intertextual context.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1: Topic Title: Allegory and Applicability in Literature in General and in Middle-earth and Narnia in particular.

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: No required text. Recommended: Augustine, De Doctrina Christiana (On Christian Doctrine) http://faculty.georgetown.edu/jod/augustine/ddc.html

Week 2: Topic Title: Tolkien’s Philosophy of Myth and its Influence on Lewis

Lecture: Narnia & Middle-earth: When Two Worlds Collude

Readings: Tolkien, “On Fairy Stories” http://www.rivendellcommunity.org/Formation/Tolkien_On_Fairy_Stories.pdf

Week 3: Topic Title: The Hobbit

Lectures: Unlocking the Catholicism of The Hobbit 

Readings: J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

Week 4: Topic Title:        The Fellowship of the Ring, Book One of The Lord of the Rings

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: The Fellowship of the Ring, Book One of The Lord of the Rings

Week 5: Topic Title: The Fellowship of the Ring, Book Two of The Lord of the Rings

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: The Fellowship of the Ring, Book Two of The Lord of the Rings

Week 6: Topic Title: The Two Towers, Book Three of The Lord of the Rings

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: The Two Towers, Book Three of The Lord of the Rings

Week 7: Topic Title: The Two Towers, Book Four of The Lord of the Rings

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: The Two Towers, Book Four of The Lord of the Rings

Week 8: Topic Title: The Return of the King, Book Five of The Lord of the Rings

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: The Return of the King, Book Five of The Lord of the Rings

Week 9: Topic Title: The Return of the King, Book Six of The Lord of the Rings

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: The Return of the King, Book Six of The Lord of the Rings

Week 10: Topic Title: The Magician’s Nephew

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: The Magician’s Nephew

Week 11: Topic Title: The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe and The Horse & His Boy

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe and The Horse & His Boy

Week 12: Topic Title: Prince Caspian and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: Prince Caspian and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

Week 13: Topic Title: The Silver Chair

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: The Silver Chair

Week 14: Topic Title: The Last Battle

Lecture on the above topic

Readings: The Last Battle, chapters 1-11

Week 15: Topic Title: Further Up and Further

Lecture on Lewis’ Eschatology in The Last Battle

Readings: The Last Battle, chapters 12-16

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

5. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES:

6. SUGGESTED READINGS and RESOURCES:

7. EVALUATION

Evaluation will be based on the student’s grasp of the literal content of each work and his or her ability to read other applicable meanings in the texts and the eloquence and erudition with which such meanings are discussed and expressed. Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

8. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Chris Apodaca, the Disability Resource Center ADA Coordinator, at capodaca@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

A native of England, Joseph Pearce is Senior Editor at the Augustine Institute, and Tolkien & Lewis Chair in Literary Studies at Holy Apostles College & Seminary. He is editor of the St. Austin Review (www.staustinreview.org), an international review of Catholic culture, series editor of the Ignatius Critical Editions (www.ignatiuscriticaleditions.com), and executive director of Catholic Courses (www.catholiccourses.com).

The internationally acclaimed author of many books, which include bestsellers such as The Quest for Shakespeare, Tolkien: Man and Myth, The Unmasking of Oscar Wilde, C. S. Lewis and The Catholic Church, Literary Converts, Wisdom and Innocence: A Life of G.K. Chesterton, Solzhenitsyn: A Soul in Exile and Old Thunder:  A Life of Hilaire Belloc, Joseph Pearce is a world-recognized biographer of modern Christian literary figures.  His books have been published and translated into Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, Italian, Korean, Mandarin, Croatian and Polish.

Professor Pearce has hosted two 13-part television series about Shakespeare on EWTN, and has also written and presented documentaries on EWTN on the Catholicism of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. He has participated and lectured at a wide variety of international and literary events at major colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, Britain, Europe, Africa and South America.