Midi 2 CV User Manual

Compatibility

Technical characteristics

Range and standards

Performance

Power supply

Overview

Quirks ahoy!

Installation

About conversion modes

Channel 1: Monophonic mode

Channel 2: Turbocharged monophonic mode

Channel 3 / Channel 4: Dual monophonic mode

Channel 5: Duophonic mode

Channel 6: Controller conversion

Channel 7/8: Note conversion + CC

Channel 10: Drums

Channel 11: Drums gates

Channel 12, 13, 14: Monophonic mode with clock/reset output

Compatibility

The Midi 2 CV is class-compliant but uses an unusual USB setting (1ms poll-rate in low-speed mode) not well supported on Windows.

Optimal latency is obtained with OS X >= 10.6.3 ; iOS ; or Linux >= 2.6.

On other systems, the Midi 2 CV will work but messages will be delayed by up to 8ms.

Technical characteristics

Range and standards:

Performance:

Power supply:

USB-bus powered, current draw < 20mA.

Overview

Sound Study Modular Midi 2 CV is a DIY USB MIDI to CV interface – enabling you to control an analog synthesizer or modular system from a computer or smartphone/tablet equipped with a USB port. The Midi 2 CV is class-compliant and as such, does not require any driver.

It features various conversion/voice allocation modes, covering monophonic, duophonic and drums/triggers applications.

Quirks ahoy!

Before moving forward, it is important to state some limitations of the Midi 2 CV – most of them due to its ridiculously simple design:

Installation

The Midi 2 CV can either be mounted in a Eurorack system, or used as a standalone box. In both cases, it does not need any external power source as it is powered by the USB bus.

About conversion modes

The Midi 2 CV interprets MIDI messages differently depending on the MIDI channel on which they are received. For example, when receiving messages on MIDI channel 1, it behaves like a monophonic synthesizer and outputs a CV/Gate pair. When receiving messages on MIDI channel 10, it behaves instead like a drum trigger converter and outputs a trigger for 4 drum instruments.

Channel 1: Monophonic mode

This mode is enabled when any MIDI message is received on channel 1. The Midi 2 CV behaves like a classic monophonic CV-Gate converter implementing most recent note priority.

Channel 2: Turbocharged monophonic mode

This mode is enabled when any MIDI message is received on channel 2. The Midi 2 CV behaves like a monophonic CV-Gate converter implementing most recent note priority, but the primary Gate output is now a digital square oscillator!

Bonus digital square oscillator! Hell Yeah!

Channel 3 / Channel 4: Dual monophonic mode

This mode is enabled when a MIDI message is received on channel 3 or on channel 4. The Midi 2 CV behaves like two independent monophonic CV-Gate converters with most recent note priority. One of them listens to notes received on channel 3, the other on channel 4.

Channel 5: Duophonic mode

This mode is enabled when a MIDI message is received on channel 5. The Midi 2 CV behaves like a duophonic CV-Gate converter with voice stealing.

Channel 6: Controller conversion

This mode is enabled when a MIDI message is received on channel 6. The Midi 2 CV converts continuous controllers (CC) 01 (modulation wheel) and 02 (breath controller) to control voltages.

Channel 7/8: Note conversion + CC

These modes are enabled when a MIDI message is received on channel 7 or 8. The Midi 2 CV behaves like a monophonic CV-Gate converter, with an additional CC value produced on the secondary output.

Channel 10: Drums

This mode is enabled when a MIDI message is received on channel 10. CV Outputs 1 and 2 are respectively triggered by the MIDI notes 36 (kick drum on the GM drum map) and 38 (snare drum on the GM drum map). Gate outputs 1 and 2 are triggered by the MIDI note 40 (snare drum 2) and 46 (closed high-hat).

Channel 11: Drums gates

Same as Channel 10, but with gates instead of triggers.

Channel 12, 13, 14: Monophonic mode with clock/reset output

In these modes, the Midi 2 CV behaves like a classic monophonic CV-Gate converter implementing most recent note priority, but also outputs triggers for synchronizing modular sequencers. A clock (with variable resolution) is sent to GATE 1; and a reset (corresponding to the MIDI ‘start’ message) is sent to GATE 2.

The resolution of the clock trigger depends on the MIDI channel used: 24 ppqn for channel 12; 8 ppqn for channel 13; 4 ppqn for channel 14.