School Catalog 2017-2018 Academic Year

Table of Contents

Welcome

Disclaimer

The School

Mission and Vision

History

Accreditation

Organization

Administration

Programs and Degrees

Advanced Certificate Requirements

Advanced Certificate in Public Health

MPH Degree Requirements

Core MPH Competencies

MPH - Epidemiology and Biostatistics

MPH - Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

MPH - Health Policy and Management

MPH - Public Health Nutrition

MPH - Community Health Education

MS Degree Requirements

MS-EOHS Competencies

MS - Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

DPH Degree Requirements

Core DPH Competencies

DPH - Community, Society, and Health

DPH - Epidemiology

DPH - Environmental and Occupational Health

DPH - Health Policy and Management

Specializations

Academic Resources

Academic Calendar

Academic Policies

Registration

Maximum Enrollment

Definition of a Credit Hour

Definition of Full Time Students

Levels for Doctoral (DPH) Students

Maintaining Matriculation

Student Leave of Absence

Unapproved Leaves

Limit on Non Degree Student Credits

Auditing Courses

Transfer of Credit and Course Residency

Students Matriculated at GSPHHP Taking Courses at Other Institutions

Students Matriculated Outside GSPHHP Wanting to Register for GSPHHP Courses

Awarding of Degrees

Time Limits for Degree Completion

Grading System

Incomplete Grades

Repeat Courses

Withdrawal from Courses

Academic Standing

Academic Probation and Disbarment

Guidelines on Satisfactory Progress for Doctoral (DPH) Students

Academic Integrity

Appealing Course Grades

Appeals Procedure for Students on Academic Probation

Email Communication

Advising

Student Services and Student Life

Admission

Office of the Registrar

Academic Records and Transcripts

FERPA Compliance

Change of Name, Address, or ID

Degree Audit - Apply to Graduate

International Students (Designated School Officials)

Veterans (Certifying Official)

Disability Services

Financial Aid

Student Eligibility

Application Procedure

Student Loans

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

Office of the Bursar

Tuition and Fees

Commitment Deposit

Payment and Refunds

Career Services

CUNY Policies

Courses


Welcome

Welcome to the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (GSPHHP) Catalog. This publication lists academic programs and requirements, course descriptions, student rights, and University policies, as well as links to admissions, tuition and fees, financial aid, academic policies and procedures, and student services.

Disclaimer

The City University of New York (CUNY) reserves the right, because of changing conditions, to make modifications of any nature in the academic programs and requirements of the University and its constituent colleges without advance notice. Tuition and fees set forth in this publication are similarly subject to change by the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York. The University regrets any inconvenience this may cause.

Every effort has been made to make the material presented herein timely and accurate. As changes occur, they will be communicated via traditional media and reflected on the School’s website. Students are encouraged to check the website to determine the most up-to-date program and course information. Critical points of fact or interpretation should be considered subject to confirmation by the appropriate office or department of the School.

The School does not guarantee to offer all courses it announces. The announcement is made in good faith, but circumstances beyond the control of the School sometimes necessitate changes. The School may cancel courses if the enrollment does not warrant their being offered or if other contingencies make such a cancellation necessary.

The School

Mission and Vision

The School’s mission is to provide a collaborative and accessible environment for excellence in education, research, and service in public health, to promote and sustain healthier populations in NYC and around the world, and to shape policy and practice in public health for all.

The vision is to promote health and social justice in NYC and across the globe through innovation and leadership. To realize its mission and vision, the School works with communities, nonprofit and private organizations, and the government at all levels to build the capacities that help people lead healthier and more productive lives.

History

The City University of New York, the largest and most diverse urban public university in the United States, began training public health professionals in 1968 at Hunter College. It was one of the first public institutions without a school of public health to meet the growing demand for professionals who could tackle the complex health problems facing the nation’s increasingly diverse cities, and to translate the promise of the health and social reforms of the 1960s into public health practice and policy in urban neighborhoods. By 2006, the City University of New York offered MPH degree programs at three campuses: Hunter, Brooklyn, and Lehman Colleges. In 2007, the CUNY Graduate School, home to the University’s thirty-four doctoral programs, introduced a Doctor of Public Health (DPH). Believing that New York City and CUNY would be better served by uniting these public health programs, the University developed a collaborative school of public health in 2008, integrating the resources of the previously independent programs under the leadership of a single Dean.

In 2011, the School received its first full five-year accreditation from CEPH. In 2013, the CUNY Board of Trustees adopted changes to the School’s governance plan to better reflect the University-wide nature of the School and position it for continued and expanded collaborations, growth, and success including renaming the school to the CUNY School of Public Health.

In November 2015, the CUNY Board of Trustees approved a resolution directing the Chancellor of the University, James B. Milliken, to develop and implement a plan to transition the existing consortial School to a unified graduate school that would administer all master’s and doctoral-level degree programs, continuing as a unit within the CUNY Graduate School and University Center. The name of the School was changed to the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.

Accreditation

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy is regionally accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education through the Graduate School and University Center.

The School is granted professional accreditation by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).

The MS-EOHS program is granted professional accreditation by the Accreditation Board for Engineering Technology (ABET).

Organization

The Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (SPH) is housed administratively within the CUNY Graduate School and University Center. SPH is led by the Dean who reports directly to the CUNY Chancellor.

Administration

The Dean has primary responsibility for oversight and management of the Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. Other major positions within the School include:

 

The Dean’s Public Health Advisory Council provides insight and advice to the Dean with respect to the external public health community. It is comprised of experienced public health and other leaders representing government, health care, business, non-profit, legal, community-based, and media sectors and organizations. The Council advises the Dean on research, academic programs, workforce development, training, and development to help ensure that the School meets the needs of the community.

 

The Associate and Assistant Deans are each responsible for leading and coordinating activities in the areas of administration, academic and faculty affairs, research, and student services, respectively. Their activities are coordinated through senior staff meetings with the Dean.

The Department Chairpersons are responsible for leading the academic programs and leading faculty within their respective departments: Community Health and Social Sciences; Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Environmental, Occupational, and Geospatial Health Sciences; and Health Policy and Management.

 

The Dean’s Cabinet consists of the Dean, the Associate and Assistant Deans, department chairpersons, the chair of the Faculty-Student Council and other persons designated by the Dean. The Cabinet meets monthly and advises the Dean with respect to the policies and operations of the School.

Programs and Degrees

The Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy offers graduate degrees, as listed in the table below. All of the degrees listed below are conferred by the Graduate School and University Center, on behalf of the CUNY GSPHHP.

Instructional Matrix, CUNY GSPHHP

Concentration

Degree

Credits

Public Health

Adv Cert

15

Community Health Education

MPH

45

Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

MPH

45

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

(students select one track)

MPH

45

Health Policy and Management

MPH

45

Public Health Geographic Information Sciences

MPH

45

Public Health Nutrition

MPH

45

Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

MS

46

Community, Society, and Health

DPH

48

Environmental and Occupational Health

DPH

48

Epidemiology

DPH

48

Health Policy and Management

DPH

48

Advanced Certificate Requirements

The Advanced Certificate is a graduate level program in CUNY. The Advanced Certificate in Public Health consists of the 5 public health core courses: Biostatistics; Epidemiology; Social and Behavioral Health; Environmental Health; and Health Policy and Management. Each course is 3 credits. The certificate program is 15 credits.

Advanced Certificate in Public Health

Required Coursework

BIOS 610 Fundamentals of Biostatistics

EPID 610 Fundamentals of Epidemiology

EOHS 610 Fundamentals of Environmental Health

CHSS 610 Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Health

HPAM 610 Fundamentals of Health Policy and Management

Elective Coursework

No Electives Required

Practice Experience

No Fieldwork Required

Culminating Experience

No Capstone Required

Total Credits Required

15

MPH Degree Requirements

Public health professionals work within multiple disciplines to improve population health and demonstrate proficiencies in technical, managerial, communications, and advocacy skills to promote health and prevent disease and death. MPH graduates work as managers, administrators, researchers, planners, educators, environmental and occupational health specialists, public health nutritionists, and community health workers in diverse locations including governments, health facilities, businesses, and community organizations locally, nationally, and internationally. To prepare students for these positions, all MPH students are required to complete core and required coursework, a supervised fieldwork experience that applies core public health coursework, and a culminating experience that demonstrates application and integration of knowledge and skills gained during coursework and fieldwork. Students enroll in one concentration area (students in the Epidemiology and Biostatistics concentration select the epidemiology track or biostatistics track). Upon graduation, students will have attained the core MPH competencies (as found below) and competencies of their selected concentration.

Core MPH Competencies

MPH - Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Core Coursework (15 credits)

EPID 611 Principles of Epidemiology

BIOS 611 Principles of Biostatistics

EOHS 610 Fundamentals of Environmental Health

CHSS 610 Fundamentals of Society & Behavioral Health

HPAM 610 Fundamentals of Health Policy & Management

Required Coursework (15 credits)

BIOS 620 Applied Biostatistics I

BIOS 621 Applied Biostatistics II

EPID 620 Epidemiological Methods I

EPID 621 Epidemiological Methods II

EPID 622 Applied Research: Data Management and Analysis

Elective Coursework (9 credits)

Epidemiology students choose 3 of the following, 2 of which must be EPID courses:

EPID 623 – Clinical Trials and Experimental Design

EPID 624 – Social Epidemiology

EPID 625 – Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases

EPID 626 – Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

EPID 627 – Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology

EPID 628 – Nutritional Epidemiology

EPID 629 – Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology

EPID 695 – Special topics in Epidemiology methods

One relevant course in biostatistics (e.g. BIOS 622 or BIOS 624)

One course in data mapping

One course in demography

One course in quantitative methods from another field  (upon advisor approval)

 

Biostatistics students choose 3 of the following, 2 of which must be BIOS or STAT courses:

BIOS 622 – Analysis of Categorical Data

BIOS 623 – Analysis of Longitudinal Data

BIOS 624 – Design and Analysis of Complex Surveys

BIOS 625 – Survival Analysis

BIOS 626 – Data Analysis

BIOS 627 – Analysis of Variance

STAT 70100 – Advanced Probability I

STAT 70300 – Mathematical Statistics

STAT 70600 – General Linear Models I

STAT 70700 – General Linear Models II

STAT 72600 – Theory & Methods of Sampling

One relevant course in epidemiology (e.g. EPID 623)

One course in data mapping

One course in experimental design from another field

(Biostatistics students are encouraged to take calculus-based probability courses e.g. STAT 70100.)

Practice Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 696 Supervised Fieldwork

Culminating Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 698 Capstone Project

Total Credits Required for MPH

45


MPH - Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

Core Coursework (15 credits)

BIOS 610 Fundamentals of Biostatistics

EPID 610 Fundamentals of Epidemiology

EOHS 610 Fundamentals of Environmental Health

CHSS 610 Fundamentals of Society & Behavioral Health

HPAM 610 Fundamentals of Health Policy & Management

Required Coursework (15 credits)

EOHS 620 Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health

EOHS 621 Environmental Chemistry

EOHS 625 Hazard Evaluation and Instrumentation

EOHS 622 Environment and Occupational Toxicology

EOHS 624 Environmental Audits and Remediation

Elective Coursework (9 credits)

Three (3) electives chosen in consultation with academic advisor

Practice Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 696 Supervised Fieldwork

Culminating Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 698 Capstone Project

Total Credits Required for MPH

45


MPH - Health Policy and Management

Core Coursework (15 credits)

BIOS 610 Fundamentals of Biostatistics

EPID 610 Fundamentals of Epidemiology

EOHS 610 Fundamentals of Environmental Health

CHSS 610 Fundamentals of Society & Behavioral Health

HPAM 610 Fundamentals of Health Policy & Management

Required Coursework (15 credits)

HPAM 620 Public Health Management

HPAM 622 Public Health and Health Care Law

HPAM 623 Comparative Analysis of Urban Health Care Systems or HPAM 624 Public Health Advocacy

HPAM 625 Public Health Policy Analysis

HPAM 621 Health Economics

Elective Coursework (9 credits)

Three (3) electives chosen in consultation with academic advisor

Practice Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 696 Supervised Fieldwork

Culminating Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 698 Capstone Project

Total Credits Required for MPH

45


MPH - Public Health Nutrition

Core Coursework (15 credits)

BIOS 610 Fundamentals of Biostatistics

EPID 610 Fundamentals of Epidemiology

EOHS 610 Fundamentals of Environmental Health

CHSS 610 Fundamentals of Society & Behavioral Health

HPAM 610 Fundamentals of Health Policy & Management

Required Coursework (18 credits)

CHSS 620 Community Health Assessment

FNPH 621 Principles of Public Health Nutrition

FNPH 620 Community Nutrition Education

FNPH 622 Food and Nutrition Through the Lifecycle

FNPH 820 Food Policy

CHSS 624 Health Program Planning and Funding

Elective Coursework (6 credits)

Two (2) electives chosen in consultation with academic advisor

Practice Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 696 Supervised Fieldwork

Culminating Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 698 Capstone Project

Total Credits Required for MPH

45

MPH - Community Health Education

Core Coursework (15 credits)

BIOS 610 Fundamentals of Biostatistics

EPID 610 Fundamentals of Epidemiology

EOHS 610 Fundamentals of Environmental Health

CHSS 610 Fundamentals of Society & Behavioral Health

HPAM 610 Fundamentals of Health Policy & Management

Required Coursework (15 credits)

CHSS 620  Community Health Assessment

CHSS 621  Community Health Interventions

CHSS 622  Community Organizing and Development for Health

CHSS 624  Health Program Planning & Funding

CHSS 623  Research and Evaluation for Community Health

Elective Coursework (9 credits)

Three (3) electives chosen in consultation with academic advisor

Practice Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 696 Supervised Fieldwork

Culminating Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 698 Capstone Project

Total Credits Required for MPH

45

MS Degree Requirements

The MS degree in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences prepares students to assess and measure exposures to environmental and occupational hazards and to develop control strategies to remediate these exposures. It offers courses that develop the scientific framework and technical skills needed to achieve these objectives. Graduates work as inspectors, health and safety specialists and industrial hygienists for government agencies, institutions, consulting firms and businesses. Upon graduation, students will have attained the concentration competencies found below.

MS-EOHS Competencies

MS - Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

Core Coursework (15 credits)

BIOS 610 Fundamentals of Biostatistics

EPID 610 Fundamentals of Epidemiology

EOHS 610 Fundamentals of Environmental Health

CHSS 610 Fundamentals of Society & Behavioral Health

HPAM 610 Fundamentals of Health Policy & Management

Required Coursework (19 credits)

EOHS 620 Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health

EOHS 628 Environmental Measurements Laboratory

EOHS 622 Environment and Occupational Toxicology

EOHS 626 Industrial Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

EOHS 623 Principles of Industrial Hygiene

EOHS 627 Noise and Radiation Hazards and Controls

Elective Coursework (6 credits)

Two (2) electives chosen in consultation with academic advisor

Practice Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 696 Supervised Fieldwork

Culminating Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 698 Capstone Project

Comprehensive Exam

Total Credits Required

46

DPH Degree Requirements

The DPH is an advanced graduate degree in public health for students interested in becoming public health researchers, teachers, practitioners, and managers in New York City and around the world. The mission of the CUNY DPH program is to contribute new knowledge to understanding the multi-level determinants of population health and to assist communities, governments, and organizations to conduct research and interventions that promote health and prevent disease in populations. Upon graduation, students will have attained the core DPH competencies (as found below) and competencies of their selected concentration.

Core DPH Competencies

DPH - Community, Society, and Health

Core Courses (18 credits)

PUBH 810 Cities, Society, and Health

PUBH 812 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Urban Health Research

PUBH 811 Quantitative Research Methods with Applications to Urban Health

PUBH 813 Qualitative Research Methods with Application to Urban Health

PUBH 814 Leadership & Organizational Change Seminar

EPID 820 Epidemiologic Methods I

Concentration Courses (21 credits)

CHSS 821 Advanced Community Health Interventions

CHSS 820 Social & Behavioral Dimensions of Health: Theory and Methods

CHSS 822 Evaluation of Public Health Programs and Policies

Four (4) advanced research methods or track-specific practice courses, of which one must be from a Graduate Center department outside of Public Health (DPH courses that are cross-listed with another program can count toward this requirement).

Practice Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 896 Practicum Project

Examinations

Students in all cohorts and all tracks take two examinations to test their mastery of the curriculum. Students must apply in advance to take each exam and students must be in good academic standing to apply. The First Exam is given after students have completed core coursework. Students work on the Second Exam after all required coursework has been completed except PUBH 816 and the dissertation (PUBH 900 & PUBH 898). Students cannot take PUBH 816 or begin their dissertation research until they have passed this exam.

Seminars (6 credits)

PUBH 815 Advanced Research Seminar I

PUBH 816 Advanced Research Seminar II

PUBH 898 Dissertation Seminar

Culminating Experience (0 credits)

PUBH 900 Dissertation Supervision

Total Required Credits

48

DPH - Epidemiology

Core Courses (18 credits)

PUBH 810 Cities, Society, and Health

PUBH 812 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Urban Health Research

BIOS 820 Applied Biostatistics I

PUBH 813 Qualitative Research Methods with Application to Urban Health

PUBH 814 Leadership & Organizational Change Seminar

EPID 820 Epidemiologic Methods I

Concentration Courses (21 credits)

EPID 821 Epidemiologic Methods II

EPID 822 Epidemiologic Methods III

EPID 823 Epidemiologic Methods IV

BIOS 821 Applied Biostatistics II

Three (3) advanced research methods or track-specific practice courses, one of which must be from a Graduate Center program

outside of Public Health (DPH courses that are cross-listed with another program can count toward this requirement).

Practice Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 896 Practicum Project

Examinations

Students in all cohorts and all tracks take two examinations to test their mastery of the curriculum. Students must apply in advance to take each exam and students must be in good academic standing to apply. The First Exam is given after students have completed core coursework. Students work on the Second Exam after all required coursework has been completed except PUBH 816 and the dissertation (PUBH 900 & PUBH 898). Students cannot take PUBH 816 or begin their dissertation research until they have passed this exam.

Seminars (6 credits)

PUBH 815 Advanced Research Seminar I

PUBH 816 Advanced Research Seminar II

PUBH 898 Dissertation Seminar

Culminating Experience (0 credits)

PUBH 900 Dissertation Supervision

Total Required Credits

48


DPH - Environmental and Occupational Health

Core Courses (18 credits)

PUBH 810 Cities, Society, and Health

PUBH 812 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Urban Health Research

PUBH 811 Quantitative Research Methods with Applications to Urban Health

PUBH 813 Qualitative Research Methods with Application to Urban Health

PUBH 814 Leadership & Organizational Change Seminar

EPID 820 Epidemiologic Methods I

Concentration Courses (21 credits)

EOHS 820 Emerging Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health

EOHS 821 Environmental and Occupational Health Risk Assessment, Management and Communication in Urban Settings

One (1) urban environment course

Four (4) advanced research methods or track-specific practice courses, one of which must be from a Graduate Center program outside of Public Health (DPH courses that are cross-listed with another program can count toward this requirement)

Practice Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 896 Practicum Project

Examinations

Students in all cohorts and all tracks take two examinations to test their mastery of the curriculum. Students must apply in advance to take each exam and students must be in good academic standing to apply. The First Exam is given after students have completed core coursework. Students work on the Second Exam after all required coursework has been completed except PUBH 816 and the dissertation (PUBH 900 & PUBH 898). Students cannot take PUBH 816 or begin their dissertation research until they have passed this exam.

Seminars (6 credits)

PUBH 815 Advanced Research Seminar I

PUBH 816 Advanced Research Seminar II

PUBH 898 Dissertation Seminar

Culminating Experience (0 credits)

PUBH 900 Dissertation Supervision

Total Required Credits

48

DPH - Health Policy and Management

Core Courses (18 credits)

PUBH 810 Cities, Society, and Health

PUBH 812 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Urban Health Research

PUBH 811 Quantitative Research Methods with Applications to Urban Health

PUBH 813 Qualitative Research Methods with Application to Urban Health

PUBH 814 Leadership & Organizational Change Seminar

EPID 820 Epidemiologic Methods I

Concentration Courses (21 credits)

HPAM 820 Seminar in Health Policy and Management

HPAM 821 Quantitative Methods in Health Services Research

HPAM 822 Public Health Economics

HPAM 823 Health Policy Analysis Methods

 

Three (3) advanced research methods or track-specific practice courses, one of which must be from a Graduate Center program outside of Public Health (DPH courses that are cross-listed with another program can count toward this requirement)

Practice Experience (3 credits)

PUBH 896 Practicum Project

Examinations

Students in all cohorts and all tracks take two examinations to test their mastery of the curriculum. Students must apply in advance to take each exam and students must be in good academic standing to apply. The First Exam is given after students have completed core coursework. Students work on the Second Exam after all required coursework has been completed except PUBH 816 and the dissertation (PUBH 900 & PUBH 898). Students cannot take PUBH 816 or begin their dissertation research until they have passed this exam.

Seminars (6 credits)

PUBH 815 Advanced Research Seminar I

PUBH 816 Advanced Research Seminar II

PUBH 898 Dissertation Seminar

Culminating Experience (0 credits)

PUBH 900 Dissertation Supervision

Total Required Credits

48

Specializations

Optional specializations are available in Maternal, Child, Reproductive, and Sexual Health (available to MPH and DPH students) and Public Health Nutrition (available to DPH students). Requirements for these specializations can be found on the GSPHHP website. They do not replace any concentration requirements.


Academic Resources

Academic Calendar

The CUNY academic calendar provides a unified view of university dates. The academic calendar alters some course meeting dates to account for holidays. As an example, turning a Tuesday into Friday, to make up for classes missed as a result of a Friday holiday. If an unexpected schedule change occurs, or if students cannot attend the rescheduled meeting date due to another holiday conflict, then instructors will make up the lost class time, either through on-line instruction, by rescheduling the class or through alternative instruction and assignments. Faculty are required to document how they make up the time.

Academic Policies

Registration 

Registration instructions are e-mailed to students accepted into or continuing in the graduate programs at GSPHHP. All registration is subject to space availability. For courses that require permission, students must obtain approval prior to registration. Questions regarding course requirements and pre- or co-requisites should be directed to the academic advisor.

Maximum Enrollment

The maximum enrollment during the Fall and Spring semesters is 16 credits each, 4 credits during the Winter term, and 10 credits during the Summer term. Exceptions to the maximum term enrollment must be approved by the School. (See Credit Overload Request.)

Definition of a Credit Hour

In compliance with policy set by the New York State Education Department, one semester hour per week during a 15-week semester (fall and spring) is equivalent to one credit. At least 15 hours of instruction (50 minutes = 1 hour) and at least 30 hours of supplementary assignments are required for each credit earned. The semester hour may include traditional in-person contact time, as well as laboratory sessions, tutorials, supervised fieldwork, individual meetings, electronic communication and field trips. The 15 hours of instruction time can be replaced through other activities equivalent in length that meet the learning outcomes, such as is the case in hybrid and online courses. These activities often include reviewing instructional materials, completing worksheets, discussions and group work (with instructor feedback and participation). Summer and winter courses are subject to the same requirements as those offered during the fall and spring semesters, with respect to the total number of classroom hours and expected learning outcomes.

Definition of Full Time Students

Masters level students are defined as full time if they are enrolled in 12 credits during a regular semester. Doctoral students are defined as full time if they are enrolled in 7 credits during a regular semester.

Levels for Doctoral (DPH) Students

Please note that the term “doctoral level” is interchangeable with the term “professional level.” DPH students begin the program as Level I. Students will advance to level 2 once they have successfully defended their second exam. They will remain in level 2 generally for one semester, during which they will register for PUBH 816 Advanced Research Seminar II (3 credits). Students that need to maintain full time (7 credit) status for financial aid, student visa, or fellowship reasons are advised to register for a four credit independent study with their dissertation chair. Upon successful completion of Research Seminar 2 students will be advanced to level 3.

Maintaining Matriculation

A matriculated graduate student who is not registered for any courses but is completing other degree requirements for graduation must be registered to maintain matriculation. The fee cannot be waived or refunded. Maintenance of matriculation is not proof of attendance. (See Maintenance of Matriculation Request.)

Student Leave of Absence

A matriculated graduate student in good academic standing is eligible to apply for a leave of absence (LOA). If a student is not in good academic standing or has not completed a semester at CUNY GSPHHP, the student’s application will not be considered until grades are posted for the last semester in attendance so that student’s academic eligibility can be verified. (See Leave of Absence Request.)

 

Specific procedures and forms to follow for Leaves of Absence include:

  1. LOA may be approved for a maximum of 4 semesters (2 academic years).
  2. Student must have completed (or complete before commencing the leave) at least one semester in the GSPHHP and must complete the semester immediately before requesting such leave.
  3. If the student wishes to begin the leave during the course of the semester, the student must drop all classes, in accordance with the Registrar’s schedule.
  4. Any changes to the length of the LOA should be submitted for review and approval.

 

The academic LOA is intended to accommodate students’ plans and needs to ensure easy return to school. Students are guaranteed a place in their current program, without reapplication, provided all deadlines and rules are observed.

 

If a student plans to take a course while on academic leave at an institution outside the CUNY system, the course must be evaluated for transferability prior to taking the leave.

 

Any international student with F-1 (student) or J-1 (exchange visitor) status should consult the Office of Student Services before applying for a leave. Any student subject to induction or recall into military service should consult the veteran’s certifying officer before applying for an official leave.

Unapproved Leaves

Students failing to register for a regular semester will be dropped automatically from the active student file. If they wish to return, they must apply for readmission. In all cases of nonattendance, students must still observe the time limitations for degree completion. (See Re-Admission Request.)

Limit on Non Degree Student Credits

Non-Degree students may complete a maximum of 12 credits at the Master’s level only. Admission is not guaranteed and registration approval is based on space availability. Those interested in taking more than 12 credits must apply for matriculation.

Auditing Courses

Courses may be audited with instructor’s permission and based on availability. Students must formally register to audit courses in the same manner as for any other course after receiving permission. The grade notation ‘AUD,’ which carries no earned credit, cannot be changed to any other credit-bearing grade. Audited courses will be included in the calculation of total credits to determine full- or part-time status. Audited courses cannot be used towards financial aid eligibility and therefore will not count toward financial aid load.

Transfer of Credit and Course Residency

Transfer credits taken prior to admission to the CUNY graduate public health program may be applied toward the degree, provided the courses were completed with a grade of B or higher within five years preceding the time of application and are equivalent to comparable courses at the CUNY GSPHHP. Students are required to take at least 70% of all credits required for the degree in residence at CUNY GSPHHP. (See Transfer Credit Request and Course Waiver or Substitution Request.)

Students Matriculated at GSPHHP Taking Courses at Other Institutions

GSPHHP matriculated students in good standing (GPA 3.0) have the option of taking courses at other CUNY colleges on a ‘ePermit’ basis and receiving credit and the grade earned toward their GSPHHP degree. Students who would like to enroll in courses at a non-CUNY college should inquire with their academic advisor. The student registers at a non-CUNY college as a nonmatriculated student and at the end of the semester requests that a transcript be sent to the School Registrar.

Students Matriculated Outside GSPHHP Wanting to Register for GSPHHP Courses

Students matriculated in a graduate program at any other CUNY branch who want to register for a course at GSPHHP are required to use the ePermit system. Students must complete the ePermit process for approval in CUNYfirst. Information regarding their epermit request will be e-mailed to their official university e-mail address. Tuition payment for courses is made at the student’s home school. (See E-Permit Request.)

Awarding of Degrees

Degrees are awarded three times per academic year to candidates that are in good academic standing and that have satisfied all academic degree requirements. Students must maintain active status for the semester in which a student will apply to graduate. Students can do this by taking a course at GSPHHP (or another CUNY college through e-permit) or paying the maintenance of matriculation fee.

Time Limits for Degree Completion

Master’s Degree: All requirements for the degree must be completed within 5 matriculated years.

Doctoral Degree: All requirements for the degree must be completed within 8 matriculated years.

(See Time Extension Request.)

Grading System

Grade

Quality Points

Explanation

A+

4

97.5% - 100%

A

4

92.5% - 97.4%

A-

3.7

90.0% - 92.4%

B+

3.3

87.5% - 89.9%

B

3

82.5% - 87.4%

B-

2.7

80.0% - 82.4%

C+

2.3

77.5% - 79.9%

C

2

70.0% - 77.4%

F

0

<70%

P

-

Pass

S

-

Satisfactory

U

0

Unsatisfactory

CR

-

Credit Earned

W

-

Withdrew (student attended at least one class session)

WA

-

Administrative Withdrawal non-punitive grade assigned to students who had registered for classes at the beginning of the term but did not provide proof of immunization by compliance date (student attended at least one class session)

WD

-

Withdrew Drop (dropped after FA cert date during the program adjustment period. Student attended at least one class session)

WF

0

Withdrew Failing (student attended at least one class session)

WN

-

Never Attended

WU

0

Withdrew Unofficially (student attended at least one class session)

NC

-

No Credit Granted (restricted to regular and compensatory courses. This grade can also be used by colleges for other administrative actions such as disciplinary dismissals.)

INC

-

Incomplete

FIN

0

F from Incomplete (to be used when the INC grade lapses to an F grade)

Z

-

No Grade Submitted by Instructor

PEN

-

Grade Pending

NRP

-

No Record of Progress (exclusive to Dissertation Supervision)

SP

-

Satisfactory Progress – restricted to thesis and research courses requiring more than one semester for completion.

AUD

-

Auditor

Incomplete Grades

Instructors may assign the grade INC, meaning that course work (examinations, assignments, classwork, lab work) was not completed. For an INC grade to be changed to a letter grade, all required coursework must be completed no later than one calendar year after the INC grade has been assigned. If not changed to a letter grade, the INC grade will automatically become permanent (FIN) and be treated the same as an ‘F’ for GPA calculation. Penalties for late submission of coursework that were previously established for the course will remain in effect. Instructors must submit an Incomplete Agreement Proposal for students receiving this grade.

Repeat Courses

Graduate and doctoral students shall not be permitted to repeat courses in which they have previously received a grade of B or better. Courses in which a grade of B- or lower is earned may be repeated only with permission by the Registrar. The maximum number of courses that can be repeated is two. Credit will be granted once, but both course grades will be included in the GPA calculation.

Withdrawal from Courses

If for any reason a student can no longer attend the course, the student must officially withdraw from the course online before the term deadline date recorded in the Academic Calendar. After the program adjustment period, a grade of W is posted to the academic record for withdrawn courses. There is no refund of tuition. W grades are not calculated in a student’s GPA; however, W grades may adversely influence a student’s ability to receive financial aid or impede progress toward degree completion. Failure to follow this procedure will result in a grade of ‘WU’ which is equivalent to a failing grade of ‘F.’ All official withdrawals after the official withdrawal period (3rd – 10th week of classes) must have the approval of the School. Documentation supporting the reason for withdrawing after the official withdrawal date must be provided. Consult with an academic advisor about the necessary documentation.

Academic Standing

Students must remain in good academic standing to continue in the program. Graduate students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to remain in good academic standing. In addition, students may not accumulate more than two open grades (e.g., ‘INC’).

Academic Probation and Disbarment

Students not in good academic standing will be placed on academic probation for at least one semester. Students are placed on probation at the end of each fall and spring semester. The student will be dismissed from further study and the program upon two consecutive semesters on academic probation. Non-degree students whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 will not be approved for further study.

Guidelines on Satisfactory Progress for Doctoral (DPH) Students

In addition to maintaining good academic standing, the following are guidelines for making satisfactory progress in the doctoral program. Students not meeting these guidelines will have a hold placed on their record and be required to meet with their academic advisor to develop a plan to improve progress. Unsatisfactory progress is defined as a student that:

  1. Has not passed all five core Master’s level public health courses prior to enrolling in the second year of coursework (applies only to students that enter the doctoral program without a MPH degree);
  2. Has completed 18 credits and not passed the First Examination;
  3. Has not completed the Second Examination after 45 credits of matriculating;
  4. Has not successfully defended their dissertation proposal by end of the matriculated year six.

Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty is prohibited at CUNY. Academic dishonesty includes cheating, plagiarism, obtaining unfair advantage, and falsifying records and documents. Penalties for academic dishonesty include academic sanctions, such as failing or otherwise reduced grades, and/or disciplinary sanctions, including suspension or expulsion. The CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity can be found here: CUNY Academic Integrity Procedures. In addition, the Graduate Center has a useful reference about avoiding and detecting plagiarism. (See Allegation of Academic Dishonesty.)

Appealing Course Grades

A student who wishes to challenge an earned final grade for a course shall use the grade appeals process. The grade appeals system affords recourse to a student who has evidence or believes that evidence exists to show that an inappropriate grade has been assigned as a result of prejudice, caprice, or other improper conditions such as mechanical error, or assignment of a grade inconsistent with the published grading method. The procedures for grade appeals are:

  1. Student must communicate with the instructor of record to attempt to resolve the matter within three weeks of posting the grade.
  2. Student must explain the grounds for the grade appeal to the instructor and attempt to reach a mutual resolution with the instructor.
  3. If student is unable to resolve the grade with the instructor, then the student may file a formal written grade appeal within five weeks of posting the grade in accordance with the procedures of GSPHHP.

Appeals Procedure for Students on Academic Probation

Student appeals shall be made in writing to the School’s Chief Academic Officer (CAO), who will forward copies to the appropriate academic advisor and department chair. Appeals must be received no later than the first day of classes of the following semester.

 

Upon receipt of this written letter of appeal, the CAO shall convene a probation appeals committee composed of representatives from the graduate program, to include the academic advisor.

 

The specifically constituted probation appeals committee shall meet to review each case and shall produce a written report stating the grounds for its decision. Copies of this report shall be sent to the student and the CAO. The decision of this committee is final. If the appeal is successful, the committee shall send official notification to the registrar.

 

Appeals that are received by the first day of classes shall be handled with dispatch to enable the student to register within the period of late registration and waived of any late registration fee.

Email Communication

Students should note that the School sends official email only to students’ official university email addresses.

Advising

Students have access to academic advising through staff and their assigned faculty advisor. Staff advisors assist students with degree requirements, registration, forms, policies, and procedures. Faculty members from the student’s department offer assistance with selecting electives, helping them plan for fieldwork and capstone, and offering professional guidance.

Student Services and Student Life

Admission

The Office of Admissions helps prospective students as they navigate the CUNY GSPHHP application and admissions processes. Admissions staff can be contacted at: admissions@sph.cuny.edu.

The admissions policies of the CUNY GSPHHP are based on the CUNY mission of access and excellence. The School seeks students that reflect the diversity of New York City and can meet the needs of the local, national, and international public health workforce. All prospective students are encouraged to attend an information session or book an appointment with an admissions counselor. Appointments can be in person, Skype, email, phone call.

For specific admission requirements, please see the GSPHHP website.                

Office of the Registrar

The Office of the Registrar is responsible for and provides the following essential services:

 

The Registrar’s Office can be contacted at: Registrar@sph.cuny.edu.

Students should enroll in classes in CUNYfirst after receiving orientation and advisement. Consult the CUNYfirst training website to learn how to enroll using CUNYfirst. Students are not permitted to register before their assigned date and time. After enrolling in courses, view class schedule to verify that the enrollment is correct.

Academic Records and Transcripts

Academic enrollment records are maintained by the Office of the Registrar. Students can review their records at any time by logging into CUNYfirst. For help with technical issues with using CUNYfirst, visit the training website.

To request an official transcript during the course of study, the student may submit a Transcript Request Form. There is a $7 charge (please enclose a check) for a transcript to be sent to an institution outside of the CUNY system. There is no charge for sending a transcript to any CUNY institution.

Students who have financial holds on their record are not permitted to complete registration or obtain a copy of their transcript, academic record, and/or degree.

FERPA Compliance

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. It is also known as the Buckley Amendment.

CUNY GSPHHP is in full compliance with FERPA and the implementation of its regulations. More information can be found under University Policies and on the U.S. Department of Education website.

Per FERPA regulations, CUNY GSPHHP does not release student information (name, attendance dates, address, telephone, e-mail address, fields of study, and degrees received), except to those documenting a legitimate interest. By filing a request with the Office of the Registrar, a student may ask that such information not be released without the individual student’s written consent. (See Directory Information Non-Disclosure Form and FERPA Consent to Release Educational Records Form.)

Change of Name, Address, or ID

A request to change your name, address, or ID on file with the School can be submitted to the Registrar’s Office.

Degree Audit - Apply to Graduate

Students should refer to the catalog for specific Degree or Certificate Requirements, and consult with their Academic Advisor if additional information is required. Filing procedures are as follows:

Application for Graduation - MS & MPH Program of Study Worksheet

Application for Graduation - DPH Program of Study Worksheet

Application for Graduation - Advanced Certificate Program of Study Worksheet

Exact dates for degree/certificate awards may be found in the Academic Calendar for the appropriate Academic Year. If a filing date falls on a weekend, applications and forms are due the following business day without penalty.

Graduation applications will be processed and audited after the filing date. Students will be contacted via email to their institutional email account if there are any problems. Letters verifying the degree/certificate award can be picked up after the conferral date. Instructions for diploma pick up will be emailed to students. Note that a diploma will not be released to anyone with outstanding financial obligations to the institution.

Only one commencement ceremony is held each year in June. All students who have applied for or earned a degree or certificate for that academic year will receive commencement information via email.

International Students (Designated School Officials)

The Designated School Official provides advice and assistance to students from outside the United States, particularly with regard to immigration issues relating to F - 1 Student Status and J - 1 Exchange Visitor Student category. For more information contact the Office of the Registrar.

Veterans (Certifying Official)

The CUNY Office of Veterans Affairs is dedicated to fostering a sense of community and to developing a channel of communication among veteran and reservist students, and with faculty, staff, and administration. The City University of New York welcomes and supports veterans and reservists on its campuses and recognizes the contribution that they make as citizens and students. CUNY is proud of the level of diversity and academic excellence that veterans and reservists bring to our campuses.

CUNY/Veterans is a virtual one-stop source of information regarding services for veterans, reservists and their dependents and survivors. It is a guide to educational benefits, entitlements, counseling and advocacy resources, which will assist veterans in pursuing their academic and civilian careers. Download CUNY's comprehensive brochure for veterans. For more information regarding Veterans services at CUNY GSPHHP, contact the Office of the Registrar.

Disability Services

Support services and accommodations are available to provide students with disabilities greater accessibility to the academic environment. For more information (with confidentiality) contact the disability coordinator.

Financial Aid

The goal for The Office of Financial Aid at GSPHHP is to provide students with the financial resources and information they need to successfully complete their study. Students receiving Financial Aid will be able to view all of their information in their CUNYfirst account. CUNYfirst announcements are sent via @SPH email addresses. The Financial Aid office can be contacted at: Financialaid@sph.cuny.edu.

Student Eligibility

To be eligible for federal and state aid, a student must be a United States citizen or an eligible non-citizen who is making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree. Students who have defaulted on a loan or owe a repayment of a federal grant at any post-secondary school must make satisfactory repayment arrangements with that institution before they will be eligible to receive Financial Aid.

Application Procedure

The best way to apply for financial aid is by completing the application online. FAFSA on the Web is available at www.fafsa.ed.gov. When the FAFSA is processed, CUNY will receive an electronic record of the student’s application information. The student may be required to provide additional documentation to the Office of Financial Aid to verify the application information or to clarify any discrepancies in the application. For more details on the application process, visit the GSPHHP website.

Student Loans

Graduate and professional degree students may be eligible to receive Federal Direct loans. Federal Direct Loan program allows students to borrow funds from the federal government to help cover the cost of attendance. Like all other loans, these loans must be repaid with interest. For more details about student loans, visit the GSPHHP website. Students can view loan information online by visiting www.nslds.ed.gov and www.studentloans.gov

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is a standard used to measure a student’s successful completion of coursework toward a degree. CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy is required via Financial Aid federal regulation to establish a satisfactory academic progress policy to determine whether an eligible student is making SAP in his or her educational program. Students who are found to be in violation of the parameters set forth by the SAP policy are ineligible to receive most forms of federal financial aid.

All students (whether aid recipients or not) will be measured against the Title IV Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards at the end of each academic year (spring semester) in order to determine eligibility for the upcoming year. Those who fail to meet the academic standards will have their federal aid automatically suspended until they meet the minimum standards that are listed below.

NOTE: Private scholarships, tuition waivers, and departmental scholarships are not subject to SAP standards. Merit scholarships have their own set of academic standards.

 

A) Minimum GPA  All Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 or better

Minimum Cumulative GPA

Graduate

3.0

DPH

3.0

B) Maximum timeframe – All students are expected to complete their respective educational programs within a specified timeframe. Once this timeframe has elapsed, students are no longer eligible to receive most forms of financial aid.

Master’s Degree: All requirements for the degree must be completed within 5 matriculated years.

Doctoral Degree: All requirements for the degree must be completed within 8 matriculated years.

 

C) Pace of Progression – Students must meet Pace and progress toward graduation by successfully completing 2/3 of the cumulative units attempted.

Pace = Cumulative number of hours (credit hours) that you have successfully completed

                         Cumulative number of hours (credit hours) that you have attempted

Credit-hours that are transferred into GSPHHP and successfully articulated toward the completion of the student’s degree will be counted as both earned and attempted hours for the purpose of this standard. Courses that are listed as Incomplete (I) or Withdrawal (W) will be counted as attempted but not earned. Repeated courses will always be treated as attempted hours.

 

Academic Programs, Total Credits Required to Graduate

MS in Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences              46

MPH in Community Health Education                                    45

MPH in Environmental & Occupational Health Science          46

MPH in Epidemiology and Biostatistics                                  45

MPH in Health Policy & Management                                     45

MPH in Public Health Nutrition                                                45

MPH in Public Health Geographic Information Science         45

DPH in Community, Society, and Health                                60

DPH in Environmental and Occupational Health                    60

DPH in Epidemiology                                                              60

DPH in Health Policy and Management                                  60

 

Frequency of SAP Evaluation

GSPHHP will evaluate SAP on an annual basis following the completion of the spring semester. In general, students who are in violation of the parameters set forth by the SAP policy upon an evaluation are not eligible to receive most forms of financial aid during subsequent payment periods. Students who are deemed ineligible upon an evaluation are designated with a status of “Not Meet” and are notified immediately by email upon the status being assigned.

Office of the Bursar

The Bursar’s Office mission is to provide professional, courteous, timely, and accurate services to students and the GSPHHP community while adhering to all policies, procedures, and regulatory requirements set forth by CUNY, NY State, and the Federal Government. The Office’s core responsibilities include collecting and processing tuition and fee payments, maintaining student financial records, managing student refunds, overseeing student payment plans, and implementing collection. The Bursar’s Office can be contacted at: bursar@sph.cuny.edu. Please note that inquiries must be sent from official @SPH email addresses to ensure security verification.

Tuition and Fees

All tuition and fees are determined by the CUNY Board of Trustees and are subject to change without notice. In the event of an increase in the tuition and fee prices, payments already made will be treated as partial payments. Notification will be given to students concerning the amount owed and the deadline date to pay.

Tuition is charged based upon the following criteria:

Mandatory Term Fees are charged based upon the following criteria:

If a student is enrolled full-time and drops to part-time status on or after the first official day of classes, the full-time fee rate is charged. Mandatory fees are non-refundable except for students who drop all their classes prior to the first official day of classes.

The School also charges general fees for services or special documents. These fees include application fees, re-admission fees, transcript fees, etc. For a complete listing of all tuition rates and fees, please see the Tuition and Fees page on the GSPHHP website.

Commitment Deposit

New students are required to pay a commitment deposit. The deposit will be applied to tuition charges for the applicable term. Please see view the commitment deposit form on the GSPHHP website.

Payment and Refunds

Payment due dates can be found on the GSPHHP Academic Calendar. Information about payment options can be found on the GSPHHP website. If a student has registered for courses and chooses not to attend, they must drop classes prior to the first official day of the semester (this may not be the first day that their class meets) to avoid tuition and fee charges. Any student that does not officially drop their classes prior to the start of the term will be charged tuition and fees based upon the University’s academic calendar and policy.

 

Students can be issued refunds for a number of reasons including dropped classes, fee changes and excess financial aid. For more details about the refund policy and other payment issues, see the GSPHHP website.

Career Services

Students seeking assistance in job searches, resume and cover letter writing, professional networking, and interview preparation can schedule an appointment with a career services/writing specialist. More information about career services can be found on the GSPHHP website.

CUNY Policies

All general CUNY policies apply to the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, including such issues as nondiscrimination, sexual harassment, and freedom of information. All of these policies and many more are available on the University website.


Courses

Number

Credits

Course Title

Course Description

Pre-requisite/Co-requisite

BIOS 610

3

Fundamentals of Biostatistics

Application and interpretation of basic descriptive and inferential statistical methods for the analysis of public health and other health-related data.

N/A

BIOS 611

3

Principles of Biostatistics

This is a first-level requirement for students specializing in EPI-BIOS, who will take subsequent intermediate and advanced level biostatistics courses. It will introduce students to the theoretical basis for and practical application of common statistical methods and principles used in public health.

N/A

BIOS 620

3

Applied Biostatistics I

Topics include: simple and multiple linear regression, logistic regression, model building techniques, including assessing for multi-collinearity, effect measure modification, non-linearity and model fit statistics, and their use to answers questions of risk stratification and causal inference. Focus on practical applications, utilizing statistical software.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611)

BIOS 621

3

Applied Biostatistics II

Topics include: generalized linear models for binary and count outcomes, random and mixed effects models, and survival analysis. Project-based assessments focus on practical applications utilizing statistical software.

PRE: BIOS 620 and EPID 620

BIOS 622

3

Analysis of Categorical Data

An introduction to statistical models for analyzing categorical data, with emphasis on examples from the health sciences. Topics include: contingency tables and corresponding tests such as chi-square, CMH and trend test, count data, logistic regression and log-linear models.

PRE: BIOS 620

BIOS 623

3

Analysis of Longitudinal Data

An introduction to statistical models and methods for analyzing longitudinal data in public health. Topics include: longitudinal designs and cohort sampling, general linear models for longitudinal data, marginal & random effects models, time-dependent covariates, missing values.

   

PRE: BIOS 620

BIOS 624

3

Design and Analysis of Complex Surveys

This course provides an introduction to statistical issues in the design and analysis of complex surveys, with a particular emphasis on public health research. Topics include: basic sampling techniques, stratified and cluster sampling, non-sampling errors, and case studies.

PRE: BIOS 620

BIOS 625

3

Survival Analysis

An introduction to regression modeling used in the analysis of time-to-event data in epidemiological, biostatistical, and other health-related research. Topics include: survival functions, proportional-hazards, parametric and competing-risks models, missing data, using case studies.

PRE: BIOS 620

BIOS 626

3

Data Analysis

Probability-free alternatives to classical statistics, concentrating on graphical and robust methods. Topics include: data summaries; transformations; the jackknife and resampling schemes; robust estimation; and robust regression methods.

PRE: BIOS 620

BIOS 627

3

Analysis of Variance

Intermediate topics in analysis of variance (ANOVA), with an emphasis on exploratory aspects. Topics including: one, two and many way layouts; decomposition and partitioning of variance; fixed, random, and mixed effects models; repeated measures; contrasts; multiple comparisons; and robust analogs.

PRE: BIOS 620

BIOS 640

3

Introduction to Bayesian Statistics

The course introduces the fundamentals of Bayesian inference. It covers simple Bayesian models and complicated models, including linear regression and hierarchical models. Bayesian computational methods, especially Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods will be discussed. Emphasis will also be placed on model checking and evaluation for public health research applications.

PRE: BIOS 621 and EPI 621

BIOS 697

0.5-6

Independent Study in Biostatistics

Independent study in biostatistics.

PRE: Departmental permission

BIOS 820

3

Applied Biostatistics I

Topics include: simple and multiple linear regression, logistic regression, model building techniques, including assessing for multi-collinearity, effect measure modification, non-linearity and model fit statistics, and their use to answers questions of risk stratification and causal inference. Focus on practical applications, utilizing statistical software.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) or equivalent

BIOS 821

3

Applied Biostatistics II

Topics include: generalized linear models for binary and count outcomes, random and mixed effects models, and survival analysis. Project-based assessments focus on practical applications utilizing statistical software.

PRE: EPID 820 and BIOS 820

BIOS 840

3

Applied Biostatistics III

Topics include extensions of generalized linear models to correlated data (Generalized Estimating Equations and Generalized Linear Mixed Models) and application of instrumental variables and other techniques, such as propensity scores, to causal inference. Missing data imputation methods are also discussed. Focus on practical applications, utilizing statistical software.

PRE: BIOS 821 and EPID 821

BIOS 695

0.5-6

Topics in Biostatistics

Courses on current topics in biostatistics.

N/A

CHSS 697

0.5-6

Independent Study in Community Health

Independent study in community health education.

PRE: Departmental permission

CHSS 610

3

Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Health

This course provides a topical and theoretical survey of social and behavioral issues in public health

N/A

CHSS 620

3

Community Health Assessment

This course prepares students to collect and analyze data on community health from a variety of sources, to identify problems and assets, and to develop objectives for community health interventions.

PRE: CHSS 610

CHSS 622

3

Community Organizing and Development for Health

Prepares students to work in communities by presenting the theory and practice of organizing for social justice, skills for promoting leadership development within communities, and the tools to create and sustain healthy organizations.

PRE or CO: CHSS 620

CHSS 621

3

Community Health Interventions

An introduction to community-level interventions as explained by theories of individual, organizational and community change from the disciplines of psychology, sociology and health education.

PRE: CHSS 620 or CO: CHSS 623

CHSS 623

3

Research and Evaluation for Community Health

Basic concepts, methods and approaches for evaluation research applied to community health education and health-related programs through a critical review of literature and a program evaluation design.

PRE or CO: CHSS 621; PRE: CHSS 622

CHSS 624

3

Health Program Planning and Funding

This course will engage students in identifying or designing a health program, finding funding sources, and developing a proposal covering program need, program objectives, a management and quality assurance plan, preliminary work, evaluation, budget, and a plan for funding support.

PRE: CHSS 623

CHSS 660

3

Health Equity and Social Justice

Analysis of health disparities and exploration of social, economic, political, and historical determinants of health, including unequal access and treatment by race and ethnicity, patterns of immigration, cultural bases of health, strategies for communicating with diverse populations, and interventions for reducing and eliminating ethnic and racial health disparities from an ethics and public policy perspective.

N/A

CHSS 661

3

History and Philosophy of Public Health

Examination of historical development and philosophical concepts underlying the practice of public health; social, political, and institutional forces shaping public health policy and the commitment to monitor, protect, and promote the public's health; emphasis on the relationship between public health knowledge, values, and actions.

N/A

CHSS 662

3

Planning and Evaluation of Community-based Public Health Programs

Fundamental approaches and methods for planning and evaluating public health programs. Application of theory and the empirical literature as a means of developing skills in evidence-based public health practice.

N/A

CHSS 640

3

Communicating Public Health

This course will frame public health communication in terms of history and theory, and engage students in understanding how these are applied in various contexts. Theories and practice will come from the fields of communication, linguistics, sociology & psychology, as well as human factors. The course covers the basics of design, implementation and evaluation of public health communications in the wide range of modalities – written, spoken, graphic and digital. Throughout the course we will focus on developing skills to analyze and critique public health messaging and campaigns. The goal is for students to enhance their ability to communicate effectively to promote public health goals.

N/A

CHSS 897

0.5-6

Independent Study in Community, Society and Health

Independent study in community, society and health

PRE: Departmental permission

CHSS 820

3

Social and Behavioral Dimensions of Health: Theory and Methods

This course prepares students to understand the impact of social structures and social environments on health and health behavior. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course examines the contributions of sociology, anthropology, economics, psychology, history and political science to the study of health and health behavior.

N/A

CHSS 821

3

Advanced Community Health Interventions

This course prepares students to lead research/intervention teams that plan, implement and evaluate community health interventions

in community settings.

PRE or CO: CHSS 820; PRE: at least two master's level courses in program development or evaluation and at least one year of work experience in community health settings. These requirements can be waived with departmental permission for students who bring other relevant experience to the course.

CHSS 822

3

Evaluation of Public Health Programs and Policies

Prepares students to design evaluations of public health programs and policies; uses a systems approach to identify key constituencies and tasks in evaluation; students design an evaluation of an existing program or policy.

N/A

CHSS 695

0.5-6

Topics in Community Health Education

Courses on current topics in community health education.

N/A

CHSS 895

0.5-6

Topics in Community, Society and Health

Courses on current topics in community, society and health

N/A

EOHS 897

0.5-6

Independent Study in Environmental and Occupational Health

Independent study in environmental and occupational health

PRE: Departmental permission

EOHS 697

0.5-6

Independent Study in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

Independent study in environmental and occupational health sciences

PRE: Departmental permission

EOHS 640

3

Biohazards and Emergency Response

This class covers the biology of microorganisms and toxins most frequently considered in perpetrated attacks. It also considers technology for detection and control for first responders, lab practitioners and other healthcare professionals, emergency communication, and prevention. In addition to classroom activities, students participate in group projects to simulate bioterrorism events and responses; government regulation, chain of evidence, and related topics are covered.

PRE or CO: EOHS 620 or departmental permission

EOHS 610

3

Fundamentals of Environmental Health

Survey of chemical, physical and biological factors influencing quality of ambient, workplace and home environments. Topics include: air and water pollution; radiation; hazardous substances; solid wastes; food protection; and natural and human-made disasters

N/A

EOHS 620

3

Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health

Introduction to basic concepts and issues of occupational safety and health, including recognition and control of chemical and physical hazards, and the regulations governing these hazards

PRE or CO: EOHS 610

EOHS 621

3

Environmental Chemistry

Survey of chemical and physical concepts essential for understanding environmental and occupational health sciences, including study of the atmosphere, air and water pollution, and energy resources. Physical principles of heat and energy, and radioactivity will be discussed

PRE or CO: EOHS 610

EOHS 622

3

Environmental and Occupational Toxicology

Introduction to principles of toxicology with emphasis on environment and occupational aspects. Systematic review of the toxicology of major organ systems; health effects of categories of toxins, such as solvents and metals; and review of toxicological testing and evaluation

PRE or CO: EOHS 610

EOHS 623

3

Principles of Industrial Hygiene

Recognition, evaluation, and control of industrial hazards due to chemical and physical agents. Topics include occupational health standards, regulatory agency activities, effects of contaminants on human health, sampling and control of hazards, current issues.

PRE: EOHS 620

EOHS 624

3

Environmental Audits and Remediation

Introduction to environmental investigation and remediation technologies commonly used in professional practice. Presents proper practices for assessing and remediating asbestos, lead-based paint, indoor air quality, and underground storage tanks situations and Phase I site audits.

PRE: EOHS 620

EOHS 625

3

Hazard Evaluation and Instrumentation

An introduction to instrumental methods used to assess environmental and occupational health hazards. Principles and operation of commonly used direct reading instruments and demonstration of their application

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611), EOHS 620, and EOHS 621

EOHS 626

3

Industrial Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

This course covers the fundamentals of design, operation and evaluation of air moving systems for local and dilution exhaust ventilation systems. Engineering controls are the preferred method for the control of airborne hazards in the workplace.

PRE: EOHS 620 or CO: EOHS 620 with departmental permission

EOHS 627

3

Noise and Radiation Hazards and Controls

Introduction to basic concepts of sound, noise measurement, and noise control in community and occupational environments. Health and safety problems involved with the use of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation, with an emphasis on identification and control.

PRE: EOHS 620; PRE or CO: EOHS 623

EOHS 628

4

Environmental Measurements Laboratory

Physical, chemical, and instrumental methods for measuring environmental and occupational contaminants

PRE or CO: EOHS 621

EOHS 629

1

Environmental Health GISc Lab

Application of GISc to examine and analyze environmental health, population, and natural and built environmental data for planning and research.

PRE or CO: EOHS 610

EOHS 630

3

Principles of GISc for Public Health

The use of Geographic Information Systems relating to public health in the teaching of social, earth, and life sciences. Demographic studies and graphic presentation of demographic analysis. The use of modern mapping techniques in studies of the Earth Environment with emphasis on environmental health and environmental justice

N/A

EOHS 631

4

Spatial Analysis and Environmental Modeling for Public Health

Use of Geographic Information Systems for conducting research and spatial analysis in the natural and social sciences with emphasis on public health. The advanced use of computer mapping and spatial analysis technologies for studying the physical and human components of the earth's environment.

PRE: EOHS 630

EOHS 632

3

The Geography of Urban Health

A geographical examination of urban health including the historical perspective of health geography; mapping and spatial analysis of health and health impacts; the social and spatial patterning of health; the geography of health inequalities and disparities; health and social/spatial mobility; and the effects of urban segregation, overcrowding, and poverty on disease illustrated through GISc laboratory exercises.

PRE: EOHS 630

EOHS 641

3

Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology

Using a case study approach, this course will explore epidemiologic methods for studying environmentally and occupationally related diseases. Key methodologic issues, such as exposure and outcome assessment, cumulative and multiple exposures, exposure pathways, research ethics, and policy implications of epidemiological findings will also be discussed. The focus will be on the environmental and occupational health of urban populations.

PRE or CO: EOHS 620

EOHS 642

3

Hazardous Waste Management

A review of the sources, transportation and control of hazardous chemical wastes. Regulatory requirements, disposal methods and health effects will also be presented.

PRE or CO: EOHS 610

EOHS 643

3

Industrial Safety and  Management

Fundamental concepts and principles of industrial accident prevention and loss control; safety program organization; hazard recognition and evaluation; accident investigation; machine guarding; tire protection; personal protective equipment

PRE: EOHS 620

EOHS 644

3

Introduction to Quantitative Methods of Geography

Emerging fields of geospatial statistics, applying quantitative techniques to real-world geographic problems. Concepts and application of exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA), traditional statistics and geospatial statistics within various software packages, including GeoDa, ArcGIS, [R], and Excel.

PRE: EOHS 630

EOHS 645

3

Demography and Population Geography with GISc

The world's population in the context of geography and demography. The theoretical framework, defined by the fields of population geography and demography, will be studied and explored qualitatively and quantitatively. Data sources and acquisition, population metrics (growth, change distribution, and composition), population and food supply, mortality, fertility, and migration. Lab work will provide students with hands-on experience using GISc to explore demographic concepts.

N/A

EOHS 660

4

Advanced Methods in Industrial Hygiene

This advanced industrial hygiene course examines methods for assessing physical hazards and occupational controls of workplace hazards, including noise, radiation (ionizing and non-ionizing), vibration, thermal stress, and pressure. Students examine potential worker exposure to physical agents, assess exposure to physical agents, determine when physical agents may be hazardous to workers, and recommend strategies for controlling exposures, where necessary. The course also explores the fundamentals of design, operation and evaluation of air moving systems for local and dilution exhaust ventilation systems.

PRE: EOHS 620

EOHS 661

2

Environmental Research & Writing

This course provides an overview of environmental and occupational research and writing techniques. The course explains how to conduct a rapid literature review, how to use research and citation software and how to use widely available spreadsheets programs (such as Excel and Google Sheets) to analyze and present data. The course provides an overview of environmental and occupational databases online and how to use data to investigate environmental and occupational health problems.

PRE or CO: EOHS 610 or departmental permission

EOHS 662

4

Workshop in GISc Research for Public Health

An advanced examination of mapping and of new computer-aided technologies in the natural and social sciences, including research design and methodology and designing and conducting an independent GIS public health research project, conforming to generally acceptable professional geographical practices and techniques, under the supervision of faculty.

PRE: EOHS 631 or departmental permission

EOHS 820

3

Emerging Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health

This course examines the impact of macro-level trends – such as corporate globalization, immigration patterns, and technological development – on the urban physical environment. It focuses on the relationship between the urban infrastructure (e.g., housing, transportation, sewage and waste disposal) and environmental media (e.g., air quality, water quality and land use). This course also examines the impact of macro-level trends on occupational health and safety conditions, focusing on such issues as outsourcing of manufacturing jobs to developing nations, the rise in the service and informal economies, immigrant labor, de-unionization, the new working class and the loss of the safety net. It examines the effectiveness of current policies in addressing these problems. Through focused readings and in-depth examination of case studies, students develop the tools for analyzing how macro-social trends affect the urban physical environment, workplaces and health. Teams of students then analyze an environmental and occupational issue, illustrate how it affects urban communities, and develop solutions to reduce environmental and occupational health burdens.

N/A

EOHS 821

3

Environmental and Occupational Health Risk Assessment, Management and Communication in Urban Settings

This course examines the development and use of Environmental and Occupational Health risk assessment and its policy implications as applied to urban settings. Approaches to assessing, communicating about and managing urban Environmental and Occupational Health risks are critically analyzed within their political, economic, social and cultural contexts. Risk assessment and risk management procedures are evaluated in light of several themes including public participation, sustainable development, environmental justice, and natural and technological hazards. Students conduct risk assessments on real world environmental and occupational health problems, develop effective written and verbal approaches to communicating the results of risk assessments, and critically review case studies in which Environmental and Occupational Health risk assessments have been used in setting public policy.

N/A

EOHS 895

0.5-6

Topics in Environmental and Occupational Health

Course on current topics in environmental and occupational health

N/A

EOHS 695

0.5-6

Topics in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

Courses on current topics in environmental and occupational health sciences

N/A

EPID 697

0.5-6

Independent Study in Epidemiology

Independent study in epidemiology

PRE: Departmental permission

EPID 897

0.5-6

Independent Study in Epidemiology

Independent study in epidemiology

PRE: Departmental permission

EPID 610

3

Fundamentals of Epidemiology

Apply principles and methods of epidemiological analysis. Identify and interpret epidemiological data. Illustrate and investigate incidence, distribution, determinants, and control of disease.

N/A

EPID 611

3

Principles of Epidemiology

 A first-level requirement for student specializing in EPI-BIOS, who will take subsequent intermediate and advanced level epidemiology courses. It will introduce students to epidemiologic theory, principles, methods and measures commonly used in public health.

N/A

EPID 620

3

Epidemiological Methods I

A rigerous introduction to the design and conduct of epidemiologic studies, including causal inference, measurement, major study designs, threats to validity, such as confounding and selection bias, and their application to public health issues. The class includes lectures on research methods, hands-on data analysis exercises and discussions about determining causation through epidemiological research.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611)

EPID 621

3

Epidemiological Methods II

Modern approaches to the design and conduct of epidemiologic studies, including use of directed acyclic graphs to inform study design and the use of instrumental variables to avoid confounding. Emphasis is placed on identifying threats to validity. This course will also cover survey methods used in epidemiologic research.

PRE: BIOS 620 and EPID 620

EPID 622

3

Applied Research: Data Management and Analysis

An opportunity to  apply epidemiological and statistical concepts to create a database, enter, format and clean  data and work with publicly available data to answer  research questions, test the hypotheses associated with it, and report results in manuscript format.

PRE: BIOS 621 and EPI 621

EPID 623

3

Clinical Trials and Experimental Design

In-depth consideration of experimental study designs, with a focus on the various design options for randomized controlled trials (RCT) for medical and behavioral interventions. The strengths and limitations of the various experimental study design options as well as experimental  approaches in comparison with related observational epidemiologic studies is discussed. Specific topics to be discussed include sampling, intervention allocation options, hypotheses that might be tested (e.g. superiority versus non-inferiority), sample size and power considerations, adverse event monitoring, regulatory (FDA) considerations, and statistical analysis of trial data. Students apply the concepts discussed to analyze data from an RCT and prepare their findings in manuscript format.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611)

EPID 624

3

Social Epidemiology

Theory and methods of social epidemiology to gain an understanding of how an individual’s interactions with factors associated with the social fabric of the society affect and shape health outcomes. This class will also examine the etiology and prevention of disease within both ecological (multi-level) and multidisciplinary frameworks.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611)

EPID 625

3

Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases

Description and quantification of the role chronic diseases in population health with an overview of the etiology, risk prediction, prevention and control of  major chronic diseases. Prevailing theories and controversies regarding the etiology of chronic diseases will be addressed in a national and global context.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611)

EPID 626

3

Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

This course is an introduction to concepts regarding the occurrence of infections and infectious diseases in human populations, epidemiologic methods for studying infectious diseases, and approaches to infectious disease control.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611)

EPID 627

3

Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology

This course covers current research, controversial issues, and methodological problems in the epidemiology of male and female reproduction and perinatal health. Topics include: epidemiology of fertility and infertility, contraception and hormone usage, reproductive cancers and other diseases, pregnancy complications, maternal mortality, adverse pregnancy outcomes and birth defects.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611)

EPID 628

3

Nutritional Epidemiology

This course is designed to help students interpret and evaluate current research in nutritional epidemiology and design and conduct epidemiologic studies in nutrition, including use of secondary analyses of large-scale studies, such as NHANES, NYCHANES, BRFSS, PRAMS, etc.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611)

EPID 629

3

Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology

Using a case study approach, this course will explore epidemiologic methods for studying environmentally and occupationally related diseases. Key methodological issues, such as exposure and outcome assessment, cumulative and multiple exposures, exposure pathways, research ethics, and policy implications of epidemiological findings will also be discussed. The focus will be on the environmental and occupational health of urban populations.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611) and EOHS 610

EPID 641

3

Modeling and Making the Most of your Data with R

This course will provide students with a toolkit for making the most of their data using R when appropriate. This course will consolidate many of the skills previously taught in data analysis and modeling. It will focus on the practical application of these skills throughout the lifecycle of a research project, and provide illustrations and applications of relevant techniques in R. It will provide grounding in the use of R.

PRE: EPID 621 and BIOS 621

EPID 642

3

Psychiatric and Mental Health Epidemiology

An introduction to the epidemiology of mental health and mental illness. This course takes an explicit epidemiologic perspective, focusing on the study of the burden and determinants of mental illness. It reviews the extant literature on the epidemiology of specific disorders and evaluates studies that investigate risk factors for mental illness. We will consider methodological challenges involved in the study of mental health and illness such as limitations to diagnostic techniques and screening instruments and issues surrounding co-morbidity. The course will also address the social consequences of mental illness, and consider how we may apply epidemiologic methods to promoting psychological wellbeing in the general population

PRE: EPID 620 or equivalent with experience with statistical software (e.g., SPSS, SAS or STATA) preferred but not required

EPID 643

3

Public Health Surveillance

Public health surveillance is the fundamental mechanism that public health agencies use to monitor the health of the communities they serve. It is a core function of public health practice, and its purpose is to provide a factual basis from which agencies can appropriately set priorities, plan programs, and take actions to identify and reduce disparities, promote, and protect the public’s health. This course will cover the principles of public health surveillance, including historical context, vital registration, disease reporting regulations and notifiable diseases, surveillance registries, surveillance for behaviors and risk factors, administrative data sources in surveillance, epidemiologic uses of surveillance data, legal and ethical issues, and dissemination of surveillance information

PRE: (EPID 610 or EPID 611) and (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611)

EPID 820

3

Epidemiologic Methods I

A rigerous introduction to the design and conduct of epidemiologic studies, including causal inference, measurement, major study designs, threats to validity, such as confounding and selection bias, and their application to public health issues. The class includes lectures on research methods, hands-on data analysis exercises and discussions about determining causation through epidemiological research.

PRE: EPID 620 or EPID 621 or equivalent

EPID 821

3

Epidemiological Methods II

Modern approaches to the design and conduct of epidemiologic studies, including use of directed acyclic graphs to inform study design and the use of instrumental variables to avoid confounding. Emphasis is placed on identifying threats to validity. This course will also cover survey methods used in epidemiologic research.

PRE: EPID 820 and BIOS 820

EPID 822

3

Epidemiologic Methods III

This course exposes students to advanced methods in epidemiologic research and provides students with an opportunity to consider how these strategies complement and improve upon the more commonly used strategies. Emphasis will be placed on developing practical skills relevant to contemporary epidemiologic research. Students will explore individual-level exposure-disease associations using classic study designs and techniques, as well as use  methods that shift away from identifying individual risk factors for disease causation to the description and analysis of environmental systems that give rise to both exposures and health states. The class includes lectures on research methods, hands-on data analysis exercises and discussions about determining causation through epidemiological research.

PRE: BIOS 821 and EPID 821

EPID 823

3

Epidemiologic Methods IV

New and emerging approaches in epidemiology using rigerous and axiomatic causal inference techniques. Topics covered included Mendelian randomization, g-estimation and marginal structural models. Consideration is also given to the role of data generating models in contrast to data driven agnostic aproaches, including the use of "big data".

PRE: EPID 822

EPID 895

0.5-6

Topics in Epidemiology

Courses on current topics in epidemiology

N/A

EPID 695

0.5-6

Topics in Epidemiology

Courses on current topics in epidemiology

N/A

FNPH 697

0.5-6

Independent Study in Food and Nutrition in Public Health

Independent study in food and nutrition in public health

PRE: Departmental permission

FNPH 620

3

Community Nutrition Education

Nutrition programs and materials for health promotion in the community

N/A

FNPH 621

3

Principles of Public Health Nutrition

Fundamentals of nutrition in public health as they apply to health promotion and disease prevention for individuals and society, with emphasis on urban populations

N/A

FNPH 622

3

Food and Nutrition Through the Lifecycle

Relation of nutrition to growth and development. Food and nutrition requirements throughout the lifecycle

N/A

FNPH 820

3

Food Policy

This policy course examines the influence of the food industry and of government on the U.S. food system and the way we eat, and on efforts to prevent and treat chronic diet-related conditions, such as obesity.

PRE: 24 credits that apply to MPH degree. (The above to be confirmed with departmental permission.)

FNPH 690

3

Seminar in Food and Nutrition Practice

Group supervision for students enrolled in food and nutrition practice courses. Includes discussion of current issues in a context of students’ experiential learning.

PRE: Departmental permission

FNPH 691

3

Supervised Practice in Medical Nutrition Therapy

Supervised practice and experiential learning in application of medical nutrition therapy.

PRE: Departmental permission

FNPH 692

3

Supervised Practice in Food Service

Supervised practice and experiential learning in professional food service settings

PRE: Departmental permission

FNPH 693

3

Supervised Practice in Community and Public Health Nutrition

Supervised practice and experiential learning in professional food service settings

PRE: Departmental permission

FNPH 695

0.5-6

Topics in Public Health Nutrition

Courses on current topics in nutrition

N/A

HPAM 697

0.5-6

Independent Study in Health Policy and Management

Independent study in health policy and management

PRE: Departmental permission

HPAM 897

0.5-6

Independent Study in Health Policy and Management

Independent study in health policy and management

PRE: Departmental permission

HPAM 641

3

Exploring Evidence in Health Policy & Services

Course will teach students to evaluate evidence from major health policy initiatives in recent decades. Investigations of the effects of the RAND and Oregon Health Insurance Experiments, the Massachusetts Health Insurance Reform, and the Affordable Care Act will be critically analyzed, as will other regional and local policies enacted to lower cost, or increase quality and access. Students will analyze secondary observational data and prepare a research brief.

N/A

HPAM 610

3

Fundamentals of Health Policy and Management

Examination of the organization, delivery and financing of health care in the United States as it pertains to the health policy-making process, including the organization of the agencies and personnel constituting the health care system, and analysis of government structure, laws, and regulations. Theoretical concepts, practice, and implementation of health programs in organized settings, including the planning, administration, management, evaluation, and policy analysis of public health agencies and private sector managed care.

N/A

HPAM 620

3

Public Health Management

Focuses on management issues in a variety of organizational settings and the larger public health environment; describes managerial functions and problem solving strategies, financial management principles, and management models for change; develops specific skills in program management, budgeting, workforce development, and managing intersectoral programs.

PRE: CHSS 610 and HPAM 610

HPAM 621

3

Health Economics

This course in health economics introduces students to essential microeconomic concepts as they apply to health systems, individual and public health.

PRE: CHSS 610 and HPAM 610

HPAM 622

3

Public Health and Health Care Law

Reviews key areas of the legal process relevant to health care delivery and public health; analyzes major court decisions that have affected the field and selected federal, state and local statutes that affect public health and health care practice; acquaints students with the basics of legal research and legal reasoning as applied to public health and health care.

PRE OR CO: (CHSS 610 and HPAM 610) or with departmental permission for those with at least one year of health care experience

HPAM 623

3

Comparative Analyses of Urban Health Care Systems

Examines unique challenges and opportunities for delivering health care in developed and developing world cities; analyses impact of national and local policies and social and political factors on health care access, quality and outcomes; introduces empirical methods for making comparative studies across municipalities and nations.

PRE: CHSS 610 and HPAM 610

HPAM 624

3

Public Health Advocacy

Prepares students to advocate for policies that promote public health, develops skills in planning and implementing advocacy campaigns; assess theories on role of coalitions and advocacy in changing health policy.

PRE: CHSS 610 and HPAM 610

HPAM 625

3

Public Health Policy Analysis

Examines common approaches and concepts of policy analysis for public health, including market efficiency and failures, cost-benefit analysis, problem and decision making analysis; describes critiques of such models with public health examples; focuses on the Health Impact Assessment as a method for analyzing costs and benefits of health and non-health policies.

PRE: CHSS 610 and HPAM 610

HPAM 640

3

Introduction to Health Survey and Methodology

Introduction to health survey design and methodology. Topics include: types of inquiries best suited for survey instruments, conditions necessary for sampling, how to design, and develop both questions and survey instruments, how to test validity and reliability, conduct data cleaning and analysis.

PRE: BIOS 610 or BIOS 611

HPAM 660

3

Conducting Community Needs and Strengths Assessments

Introduction to community needs and strengths assessments. Identification, gathering, synthesis and presentation of population (neighborhood) specific data related to a public health issue or condition using technologically appropriate presentations. Analysis of multiple data sources including: U.S., Census, State, county, and neighborhood quantitative data as well as key informant interviews and focus groups.

PRE: 9 credits of core courses in MPH

HPAM 661

3

Health Care Financial Management

Study of the basic principles of health-care accounting. Analysis of health-care financial statements and responsibility-accounting techniques. Evaluation of methods of managing working capital, budgeting, using cost information in decision making, controlling costs, and financing capital projects in the health-care setting. Analysis of approaches to pricing, rate setting, and cost control in the health-care reimbursement environment.

N/A

HPAM 662

3

Health Economics

Economic analysis of the structure, performance, and government policy in the health care sector of the economy. Demand and supply of health care services, the role of third party payers, and the public policy debate over government reform of the health care system. Microeconomic, econometric, and political philosophy concepts relevant to issues of justice in health care.

N/A

HPAM 663

3

Health Policy and Administration in Public Health

Study of public health policy and its impact on health care service organization, administration, and delivery. Study of public policies that drive health care organization and delivery. Examples of special topics in public health policy such as Medicare and Medicaid development and changes. Administrative responses to policy shifts. Increasing complexity and frequent changes in law and regulation change how health care services are defined and delivered.

PRE: HPAM 610

HPAM 664

3

Health Services Development and Implementation in Community and Public Health

Planning, developing and implementing public health and personal health services and relationship to population health. Examination of health planning in the United States and New York State from historical and contemporaneous perspectives. Public policy agenda shaping health services; and local activity derivation from national agenda. Implementation and operating among policy and resource constraints.

PRE: 9 credits of core courses in MPH

HPAM 665

3

Health Service Strategies to Improve Population Health

A critical exploration of the tensions between health care quality, costs and population health. Identification of the conflicting needs and values of patients, communities, medical and behavioral health practitioners, health care systems, and industry. Assessment tools to address the opportunities within and limitations of the ACA to improve population health. Practice in the development of performance measures, incentives, and implementation of clinical treatment recommendations.

PRE: HPAM 610

HPAM 666

3

Program Evaluation in Community Health

Development and application of program evaluation methods applicable in a range of community health and public health settings. Critique of existing community health education and other health programs for promoting critical thinking and analytic skills.

PRE: CHSS 610

HPAM 820

3

Seminar in Health Policy and Management

The objective of the course is to understand patterns in the organization, financing, and delivery of health care, and their relationship to population-based health outcomes, through an integrated exploration of research from the various disciplines informing the health policy and management fields. With an emphasis on the development of critical thinking skills, students are introduced to multidisciplinary models from the social sciences as conceptual sources for health policy and management research. The course adapts a trans disciplinary approach to the examination of important topics in urban public health management and policy, such as the relationship between health systems and the urban-based health economy, and the interface between managerial functions and health policy analysis in addressing health status and outcomes disparities.

N/A

HPAM 821

3

Quantitative Methods in Health Services Research

This course focuses on quantitative reasoning skills in health services research within the context of the principles of the scientific method and the logic of the research process. The logic and methodologies of problem formulation, development of hypotheses and objectives, multidisciplinary research design, sampling, operationalization and measurement are reviewed in connection with selected analytic strategies, such as cross-section/time-series design, multilevel analysis, cost effectiveness analysis, and health impact assessment. Methodological connections between practice-based performance assessment for management and population-based health outcomes assessment for policy are addressed.

PRE: HPAM 820

HPAM 822

3

Public Health Economics

The broad literature on health economics helps improve the understanding of issues related to public health and its influence in the decision-making process of cost-effective interventions for the overall population health. The emphasis of this class is on acquiring a set of devices from the economic theory and a framework within which to organize empirical analysis to inform health and public health policy. Topics will include the analysis of the overall health market, and in particular the analysis of the demand for health, health care and insurance, the supply of health care and insurance, the 29 market structure of the health care sector, and, finally, the positive and normative aspects of performance of the health care sector.

N/A

HPAM 823

3

Health Policy Analysis Methods

This course is designed to expand and deepen the analytic repertoire of students with respect to (1) the analysis of problems or issues that face health policy-makers; (2) the analysis of alternative solutions so those problems and (3) the evaluation of selected solutions (including doing nothing). The course uses research and analytic methods drawn from epidemiology, decision sciences, political science, sociology, social psychology and economics. It emphases how methods developed within these disciplines can be applied to policy analysis in public health and health care.

PRE OR CO: HPAM 821

HPAM 895

0.5-6

Topics in Health Policy and Management

Courses on current topics in health policy and management

N/A

HPAM 695

0.5-6

Topics in Health Policy and Management

Courses on current topics in health policy and management

N/A

PUBH 697

0.5-6

Independent Study in Public Health

Independent study in public health

PRE: Departmental permission

PUBH 897

0.5-6

Independent Study in Public Health

Independent study in public health

PRE: Departmental permission

PUBH 643

3

Adolescent Health

Course explores the public health issues facing adolescents. Students will gain a broader understanding of adolescents through an examination of systems and contexts that can impact their health, development and well-being. Group problem solving strategies will be utilized to develop youth interventions based on knowledge gleaned from evidence-based prevention practice and from community members and organizations working with youth in NYC. Open to all MPH students except EOHS, and serves and as elective for all students in MRSCH concentration.

N/A

PUBH 645

3

Health Literacy

A silent killer maneuvers just below the surface of almost all the health issues that will lead to disease and death in the 21st century. The silent killer is low health literacy. At least half of the adults in the US have low health literacy, making it one of the most critical threats to public health. Health literacy refers to the wide range of skills, and competencies people develop over a lifetime to seek out, comprehend, evaluate, and use health information and concepts so that they can make informed choices, reduce health risks, and their increase quality of life. There is very little capacity for people to live healthier and more equitable lives without improving health literacy. From type 2 Diabetes and obesity, to emerging infectious diseases and radiation poisoning, this course will give students a solid foundation in health literacy using real world cases focusing on research, public health communication campaigns, and social media's new role in shaping public health literacy.

N/A

PUBH 646

3

Healthy Urban Aging: Economic & Policy Issues

Population aging has been named one of the major public health challenges we face in the 21st century by the CDC. This course examines key social, economic, and policy issues at the intersection of the changing demographics of aging, urbanization, public health. The disciplines of gerontology, public health, urban planning, and economics are beginning to communicate, and interdisciplinary exchange among those fields is growing. The course is designed to increase our knowledge of aging as it relates to urban public health in two basic areas: (1) the economic implications of demographic changes in the population, both nationally and globally; and (2) the policy implications of multilevel interactions of the elderly with neighborhood environments, the health care system and community-based organizations. How municipal and national public health policies respond to the challenges of healthy urban aging will have a critical impact on health care costs and quality of life for all.

N/A

PUBH 647

3

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Corporations, Health and Democracy, 1900-present

This course will examine the changing impact of corporate business and political practices on health since 1900 in the US and globally. Using scholarship from history, economics, political science and public health,  students will analyze how various industries including automobile, firearms, food, alcohol and tobacco  and pharmaceutical contribute to patterns of health and disease. The course focuses on the role of business practices in chronic diseases and injuries, two leading causes of premature death and preventable illness in the 21st century, and will consider the varying public health responses to corporations, from partnerships to regulation , social responsibility  initiatives and  activist campaigns. Open to graduate students in public health, sociology, social work, history. No prerequisites.

N/A

PUBH 648

3

Media: Impact & Advocacy for Public Health

This course will help students communicate messages to stakeholders including the public, understand how to use media as an organizing tool, and how stakeholders use the media to impact public policy and perception. Students will learn to use the elements of effective messaging, explore the role of data and evidence in messaging, develop a media strategy for a public health issue, and understand the difference among social marketing, media advocacy, and using media as part of an organizing strategy.

N/A

PUBH 649

3

Producing a Public Health Documentary

This graduate class will be a collaborative workshop that brings together Hunter College students from Public Health and Integrated Media Arts to use media for community organizing, development and education aimed at exposing inequities and improving the quality of health care and/or improving the social determinants of health and well-being. This is a production course. Students will produce a short piece to use for community organizing, development and education.

N/A

PUBH 620

3

Applications of Research Methods in Public Health

Principles of statistical and other research methods applied to design of public health studies; analysis, interpretation, and reporting of epidemiological data to public health professionals and lay audiences.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611)

PUBH 840

3

Maternal, Child, Reproductive and Sexual Health in Context

A critical overview of public health issues, approaches and concerns in the area of Maternal, Child, Reproductive and Sexual Health. Topics will include the medicalization of maternity care and infancy/childhood; the consequences of 'risk' as a dominant ideology for Maternal, Child, Reproductive and Sexual Health care; issues in reproductive justice, with particular attention to race and class, and the historic and contemporary influence of eugenics in public health; the history of midwifery and global trends in midwifery care; and the role of public health interventions in infant care; sexual health and gender identity

N/A

PUBH 841

3

Maternal, Child, Reproductive and Sexual Health: A Life Course Perspective

Provides a theoretical framework as to how life course exposures affect vulnerability to disease, with an emphasis on the roles of maternal, child, reproductive and sexual health. This course also considers how intra- and inter-generational influences may be relevant to disparities in health. Readings will address empirical patterns, prevailing theories and controversies regarding life course influences, as well as addressing interventions or policies that may be applied to improve population health.

PRE: PUBH 840

PUBH 651

3

Sexual Health Promotion

This course will focus on specifically applying health promotion principles to sexual health. Topics covered will include sexuality frameworks and priority populations, examination of sexual health data, and planning and evaluating sexual health promotion interventions and messages. Some understanding of health promotion/evaluation is expected.

N/A

PUBH 642

3

Social Marketing

Social marketing is the application of communication and influence strategies to generate behavior and attitude changes around issues of public concern. In many respects, social marketing principles share similarities with traditional commercial marketing, and in many respects there are important differences. This course will provide an introduction to the concepts and theories of social marketing for public health, and will explore those areas of commonality and difference. Students will analyze real examples of social marketing campaigns, and will design a campaign around a real local or global public health issue.

N/A

PUBH 650

3

Qualitative Reseach Methods in Public Health

Provides students with a foundation in qualitative research methods, with a focus on their application to public health practice. Will cover qualitative research design, data collection, analysis, writing for publication, and dissemination of findings. Students will specify a qualitative research question of their interest, develop an appropirate design, conduct primary data collection and analysis, and write a research report.

PRE: (BIOS 610 or BIOS 611) and (EPID 610 or EPID 611) or departmental permission

PUBH 644

3

Global Maternal & Child Health

The focus of this course is on the global issues in the maternal and child health field with particular emphasis on the health of children and their mothers in developing countries. Open to 2nd year+ MPH students (18+ earned credits) and serves elective to MRSCH concentration.

PRE: 18 credits including a minimum of 3 public health core courses

PUBH 696

3

Supervised Fieldwork

Students carry out 180 hours of supervised field work that is intended to bridge academic preparation and public health practice. Knowledge and skills from the core MPH and specialization courses are applied in a public health agency, community organization or other setting relevant to the student’s academic background, specialization and career expectations. This is accomplished under the supervision and guidance of an experienced preceptor. Field-based hours are implemented with classroom and individual meetings along with online communication. Aside from deliverables required by the preceptor, the student develops a reflection paper, a self-evaluation and a capstone proposal.

PRE: Completion of at least 18 MPH credits, including biostatistics, epidemiology, and two courses in the student's area of specialization; and departmental permission

PUBH 695

0.5-6

Topics in Public Health

Courses on current topics in public health

N/A

PUBH 698

3

Capstone Project

This course consists of a structured seminar aimed at allowing students to apply experiences gained during their graduate program and synthesize that knowledge and experience in the form of a major writing project. It is expected that students use a combination of synthesized evidence, theoretical models, and empirical research to answer a public health research question or practice problem using interdisciplinary perspectives.

PRE: Completion of at least 36 credits of coursework toward the MPH or MS degree, which must include Supervised Fieldwork, and at least one course in each of the 5 core areas of public health (biostatistics, epidemiology, social and behavioral sciences, public health policy and environmental health and safety), and at least 3 specialization courses; and departmental permission

PUBH 810

3

Cities, Society, and Health

This course presents an ecological, multilevel approach to the study of urban health and brings together public health and social science disciplines to examine the impact of city living on population health.

N/A

PUBH 811

3

Quantitative Research Methods with Applications to Urban Health

This course will introduce students to intermediate level approaches and applications in conducting quantitative research in urban public health. It follows introductory biostatistics and epidemiology courses. Course objectives include understanding the assumptions, application, and interpretation of generalized linear regression models, including linear, logistic, Poisson, and proportional hazards models; understanding standard methods for making inferences on model parameters, including Wald testing and ratio testing; and being able to fit generalized linear regression models and diagnose the appropriateness of models using standard statistical software. Particular attention will be made to choosing and defining the right outcome(s), given specific research questions and available data; defining appropriate comparison groups; and understanding the assumptions of each model in order to make appropriate choices and analytic decisions for different types of data and research questions common to urban health research. Labs will allow students to practice these new skills. The final examination will include a project in which students develop and carry out an analysis of an urban health research question using a publically accessible dataset.

PRE OR CO: EPID 820

PUBH 812

3

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Urban Health Research

This course prepares students to investigate causes and solutions to complex urban health problems by bringing together concepts, theories and methods from a variety of disciplines that contribute to our understanding of urban health. It also focuses on research that contributes to reducing health disparities and promoting well-being in urban communities.

PRE: PUBH 810

PUBH 813

3

Qualitative Research Methods with Application to Urban Health

This course will introduce students to approaches in designing and conducting qualitative research in topics of relevance to public health. It is intended to provide doctoral students with a foundation in the various qualitative data collection and analysis methods, focusing on their application to public health practice and research. It will cover elements of qualitative research design, data collection, analysis, and writing for publication. This will be integrated with the main assignment in which students develop a proposal for a qualitative research project tailored to address a specific public health research question.

N/A

PUBH 814

3

Leadership & Organizational Change Seminar

The Public Health Leadership Seminar introduces students to theories and models of leadership and organizational change and helps students to analyze their own strengths and weaknesses as leaders. Using a case study approach, students analyze successful and unsuccessful examples of public health leadership and organizational change.

PRE: PUBH 810 and PUBH 812

PUBH 815

3

Advanced Research Seminar I

Students develop specific research questions pertaining to potential areas of interest for their doctoral dissertations and prepare a proposal that specifies a research question, a public health rationale for the study and an appropriate research design and methods. Students will be expected to complete a literature review and design a study, which may later lead to a dissertation proposal.

PRE: PUBH 810 and PUBH 812

PUBH 816

3

Advanced Research Seminar II

Guides advanced students in the completion of their dissertation proposal and, if needed, Institutional Review Board (IRB) application for dissertation research. Faculty assist students to refine the research design, to fully develop appropriate research methods and analytic strategies and to provide protection for human subjects in their dissertation research. In order to take PUBH 891 Research Seminar II, students need to have defended the Second Exam or have permission of the instructor and have the Second Exam defense scheduled within the first two weeks of the semester. Students must successfully defend the Second Exam within the first two weeks of the semester in order to remain in the course.

PRE: All other coursework, successful defense of the second exam, and departmental permission

PUBH 895

0.5-6

Topics in Public Health

Courses on current topics in public health

N/A

PUBH 896

3

Practicum Project

The DPH Practicum Project is a planned, supervised and evaluated experience that allows students to apply the knowledge and skills that they have acquired through learning experiences in a practice setting. The DPH Practicum Project requires 180 practicum hours that can be completed in a range of organizations across New York City or elsewhere. Students must document how the 180 practicum hours are spent. The student must complete a detailed learning plan, a summary report (that includes objectives), a self-evaluation, and a final report. It is the belief of the DPH Program and the CUNY School of Public Health that there is always a new topical, methodological, or positional approach that will allow students to gain new experience or skills or benefit from the additional practical experience. Therefore, the Practicum Project requirement cannot be waived, as even students with extensive experience in public health practice and leadership can benefit from applied public health experiences that they have not yet encountered in their careers.

PRE: PUBH 810 and PUBH 812 and departmental permission

PUBH 898

0

Dissertation Seminar

This is a non-credit required course that students must take every semester they are working on the dissertation and registered for PUBH 900. The dissertation seminar meets up to four times a semester and serves as a workshop in which students attend Public Health Grand Rounds, present and discuss their dissertation research, and review aspects of each other’s work (peer review). The student must be registered for this course number in the same or preceding semester the student deposits the dissertation. After the student is advanced to candidacy, this course number will appear as audit on the transcript.

PRE: All coursework and exams, and departmental permission; CO: PUBH 900

PUBH 900

0

Dissertation Supervision

Students pursue doctoral research leading to the required dissertation under the supervision of their dissertation sponsor. Doctoral faculty provide supervision on research design, data management and analysis, presentation and interpretation of findings. The student must be registered for this course number in the same or preceding semester the student deposits the dissertation. After the student is advanced to candidacy, this course number will appear as audit on the transcript.

PRE: All coursework and exams and departmental permission; CO: PUBH 898

PUBH 660

3

Research Seminar

Examination of the stages of the research process, highlighting selected research designs and data collection techniques. Application of the principles and methods of research to the critical analysis of the health and nutrition sciences literature.

N/A

PUBH 661

3

Research Seminar II

Examination of quantitative and qualitative techniques appropriate for research in the health sciences. Class discussions of each student's efforts in developing a master's thesis.

PRE: PUBH 660 and GPA of 3.0 or better

PUBH 662

3

Research Seminar III

Examination of quantitative and qualitative techniques appropriate for research in the health sciences. Class discussions of each student's efforts in developing a master's thesis.

PRE: PUBH 660 and GPA of 3.0 or better

PUBH 663

3

Thesis Research

Research for master's thesis supervised by a faculty member. Credit is not earned until the thesis is accepted. Students register for this course only once.

PRE: Departmental permission

PUBH 999

0.5-6

Public Health Elective

Public health elective.

N/A