Name ____________________________                                                                                  

Period ___________________________                                                                        

Reader Response Four Square                                                

Title: Tunes for Bears to Dance to__________________________________________________________

Author: ____Robert Cormier______________________________________________________

This book/story/poem is about: A young boy is faced with a terrible moral dilemma when he is blackmailed by a hateful man in a position of power.

The subject I am exploring is ___Situational Irony____________________________________

Quotation:

“What a world.”

Page Number: 6

Inference:

The situational irony of Mr. Hairston’s statement serves to highlight what is truly problematic in the world.

Context:

Mr. Hairston is looking out his window and criticizing all the people who walk by. His remarks are made up mostly of ethnic and religious stereotypes that show him to be a discriminatory person. After showing his disgust for his neighbors he states, . . .

Commentary:

Mr. Hairston means that the world is a terrible place for having certain types of people in it. His basis for judgment is entirely superficial and discriminatory. His statement is ironic because in spite of his intention to criticize others, his words actually invite the reader to criticize him for his hateful nature. The reader determines that what is truly wrong with the world is people like Mr. Hairston, who choose to judge and hate rather than to understand and love. Cormier’s use of irony helps the reader to look past their own hate for this despicable character and realize that his rush to judgment is what they are revolting against. Consequently, the author helps the reader to question their own motives and seek to understand the deeper issues underneath hateful behavior.

        In Tunes for Bears to Dance to by Robert Cormier, the situational irony of Mr. Hairston’s statement serves to highlight what is truly problematic in the world. Mr. Hairston is looking out his window and criticizing all the people who walk by. His remarks are made up mostly of ethnic and religious stereotypes that show him to be a discriminatory person. After showing his disgust for his neighbors he states, “What a world” (6). Mr. Hairston means that the world is a terrible place for having certain types of people in it. His basis for judgment is entirely superficial and discriminatory. His statement is ironic because in spite of his intention to criticize others, his words actually invite the reader to criticize him for his hateful nature. The reader determines that what is truly wrong with the world is people like Mr. Hairston, who choose to judge and hate rather than to understand and love. Cormier’s use of irony helps the reader to look past their own hate for this despicable character and realize that his rush to judgment is what they are revolting against. Consequently, the author helps the reader to question their own motives and seek to understand the deeper issues underneath hateful behavior.

Element + Effect

Inference: Identify the literary element AND the effect it creates.

Commentary: Explain HOW the quote demonstrates that element AND how it creates that effect.