WHITEHALL SCHOOL DISTRICT

2017-2018

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HS (9-12) Course Offerings/Descriptions


Students and Families of Whitehall School District:

        

Welcome to the 2017-2018 edition of the Whitehall Schools course offerings and descriptions. Please look it over carefully.  It is important that you spend time studying and reflecting on your future educational plans as you make your course selections and plans for high school. 

Develop a 4 year plan and choose accordingly.  Please choose only those classes that you fully intend to take.  

For a brief description of  courses being offered, use this catalog.  For more detailed information, please consult the department instructors, school counselor, our administrators, or registrar.  It is important that you understand what courses must be taken and what the requirements are both for high school graduation at Whitehall and/or the individual college or university you intend to enroll after graduation.

Students are  required to schedule a minimum of eight credits. Most semester long classes earn ½ credit.  One of the 9 periods is response to intervention, or RTI and one class will be a study hall.  You should also request some  elective classes as alternates.

All students are required to have a minimum of 26 credits* for graduation.  The following are required credits:

The remaining credits are taken through elective coursework.

*The graduation requirements for students at Whitehall High School do not necessarily meet the admission requirements of technical colleges and universities.  If students have questions about classes or want to review current college or university admission requirements, please consult with the school  counselor.

Non-Discrimination

It is the policy of the school district that no person be denied admission to any public school in this district or be denied participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be discriminated against in any curricular, extracurricular, pupil service, recreational or other program or activity because of the person’s sex, race, religion, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation or physical, mental, emotional, or learning disability as required by section 118.13 of the statutes.  This policy also prohibits discrimination as defined by Title IX of the Educational Amendments of the 1972 (sex), Title VI of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 (race, color, national origin), section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (handicap), Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (disability).  The district shall provide appropriate educational services or programs for students who have been identified as having a handicap or disability, regardless of the nature or severity of the handicap or disability.  The district shall also provide for the reasonable accommodation of a stude

nt’s sincerely held religious beliefs with regard to examinations and other academic requirements.  Request for religious accommodations shall be made in writing and approved by the building principal.


Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Agriculture Department

Art Department

Business Education/Technology Department

English Department

Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) & Health Sciences Education Department

Career Programs of Study

Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Health Sciences Education

Foreign Language - Spanish

Health/Physical Education Department

Industrial Technology Department

Mathematics Department

Music Department

Science Department

Social Studies Department

Two-Way Project Circuit Classes

Technical College Courses

Advanced Placement Courses (AP)

University Credit Courses

Trempealeau Valley Consortium


Agriculture Department

Basic Overview

Title: Ag in Motion                                                        Course No:  AG 003

Length:  Fall SemesterIMG_20161103_104441390.jpg

Grade Level:  9 & 10        

Raise plants in the high tunnel and animals in the classroom! More and more people want to know how to grow and raise their own food, from seed or egg to their own plate.  Students enrolled in this class will have full access to the new hoop house to grow crops for their own families as well as our community.  We will discover the growth and raising of fertile eggs to processing chickens and experience raising a variety of animals for consumption.  Students will take into account the cutting edge of technology as we explore drones, GPS, biotechnology and energy systems as well as food processing.  This class will build your foundation if you are potentially seeking to take any additional upper level classes in plant or animal science or considering plant or animal studies as a career choice.

Pathway: Animal Science, Plant Science and Food Processing and Products

Title:          The Great Outdoors                                                Course No: AG 004        

Length:  Spring Semester                                IMG_20150306_111940_211.jpg

Grade Level: 9 & 10

Be outside!  Careers in the environmental science areas are in high demand!  This class will prepare you for a future career in natural resources including water, forestry, energy, land and wildlife.  Hiking and camping as recreational activities will be explored.  The winter survival day is a favorite activity!  Several field trips and guest speakers will help to make class interesting and offer hands on action.  Students will spend a great deal of time outdoors including participation in Trout Stream Restoration and other environmental projects within the community.   Let’s help you prepare for the future of protecting our environment in exciting surroundings.

Pathway: Natural Resources & Environmental Science

Title: Ag-Product Processing                                        Course No: AG 008

Length of Course: semester

Grade Level:  10,11,12

The largest industry in Wisconsin is the food industry.  The processing of raw products into food is the focus of this class.   Lab activities include processing cheese and other dairy products, creation of new food products to include beverages, candy and new ways to get people to eat their fruits and veggies by making them more appealing.  Some of what we work with is grown on school grounds.   Field trips to local processing plants and guest speakers will be helpful in getting real world experience.

Pathway: Food Products and Processing

Title:          Animal Science-*ES                                                Course No: AG 005                

Length:  Fall Semester                                                No. Periods:  2 Credit:  1IMG_20160920_090428317.jpg

Grade Level: 11 & 12        

*One science credit

This class has transcripted credit agreement with WTC, LaCrosse.  This class has also been accepted as a DPI accredited science credit.

This course is designed to give students knowledge and experience in the care of small and large animals.  Pets are very popular today and it is very important that people understand how to care for their animals properly and to understand the animal welfare issues faced by today’s animal owners.  Topics will include physiology, nutrition, health, daily care, breed identification, selection, and training.  Labs will be done to demonstrate proper grooming, feeding, handling, and health practices.  Animals to be discussed will be dogs, cats, rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs, gerbils, birds, cattle, pigs, horses, llamas and others chosen based on class interest.  Field trips and guest speakers, along with time spent at the Whitehall Veterinary Clinic will also be an important part of the class.  

Pathway: Animal Science

Title:          Wildlife Science & Management                                        Course No: AG 006  

Length:  Fall Semester

Grade Level: 10, 11,& 12                                                        IMG_20141119_151247_412.jpg

Anyone who enjoys the great outdoors will enjoy this class.  We spend time discussing habits and habitats of a wide variety of wildlife animals.  Trapping and hunting to keep populations in tact are explored.  Students participate in local wildlife improvement projects; learn to score trophy bucks, age deer, estimate wildlife populations and various labs based on student interest.  Several outdoor careers will be explored as there are many jobs in the wildlife science area besides a DNR conservation warden to include wildlife biologists, habitat specialists, managers, rehabilitation services as well as those in policy development and law.  We will be participating in several field trips and rely on guest speakers to gain insightful information on various wildlife topics and develop useful skills for future careers.

Pathway: Animal Science, Natural Resources, Environmental Science

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Title:          Plant Science & Greenhouse Management-ES*                        Course No: AG 007                 Length:  Spring Semester        

No. Periods:  2 Credit: 1        *1/2 Science Credit

Grade Level:  11 & 12                Maximum- 16 students

Transcripted credit agreement with Western Technical College, La Crosse.

This class has also been accepted as a DPI accredited science credit.

Spend time in the greenhouse, school garden and the high tunnel growing and managing food for yourself and the school!  The plant science industry is one of the fastest growing areas in the agricultural field.  Participants will experience plant components and their functions through the completion of hands-on activities both in the greenhouse and outdoors.  A mixture of plants will be explored to include wild plants, field crops, gardening and floral production.   Possible field trips to local greenhouses & crop centers along with expert guest speakers, will add to class success.

Pathway: Plant Science

Title:          Aquaculture Science & Management                                Course No:  AG 009

Length:  Spring Semester        IMG_20160915_130241794.jpg

Grade Level:  10, 11 & 12        

This class will use the agriculture department’s fish rearing system to learn how to efficiently raise a quality product for today’s consumer. This class will evaluate the engineering of the system, perform water tests, and learn how to use bio-filtration to help maintain a healthy fish system.  Topics will include careers, Wisconsin industry, water quality and testing, nutrition, stocking rates and the nitrogen cycle.  Students will design and build their own re-circulating system, design and make fishing lures, participate in freshwater fishing experiences to include the Trout Stream Restoration Projects within the district in coordination with local Rod and Gun Clubs. Students will also explore aquaponics and learn to manage fish waste to grow healthy vegetation for consumption.  

Pathway: Animal Science,  Natural Resources, Environmental Sciences.

Title:  Small Engines                                                                Course No. AG 011

Length: Semester  (may be spring or fall)IMG_20161102_110951918.jpg

Grade Level: 11 & 12

Maximum-16 students

Students will focus on basic small engine knowledge, study external engine parts, discover tools of the trade & learn the concepts behind what makes small engines work. They will explore internal parts of engines, learn about engine sizes, compression ratios, seasoning their engines & safety issues. They will also learn about occupational possibilities, teardown and rebuild an engine procedures, use diagnostic tools, research rules and regulations about using small engine machines and select replacement engines. Other possibilities are available depending on the work ethic of students in class.

Pathway: Power, Structures and Technical Systems


Title: Agriculture Issues                                Course No. AG 022

Length: Semester (may be spring or fall)

Grade Level: 11-12

Maximum 12 students

Explore the pressing topics of living in the big world!  Stretch your thinking into real world problems as we discover biofuels, drones and privacy issues, pollution sources and clean up efforts, population challenges, GMO crops, Antibiotic free food, animal welfare/rights, food quality and marketing strategies, are among the few.  Each week promises in depth discussion & debates, consumer surveys, field trips and guest speakers along with educating the public about these concerns through a weekly blog and youtube videos created and updated regularly by students.  

Pathway: all 7

Title: Agri-Business & Marketing*FL                                              Course No. AG 012

Grade Level:  11 & 12

*This class can be taken to fulfill the ½ graduation credit for financial literacy.

Calling all future business owners!  Owning and operating your own business is where the money is.  This class will explore different types of businesses through field trips and guest speakers, use computer simulations to study markets and economics, and develop a business plan,  Students will evaluate supply and demand and marketing schemes used by popular businesses.   FFA members will use time to complete their SAE projects and complete proficiency awards while applying concepts learned in class.  Each Friday will be dedicated to helping students reach their goal of owning and operating a business of their own or preparing them for the world of employment.  Students will develop resumes, cover letters and do mock interviews with business owners from the community.  Job shadows will be an opportunity for all students based on career interest and aspect of agriculture business most appealing to them.  

This class is offered on an every other year basis and will be offered again in 2019-20.

Pathway: all 7 of them!

Title: Agriculture Career Development Events                                Course No. AG 013

Length: Semester- Fall

Grade Level: 10 - 12

This class will give students the self paced opportunity to focus on learning skills within their choice of 14 different career development events which teach the entry level skills needed for careers within the agricultural area.  Examples of events include: wildlife, agronomy, ag. business, ag communications, livestock, dairy, foods, ag. mechanics, forestry, landscaping, floriculture, environmental science, horses, and veterinary science.  Students will choose one area to study at their own pace.  This is a class where self- motivation is a must!  Upon completion of this class, students will compete in the CDE contests with the opportunity to advance to the state and/or national competitions.  Learn a specific topic of your choice, with guided instruction and the chance to compete for recognition, prizes and skill building for a better chance at a successful career.  This class can be taken as an independent study course with advisor approval.

Pathway: Any of the 7 career pathways

Title: Advanced Animal Science-*LS                                                Course No. AG 018

Length: Semester  (offered in the spring)IMG_20161011_094007476.jpg

Grade Level: 11 & 12                                                                  *½ local science credit

Maximum-12 students- prerequisite- you must have passed wildlife science, animal science and/or aquatic science with a B- or better in order to be eligible for this class.

Prepare yourself for a successful career in the animal science industry as we explore the anatomy and physiology of animals through dissections of each system, learn and practice veterinary technician skills to include: restraints, medical terminology, drug dosage, tools used and common management as an animal owner, both large and small. Students who are interested in veterinary science, vet tech or production animal science will benefit from this class.  Field trips, guest speakers, job shadow opportunities and labs will make this class relevant to the real world.  This class is offered every other year and is scheduled for the 2018-19 school year. 

Pathway: Animal Science

Title:  Agriculture Youth Apprenticeship                                     Must be approved by Mrs. Goplin

Length:  1 or 2 year program

Grade Level: 11 & 12                

Credit:  Variable

Comments: This program is for students interested in exploring the work world in the agriculture fields of plants, animal and the environment outside of the classroom. Students earn a wage while working at a location of their choice to fulfill a list of standards.. Work can take place during the school day based on workplace or many students work weekend and evening shifts. Summer hours can count as well.   450 hours/year are needed to complete the program.  In order to be approved for this class, one other agriculture related class must be taken during the current school year.  

Pathway: Any of them!

FFA DEGREES – In order to get the FFA degrees you must have completed Ag courses.  (Taken from National Constitution)  Examples -

Greenhand – be enrolled in agricultural education

Chapter – completed 180 hours (one course)

State Degree – completed 360 hours (2 years)

                American Degree – completed 540 hours (3 years)

For each degree there are about 8 requirements, most of which are covered in agriculture courses.  All beginning students should take the level 1 Ag classes where FFA is taught to get a better understanding of the requirements.  A local advisor cannot change these requirements.  If you do not meet minimum requirements, you cannot get the degree.

        

FFA  The three parts of an agricultural education program are classroom instruction and/or labs, supervised agricultural experience program (SAE), and the FFA.  The FFA provides students and members opportunities to develop leadership skills, participate in contests, be involved in community activities, receive local, state, and national awards, and travel.  The activities done by the FFA are planned and coordinated by the members themselves.  FFA’s mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education.

Art Department 

Title:  Art Survey I                                                                Course No: AR 103        

Grade Level:  9-12

Maximum of 22-24 students

This course explores art through history. The course covers the art of Prehistoric People, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome and Pompeii, Early Christian & Byzantine, Romanesque & Gothic, and the Italian Renaissance. Students will create studio projects based on the cultures and art of these different time periods. Students will be able to use and manipulate a variety of art mediums: clay, paint, drawing materials, and mixed media.  This class is great for students who want to improve their art skills in all mediums.

Title:  Art Survey II                                                                Course No: AR 104        

Grade Level: 10, 11 & 12

*Prerequisite:  Art Survey I

Maximum of 22-24 students

This course is a continuation of Art Survey I. The course covers the art of Impressionism, Post Impressionism, Surrealism, Cubism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Op Art, Color Field Art, and Art in America. Students will create studio projects based on these different time periods. Students will also learn about the interesting and sometimes, weird lives of the artists. Students will be able to use and manipulate a variety of art mediums: clay, paint, drawing materials, and mixed media. This class is great for students who want to improve their art skill in all mediums.

Title:        Multi-Cultural Art                                                        Course No: AR 105                

Grade Level: 9-12

Maximum of 22-24 students        

This course is about art from many cultures. Students will explore the art and cultures of people from all over the world. Students will be able to create studio projects based on various cultures. Some projects include: Indian Henna Designs, African Printmaking, Aboriginal Dot Paintings, Polish Wycinanki, Japanese Origami, Mexican Yarn Paintings, Native American Totem Poles, Islamic Radial Designs, and many more. This is a fun class for students who want to improve their art skills, use a variety of materials, and learn about other cultures.

 

Title:  Ceramics I                                                                    Course No: AR 106 Grade Level:  9-12                

Maximum 16-18 students

This is an introductory pottery course for any skill level. Students in this class will learn or improve basic skills of pinch, coil, and slab techniques to create unique works of art.  Students will also be introduced to the potter’s wheels and will have opportunities to work on them throughout the semester. Students will gain or improve their ability to hand-build and problem-solve through constructing with clay. Students will be able to create one-of-a-kind, decorative, or functional pieces of art.

 

Title:  Ceramics II                                                                  Course No: AR 107 Grade Level:  9-12                

Maximum 16-18 students

Students taking this course should have taken and passed Ceramics I (Pottery & Crafts I). This class is a continuation of Ceramics I. Students in this class will continue to perfect their pinch, coil, and slab techniques in more complex pottery projects. Students will have more time to research their ideas, brainstorm and sketch their projects, create their works, while following basic project criteria.

Title: Advanced Ceramics                                                          Course No:  AR 108

Grade Level:  11-12

Maximum 16-18 students

This course is for students who have already taken and passed Ceramics I (Pottery & Crafts I) and Ceramics II (Pottery & Crafts II) and want to work more with pottery. Students taking this course should have the knowledge and ability to use the basic skills of pinch, coil, and slab in projects.  Students who take this course will also have more practice time to work on the potter’s wheels and improve their skill. Students will have more opportunities to choose their ceramic projects. Students will be in charge of organizing pottery sales to fundraise for art-related field trips.

 

Title: Studio Art (Independent Study)                                        Course No:  AR 109

Grade Level: 11 & 12

Must get approval from Mrs. Irvine

This class is for students who have already taken and passed four or more art classes and have a passion for art. Student must have approval by teacher before being added to this class. This class is a great option for students who work well independently, are self-motivated, and can create artwork with limited guidance from the teacher. Students taking this course will complete a set number of assignments by due dates given by the teacher. Students will have more opportunities to pick and choose projects that interest them and use a variety of mediums. Students will have time to reflect on their work and learn more about themselves, as artists, throughout the semester.

Title:  Drawing & Painting                                                        Course No: AR 111        

Grade Level:  9 -12                                        

Maximum  18-20 students

This is a course for any students who want to improve their drawing skills. Students will be taught basic drawing skills, color theory, how to draw using perspective, and how to incorporate the elements and principles of art into their own work. Students will also experiment with watercolor and acrylic paint in several assignments. Students who take this course will improve their understanding of what makes a good design and expand their art and design vocabulary.

Title:  Drawing & Painting II                                                Course No:  AR 112 Grade Level: 9th-12th

Maximum 18-20 Students

Students in the class should have taken and passed Drawing and Painting I. Students will continue to explore the possibilities and limitations of different mediums.  Students will work with charcoal, pastel, oil pastel, watercolor, acrylic, and mixed media, and many more mediums.  They will learn different techniques used by artists in various times in history and how those fine art mediums are still applied today. There will be more opportunities for students to choose subject matter in paintings or drawing projects. Students will also be introduced to painting on canvas.

Title:  Graphic Art                                                                Course No: AR 113        

Grade Level: 9th-12th

Maximum 12-14 students

Students taking this course will learn how the elements and principles of art play an important role in everyday publications, magazine ads, and photography layouts. Students will create various forms of media that express their ideas. Some projects include: Designing an alphabet, merging two animals into one, creating edible architecture, woodcut printing, Doodle 4 Google, and many more.  Students in this class will learn how to effectively use Adobe Photoshop Elements as a tool to create unique visual media, communicate creative ideas, and express new concepts. Students will also explore a printmaking process to create another form of visual media.  Students are encouraged to think outside the box.

Title:  Sculpture                                                                Course No:  AR 114

Grade Level: 9th-12th

Maximum 18-20 students

This course is for students who like to make things with their hands. Students will explore the different mediums used to create 3-dimensional artwork. Students will learn about various sculptors, meanings behind the art, and how to create sculptures of their own. Most projects will be completed independently, though occasionally small groups will create larger pieces. Students will use a variety of materials in their work: clay, foam board, recycled items, plaster, and mixed media. This is a great class for students who like hands-on projects.

Title:  Photography                                                                Course No:  AR 115

Grade Level: 9th-12th

Maximum 14-16 Students

In this course, students will learn the basic parts of a camera, how to use manual settings, and how to properly compose a photograph. Students taking this class must have or have access to a digital camera to use for the entire semester. Students must also supply their own SD card and batteries for their camera. Students will be given assignments and extended amounts of time to shoot pictures for each assignment. Most photo assignments will need to be taken outside of school, on the student’s own time. Students who take this class should be self-motivated.  In this class, students will create their own photography blogs to share, post their work, and be able to reflect and write about their work.  Students will have class time to create photo presentations and post them on their blogs.


Business Education/Technology Department

Title:  Personal and Family Finance*                                               Course No. BS 202

Required:  10th-12th grade

*This class can be taken to fulfill the ½ graduation credit for financial literacy.

This course is designed to help you understand the impact of your individual choices on occupational goals and future earnings potential. Real world topics covered will include income, money management, spending and credit, as well as saving and investing. This course will provide a foundational understanding for making informed personal financial decisions.          

Title:  Accounting I*                                                                  Course No. BS 203/204

Length: Full Year

Grade Level:  9-12

Are you interested in a career in the business field or owning your own business some day? Most colleges require at least 1 accounting class. You will benefit greatly with prior knowledge of the generally accepted accounting principles. The information covered in the class includes:

Title:  Introduction to Business and Marketing                                Course No. BS 207

Grade Level:  9-12

This course introduces students to the world of business and prepares them for the economic roles of consumer, worker, and citizen. This course will serve as a background for other, more detailed business courses, such as accounting, business law, entrepreneurship, sports & entertainment marketing as well as preparation for future employment, financial literacy, and consumer decision making.

Title: Sports & Entertainment Marketing                                        Course No.BS 208

Grade Level: 10-12

Prerequisite: Intro to Business & Marketing

Sports and Entertainment Marketing is a unique and innovative course designed for students with an interest in the sports and entertainment industry. This course stresses the utilization of fundamental marketing concepts and will include an orientation to the sports and entertainment industry. Marketing strategies along with topics in sponsorship, pricing, marketing research, endorsements, and promotions will be part of this course.  The course will develop critical thinking, decision making and communication skills through real world applications. Students will be prepared to handle specific tasks associated with either industry. This course offers students an edge if pursuing marketing or sports management degrees on the collegiate level.

Title: Entrepreneurship (New Class!)                                        Course No. BS 209

Grade Level: 10-12

Prerequisite: Intro to Business & Marketing

In this course you will learn the basics needed to plan and launch your own business. Do you have what it takes to start a new business? Do you have an idea for a business but need the tools to get started? This course will provide you with the core skills you need to become successful. In this course you will study the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs. You will also learn about self-employment and basic economic concepts related to small businesses, such as competition and production. This course will also walk you through the steps of setting up a business, including developing a business plan, a mission and a vision, attracting investors, and marketing your company.

Title:  Computer Applications                                                        Course No. BS 210

Grade Level:  9-12

The workplace and post-secondary institutions expect students to be equipped with essential computer software skills. Students will learn to set a variety of tabs and create tables, create documents using columns, insert and manipulate graphics and shapes into documents, print envelopes and labels, design a form, create and use a spreadsheet, use various formulas, create a web page, reconfigure pictures using Photoshop Elements, edit video using Movie Maker, create a database and query for information, design a form or report in Access.  This course is designed to assist students in developing technological proficiencies to meet these demands. Units of instruction include Windows; Microsoft Office: Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and Access; graphic design; desktop publishing; ethical issues; internet services; and digital input devices.

Title:  Business and Personal Law                                                         Course No. BS 211

Grade Level:  10-12

Prerequisite: Intro to Business & Marketing

Students will study and understand how our nation follows the law, know the difference between law and ethics, differentiate between civil and criminal cases, know and describe a variety of crimes, know the 6 elements and functions of a legal contract, describe how a contract legally ends, describe the different forms of a contract, knowledge of what makes a contract legally binding, and legally ended.  Students will be able to describe what happens when there is a breach of contract, identify the elements of a contract of marriage, identify various divorce proceedings, describe a “Last Will and Testament” and purpose, family law, landlord/tenant relationships and expectations, identify the process of applying for and securing a personal loan.

Title: Career Communications                                        Course No. EN 335

Grade Level:  11-12

******REQUIRED

This course provides you with the opportunity to develop skills needed to seek, obtain, and maintain employment. Students will utilize foundational English-based skills in addition to business and marketing competencies to complete a job application, create a resume, write a cover letter, interview, and grab the job!  This course also covers basic employment/life skills such as insurance, reading your paycheck, and calculating wages. Students will also create Linked-in accounts, discuss social media etiquette, and professional dress. Students will also be required to do a job shadow in a career area of their choice.


Title: Multimedia & Webpage Design                                                   Course No. BS 213

Grade Level:  9 – 12

Do you like to design? Amaze your teachers and classmates with dazzling multimedia presentations and websites! Learn the elements of design. Build video productions, movies, websites, and presentations that "wow" your audience. The digital video camera, the scanner, and your own creativity will be used to help you design great computer and video presentations and web sites. You will also add sound, pictures, video, music, voice, and animation to your projects. You will use Prezi, Animoto, Audacity, Movie Maker, Google Sites, Wikispaces, Photoshop Elements, other exciting software, and the Internet.

Title:  Digital Imaging & Editing                                                    Course No. BS 214

Grade Level:  9 - 12

We live in a digital world! In this class students will learn all about editing and manipulating photos in Photoshop Elements. Students will create tutorial videos based on the tools that they learn. Students will also record and edit videos of their own using Windows Movie Maker.

Title:  Digital Imaging & Editing II  (New Class!)                                 Course No. BS 215

Grade Level:  9 - 12

Prerequisite: Digital Imaging & Editing

Students will create advanced and technical projects using various software. We will dive deeper into the functions and abilities of Photoshop Elements and video making. We will use the green screen to create and edit a production. Students will end the class with greater knowledge of design, software functionality, and creativity.

Title: Marketing 101        (New Class!)                                                Course No. BS 216

Grade Level:  10-12

Prerequisite: Intro to Business & Marketing

This course helps students understand marketing, the process through which organizations analyze, plan, and implement a strategy to sell their product(s). Effective marketing is critical for the long-term success of any business organization because it ensures that the business attracts, retains, and grows customers. In this course, students will choose a product to market to a select population. Students will learn about the 4 P’s of marketing (Product, Price, Place, Promotion) and conduct market research to help determine the most effective ways to advertise and sell to their population.

Title: Advertisement Marketing (New Class!)                                Course No. 217

Grade Level:  11-12

Length: Semester (Block)

Suggested Courses: Intro to Business & Marketing, Marketing 101 or Sports & Entertainment Marketing

This course helps students understand marketing, the process through which organizations analyze, plan, implement, and control programs to develop and maintain beneficial exchanges with target buyers. Effective marketing is critical for the long-term success of any business organization because this function ensures that the firm attracts, retains, and grows customers by creating, delivering, and communicating superior customer value.

Students find out what it takes to market a product or service in today's fast-paced, over-crowded advertising environment. They will learn the fundamentals of marketing using real-world business examples. They will learn about buyer behavior, marketing research principles, demand analysis, distribution, financing, pricing, and product management.

Students will have the opportunity to:

 

It is all hands-on and real life!

Title: Social Media Interns                                                        Course No: BS 217

Length: Semester  (may be spring or fall)

Grade Level:  11 & 12

** Max of 2 students per semester

This class requires self motivated students who are interested in showcasing all the GREAT things happening in our school district.  You will be in charge of posting those great things to all of our school social media outlets. (Facebook, Twitter, & School Website)

**Requires approval from Mr. Anderson and Mrs. Lisowski

Title:  Finance Youth Apprenticeship - Must be approved by Mrs. Kensmoe

Length:  1 or 2 year program

Grade Level: 11 & 12                                                Credits:  Variable

This program is for students interested in exploring the work world in the business field. Students earn a wage while working. Work can take place during the school day based on workplace.  Most students work weekend and evening shifts.  450 hours per year are needed to complete the program. Students are expected to complete the skills listed on the skill checklist.


English Department

Title:  English 9                                                        Course No: EN 304/305        

Length:  All Year                                                        Grade Level:  9th Required                        

This course is required for all freshmen.  During First Quarter students will read, respond, and write narrative and informative texts to foster a deeper understanding of the human experience.  During Second Quarter students will study Shakespeare’s tragic reach (Romeo and Juliet), investigate a theme, and promote social awareness of issues impacting American teens.  During Third Quarter students will study a timeless theme in literature, critique an argument, and write a persuasive letter to an individual or community organization.  During Fourth Quarter students will read and write realistic fiction.

Title:        English 10                                                        Course No: EN 306/307  

Length:  All Year                                                        Grade Level:  10 Required

This course is required for all sophomores.  During First Quarter students will read, respond, and write narrative and informative texts to foster a deeper understanding of the human experience.  During Second Quarter students will study mythology, investigate a theme, and promote social awareness of issues impacting American teens.  During Third Quarter students will study a timeless theme in literature, critique an argument, and write a persuasive letter to an elected official.  During Fourth Quarter students will read and write historical fiction.

Title:        English 11                                                        Course No: EN 308/309 

Length: All Year                                                        Grade Level:  11                          

A major component of this course focuses on the writing process, especially on the development of expository and persuasive writing.  Students will develop writing skills through a variety of essay assignments and will prepare a formal research paper, building further skill in paraphrasing, summarizing, and properly citing source material.  Research and organizational skills are emphasized.   Students gain an understanding of the emerging literature as it connects with the people and events of world history through activities that enhance written and oral communication skills, group projects, and individual reading and research.  Students will have exposure to novels read together as a class as well as those selected for individual reading.  Oral communication activities may include interpretive readings/compilations of prose and poetry or more formal speeches such as the four-minute speech, oratory, or public address, to name a few.  Oral communication activities will often be integrated in writing or literature units.

NEW ENGLISH ELECTIVES

Title: Creative Writing                                                Course Number: EN 312

Length: Semester                                                        Grade Level: 11/12

Students will read and interpret an assortment of short stories, poems, and song lyrics. In addition to that, the students will be writing their own personal narratives, mysteries, poems, lyrics, and short plays.

Title: American Literature                                                Course Number: EN 313

Length: Semester                                                        Grade Level: 11/12

For this course, students will read and analyze the works of notable American authors. This list of authors includes Poe, Steinbeck, Twain, Frost, Hemingway, and Arthur Miller. In addition to exploring these authors, the students will gain experience with inquiry and persuasive writing, as well as with public speaking.

Title: Nonfiction                                                        Course Number:EN 314

Length: Semester                                                        Grade Level: 11/12

Students will read, interpret, analyze, and emulate a selection of nonfiction texts. They will also practice writing their own news articles, Facebook posts, Tweets, and biographies.

Title: Heroes vs. Villains                                                Course Number: EN 315

Length: Semester                                                        Grade Level 12

This course will provide students with the opportunity to research and analyze some of the most iconic heroes and villains in literature and film. Some villains that will be studied include Voldemort, Professor Moriarty, Loki, and Iago. The heroes will include The Doctor, Captain America, Harry Potter, and Gandalf the Grey. This course emphasizes research, literary analysis, and speech/debate.

Title: Career Communications                                        Course No: EN 335

Grade Level:  11-12

*****REQUIRED

This course provides you with the opportunity to develop skills needed to seek, obtain, and maintain employment. Students will utilize foundational English-based skills in addition to business and marketing competencies to complete a job application, create a resume, write a cover letter, interview, and grab the job!  This course also covers basic employment/life skills such as insurance, reading your paycheck, and calculating wages. Students will also create Linked-in accounts, discuss social media etiquette, and professional dress. Students will also be required to do a job shadow in a career area of their choice.

Title: College Prep English                                                 Course Number: EN 316

Length: All Year                                                        Grade Level 11

This course is meant to prepare and challenge students who are college-bound. The curriculum is designed to introduce and handle themes which students are likely to encounter at a four-year university. Texts will include In Cold Blood (Truman Capote), Hamlet (Shakespeare), Cannery Row (Steinbeck), and Nervous Conditions (Tsitsi Dangarembga). A variety of shorter texts will also be featured. These will include short stories, poetry, song lyrics, and short plays. Writing will also be emphasized in this course. Students will be writing research papers, persuasive pieces, and narratives. In addition to this traditional English curriculum, students will also be writing college admissions essays, and filling out college admissions and scholarship applications. At the end of the year, students will also cover the practical aspects of college life.


Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) & Health Sciences Education Department

Career Programs of Study

Career Option 1

Career Option 2

Health and Medical Careers

Introduction to Health CareersTN_medical-caduceus-black-clipart-815ga.jpg

Introduction to Medical Terminology

Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)

Medical Terminology (ITV-WTC)

FCCLA Youth Leadership

Health Services Youth Apprenticeship-Medical Informatics, Pharmacy, Imaging, CNA, Medical Assistant, Dental Assistant, Therapy, Dietetics

Personal & Family Finance

Independent Study FCS-Medical

Health Science Academy-must apply, interview and be selected by committee

Assistant Childcare Teacher Certification/Teacher Preparation

Parents, Children, and Human Development 

Assistant ChildCare Teacher (ITV Course-Technical College Credit)

FCCLA Youth Leadership

Personal & Family Finance

Child Care Services Skill Standards

Let’s Teach!

College and Career Ready

*Independent Study FCS-Teaching Training

Career Option 3

Career Option 4

Culinary Arts ~ Culinary Management ~ Dietetics

Family Foods                                    FCCLA Youth Leadership

Personal & Family Finance              Food Science & Nutrition

Culinary Arts I                                  Culinary Arts II

YTY ~ 7th Grade FCS                      ProStart Training                               Food Services Skill Standards          

*Independent Study FCS-Culinary/Food Service/Hospitality

DPI Foodservice Skill Standards Program

Hospitality, Tourism, and Lodging Youth Apprenticeship

Health Science Youth Apprenticeship-Dietetics

Fashion, Design, Housing & Interiors

Focus on Fashion

FCCLA Youth Leadership

Personal & Family Finance

Independent Study FCS-Visual ArtspTqKdGEec.jpg

Entrepreneurship Applications in Textile Arts

Homes & Interiors Studio

Career Option 5

Career Option 6

Family and Community Services

Families First

Parents, Children, and Human Development

Personal & Family Finance

Family Foods

Food Science & Nutrition

FCCLA Youth Leadership

*Independent Study FCS-Teaching Training

Housing and Interiors

Homes & Interiors Studio

FCCLA Youth Leadershipimages.jpeg

Personal & Family Finance

Independent Study FCS-Visual Arts

Entrepreneurship Applications in Textile Arts

Career Option 7

Career Option 8

Family Finance/Consumer Economics

Personal & Family Finance

FCCLA State Financial Fitness Peer Educator

FCCLA Youth Leadership

Accounting-Business Ed. Dept.

Finance Youth Apprenticeship

Personal Development and Family Life

Families First

Parents, Children, and Human Development 

Personal & Family Finance

Focus on Fashion

Homes & Interiors Studio

Family Foods

Food Science & Nutrition

FCCLA Youth Leadership

*Independent Study FCS-Teaching & Training

Entrepreneurship Applications in Textile Arts

The Family and Consumer Sciences (FCSE) and Health Sciences Education Department courses emphasize applied academics, thinking skills, problem solving, preparation for the work of the family and paid work.  Unique in many ways, the FCSE and HSE programs use community business partnerships, service learning, on-the-job training, and job shadowing, parent shadowing experiences to enhance the preparation of students for their future roles as family members and as productive workers in our society.

Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Health Sciences Education

Mission:  To empower individuals and families across the lifespan to manage the challenges of living and working in a diverse society.  Our unique focus is on families, work, and their interrelationships.

Career Pathway: Hospitality, Tourism, and Lodging

 Family Foods                                                                Course No: FC 402

Grade Level: 9, 10 & 11                        

Welcome to the Family Foods course!  Who doesn’t love food?  This course will cover basic kitchen safety, sanitation, equipment, terminology, measurement, nutrition and the dietary guidelines, making nutritious meals as well as meal planning, management, and service as it relates to personal and family settings. This course also involves an action project relating to “go green” concepts as well as a Foreign Foods project.

*This class will cover some of the content for ProStart© certification. Pro-Start certification is a national certification for the foodservice industry.  It requires that the student take a series of courses and pass the national exam.  This certification transfers into college for up to 18 semesters in culinary arts/management programs.  Course Site: www.stendahlfamilyfoods.weebly.com

Title:  Food Science & Nutrition-Capstone Class**ES                        Course No: FC 403

Grade Level: 10, 11 &12                        

**Students receive ½ High School Science credit for this course.                        

Comments:  Family Foods class recommended.

This course uses a hands-on approach to learning about food and how it affects your body through food lab experiments.  We will be able to test and sample edible foods products.  You will become acquainted with the equipment used in a food science laboratory, as well as proper techniques for carrying out food science experiments.  You will discover that appearance, odor, sound, and how food feels in your mouth are just as important as taste in determining whether or not you find food appealing.  Some of the food laboratory units include safety and sanitation, basic science related to foods, acids and bases, water, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals, dehydration, and several more, time permitting.  Expect some really fun experiments that are edible as you learn how science works with food!   This course supports career choices in dietetics, food technology, food science, family and consumer sciences, and food chemistry. This course involves serving the public for one event and students are required to take part in this performance/experience.

*This class will cover some of the content for ProStart© certification.  ProStart© certification is a national certification for the foodservice industry.  It requires that the student take a series of courses and pass the national exam.  This certification transfers into colleges for up to 18 semesters in culinary arts/management programs.  Course Site: www.stendahlfoodscience.weebly.com

Title:  Culinary Arts I-Capstone Class(Meets in Commercial Kitchen)*        Course No: FC 404

Length: Semester-(Block-2 periods)         

Grade Level: 11 & 12                                

*Prerequisite:  Food Science & Nutrition

This course allows students to practice and explore various skills in culinary arts and management used in many foodservice settings.  Some of the units of study include preparing for a successful career in hospitality, successful customer relations, preparing and serving safe food, preventing accidents and injuries, food service equipment, breakfast foods and sandwiches, soups, salads, salad dressings, garnishing, cakes and cake decorating, grilling, working with people, business math, and controlling foodservice costs.  Students are expected to participate in customer service and sales experience projects.  Students will be required to wear black pants and a white top on days in which food is served to the public.  Note: All students are expected to reach 80% or better on Food Safety and Sanitation course test in this course; taking the test as many times as needed to reach this standard. In addition, students can choose to complete National Restaurant Association certification in Food Safety for Food Handlers; which is recognized nationwide.

*This class will cover some of the content for ProStart© certification.  ProStart© certification is a national certification for the foodservice industry.  Some of the units of study include preparing for a successful career in hospitality, successful customer relations, preparing and serving safe food, preventing accidents and injuries, food service equipment, breakfast foods and sandwiches, soups, salads, salad dressings, working with people, business math, and controlling foodservice costs. This certification transfers into colleges for up to 18 semesters in culinary arts/management programs.  Course site: www.stendahlculinaryarts1.weebly.com

Title:  Culinary Arts II Capstone Class(Meets in Commercial Kitchen)*        Course No: FC 405        

Length: Semester-(Block-2 periods)        

Grade Level: 12

*Prerequisites: Family Foods, OR Food Science & Nutrition,  AND Culinary Arts I

This course expects that students are efficient and knowledgeable regarding basic measurement, following recipes (directions), food safety & sanitation procedures, and are eager and willing to do their FAIR share in the kitchen. Class work completion is required to participate in labs.

This class is designed for students who want to pursue foodservice or culinary arts as a profession.  It will focus on key concepts and skills of the hospitality industry.  Students will be expected to participate in planning, preparation and service of food to the public, several  times during the semester.  ProStart, and Culinary Arts is the fourth and final level of Foods courses and is a required course of the Hospitality, Tourism and Lodging Youth Apprenticeship and/or the Wisconsin Food Service Skill Standards Program.  These two work-based learning programs are often pursued simultaneously.  This course and these programs will provide students with a set of knowledge and skills required for level one ProStart®, a National Restaurant Association certification program.  Students are eligible to test take the first year national ProStart® test upon completion of this course as a sequence of all Food courses offered at our school.  Students are encouraged to seek Wisconsin State ServSafe® Certification for Food Service Manager.  This course will cover the following topics:

Sanitation and Safety Review                        Abbreviations, Recipe Conversion and Measurement

Customer Service                                        Employment in the Industry

Planning, Preparing and Marketing Foods                Calculating Recipes and Costing Foods

Cocoa and Chocolate Knowledge and Skills                Pastas and Red Sauces

Cheesecake and Crème Brule                        Rice and Pilaf Dishes

Wontons/Potstickers/Dumplings                        Carrots/Carrot cake

English Muffins/Yeast Bread Products                Salads and Dressings

Crustaceans                                        Cobblers, Betty's, Crisps and Grunts

Course Site: www.stendahlculinaryarts2.weebly.com

Completion of the ServSafe program is equivalent to course, FN 105 at UW-Stout and can be waived in a foods program.

Financial Literacy Add-on Option: 

Students can choose to meet the graduation requirement of Financial Literacy through the Culinary Arts 2 course.  If you choose this option, you will have additional assignments to meet the financial literacy requirements. You will demonstrate your knowledge of the hospitality, tourism, and recreation industries and translate your knowledge into a hypothetical or real business. Your project must relate to culinary, lodging, recreation, tourism, or event coordination. You will research existing businesses which are similar to their project, develop basic business plan and client services, information, and create a website that highlights the business. See Mrs. Stendahl or the class website,stendahlculinaryarts2.weebly.com for information regarding the project requirements.  You will find information under the Home tab regarding this option.

Bakery & Pastry Arts Capstone Class                                        Course No: FC 434        

Length: Semester (Block-2 Periods)

Grade Level: 11 & 12                                        

Credit: 1

This course is designed for the student with a personal interest in baking or for the student with a career interest in becoming a professional baker or pastry chef. In this hands-on class students practice techniques used in creating breads, pastries, cookies, quick breads, chocolate, cheesecakes, creme brule,  cakes and basic decorating, etc. This course also includes instruction on the function of ingredients, equipment, costs, and career opportunities in the field of pastry and baking.  Field trips to a local bake shop and demonstrations by local chefs will be part of this course. One of the units includes running a bakeshop/cafe.

Independent Study in FCS -        Hospitality                                        Course No: FC 410

Requires approval from Mrs. Stendahl        

Grade Level: 12                                        

Credit: 1/2 credit per semester enrolled

Have you explored all your options in FCS?  Perhaps an independent study in your career area is what you need!

Culinary Arts/Food Service/Hospitality, Tourism, and Lodging-Independent Study for Culinary Arts/Culinary Management available for students who have completed Family Foods, Food Science & Nutrition, and Culinary Arts.  Students will work independently to explore more areas of food production and plan, prepare and host meals for guests.  Students will be expected to complete a career investigation project in a food related field. The students will perform self-assessments, research and explore a career, set career goals, create a plan for achieving goals, as part of the career investigation project.  Students are able but not required to receive credit for employment in a career area through a food service/hospitality or culinary occupation.

Mentorship: Do you have a career area that you want to spend extended time shadowing?  If there are willing employers in our area, we can set up mentorships where you rotate between 4-5 employers for the semester and see your career area of interest in a variety of settings and get a feel for the atmosphere and various ways the career can be experienced.

Career Pathway: Teach and Train

Title:          Parents, Children, and Human Development                        Course No: FC 406

Length: Semester                                                        

Grade Level: 10, 11 & 12        

This course is a prerequisite to the Assistant Childcare Teacher class taught over ITV.  This course focuses on the awesome responsibilities and personal interactions between adults and children from pregnancy to birth to adolescence.  In an ever-changing world, the parent-child relationship is complex and greatly influenced by family, community, and society.  Nurturance, responsibility, empathy, practical reasoning, and community and social action are key ideas covered in this course.  Students will have the opportunity to do observations at the local daycare, and elementary school.  Students will wear the pregnancy simulator in class and will take a computerized Real Care Baby2™  home as a classroom assignment for a weekend to understand and explore the responsibilities and care for an infant.  Upon completion of the experience, a computer print out of the responses to the baby will be generated to identify how successful the student was at caring for the baby.  This course is appropriate for students entering career fields in education, sociology, psychology, and family and consumer sciences, and child care as well as for personal growth and understanding. This course is an excellent choice if you are planning to pursue a career in teaching!  Students will receive training in Shaken Baby Syndrome Prevention for Child Care Providers and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Prevention and receive certificates with successful completion. These certifications are necessary for working in day care centers in Wisconsin.

*This course may be available for Technical College credit; work in progress.  

Course Site: www.stendahlparentsandchildren.weebly.com

Title:  Let’s Teach!                                                                Course No: FC 426

Length: Semester                                         

Grade Level:  11-12

The Let’s Teach course is designed for 11th and 12th grade students who have a sincere desire to teach and care for young children. It prepares students for either an entry-level position in the childcare industry or to pursue a college degree in early childhood education, elementary education, middle, or junior high. Since the concepts are foundational to education, this course also provides a window of opportunity for students interested in secondary education.  Students observe and interact in a variety of early childhood settings including elementary school, child care centers, Head Start programs, and early intervention programs.  Students who successfully complete this course with a minimum grade of "B" can continue their exploration in Education through the Independent Study in Teaching where the student will explore teaching grades 3K-Grade 6 in Whitehall Elementary and/or Junior or Senior High.  See Mrs. Stendahl if this is of interest to you.  Course site: www.stendahlletsteach.weebly.com

Assistant Child Care I                                                        Course No:  FC 423

Length: Semester                                                                Grade Level; 11 & 12

Prerequisite (s): Parenting or Psychology

Description: This class is recommended for students with an interest in working with children. Career ideas that would greatly benefit from this course include: Pre-K to third grade education including daycare work, elementary guidance, social workers, and anyone who plans on spending time with young children. This course certifies students for an entry-level position as an assistant childcare teacher in Wisconsin. Students need an 85% average, 85% attendance, to be at least 17 years old upon completion, and to complete a 10-hour job shadow to meet state certification requirements. Others may take the class for credit without certification. Students will need a computer and Internet access for the class.

Credits: High School (0.5)

Length: 1 Semester (2nd semester)

Host school/Instructor: ACHM/Karalee Wensel

Independent Study in FCS -        Education                                        Course Number: FC 410

Requires approval from Mrs. Stendahl        

Grade Level: 12                                

Credit: 1/2 credit per semester enrolled

Have you explored all your options in FCS?  Perhaps an independent study in your career area is what you need!

Education and Training-Independent Study in Human Growth and Development available for students who have completed the Parents, Children, and Human Development course and would like to prepare for a career in teaching.  Students will utilize the FCCLA STAR event for Teaching and Training, as well as develop a Career Investigation project in the field of education.  The students will perform self-assessments, research and explore a career, set career goals, create a plan for achieving goals, as part of the career investigation project.  The teaching and training project will require the student to job shadow at least two teachers, plan and prepare, and evaluate lessons which they will then teach in the FCSE department, local day care center, or in the elementary schools.

Mentorship: Do you have a career area that you want to spend extended time shadowing?  If there are willing employers in our area, we can set up mentorships where you rotate between 4-5 employers for the semester and see your career area of interest in a variety of settings and get a feel for the atmosphere and various ways the career can be experienced.

Career Pathway: Visual Arts-Textile, Interiors & Entrepreneurship as well as Construction Trades

Focus on Fashion                                                                Course No: FC 420

Length: Semester                                        

Grade Level: 9-12                                        

This course will focus on clothes and fashion, apparel industries, textiles, design-the art of apparel, and clothing selection to identify clothes that are “right” for you and explore careers in the apparel industry.  Students will learn more in depth sewing techniques and make garments or home furnishings project for themselves and/or others.  This will be mostly a sewing lab class. Depending on semester offered, projects may include costuming for the school play and projects within the district.

Title:  Entrepreneurship Applications in Textile Arts                        Course No: FC 419

Grade Level:  10, 11 & 12                                                                        

Credit: 1/2 credit

Comments:  You should have taken Focus on Fashion or Exploring Fibers and Furnishings, or seek approval from Mrs. Stendahl prior to registration.

Did you enjoy the opportunity to create projects or successfully repair garments in middle school?  Do you like the idea of being your own boss and determining your own future through self employment?  This semester course is for students who wish to explore the career pathway, Visual Arts-Textiles, Interiors & Entrepreneurship.  Did you know that 40% of the population are projected to be ‘gig’ workers in the near future?  A ‘gig’ worker is self-employed and works random jobs as they are available.  How would ‘gig’ work change your way of life and is it a job you could handle?  What about your future family?  How would ‘gig’ work affect you and your family?  This course helps students look at skills and knowledge they need to be successful in this new work environment. Do you have what it takes to succeed in the new world of work?  Take this class to evaluate your desire for entrepreneurship and elevate your skills and knowledge to succeed at college and career aspects of your life.  You will have a chance to write a business plan and  develop an entrepreneurial business using embroidery machines, sergers and basic sewing machines.. If you like, you can take this project to compete in the FCCLA STAR event, Entrepreneurship.  

Title:  Homes and Interiors Studio                                                Course No: FC 407

Length: Semester                                         

Grade Level:  9-12                                        

This course will explore some of the new concepts in housing such as Tiny Houses, green homes, man-caves, and the latest in technology options making homes more efficient and tech savvy. Students will build a website portfolio showcasing work during ‘studio time’ in class while exploring drafting skills, architectural symbols, preparing professional storyboards of their creations and working with ‘clients’ to create mock up floor plans and project illustrations as architects and designers would for customers.  Key concepts learned include elements and principles of design and color, textiles for homes, interiors (wall, floor, ceiling, furniture, lighting, window treatments, appliances), landscaping, home maintenance, home safety, and careers in housing.  Fieldtrips to lumber supply stores, home improvement chains, and home furnishing businesses will be planned.  

***As an individual or team the student will design a living space as indicated by the Interior Design Scenario, found in the STAR Events section of the FCCLA national website. Students will create design boards featuring their interior selections for the judges and have the option to compete at regional level competition as possibly at state and national levels.  

Independent Study in FCS -        Visual Arts                                        Course No: FC 410

Requires approval from Mrs. Stendahl         

Grade Level: 12                                        

Credit: 1/2 credit per semester enrolled

Have you explored all your options in FCS?  Perhaps an independent study in your career area is what you need!

Visual Arts-This independent study course allows students who completed the Focus on Fashion or Housing and Interior Design course to pursue further career exploration through employment in this field  such as working at a fabric, apparel or home furnishings store.  Students will complete a career investigation project in the field of interest, perform self-assessments, research and explore a career, set career goals, create a plan for achieving the goals as part of the career investigation project.  Students will also prepare window displays appropriate to the career area and have them displayed in community storefronts for community to view.  

Mentorship: Do you have a career area that you want to spend extended time shadowing?  If there are willing employers in our area, we can set up mentorships where you rotate between 4-5 employers for the semester and see your career area of interest in a variety of settings and get a feel for the atmosphere and various ways the career can be experienced.  

Career Pathway: Health Services-All Areas

Title:  Introduction to Health Careers                                        Course No: FC 409

Length: Semester                                        

Grade Level: 9-12

Comments: Students will be required to be up to date on immunizations and sign confidentiality forms for admittance to local medical facilities for field trips and/or job shadow experiences.  One of the fastest growing and fields of career demand is the healthcare field.  This course is the first in the series of three courses that lead to the State of Wisconsin Health Youth Apprenticeship certification program and is the first course required to be selected for the Health Science Academy Program.  (See further information at the end of the FCSE section of this catalog.) In this course you will explore the origins of health care, careers in health care, legal and ethical issues, communication in the healthcare system, infection control, safety practices, body systems, health and wellness, human growth and development, and emergency care.  This course will involve many hands-on applications such as building human anatomy out of clay and field trips to various health care/medical facilities to examine the many avenues one can take in the medical field.

Title:          Introduction to Medical Terminology                                Course No: FC 408

Length: Semester                                        

Grade Level: 9-12

Comments:  This course will include field trips to area medical facilities, job shadowing with health practitioners, and guest speakers.  Students will be required to be up to date on immunizations and sign confidentiality forms for admittance to local medical facilities for field trips and job shadow experiences.  This course uses the Dean Vaughn Medical Terminology 350 Total Retention System.  The program teaches the basic design medical terminology and how to easily remember, pronounce and apply the meaning of all the prefixes, roots and suffixes that combine to form 11,000 complex medical terms.   We will also learn common abbreviations and their meanings for medical terms in each of the body systems.  This course is an excellent way to explore one’s interest in the medical field or as preparation for taking the Medical Terminology course over the ITV system at school.

*This course meets the Health Services Youth Apprenticeship Medical Terminology course requirement and is a part of the Health Career Academy program.  Health Occupations Students of America or HOSA is a student organization linked to the Health Sciences Education field which provides opportunities to expand student knowledge and critical experience in the medical field.  Students with an interest in the medical professions are encouraged to take part in this organization.  See Mrs. Stendahl for information.

Course site: www.stendahlintromedterm.weebly.com

Independent Study in FCS -        Medical                                        Course No: FC 410

Requires approval from Mrs. Stendahl         

Grade Level: 12                                        

Credit: 1/2 credit per semester enrolled

Have you explored all your options in FCS?  Perhaps an independent study in your career area is what you need!

Medical-This independent study course allows students who completed the youth apprenticeship program to further explore the field of medicine.  Students will complete a career investigation project in the medical field, perform self-assessments, research and explore a career, set career goals, create a plan for achieving the goals as part of the career investigation project.  In addition, the student shall develop and implement a school and community service project promoting positive health; health careers, educating the public on health issues, etc.  Students can receive credit for employment in the medical field in connection with this course.

Mentorship: Do you have a career area that you want to spend extended time shadowing?  If there are willing employers in our area, we can set up mentorships where you rotate between 4-5 employers for the semester and see your career area of interest in a variety of settings and get a feel for the atmosphere and various ways the career can be experienced.   

Medical Terminology Online                                                Course No: FC 413

Credits: Western Technical College Credit (3.0) ½ HS Credit

Length: Semester (2nd Semester)                        

Grade Level:  11 or 12

Host School/Instructor: Western/ Staff 

Prerequisite(s):  Introduction to Medical Terminology

Description: Focuses on the component parts of medical terms: prefixes, suffixes and word roots. Students practice formation analysis and reconstruction of terms; emphasis on spelling, definition and pronunciation.  There will be an introduction to operative, diagnostic, therapeutic and symptomatic terminology of all body systems, as well as systemic and surgical terminology.  This course is open to all students, but meets a course requirement for Health Services youth apprenticeship program students.

Title:  Certified Nursing Assistant                                Course No.: FC427   New Listing

Must be approved by Ms. Stendahl                                Credits:  .5 (See description for details!)

Length:  120 hours After school hours                        Career Pathway: Health Services-All Areas

Grade Level: 10-12 (Must be 16 years old!)

Mrs. Stendahl is able to hold training spots for high school students who plan to pursue a career in health care. See Mrs. Stendahl regarding dates, times and commitment. You will be responsible for class fees, transportation, and testing fees to take the CNA course. Students can be reimbursed these fees when employed. Again, talk with Mrs. Stendahl regarding reimbursement criteria.  Note that this is not a college course or high school offering. The course is through a local medical facility.

If you choose to be in the Health Youth Apprenticeship program, school will award you credit for taking the CNA course when you pass your state CNA test to be on the Wisconsin State Registry AND you successfully COMPLETE the Youth Apprenticeship program in Health Science.  

Title:  Health Services Youth Apprenticeship -                                Course No.: FC 415

Must be approved by Ms. Stendahl                                                Credits:  Variable

Length:  1 or 2 year program                        

Grade Level: 11 & 12                                                

Comments: This program is for students interested in exploring the work world in the medical field. Students earn a wage while working. Work can take place during the school day based on workplace.  Most students work weekend and evening shifts.  450 hours are needed to complete the program. Students are expected to complete the skills listed on the skill checklist at this link:  Health Services

Students complete the skills appropriate to their area such as: Health Care Foundation's, Health Information Management, Medical Assistant, Dental Assistant, Nursing Assistant, and Pharmacy Assistant.Youth Apprenticeship (YA) integrates school-based and work-based learning to instruct students in employability and occupational skills defined by Wisconsin industries. Local programs provide training based on statewide youth apprenticeship curriculum guidelines, endorsed by business and industry. Students are instructed by qualified teachers and skilled worksite mentors. Students are simultaneously enrolled in academic classes to meet high school graduation requirements, in a youth apprenticeship related instruction class, and are employed by a participating employer under the supervision of a skilled mentor.  Program Framework/Key elements of the youth apprenticeship program are:  Industry-developed skill standards and exposure to multiple aspects of the industry.  Skilled mentors assigned to train the students, Paid on-the-job work experience, related classroom instruction concurrent with work-based learning, curriculum guidelines for all programs (2 aligned courses at school), performance evaluation of demonstrated competencies, and state-issued skill certificate

There are THREE work experience options for students interested in the medical field.  Please review the options:

This program also provides opportunity to gain work experience in Clinical Laboratory, Cardiology, Dental, Dietary, Imaging, Medical Records, Health Unit Coordinator, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, and Radiography.  This experience can be priceless in making decisions regarding future career plans in the medical profession! Course site: Under development

For further information, see or contact Mrs. Stendahl at stendahld@whitehallsd.k12.wi.us or 715.538.4364 ext. 141


Foreign Language - Spanish

Title:        Spanish I                                                        Course No: FL 500/501 Length: All Year        

Grade Level: 9-12        

Spanish 1 is designed to increase students’ awareness of the Spanish language and culture. Students will learn how to speak, read, and write in Spanish through various games, activities, and skits. Vocabulary will include but is not limited to: basic conversational questions and answers, the Spanish alphabet, numbers, hobbies, food, mealtimes, family and clothing. Grammar concepts will include learning how to read, speak and write in the present tense.

                

Title:  Spanish II*                                                        Course No: FL 502/503

Length: All Year        

Grade Level: 10, 11,& 12        

*Prerequisite:  Spanish I

Spanish II is designed for students who completed Spanish 1 with a grade of a “C” or better, unless with expressed approval by the instructor and principal. Students will continue to learn more about the Spanish language and culture in this course. Vocabulary will include but is not limited to: vacation destinations, furniture, homes, body parts, places in the community, TV shows, movies and traditional cuisine. Grammar concepts will include learning how to read, speak and write in the past tense.

Title:  Spanish III*                                                        Course No. FL 504/505

Length: All Year

Grade Level: 11 & 12

*Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Spanish I and II

Spanish III is designed for students who completed Spanish 2 with a grade of a “C” or better, unless with expressed approval by the instructor and principal. Students should also be planning on continuing their education in Spanish after high school. The majority of this class will be held in Spanish and students will increase their listening and speaking abilities throughout this course.

Title:  Spanish IV*                                                        Course No.FL 506/507

Length: All Year

Grade level: 12

*Prerequisite:  Spanish I and II and III

Spanish IV is designed for students who completed Spanish I, II and III with a grade of “C” or better, unless with expressed approval by the instructor and principal.  Students should also be planning on continuing their education in Spanish after high school.  The majority of this class will be held in Spanish and student will increase their speaking and reading abilities throughout this course.


Health/Physical Education Department

Title:  Physical Education  9                                                Course No: PH 904

Grade Level:  9th                                                        

Comments: Required of all freshman. The instructor will determine what is appropriate to wear for P.E. class. Fall Semester – Physical fitness, flag football, volleyball, basketball, soccer, weight training, circuit training, low organizational games, and folk dance.
Spring Semester – Same as fall except track and field and softball.

Title:  Physical Education 9-10                                        `        Course No: PH 906/907

Grade Level:  9-10

This class is available Semester 1 and Semester 2 for both 9th and 10th grade students.  Ninth grade must have completed Phy Ed 9 (122) before taking this class (123)

Title:  General Physical Education                                                Course No: PH 908          

Grade Level: 10 & 11                        

This course is designed for students interested in an average level of personal fitness and a variety of different units.  Physical fitness activities are included in each unit.

Title:          Advanced Physical Education                                        Course No: PH 909         

Grade Level:  11 & 12        

This course is designed for the student who is interested in a high level of personal fitness and advanced games.  Fitness activities, information on nutrition, principles of fitness and advanced eye/hand games and activities will be emphasized.

Title:          Fitness I                                                                Course No: PH 910

Grade Level: 10-12                                

This course is designed to develop an appreciation of various components of physical fitness, strength, endurance, and flexibility.  Various activities will be used in conjunction with the weight room (stretching activities, weight training, form running, aerobics, agility skills and other various activity series).

Title:  Fitness 2                                                                Course No: PH 911        

Grade Level:  11 & 12        

This course will allow a student to continue the study of physical fitness, strength, endurance and flexibility at a higher level.  Various activities will be used in conjunction with the weight room (weight training, stretching activities, aerobics, long distance running, plyometrics, and other various activity series.


Industrial Technology Department 

Title:        Construction 1: Basic Carpentry Skills

Career Connections Project Book 1                                        Course No: IN 602

Grade level: 9-12

Maximum: 15

In this class students will learn how to correctly operate basic hand and power tools to complete quality woods projects from a given set of plans.  Students will be actively involved in the design, estimating, machining, and assembly processes needed to carry out the completion of the chosen project(s). Students will follow the  North Central States Regional Council of Carpenters curriculum “Career Connections Project Book 1.” The book includes introductory information on basic skills and key safety elements to make you successful in a shop and/or a career setting. The book details several projects that highlight the basic skills necessary to provide knowledge of a beginning carpenter. Students, whether or not are interested in carpentry as a career, will develop and become proficient in basic, useful carpentry skills. Class includes 30% Classroom and 70% lab activities.

Career Connections is a unique program designed to provide students with the necessary skills and gain confidence to be successful in the workplace or personal projects. The curriculum is written by practicing carpenters to ensure students get the correct and most relevant information. Project Book 1 will provide students with a welcome opportunity to consider a career that has many jobs with competitive pay and benefits without having to go the traditional 4-year education route.

Title:  Construction 2: Advanced Carpentry Skills

Career Connections Project Book 2                                        Course No: IN 603

Grade Level: 10-12

Maximum students: 15

Suggested: Construction 1

Students will use prior knowledge and skills attained in Construction 1. Students will focus their skills on an advanced series of projects outlined in “Career Connections: Project Book 2”. Projects include sawhorses, picnic tables, sheds, and a playhouse. Class includes 20% classroom 80% lab activities.

Title:  Architectural Design                                                        Course No: IN 604          

Grade Level: 9-12                

Maximum students:  19

In this course students will learn basic drafting techniques and concepts. Students will be using Autodesk Revit 2015 to understand basic 2D and 3D modeling techniques along with basic interior and exterior design principles. As a capstone project students will be able to research and design their own homes. An emphasis will be placed on planning, cost, materials, and efficiency. Students will be using TeachMe3D curriculum which will allow students to be independently self paced on assignments. Students can use classroom time to participate in discussion, ask questions and work on workbook assignments. Students will be graded on participation, behavior, and completion of weekly class projects.

Title:  Introduction to Welding                                                Course No: IN 605

Grade Level: 10-12

Maximum students: 16

This course will be devoted to the basic welding processes.  Students will be expected to perform basic welds using the following processes:  Electric Arc, Oxy-Acetylene, Plasma, MIG, and TIG. An emphasis will be placed on safety, material, electrodes, welding positions, welding joints, cutting and grinding.

Title: Advanced Welding**                                                         Course No. IN 606        

Grade Level:  11 & 12

Maximum students: 16

**Prerequisite: Introduction to Welding

CAPSTONE: BLAIR /TAYLOR HIGH SCHOOL MAC BOWENM

Students will review the different welding and cutting processes. During the first 6 weeks the emphasis will be placed on safety and correct welding joint procedure. The remaining 12 weeks will be devoted to community repair and individual projects. Emphasis will be placed on design and structural integrity. Students will be expected to learn and function in a team environment with an emphasis on communication.

Title:        Electronics                                                                Course No: IN 607         

Grade Level: 9-12

Maximum students: 16

The electronics course provides students with a general introduction to electronic components and systems.  Basic theory is presented through lecture, demonstration, and completion of lab activities.  Approximately half of our class time is devoted to understanding basic theory through the completion of “hands-on” lab work.  Students will have the opportunity to construct light and sound circuits, use electronic test equipment, build a working project, and experiment with many of the individual parts commonly used in today’s electronic systems. A major emphasis will be placed on house wiring and different combinations of lights, switches, and outlets commonly seen in residential settings.

Title:  CAD (Computer Assisted Drafting)                                         Course No: IN 608         

Grade Level:  9-12        

Maximum students: 19        

Most technical and vocational related occupations require an understanding of basic drafting.  Techniques taught in this class will help students better understand how to interpret, convey, and transfer ideas and information on drawn plans.  Students will use CAD software, some traditional board and T-square equipment, and Autodesk Inventor 2015 Software (creates 3-D model images which can be rotated) to complete drafting exercises that have a professional look when they are finished.  Ending the semester, students will have the opportunity to complete drawings and designs of their choice which will give them a chance to show off their drafting skills. Students will be using TeachMe3D curriculum which will allow students to be independently self paced on assignments. Students can use classroom time to participate in discussion, ask questions and work on workbook assignments. Students will be graded on participation, behavior, and completion of weekly class projects.

*A capstone project may include creating designs that can be printed using our 3D printer. These printers can bring designs and drawings to life and potentially solve “real-world” problems.

Title:  Norsemen Manufacturing -                                                Course No. IN 609

Requires approval from the Tech. Ed instructor.                                Credit:  Variable

Length:  semester or  year

Grade Level: 11 & 12

Prerequisite-Students will need to complete a JOB APPLICATION and have a short interview with Mr. Anderson and possible community members. CAD or knowledge of Autodesk Inventor is highly recommended.

This course is designed for students who would like to further develop their technical and business skills. This course will be the foundation for a future student run business.  Students will be able to use skills attained in their classes to provide a product that can be purchased by the public. Students will work in a team environment to discuss items to design, manufacture, market, and sell. Students will be expected to learn and function in a team environment with an emphasis on communication.

Title:  Residential Construction/Carpentry Skills         (CAPSTONE)        Course No: IN 610

Career Connections: Project Book 3                                        

Grade Level: 11 & 12                

Class Maximum:  15 students

Suggested: Construction 1/Construction 2                

1 YEAR/ 2 CREDIT BLOCK

Mr. Anderson Whitehall Memorial High School

Students will be actively involved in learning about how a typical house is built.  Information covered in class discussions and demonstrations will be put to use through the construction of scaled house models and full size structures such as storage sheds and occasionally garages.  No matter what type of structure is built, you will be able to obtain the knowledge and skills that could be your first step towards a future in the building trades.  If you do not pursue a construction related career, the skills you are able to obtain in this class could still be used to save you thousands of dollars in your lifetime by allowing you to do many of your own construction related projects.

Students will follow Career Connections: Project Book 3 Residential Construction. This includes laying out walls, using tools and materials common to construction, building the structure, as well as installing the ceiling and the floor.

This will be a student paced concept. Students will follow the “Career Connections” Curriculum and find a pathway that best fits their individuals goals and needs. Career Connections is a unique program designed to provide students with the necessary skills and gain confidence to be successful in the workplace or personal projects. The curriculum is written by practicing carpenters to ensure students get the correct and most relevant information. The Project Book Series  will provide students with a welcome opportunity to consider a career that has many jobs with competitive pay and benefits without having to go the traditional 4-year education route.

UPON COMPLETION OF CERTAIN REQUIREMENTS:

Title: DIY (Do-It-Yourself Project Construction)                                Course Number: IN 611

Grade Level 11 and 12

Class Maximum: 10-15

Suggested: Construction 1

In this independent self-paced class students will have the ability to plan and construct small crafts and detailed woods projects. Students will use Pinterest, You-Tube and other DIY resources to be the source of their creativity. Students will learn how to plan projects, square material, and join using Kreg-Jig.


Mathematics Department

The policy at Whitehall High School is that all students will successfully complete Algebra I and Formal Geometry.  One other math classes will be required of all student to meet WHS graduation requirements. Although if a student plans to pursue post secondary education, a 4th year of math is highly recommended.  These math classes will be identified by the student, parent, math teacher, and school counselor based on the student’s future plans.  Additionally, all students planning on attending a 2 year UW College or 4 year college will be required to complete Algebra II with a strong recommendation of completing Pre Calculus. All students attending a Technical College are recommended  to complete Algebra II (as this is advised by most technical college instructors).

Title: Pre-Algebra                                                        Course No:  MA 714/715

Length:All  Year

Grade Level:  9-10

Review of the mathematical skills needed for the study of algebra as well as a brief introduction to algebra. Topics include the arithmetic of integers, fractions, decimals, and percents; applications of these arithmetic skills to problems involving measurement, percent, ratio, and proportion; and math study skills. The introduction to algebra consists of operations on signed numbers, algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and graphing.

Title:  Algebra I                                                        Course No:  MA 704/705

Length:All  Year

Grade Level:  9

This is a required freshman course, unless completed successfully in junior high.  It begins with a review of basic operations and an introduction to the variable.  The remainder of the class is spent building the student’s mathematical skills through the use of algebraic concepts.  

Title:  Geometry Skills                                                Course No: MA 731/732

Length:  All Year

Grade Level: 10                

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra I

In Geometry Skills you will use theorems, postulates, and definitions to do proofs and find solutions to problems.  You will study geometric figures and their properties.  Construction using a straightedge and a compass will be covered.   Geometry Skills will cover the fundamentals of geometry.  This course may be taken after the completion of Algebra I with the consent of the instructor.  

Title:  Formal Geometry with Probability & Stats.                Course No: MA 706/707

Length:  All Year

Grade Level: 10                

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra I

Comments:  Most colleges require this course for admission.

In Geometry you will use theorems, postulates, and definitions to do proofs and find solutions to problems.  You will study geometric figures and their properties.  Construction using a straight edge and a compass will be covered.  Probability and statistics will be studied during the second semester.  This course may be taken after the completion of Applied Algebra I and Applied Geometry with the consent of the instructor.

Title:  Algebra 1.5                                                        Course No:  MA 741/742  

Length:  All Year

Grade Levels: 11-12

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra I and Formal Geometry

The course is usually taken during the junior** year.  A review of Algebra I is included along with a more detailed study of the areas covered in Algebra I.  If time permits some trigonometry will be introduced.  Algebra 1.5 moves at a slower pace than Algebra II to allow for more in depth learning of the Algebra II concepts.  This course may be taken after the completion of  Geometry with the consent of the instructor.  

Title:  Algebra II                                                        Course No:  MA 708/709  

Length:  All Year

Grade Levels: 11-12

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra I and Formal Geometry

The course is usually taken during the junior** year.  A review of Algebra I is included along with a more detailed study of the areas covered in Algebra I.  If time permits some trigonometry will be introduced.

Title:        Pre-Calculus                                                         Course No:  MA 710/711                

Length:  All Year

Grade Level:  11 & 12                                        

Prerequisite:  Algebra I, Algebra II, and Formal Geometry                

Comments:  This is an honors/weighted course.

This course is open to juniors and seniors who have successfully completed Algebra II.  The class will review the fundamentals of Algebra, discuss functions and their graphs, study polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.  We will conclude by studying systems of equations and complex numbers.  A graphing calculator will be required for this class.

Title: Calculus Adv. Placement (AP)                                   Course No. MA 712/713

Length:  All Year

Grade Level: 12

Prerequisite:  Pre-Calculus

Two-Way - Whitehall - This is an honors/weighted course

This course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics including algebra, formal geometry (rectangular and polar coordinates, equations and graphs, lines, conics).   Advanced placement calculus is a course in introductory calculus with elementary functions.

This elective course will be structured so students will have an opportunity to take an advanced placement test near the end of the school year.  The Advanced Placement Test gives students an opportunity to earn college credit.

Title: Math Applications                                                Course No: MA 721/722

Grade Level:  11-12

Prerequisite: Formal Geometry

This course does not satisfy the math admission requirements for a 4-year college.  Please check with the school counselor for technical college programs.    This course will also have a heavy dose of Algebra and Geometry review.  This course will also focus on students using problem solving strategies and previous mathematical knowledge to solve larger problems.  After completing Math Applications students can enroll in Algebra II.

Title: Math 12                                                        Course No. MA 723/724

Grade Level:  12        

Prerequisite: Formal Geometry

This course gives the student information and practice in solving problems statistics.  This course will present the most used methods of statistics in a way that emphasizes working with data.  The aim is to help students think about data and use statistical methods to understand data.  Students will also review basic algebra skills as a part of this course.

Title: Math for the Trades        

Length: Semester                                                Course No. MA 716

Grade Level:  12        

 

This course is intended for students that are considering a career in the Trades.  This course covers the math skills needed on a jobsite. All the topics, assignments, and projects in this course are based on real-life scenarios.    

Title:  Exploring Computer Science                                        Course No: 735

Length: Year

Grace Level:  9, 10,  11 & 12

Prerequisite: None

Exploring Computer Science is a yearlong course with 6 main topics consisting of Human Computer Interaction, Problem Solving, Web Design, Programming, Computing and Data Analysis and Robotics.  The course was developed around a framework of both computer science content and computational practice. Assignments and instruction are socially relevant, practical and meaningful for students.   This course is for everyone not just those that want to be “programmers”.  This course is meant to introduce and explore computing and technology to all students.  Technology and computers are woven into the daily fabric all of our lives and all students would benefit from learning more about these.  This class will not fulfill college math credit requirement.

Title:  Computer Programming I                                                Course No: MA 733

Length: Semester

Grace Level:  9, 10,  11 & 12

Prerequisite: None

This course will allow students to explore the world of computer programming. This course is designed for students interested in learning more about programming and is recommended for those going on to college and/or technical school.  The course provides students with a solid background of standard computer logic, which will enhance problem-solving skills.  This course is designed to be a rewarding and fun learning experience for students who have no prior programming experience and also for those that have some experience.  This class will not fulfill college math credit requirement.

Title:  Computer Programming II                                                Course No: MA 734

Length: Semester

Grace Level:  10,  11 & 12

Prerequisite: Pass Computer Programming I

This course will allow students to explore the next level in the world of computer programming. Students will explore a variety of programming languages and applications.  The students will also build games, applications and much more. This class will not fulfill college math credit requirement.

Title:  STEM Lab                                                                Course No: MA 744

Length: Semester

Grace Level:  10,  11 & 12

Prerequisite: None

This course will allow students to experience the world of STEM, Science Technology Engineering and Math.  Students will work on STEM related projects throughout the semester.  These projects could include but are not limited to building robots, programming robots, writing computer programs, building drones, the possibilities are endless!!  Students will have input on the type of projects we will work on.  This class will not fulfill college math credit requirement.

Music Department

Title:        Concert Choir                                                Course No:  MU 806/807

Length:  All Year        

Grade Level: 9-12

Concert Choir is a group designed to study choral literature of various periods and styles through performance.  Students will study fundamental skills including music reading, vocal production, and diction.  Students are required to attend all concerts, group contests, and voice lessons each quarter.  They may also choose to do solo and small ensemble study.

Title:  Concert Band*                                                        Course No: MU 808/809

Length:  All Year                

Grade Level: 9-12                        

*Prerequisite:  Consultation on skill level and attitude will determine placement in regular concert band or an independent class that will help develop the skills necessary to play high school level music.  The concert band is designed for the instrumentalist who desires to perform a variety of music with continued emphasis on the development of intelligent musicianship, technical training, and extensive repertoire.  Pep band and jazz ensemble are made up of members from the concert band.  This is a performing group.  Attendance at all concerts and contest is required as part of your grade.

Title:        College Bound Theory Preparation*                                Course No: MU 811

Grade Level: 11 - 12        

*Prerequisite:  Enrollment in band or prior approval from instructor

This course is designed for the advanced music student who is planning on majoring in music at the college level.  An independent study music theory course through the university extension office will be the main focus of this class.

Title: Chamber Choir**                                                        Course No: MU 812/813

Length:  All Year

Grade Level: 10-12

**Prerequisite:Approval of instructor or audition; limit of 20 students

Audition or prior approval from instructor is required.  Students will learn and perform a variety of musical styles.  Chamber choir is the most advanced choral offering. This is a select vocal ensemble. Music will be both accompanied and a cappella. Styles will include jazz, pop and classical.

Title:        The Grass is Always Greener**Requires Teacher Approval        Course No: MU 814        

Length: Semester

Grade Level: 9 - 12                

**Prerequisite:  Enrollment in band or prior approval from instructor

Here is your chance to learn how to play a second instrument!  Guidance will be available for you to learn another band instrument.  Selection of the instrument will depend on availability and the band director’s prerogative.  It will be necessary to keep up with your regular instrument

unless other arrangements are mutually agreed upon with the band director.  Entrance into this class is by permission of the director only.

Title:        Women's Choir                                                        Course No:  815/816

Length:  All Year        

Grade Level: 9-12 Women

Women's Choir is an ensemble designed to study choral literature of various periods and styles through performance of music written or arranged specifically for women's voices.   Students will study fundamental skills including music reading, vocal production, and diction. Students are required to attend all concerts, group contests, and voice lessons each quarter.  They may also choose to do solo and small ensemble study.


Science Department

Title:        Physical Science-1                                                        Course No: SC 1004 

Length:  Semester-1

Grade Level: 9th                                                        

Comments:  Required of 9th graders

Aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards

This course is an interrelated study of the scientific method, Chemistry and Physics.  The first semester of Physical Science will focus on the scientific process, chemistry, and thermodynamics.  Throughout the semester we will emphasize mathematical aspects of modern sciences necessary for advanced high school science classes, as well as for solving many common problems faced by everyone after high school.

Title:        Physical Science-2                                                        Course No: SC 1005

Length:  Semester-2

Grade Level: 10th                                                        

Comments:  Required of 10th graders

Aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards

The second semester of Physical Science will continue with laws of physics, nuclear power, waves, sound, light, earth science, and space science. Students will enhance their critical thinking skills and problem solving abilities when focusing on the fundamental nonliving factors governing the world around us.  

Title:        Biology-1                                                                 Course No: SC 1006 

Length:  Semester-2

Grade Level: 9th

Comments: Required of all 9th graders

Aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards                

This semester course focuses on looking at the living world through interconnected cycles and systems.  Students are challenged to connect the units of study to see how all the systems and cycles work together in the living world.  The first semester units covered include ecology, biogeochemical cycles, several body systems (respiratory, digestive, and circulatory), plants systems, and structure and function of the cell.  

Title:        Biology-2                                                                 Course No: SC 1007         

Length:  Semester-1

Grade Level: 10th

Comments: Required of all 10th graders

Aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards                        

The second semester of Biology focuses on the underlying principle of evolution in our study of genetics.  Students will learn about evolution, basic genetics, and modern genetics and ethical issues.


Title:          Comprehensive Science                                                Course No: SC 1008         

Length: Semester        

Grade Level: 11 or 12                

Hands-On Learning!! Design your own short experiments! Build a Rube Goldberg Machine! This course offers a variety of sciences.  Science studies such as physics, biology, anatomy, and chemistry are covered.  By way of problem-based learning, & forensics oriented activities and lessons, students will gain insight into how science concepts are applied in the “real world”.  Also included are experimental design, projects, and many hands-on activities.

Title:        Anatomy/Physiology*                                        Course No: 1009/1010 

Length:  All Year

Grade Level:  11 or 12                                        

*Prerequisite:  B or higher in Biology; or consent of instructor

This course is intended for the high school student that wishes to know about the human body and how it works, or those that may be considering a career in a health related field.  This is an intensive, college preparatory course; intended to prepare juniors and seniors for college level work.  Nearly all body systems will be covered (time permitting).  This course will be taught by lecture and discussion, and supported with laboratory work including microscope work, dissections of specific organs and a selected specimen (fetal pigs).  Professional speakers may also be included as additional support to the content material.

Title:  Introduction to Human Disease                                        Course No: SC 1011        

Length: Semester

Grade Level: 11 or 12                                        

Disease results from disruptions to the body’s normal homeostasis. This course will explore diseases affecting each system of the body, specifically causes, symptoms, and treatments. This will include an in-depth study of the mechanisms of each disease & the effects on the body.

Title:  General Chemistry*                                                Course No:  SC 1012/1013

Length:  All Year, 1 credit        

Offered To:  Juniors, Seniors                                                

*Prerequisite: Grade of C  in Biology and Science 9, or consent of the instructor.

Chemistry is the science dealing with the matter and atomic structure, chemical compounds and formula writing, chemical quantities and mole conversions, solutions, and acid/base reactions.   This course may be required for students entering college.  It should be considered a requirement for students interested in science and medical fields and will be extremely helpful for introductory science courses taken by all college freshmen.

Title:  ADVANCED Chemistry**New! 16-17                        Course No: SC 1014/1015          

Length:  All Year        

Grade Level:  11 & 12                                                

**Prerequisite:  -  Students should choose to take this course after General Chemistry

Upon completion of this course, students will have the option to take the AP Chemistry Test.

Students must have earned a Grade of C  in General Chemistry, Biology, and Science 9, or have consent from the instructor.  

The Whitehall Advanced Chemistry Course is modeled after the AP Chemistry Syllabus 3.  Students will be focusing on the six big ideas in the AP Chemistry Curriculum Framework.  The goal for this course is to complete 22 units and have the students prepared for the AP Chemistry Course.  This course will be a continuation of the concepts learned in the Whitehall General Chemistry Course.   The first four units will be reviewing chemical foundations, atoms, molecules, ions, Stoichiometry, and  Reaction Types.  The remaining eighteen units will be covering new concepts and ideas in Chemistry.  

Title:  Physics**                                                        Course No.:  SC 1016/1017

Length:  All Year

Grade Level: 12                                                        

**Prerequisite:  C or better grade in Biology and Science 9, C or better grade in both Geometry and Algebra II

This is an Honors course

This course is a study of toys and how basic physics concepts affect every aspect of our lives.  Through hands-on and technology based laboratories, students will discover physical concepts and develop mathematical relationships to explain their observations.  This course will help prepare students who are planning on going on to school in any type of science field.

Title:  Biology-Ecology                                                        Course No: SC 1020

Length: Semester

Grade Level:  11 or 12                                

If you have an interest in ‘going green’ or are interested in the health of the environment, this is the class for you! Bio-Eco is an environmental science course, which includes the study of ecology, populations, water, air, and land, as well as mineral and energy resources, and the health and future of the environment.  The goal is to expand personal awareness of all interactions with the environment.  Special focus is on the impact of humans (and society as a whole) on the environment with regard to a local, national, and international perspective.

Title:  Biochemistry: Human Nutrition & Wellness                        Course No. SC 1021

Length: Semester

Grade Level:  11 or 12

In order to understand biological processes, & how the human body works, an understanding of biochemistry is valuable. Biochemistry is the branch of chemistry focusing on the chemistry of living things, organic compounds. This course is intended to study the chemistry of the human body in a way that will make the study of anatomy and physiology understandable on a deeper level. Study will center around applying biochemical principles to human nutrition & wellness practices. Concurrent or previous enrollment in Anatomy & Physiology is recommended.

Title:  Vertebrate Zoology                                                        Course No. SC 1023         

Length: Semester

Grade Level:  11 or 12

 

Vertebrate Zoology was designed for those students that enjoy animals.  Enrolled students will create a more thorough understanding of the animals that capture our hearts as well as our imagination both locally and beyond.  The course starts with a brief overview of the major divisions found within of the animal kingdom. The remaining weeks of the semester-long course will be spent on in depth investigation of three major animal groups.  Animal classification and identification, comparative anatomy and physiology, and biodiversity will be the primary themes behind each animal group.  The first animal group studied will be fish followed by the reptiles and amphibians. The final group will be the birds.   Students will have the opportunity to handle many specimens, earn various field trips to remote locations that support the curriculum and experience various demonstrations provided by local experts.  Vertebrate Zoology will be differentiated to meet the students who are seeking a college-preparatory course as well as those that are seeking a more complete understanding of the major animals that share the planet with us.

 

Title: Forensic Science                                                        Course No. SC 1024

Length: Semester

Grade Level:  11 or 12

 

Due to television shows like “Bones,” “CSI,” “Forensic Files” and many others, the discipline of Forensic Science has gained popularity and interest within the general public as well as high school students around the country.  The course of Forensic Science originated from this obvious interest.  Forensic Science is primarily a life science elective course that incorporates the fundamental topics found in biology, chemistry and physics into a scientific problem solving adventure.  Concepts including genetics, toxicology, projectile motion, pathology, and computer forensics will be of high priority in this course.  Forensics Science focuses on strengthening a student’s problem solving ability while reinforcing logical thought processes.  Scenario reconstructions, evidence analysis and simple laboratory techniques will become routine for all enrolled students.  Find your “hidden talent” in this course and expose the truth.

 

 

Title: Genetics                                                                         Course No. SC 1025         

Length: Semester

Grade Level:  11 or 12

 

The course of Genetics takes the basic concepts addressed in Biology 2 to the next level.  Mendelian Genetics, advanced probability, chromosomal linkage and biotechnology represent the cornerstones of the course.  Genetic abnormalities and disease will also be discussed in an attempt to create understanding of those who are different, unique and special.  In addition, Genetics will investigate and discuss the future of genetics testing, chromosomal privacy issues and human ethics.  Laboratory techniques will monitor, analyze and reinforce the theories of these the basic-to-advanced genetics concepts.  With additional computer simulation programs and other modern technologies, the world of genetics will become adventurous instead of intimidating.         

 


Social Studies Department

Title:        U.S. History 9**                                                Course No: SS 1105/1106

Length:  All Year 

Grade Level:  9th

**Required of all students for graduation

U.S. History 9 is a full year course designed to acquaint students with the history of the important political, economic, and social developments that have occurred in the United States from 1860 to the present.  Several important periods are discussed including but not limited to Civil War and Reconstruction, Industrialization and Immigration, World War I, The Roaring Twenties, World War II, Korean War, Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam, Watergate, and Gulf War.  Historical videos as well as the text, The Americans, supplement discussion.

Title:        American Government**                                        Course No: SS 1107/1108        

Length:  All Year 

Grade Level: 10th                                        

**Required of all students for graduation

American Government is a  course for sophomores or any student that has not met this requirement.  This course is designed to create an awareness of the government and the principles that students must live with.  It will help students understand, work with, and become worthy citizens at the different levels of government.

Title:        Western Civilization                                                Course No: SS 1109

Grade Level:  10, 11, or 12                                

Prerequisite:  U.S. History

Western Civilizations is an elective course.  It is a survey of man’s progress and the influences that have shaped the western world.  Included in this study of forces and events are different cultures, religions, political and economic systems which have influenced people(s) and nations through the centuries.

Title:  Eastern Civilization                                                Course No: SS 1110

Grade Level: 10, 11, or 12                                

Prerequisite:  U.S. History

Eastern Civilizations is an elective course.  It is a survey of man’s progress and the influences that shaped the eastern world.  Included in this study of forces and events are different cultures, religions, political and economic systems which have influenced people and nations through the centuries.

Title:  Economics-*FL                                                Course No: SS 1112

Grade Level:  11 or 12

*This class can be taken to fulfill the ½ graduation credit for financial literacy.

Economics is the study of the choices people make about how to use world and personal resources.  An important aspect of every student's future is the ability to plan and implement these sound financial decisions.  In part, this course will help students understand and identify large-scale economic concepts such as supply, demand, and market prices.  In addition, students will learn personal financial responsibility including preparing a budget, understanding employment benefits and taxes, as well as other topics such as credit, insurance, and saving/investing.  Students will exit this course with the skills to identify and make wise choices in their financial future.

Title:        Contemporary Issues                                        Course No: SS 1113  

Grade Level: 11 or 12

Prerequisite:  U .S. History

Contemporary Issues is a one-semester course for juniors and seniors.  The goal of this course is to provide the students of Whitehall High School the opportunity to study their rights and responsibilities of citizenship through the daily issues of international, national, state, and local concern.  We will specifically focus our research on political, social, and economic issues that confront our society today.

Title:  Wisconsin History                                                                Course No: SS 1114         

Grade Level: 11 & 12                                        

Prerequisite:  U. S History 9

This course will provide the student with an in-depth look at the place that we call home – Wisconsin.  Among the topics covered are:  geography and glaciers, Native American tribes, the fur trade and its effect on the state, white settlement of Wisconsin, Wisconsin during the U.S. Civil War, political, social, and economic (mining, lumber, dairy), history of the state, the Progressive Era in Wisconsin under Douglas LaFollette, and modern times in Wisconsin.  A Wisconsin research project or oral history project will conclude the semester course.  Students will be evaluated based on their academic work in the form of quizzes, tests, projects, and their classroom behavior.

Title:  Psychology                                                                        Course No: SS 1124

Grade Level: 11 or 12                                        

One section may be held on the Two-Way – Whitehall

This course is designed for high school juniors and seniors.  The curriculum provides an overview of basic psychological concepts such as brain development, function, personality, altered states of consciousness, and abnormal behaviors.  Students are expected to design, execute, present, and experiment.  Writing skills are emphasized in this course.

Title:   AP U.S. History**                                                        Course No: SS 1125/1126

Length:  All Year        

Grade Level:  11 & 12                                        

**Prerequisite:  Recommendation of local social studies teacher

Comments:  This is an honors/weighted course

While the course will survey U.S. History from 1607 to 1973, the primary goal will be acquiring the skills necessary to think historically, to analyze critically, and to effectively write well-developed essays on historical issues.  Students who take AP U.S. History should be good readers, highly motivated, and willing to undertake a demanding workload to achieve the above goals.  The class will be conducted in a seminar fashion requiring student participation. **Also listed in Advanced Placement Courses

Title: Preserving History; Research, Writing and Preserving Local History   Course No:  SS 1127 

Grade Level:  11 or 12 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of U.S. History 9

This course is designed to incorporate the study of local history, train students in collection and preservation of historic artifacts, and practice the writing of history for museums and the general public.  Guided by facilitators through hands-on local history educational activities and writing/research workshops, students will develop skills critical to research, fieldwork, and writing.  Students will also learn the science of preserving and cataloguing historic artifacts, beginning with the historic holdings already acquired by the district.  Possible experiences students will gain may include the collecting of oral history, job shadowing at local museums, and the writing of student-authored books and/or articles for publication.  The course will be team taught by faculty of the social studies and library science departments.

Title:  Modern U.S. History -(1945 - present)                                        Course No: SS 1131

Grade Level:  11 or 12

This course explores key themes and topics in United States history from the end of World War II to the present, including: 1) Postwar Boom; 2) Cold War; 3) Civil Rights Movement; 4) the Seventies; 5) Social   Change for Women and Latino and Native Americans; 6) the Conservative tide and Reaganomics; and 7) the United States in today’s world.


 Two-Way Project Circuit Classes

The following classes are offered over the two way system in the Distance Learning Classroom.  These classes are geared toward junior and senior students who would like to take more in depth classes that may aid them in career exploration.  Please note that your instructor will be teaching from another building somewhere in Wisconsin so students will not have in person day to day contact with their teacher.Students taking these classes will need to be self motivated, highly responsible and good students.  If students don’t pass their class, they will be responsible for reimbursing Whitehall High School for the cost of taking the class.

Assistant Child Care I                                                                Course No:  FC 423

Length: Semester

Grade Level; 11 & 12

Prerequisite (s): Parenting or Psychology

Description: This class is recommended for students with an interest in working with children. Career ideas that would greatly benefit from this course include: Pre-K to third grade education including daycare work, elementary guidance, social workers, and anyone who plans on spending time with young children. This course certifies students for an entry-level position as an assistant childcare teacher in Wisconsin. Students need an 85% average, 85% attendance, to be at least 17 years old upon completion, and to complete a 10-hour job shadow to meet state certification requirements. Others may take the class for credit without certification. Students will need a computer and Internet access for the class.

Credits: High School (0.5)

Length: 1 Semester (2nd semester)

Host school/Instructor: ACHM/Karalee Wensel


Technical College Courses

These courses are Western Technical College and Chippewa Valley Technical College courses are taught by certified instructors, using technical college books and materials.  Students receive regular technical college credit upon completion of the course(s).  At successful completion of the course, students will receive an official transcript with grade and credit(s) recorded at the technical college.

These courses are of college level integrity and rigor.  Courses will be taught on the Western Technical College and Chippewa Valley Technical College calendar delivery as stated in the course syllabus.  Absences due to conflicting high school activities must be pre-arranged with the instructor, and students will be responsible for any missed work.  Students taking these classes will need to be self motivated, highly responsible and good students.  If students don’t pass their class, they will be responsible for reimbursing Whitehall High School for the cost of taking the class.

Final grades can be provided only at the completion of the Western Technical College and Chippewa Valley Technical College semester.  Requests for student grade status prior to graduation will be considered on an individual request if initiated by the secondary school counselor, transmitted by the student to the Western instructor.

All students will need an email address for Western classes.

All high school student registrations must be submitted on the "High School Registration Form" with appropriate signatures and recommended form where applicable.

Compass testing is held at the Independence Campus on the 1st Thursday of each month at 1:00 PM or the 3rd Monday at 6:00 PM.  (Appointment is necessary,-you must register online) PO Box 308, Independence, WI 54747.  **Are you wondering how your Technical College course might transfer into one of the UW-System campuses?  You can look up specific courses and campuses at this website:  www.uwsa.edu/tis/.  The Transfer Information System (TIS) is managed by the University of Wisconsin System and developed in conjunction with the Wisconsin Technical College System.

Current Events in Criminal Justice (10-504-173)                                          Course No:  SS 1128

Credits:  NTC Credit (3.0)   ½ HS Credit

Grade Level: 11 & 12

Prerequisite(s): None.

Description: Students will explore nine current issues related to law enforcement of today.  Students will be given scenarios that speak to those issues and will be expected to research, reflect and eventually respond to those scenarios in a manner that effectively addresses the issues being explored.

Medical Terminology Online                                                        Course No: FC 413

Credits: Western Technical College Credit (3.0) ½ HS Credit

Length: Semester (2nd Semester)

Grade Level:  11 or 12

Host School/Instructor: Western/ Staff 

Prerequisite(s):  Introduction to Medical Terminology

Description: Focuses on the component parts of medical terms: prefixes, suffixes and word roots. Students practice formation analysis and reconstruction of terms; emphasis on spelling, definition and pronunciation.  There will be an introduction to operative, diagnostic, therapeutic and symptomatic terminology of all body systems, as well as systemic and surgical terminology.  This course is open to all students, but meets a course requirement for Health Services youth apprenticeship program students.


Introduction to Sociology (10-809-196)**                                                Course No: SS 1140

Credits: Western Technical College Credit (3.0)/1/2 HS Credit

Grade Level:  11 & 12

**Prerequisite(s): Intro to Sociology Reading Placement Scores: ACT 13+(Reading), COMPASS 60+(Reading), ASSET 35+(Reading).

***Must have taken High School Sociology prior

Host School/Instructor: Western/Staff.

Description: Introduces students to the basic concepts of sociology: culture, socialization, social stratification, multi-culturalism, and the five institutions, including family, government, economics, religion, and education. Other topics include demography, deviance, technology, environment, social issues, social change, social organization, and workplace issues

Psychology, Introduction to (10-809-198)**                                        Course No: SS 1141

Credits: Western Technical College Credit (3.0).

Graded Level: 11 or 12

** Prerequisite(s): Intro to Psychology Reading Placement Scores: ACT 13+(Reading), COMPASS60+(Reading), ASSET 35+(Reading).

***Must have taken High School Psychology prior

Host School/Instructor: Western/Staff

Comments:  Whitehall Students must have a C+ or better GPA
Description An introductory course in psychology surveying the multiple aspects of human behavior. It addresses the theoretical foundations of human functioning in such areas as perception, learning, motivation, development, personality, health and pathology, exploring physiological and environmental influences. It directs the student to an insightful understanding of the complexities of human relationships in personal and vocational settings.  

This course is required for all Associate in Applied Sciences degrees.

Written Communications (10-801-195)***                                                Course No: EN 333

Credits: Western Technical College Credit (3.0)/1/2 HS Credit

Grade Level:  12

*** Prerequisite(s) : Required Written Communications Writing Scores:  ACT 19+ (English), COMPASS 75+(Writing), ASSET 45+ (Writing)

Host School/Instructor: Western/Staff

Description: Students use the writing process and the computer to complete written projects. In the process of doing so, students analyze audience and purpose; generate ideas for writing; employ appropriate rhetorical strategies; research, synthesize, and organize information; use an approved documentation system for research writing; format word-processed documents appropriately; and follow grammar and punctuation rules.  

This course is required for all Associate in Applied Science degree programs.


Speech (10-801-198)**                                                Course No: EN 334

Credits: Western Technical College Credit (3.0)/ ½ HS Credit

Grade Level:  11 & 12

** Prerequisite(s):  Speech Placement Scores: ACT 13+(Reading), COMPASS 60+(Reading), ASSET 35+(Reading).

***English Credit

Host School/Instructor: Western/Staff

Description: Explores the fundamentals of effective oral presentation to small and large groups. Topic selection, audience analysis, methods of organization, research, structuring evidence and support, delivery techniques, and other essential elements of speaking successfully, including the listening process, form the basis of the course.

Title:          Animal Science**(also listed in Agr.)                        Course No:  AG 005

Credit:  Western Technical College (3.0)/ 1 HS Science Credit

Length:  Semester No. Periods:  2        

Grade Level: 10-12

This class has a transcripted credit agreement with Western Technical College, LaCrosse, Wisconsin.

This course is designed to give students knowledge and experience in the care of small and large animals.  Pets are very popular today and it is very important that people understand how to care for their animals properly and to understand the animal welfare issues faced by today’s animal owners.  Topics will include nutrition, health, daily care, breed identification, selection, and training.  Labs will be done to demonstrate proper grooming, feeding, handling, and health practices.  Animals to be discussed will be dogs, cats, rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs, gerbils, birds, cattle, pigs, horses, llamas and others chosen based on class interest.  Field trips to the Humane Society, Vet Clinic, Llama farm and other local facilities and guest speakers will also be an important part of the class.  


Advanced Placement Courses (AP)

Advanced placement courses allow high school students to earn university credit while still in high school in an intellectually stimulating and rewarding environment.  Advanced Placement courses are offered in over 10,000 American high schools and in sixty-four foreign countries.

Title:  A.P. Calculus**                                         Course No: MA 712/713        

Length:  All Year        

Grade Level:  12                                                 

Two-Way Class - Whitehall - This is an honors course

This is an introductory calculus course with elementary functions.  It is taught as an advanced placement class.  Calculus is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics including algebra, formal geometry, rectangular and polar coordinates, equations and graphs, lines, and conics.

Title:  AP U.S. History                                        Course No: SS 1125/1126        

Length:  All Year

Grade Level: 11 or 12

Recommendation of local social studies teacher

This is an honors course

This course will survey U.S. History from 1607 to 1973, yet its primary goal will be acquiring the skills necessary to think historically, to analyze critically, and to effectively write well-developed essays on historical issues.  Students who take AP U.S. History should be good readers, highly motivated, and willing to undertake a demanding workload to achieve the above goals.  The class will be conducted in a seminar fashion requiring student participation.


University Credit Courses

Students taking these university classes will need to be self motivated, highly responsible and good students.  If students don’t pass their class, they will be responsible for reimbursing Whitehall High School for the cost of taking the class.

One University credit is equal to .25 High School credit

Title:        ENG 101: Composition I                                         Course No: EN 331        

Length:  Semester (1st) 

Credit: 3 university elective English credits/.75  English H.S credits                

Grade Level: 12        

Prerequisite(s): Pass the UW-System Placement test with  a sufficiently high placement score.

Description: A composition course focusing on academic writing, the writing process and critical reading. Emphasis will be on essays that incorporate readings.

Credits: 3.0 Length: 1 Semester

Title: ENG 102: Composition II                                        Course No: EN 332

Credits: 3 university 3 university English credits/.75  English H.S credits

Length:  Semester (2nd)

Grade Level:  12

Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENG 101 Composition I or exemption through a sufficiently high placement assessment.

Description: A composition course focusing on researched academic writing that presents information, ideas and arguments. Emphasis will be on the writing process, critical thinking and critical reading.

Title: ENG 250: Introduction to Literary Studies                        Course No: EN 330

Credits: 3 university 3 university English credits/.75  English H.S credits

Length:  Semester (2nd)

Grade Level:  12

Prerequisite(s): Pass the UW-System Placement test with  a sufficiently high placement score.

Description: An introduction to the discipline of literary studies through its fundamental approaches to reading, interpreting, and writing about a variety of texts, ranging from the classic to the contemporary with the goal of understating, appreciating and enjoying literature.

Title: Academic Success Strategies (890-205)                         Course No: Z 1211

Credits: 1 college credit CVTC/.5 high school credit

Length: Semester

Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite(s): None 

Description: This one credit course covers success strategies for academic, professional, and life contexts. Students will learn about the academic community, and they will learn strategies and tactics related to effective studying, time management and prioritization, and problem solving. Emphasis will be placed on service learning and community involvement.

Trempealeau Valley Consortium

COURSE OFFERINGS        2017-18

Junior and Seniors ONLY


Agriculture Science

Arcadia Offerings:

Agronomy Capstone

Course #AG 023

Credit: 1 (Block)

2nd semester

Grade Level: 11-12

Teacher: Mr. Schank

A career in agronomy will keep you in the center of efforts to increase the global supply of high-quality food, feed, fiber, fuel, and pharmaceuticals while protecting and preserving the environment. You will use your natural curiosity and enthusiasm for science to help solve some of the toughest problems facing humanity: safe and abundant food production.

Our goal is to prepare you for a entry level career in agronomy or prepare you for a degree program in the field. Your coursework will include plant and soil science, insect and plant disease identification, plant nutrients and fertilizer applications, pesticide application and pesticide modes of action and precision agriculture, drones operation and GIS data maps. Class opportunities will include working with local agronomist and agronomy centers as well as managing our Arcadia High School land lab Soybean and Corn Rotation.

Food Processing Capstone

Course # AG 024

Credit: 1 (Block)

1st semester

 

Grade Level: 11-12

Teacher: Mr. Whalen

 

Food processing deals with the handling of food and foodstuffs from the time a raw product is harvested until it reaches the customer . This class is a hands –on laboratory class that utilizes our food processing laboratory to develop lifelong skills.  Specific units covered include: dairy, cereal, meats, fruits, and advanced product processing. The processing activities  will include: Apple cider production, meat cutting, ham processing,  beef jerky production, brat making, soft drink processing,  and we will also be processing milk into butter,  cheese, yogurt, and ice cream to better understand product manufacturing. Wild game processing includes field dressing and processing of waterfowl, gamebirds and whitetail deer. Sensory testing will be used to evaluate products that are created. Field trips include area processing plants.

Blair-Taylor Offerings:

Environmental Science Capstone

Course # AG 025

Credit: 1 (Block)

2nd semester

Grade Level:11-12

Teacher: Ms. Massman

Students will take a look at real world case studies where both natural and man-made environmental issues have impacted the earth and explore possibilities for alleviating them. An understanding of how individual daily decisions can impact the environment will be developed throughout the semester. Topics that will be covered include earth systems and resources, ecosystems, population growth, land and water use, energy resources and consumption, population, and global changes. There will be a hands on component of the class where scientific concepts will be observed and explored through labs, experiments, and field trips.


Independence Offerings:

Small Engines Technology Capstone

Credit: 1 (Block)

1st semester

5th/6th Hour 12:20-1:58

Teacher: Mr. Jason Hovell

hovellj@indps.k12.wi.us

715-985-3172 Ext 119  Room 308

Small Engines Technology allows students the opportunity of completely disassembling and reassembling a 3 to 8 horsepower engine to learn more about each part’s function.  Engine theory, design, troubleshooting, and maintenance units will be covered.  Labs in the agriculture shop will be performed often on a weekly basis.  Safety glasses will be required.  A 3-8 horsepower engine is also required to be brought in from home by the 5th week of class for the student to work on.  The engine does not have to run- it just needs to be a complete engine with all the parts necessary to run, and a commitment from the student that they will be responsible for supplying replacement parts (i.e. replacement gaskets, etc) for this project.

Ag Mechanics: Tractor

Restoration Capstone

Course # AG 026

Credit: 1 (Block)

2nd semester

5th/6th Hour 12:20-1:58

Teacher: Mr. Jason Hovell

hovellj@indps.k12.wi.us

715-985-3172 Ext 119  Room 308

This semester-long, 90 min. block class will include basic skills and competencies needed in agricultural mechanics- hydraulics, plumbing, electricity, and surveying, but will focus most of our attention disassembling and rebuilding a 30-60 horsepower tractor, students will learn how to read technical drawings and parts books. This hands-on course takes what is learned in the classroom for engine rebuild, part restoration, painting and detail work and puts it into practice. Student maintain record books each week as they work in every area of a tractor auxiliary, electrical, hydraulics, power train and more.  Taking Small Engines and a Metal Fabs/Welding class are strongly encouraged to have been taken prior to this course.

Whitehall Offerings:

Animal Science-*ES        

Course # AG 005

Credit: 1 (Block)

1st semester

Grade Level: 11-12

Teacher: Ms. Goplin

This course meets 1.0 high school science credits toward graduation.

Transcripted through:

  

Pathway: Animal Science

This course is designed to give students knowledge and experience in the care of small and large animals.  Pets are very popular today and it is very important that people understand how to care for their animals properly and to understand the animal welfare issues faced by today’s animal owners in order to put quality food on the table.  Topics will include physiology, nutrition, health, daily care, breed identification, selection, and training.  Labs will be done to demonstrate proper grooming, feeding, handling, and health practices.  Animals to be discussed will be dogs, cats, rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs, gerbils, birds, cattle, pigs, horses, llamas and others chosen based on class interest.  Field trips and guest speakers, along with time spent at the Whitehall Veterinary Clinic will also be an important part of the class. IMG_20160920_090428317.jpg

Course No: AG 005

Business Education

Arcadia Offerings:

Finance Internship Capstone

Course # BS 229

Credit: 1 (Block)

1 Semester

 

Grade Level: 11-12

Teacher: Mrs. Baumgartner

 Transcripted through:

  

 

Are You Interested in a Career with a

Real “RETURN ON INVESTMENT”?

Then the Finance Internship Course is for YOU!

The field of finance looks at how individuals and firms allocate their resources over time. Whether you choose to concentrate in corporate finance or investment finance, you will gain an understanding of business and the economy. And you’ll begin to evaluate investment decisions that serve your clients.

  • Make financial decisions for fictional businesses based on their investments and resources... Finance | by Tax Credits
  • Research investments to accumulate wealth and save for retirement
  • Apply your knowledge to insurance and real estate companies
  • Play the Stock Market Game!

Average Starting Salary:        $55,400*

* April 2014 Salary Survey, National Association of Colleges and Employers

This is one of the highest paid careers in the business field!!

Administrative Services Capstone

Course # BS 230

Credit: 1 (Block)

1 Semester

 

Grade Level: 11-12

Teacher: Mrs. Matchey

 

Are you ready to jump start your career as an Administrative Professional? Enrollment in the Administrative Services course will prepare you with the essential office-related skills and knowledge to work in a business office.

Topics include filing, answering and routing phone calls and emails, distributing mail, making travel plans, doing research, compiling reports, managing executive calendars, scheduling meetings and appointments, and taking minutes during meetings.

Students will learn organizational skills, the ability to work independently, and the ability to prioritize a number of tasks. Students will learn to communicate clearly verbally and in writing, how to work with people from a wide range of backgrounds, and learn customer service skills. Students will develop their computer literacy skills and polish their word processing, spreadsheet, and database software skills as well as improve their typing and writing skills.  In addition, students can earn industry-recognized certification as a Microsoft Office Specialist in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.

Administrative assistants earned a median salary of $33,240 in 2014, according to the BLS.

Blair-Taylor Offerings:  

Accounting II Capstone

Course # BS 228

Credit: 1 (Block)

2nd Semester

Teacher: Mrs. Lisa Perry

perryl@btsd.k12.wi.us

608-989-2525 ext 247 Room E109

 Transcripted through:

  

Do you want to gain a life skill that will impact all facets of your life whether in the personal or business areas?  Then continuing studies in Accounting will prepare you with the necessary skills and knowledge to succeed in your future!

·         Accounting is the language of business and the basis for many business careers.

·         Knowledge of accounting helps with budgeting and managing personal finances.

·         Accounting gives the basic understanding of how any entity, whether a corporation, government, or a not-for-profit, operates.

·         Accounting is the foundation for entrepreneurs, investors, managers, leaders and for everyone to better understand their own personal tax opportunities.

Topics include the accounting cycle, accounting for assets, liabilities and equity, analyzing and interpreting financial statements, accounting for partnerships and not-for-profit organizations, special accounting systems such as departmental, branch, and manufacturing accounting, and accounting for business decision making.

Independence Offerings:

Economics & Personal Finance

Credit: 1 (45 minutes)

Year Long    5th hour 12:20-1:07          

 

Grade Level: 11-12

Teacher: Mrs. Linda Killian Baures

killianbauresl@indps.k12.wi.us

715-985-3172 Ext. 118 Room 305

This course will prepare students for the real world of finances. Course content includes numerous economic concepts including supply and demand, wages, inflation and our country’s economic beliefs. Students will learn how to evaluate their financial decisions including major purchases. Using a variety of activities, students will learn about insurance, credit, credit cards and credit scores. Students will participate in projects to help them make economic decisions, create a financial plan, and determine the best ways to save and invest.

** This class is in the process of being approved for high school Social Studies credit.

Introduction to Business

Credit: 1 (45 Minutes)

Year Long    6th hour 1:11-1:58

Grade Level: 11-12

Teacher: Mrs. Linda Killian Baures

killianbauresl@indps.k12.wi.us

715-985-3172 Ext. 118   Room 305

This course is designed to allow students to explore the different areas of business including marketing, accounting, management, and international business. A student considering starting their own business (becoming an entrepreneur) would benefit from this course. Topics discussed will be entrepreneur traits, market economy and types of ownership. Students will come up with their own business idea and develop a business plan as a final product for this course.

Whitehall Offerings:

Advertisement Marketing

Course # BS 217

Credit: 1 (Block)

1 Semester

Teacher: Mrs. Kensmoe

kensmoek@whitehallsd.k12.wi.us

 

This course helps students understand marketing, the process through which organizations analyze, plan, implement, and control programs to develop and maintain beneficial exchanges with target buyers. Effective marketing is critical for the long-term success of any business organization because this function ensures that the firm attracts, retains, and grows customers by creating, delivering, and communicating superior customer value.

Students find out what it takes to market a product or service in today's fast-paced, over-crowded advertising environment. They will learn the fundamentals of marketing using real-world business examples. They will learn about buyer behavior, marketing research principles, demand analysis, distribution, financing, pricing, and product management.

Students will have the opportunity to:

  • collaborate with REAL companies to create advertisement campaigns for their products
  • network with people in the industry
  • investigate consumer behaviors & decision making processes
  • explore new & unique marketing trendsmarketing.jpg
  • shadow/visit marketing firms
  • and more!!!

 

It is all hands-on and real life!

Family and Consumer Science

Arcadia Offerings:

Health Science Capstone

Course # FC 433

Credit: 2 (Block)

Year Long

 

Grade Level: 11-12

Suggested Prerequisites: Introduction to Health Careers and Medical Terminology

Teacher: Ms. Teske

Students participating in the Health Science Capstone will be able to: Make health career decisions based on their individual career interests, needs, abilities, and career goals. Develop professional or technical skill foundations that support a successful transition to postsecondary education and/or entry-level employment in a health career. Develop employability skills to be successful in a changing healthcare environment. HSC Educational Opportunities may include: academic curriculum focused in health sciences with clinical applications; Youth Apprenticeship programs, industry recognized certifications, leadership and team building skill development, observations and tours, mentor-ships, volunteer opportunities, and health careers fairs.

Blair-Taylor Offerings:

Understanding Childhood

Capstone

Course # FC 429

Credit: 1 (Block)

1st semester only

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Teacher: Mrs. Lebakken

Children have patterns of  physical, social, and emotional development and interact with their environment in predictable ways.  Future parents, teachers, and health care workers will have more successful experiences with young people with knowledge and skills for working with children up to 12 years old. Students in this class will work closely with infants, toddlers and/or preschool students Wednesdays and some Fridays in their home communities.  Students will travel to the Blair-Taylor High School  on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays for face to face coursework.  This course is transcripted with Western Technical College for three college credits (course ECE 1030179 ). Use this course for career exploration and possible enrollment in the Assistant Childcare Teacher class for certification to work in childcare centers. See offering (in second semester) for Intro Human Services & Teaching.

Introduction to Human Service & Teaching Capstone

Course # FC 430

Credit: .5 (45 Minutes)

2nd semester only

Students are encouraged to pair this course with Family Life Skills to create a 1 credit block.

Teacher: Mrs. Lebakken

Professionals in social work, therapy, and other human services are helpful when  stressful family problem occur and families need support from community or government services. Students will explore and research current family issues and make recommendations based on their data and discussion. Examples of topics are abandoned babies, teenage parenting, low income families, living with disabilities, and disaster preparation. Students interested in teaching can observe and interact in a variety of early childhood settings including elementary school, child care centers, Head Start programs, and early intervention programs. Students will work at a site in their community Wednesdays (after 3 weeks, until end of semester),  Thursdays (beginning week 4, until end of semester) and Fridays (last 6 weeks).  Students will travel to the Blair-Taylor High School for face to face coursework.  

Family Life Skills Capstone

Course # FC 431

Credit: .5 (45 Minutes)

2nd semester only

Students are encouraged to pair this course with Intro to Human Services & Teaching to create a 1 credit block.

Teacher: Mrs. Lebakken

In Family Life Skills, students will discuss the work of individuals and families for healthy development and nurturing relationships. Students gain skills for their roles in society - employee, dating, marriage and parenting.  Professionals in social work, therapy, and other human services study healthy families to help dysfunctional families build healthier relationships. Topics include sexual harassment, discrimination, partner abuse, adoption, brain development, marriage and divorce, stress, and balancing work and family. Students will travel to the Blair-Taylor High School for face to face coursework.

Whitehall Offerings:

Culinary Arts I Capstone

Course # FC 404

Credit: 1 (Block)

1st semester only

Students will be required to wear black pants and a white top on days in which food is served to the public.

Teacher: Mrs. Delaine Stendahl

Stendahd@whitehallsd.k12.wi.us

715-538-4364 ext. 141

This course allows students to practice and explore various skills in culinary arts and management used in many foodservice settings.  Some of the units of study include preparing for a successful career in hospitality, successful customer relations, preparing and serving safe food, preventing accidents and injuries, food service equipment, breakfast foods, beverages, sandwiches, soups, salads, salad dressings, cakes and cake decorating, and grilling. Students are expected to participate in customer service and sales experience projects.

Course website: dstendahlculinaryarts1.weebly.com

Commercial Culinary Kitchen and Room 109

Food Science & Nutrition Capstone

Course # FC 403

Credit: .5 (45 Minutes)

1st semester only

This course meets .5 high school science credits toward graduation.

Teacher: Mrs. Delaine Stendahl

Stendahd@whitehallsd.k12.wi.us

715-538-4364 ext. 141

This course uses a hands-on approach to learning about food and how it affects your body through food lab experiments.  We will be able to test and sample edible foods products. You will become acquainted with the equipment used in a food science laboratory, as well as proper techniques for carrying out food science experiments. You will discover that appearance, odor, sound, and how food feels in your mouth are just as important as taste in determining whether or not you find food appealing. Some of the food laboratory units include safety and sanitation, basic science related to foods, acids and bases, water, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals, dehydration, and several more, time permitting  Expect some really fun experiments that are edible as you learn how science works with food! This course supports career choices in dietetics, food technology, food science, family and consumer sciences, and food chemistry.

Course website: dstendahlfoodscience.weebly.com

Culinary Arts II Capstone

Course # FC 405

Credit: 1 (Block)

2nd semester only

Students will be required to wear black pants and a white top on days in which food is served to the public. Aprons, Chef Coats and Chef Hats are provided for this course. Students may also purchase at significant discounts.  

Teacher: Mrs. Delaine Stendahl

Stendahd@whitehallsd.k12.wi.us

715-538-4364 ext. 141

Students enrolled in this course have the opportunity to earn certification, making them employment-ready for work in the industry. Students can choose to take the ServSafe Manager or Food Handler certification exam. In addition to ServSafe training, practice and explore various skills in culinary arts and management used in many foodservice settings.  Within this segment of the program students will explore the following:

*Potstickers, Wontons, Dumplings   *Pasta Making and Sauces   *Rice and Pilafs        *Vegetables   *Preparation of Game Meats   *Crustaceans (Crab, Shrimp, etc.)    

*Beef and Pork   *Salads & Dressings   *Planning & Preparing Food Events

*Preparing & Marketing Food   *Catering Events

Course website:  dstendahlculinaryarts2.weebly.com

Bakery & Pastry Arts Capstone

Course # FC 434

Credit: 1 (Block)

2nd semester only

Teacher: Mrs. Delaine Stendahl

Stendahd@whitehallsd.k12.wi.us

715-538-4364 ext. 141

This course is designed for the student with a personal interest in baking or for the student with a career interest in becoming a professional baker or pastry chef. In this hands-on class students practice techniques used in creating breads, pastries, cookies, quick breads, chocolate, cheesecakes, creme brulee,  cream puffs, eclairs, cakes and basic decorating, etc. This course also includes instruction on the function of ingredients, equipment, costs, and career opportunities in the field of pastry and baking.  Field trips to a local bake shop and demonstrations by local chefs will be part of this course. One of the units includes running a bakeshop/cafe.

Course website: dstendahlbakingandpastry.weebly.com

        

Note: These courses (Whitehall offerings) will cover some of the content for ProStart© certification.  ProStart© certification is a national certification for the foodservice industry.  It requires that the student take a series of courses and pass the national exam.  This certification transfers into colleges for up to 18 semesters in culinary arts/management programs.  

Discussions are in process for transcripted and articulated credit for coursework with Wisconsin Technical College System-Western and Chippewa Valley Technical College as well as UW-Stout.

Technology Education

Arcadia Offerings:

Automotive Services Coop

Course  # IN 613/614

Credit: 2 (Block)

1st & 2nd semester

Teacher: Mr. John Peterson

Grade Level: 11-12

Suggested Prerequisites: Power Mechanics/Small Gas Engines.

Auto Mechanics Services Co-op is for students interested in making a career as a technician. During the class students will learn and perform basic auto maintenance and repair as done in the auto trade.

Areas covered are engines, fuel system, cooling systems, disc and drum brake overhaul, testing equipment, oscilloscope patterns, scan tool diagnostics, lubrication system, safety inspection, and wheel and tire diagnosis and repair. The final quarter of class, students will be paired with a mentor for on the job trainings.

Blair-Taylor Offerings:

Welding Capstone 1

Course # IN 615

Credit: 1 (Block)

1st semester only

Teacher: Mr. Bowen

This course will put you on the track to becoming a career welding or a hobby welder, depending on your interest level. Topics focused on in the class will be: Oxy-Fuel Cutting, CNC and manual Plasma Arc Cutting, Gas Metal Arc Welding, Shielded Metal Arc Welding, and GTAW welding. Students will be exposed to welding using the GMAW, SMAW, GTAW processes in all positions through project based learning. This will be the first level Welding Capstone course and will be taken before Welding Capstone 2.

Welding Capstone 2

Course # 616

Credit: 1 (Block)

2nd semester only

Teacher: Mr. Bowen

In the first quarter of Welding capstone 2, students will This course will put you on the track to becoming a career welding or a hobby welder, depending on your interest level. After that you will learn how to apply for a welding position, practice interviewing, create a cover letter/resume, select good references, and research welding careers. In the second quarter of Welding capstone 2, students will have the opportunity of participating in a school to work program, where you will have the option of working in the welding industry during or outside of the school day. Entry level welding positions may be available at Nelson Global products in Arcadia, Nick’s Welding in Hixton, Badger Stainless in Pigeon Falls, and Ashley Furniture in Arcadia.

Whitehall Offerings:

Residential Construction/ Carpentry Skills         (CAPSTONE)

Course # IN 610

Credit: 2 (Block)

Year Long

Grade Level: 11-12

Class Maximum: 15 students

Teacher: Mr. Anderson

Suggested Prerequisites: Construction 1/Construction 2

Upon Completion of Certain Requirements:

Apprenticeship Certificate(s): (United Brotherhood of Carpenters)

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Students will be actively involved in learning about how a typical house is built.  Information covered in class discussions and demonstrations will be put to use through the construction of scaled house models and full size structures such as storage sheds and occasionally garages.  No matter what type of structure is built, you will be able to obtain the knowledge and skills that could be your first step towards a future in the building trades.  If you do not pursue a construction related career, the skills you are able to obtain in this class could still be used to save you thousands of dollars in your lifetime by allowing you to do many of your own construction related projects.

Students will follow Career Connections: Project Book 3 Residential Construction. This includes laying out walls, using tools and materials common to construction, building the structure, as well as installing the ceiling and the floor.

This will be a student paced concept. Students will follow the “Career Connections” Curriculum and find a pathway that best fits their individual goals and needs. Career Connections is a unique program designed to provide students with the necessary skills and gain confidence to be successful in the workplace and/or personal projects. The curriculum is written by practicing carpenters to ensure students get the correct and most relevant information. The Project Book Series  will provide students with a welcome opportunity to consider a career that has many jobs with competitive pay and benefits without having to go the traditional 4-year education route.

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