Power 100 Leaderboards
Best Practice Guide


Congratulations! You’ve decided to be a Rise Power 100 board manager.

You now have a digital marketing rocket launcher, resting on your shoulder and ready to be fired!

This best practice guide is aimed at ensuring you fire your rocket at the right people and get the right result!

This best practice guide covers:

Any suggestions for improvement to this guide please email hello@rise.global - we always love hearing from you.


Contents

Case Studies

Case Study 1: City AM Fintech Powerlist

Case Study 2: Zoopla Property Power 100

Case Study 3: The Parent Blogger Club

Marketing Benefits

Getting Started

Before you start checklist

Asset List

Step by Step - Setup

Step by Step - Launch

Step by Step - Running your board each week

Any final tips?

Appendix A - Big Checklist

Set up

Content

Design

Release Distribution & Notification

Commentary

Tracking

Appendix B - Sourcing Your Initial List of Players

Use Rise’s in-built Twitter search

Internet Research including existing Twitter Lists

Appendix C - Why it Works!

Appendix D - More Rise boards to check out


Case Studies

Case Study 1: City AM Fintech Powerlist

The audience development team objective is to build the right readership for the online version of the City AM newspaper among their target audience. They target  the 2 million people who work in the City of London.  

Fintech – the use of new technology within finance – is an emerging category that is of interest to the City AM target audience. Why wouldn’t you want to hear about a robot that can make you more money?

But, who are the thought leaders in the Fintech space? Who are the people to follow, listen to and learn from? Who are the influencers? CityAM wanted to get both the influencers themselves and the larger audience of those people interested in FinTech i.e. those likely to be “followers” of these influencers, engaged on their website.

The Fintech powerlist – the most influential people in Fintech (as measured by their social media influence score, using Klout) was launched in March 2015 and then updated fortnightly since then.

The post which embeds the leaderboard on cityam.com has been shared over 5,000 times.

Compare that with most City AM posts that max out at just 20 shares each! The Fintech powerlist (and other boards which City AM have gone on to create) have been their most viral social content in 2015.

 

What made their board such a success?

  1. The board is embedded as part of their site content. It appears within a standard City AM news article. This lends it credibility and feels part of the City AM brand..
  2. The board was seeded with 100 selected FinTech influencers – people who the journalists at City AM had already identified as worthy of being on the board.
  3. They created a custom theme for their board so the formatting matched exactly the look and feel of their website, which was already geared for mobile browsing.
  4. They moderate inclusion on the list – while anyone can apply to join, only those approved are added to next week’s leaderboard. This maintains the quality of the list.
  5. They tweet out weekly ranks to everyone on the list from the main City AM twitter account. This drives retweets and social engagement.

Case Study 2: Zoopla Property Power 100

Back in 2013, estate agents were looking at Social Media as a way to market houses for sale and drive up deal flow in the local area. As a marketing partner, Zoopla wanted to provide value to estate agents by giving them feedback on their social media marketing performance.

This was to be done in a light hearted way as some “ego bait” that would encourage the estate agents to visit the Zoopla site and see how they ranked against their peers.

And so the ZPP100 was born.  Since its launch in 2013 the page has now been shared over 14,000 times on Twitter and nearly 2,000 times on Facebook. Conversations about the ZPP100 continue to occur on a weekly basis as new estate agents join the list and existing ones improve their social media marketing performance and see themselves rise.

We’ve even seen some estate agents share their Zoopla Property Power 100 badge in the window of their shops themselves!

What can we learn from Zoopla’s use of Rise:

  1. Zoopla created an easily downloadable, embeddable badge for participants giving them a certificate to go with their ranks.  [Since 2014 Rise has now partnered with Credly.com to make creating and giving badges even easier]
  2. Zoopla launched the list with PR fanfare including a press release. For the first 100 this then spun off several other press releases from participants who were delighted to be included.
  3. They included a twitter hashtag (#ZPP100) on the page and in all tweet outs to facilitate a conversation about the board among the participants.
  4. Each player receives a tweet letting them know their new rank. This happens at the same time each week.
  5. They now limit inclusion on the board to only those companies who are customers of Zoopla itself – this makes the board an additional benefit to existing customers.


Case Study 3: The Parent Blogger Club

The Parent Blogger Club started life as a way for new startup KidRated (‘travel advisor for kids’) to build a new audience among mummy and daddy bloggers, predominantly in the UK.

Rather than host the club on their own site KidRated chose to sponsor a “club” together with another company, Glipho. The club then has its own administrator who runs the board (and is also a parent blogger). KidRated appear as a sponsor and the club is currently on the look out for other sponsors to replace Glipho.

From its beginnings in June 2014 the club has steadily grown in membership to over 900 bloggers, more than 400 of which are signed up to the weekly emails.

The Parent blogger club exists only on Rise. They use a customized board theme that allows sponsors to update their marketing messages that are displayed next to the board.

 

What can we learn from the Parent Blogger Club:

  1. You can build a significant, audience channel simply using Rise, there is no need to embed the board elsewhere.
  2. The email channel grows over time. Now each week, KidRated and the PBC can include adverts and marketing messages to over 400 influential bloggers which they see before they scroll down in the email to their score.  Open and click rates are very high.
  3. A release article (brief written commentary on who are the movers and shakers in this week’s release or any other relevant news for this blogger community) can really add colour to the raw scores.
  4. The members will self-monitor the list – some people who started on the list were more lifestyle bloggers and once this was pointed out, were then excluded.
  5. Influencers are an audience worth building – most of the parent bloggers have in turn their own audiences of thousands of people.

 


Marketing Benefits

A Power 100 leaderboard brings the following marketing benefits:

  1. Brand Awareness
  1. Among a group of influencers - the players on your board will discover you and your brand
  2. Among people interested in your influencers - others will look at the leaderboard to see who the top influencers are, they will discover your brand too
  1. Brand Credibility - producing a regular, accurate, trustworthy score and ranking builds trust over time.
  2. Repeat Attention & Engagement - players are engaged in discovering their latest score and rank each time you publish the latest release of your leaderboard.
  3. Social media content - regular, interesting content to share on your social media feed, particular twitter
  4. Adverts - if you have people’s attention in any of your communication channels (your own website, Rise site, email) then you can piggyback those channels with additional adverts
  1. Naming and sponsorship of the board – for Zoopla their brand is linked to the ZPP100 and the community. The community now use #ZPP100 as shorthand to talk to each other, mentioned and building brand awareness for Zoopla with every tweet.
  2. Advertise next to the leaderboard onsite – by embedding the leaderboard (the most interesting piece of content from a Rise board) on their site, brands can add cross selling and upselling messages around the board – as City AM do by showing “other articles you might be interested in” - the “Most Read” section.
  3. Including messages in the tweet out – while tricky to squeeze in to 140 characters, it can be possible to add in a marketing message with the tweet out to each player letting them know their rank
  4. Include marketing messages in the release article – the release article (the optional commentary that accompanies each statistical release of the board) can include marketing messaging and copy. This is then displayed on the Rise board on rise.global and included in the email.
  5. Advertise within the email notification – the email notification template can have up to 4 advertising images and an article in addition  to the release article. All of which are above where a player gets to see their score.

TOP TIP

 In most Power 100 leaderboards, the top players tend to be the most engaged, and they also tend to be the most influential with the largest reach! So, even if you only have a few people engaged, if they have massive audiences and they are spreading your brand, then you are still achieving your marketing goals.

Getting Started

Before you start checklist

Here’s a list of questions that we’ve used to help us when creating new Power 100 boards. We hope it helps you!  It’s pretty exhaustive, so just use the ones that are relevant for you.

  1. Who are you targeting to be on your Rise board? Be as niche as possible. Dimensions could include: industry sector, role, job title, conversation topic and geography
  2. What does success look like for your players? What will motivate players to join the board, track their success?
  3. How will a score be created for each players? If success = digital influence then the default Klout score is often enough. If success is something different then you’ll need to decide what activities are tracked that go into creating a score.
  4. What is your release period? How often will you communicate changes in the score? Daily, Weekly, Fortnightly or Monthly
  5. What’s the size of the top tier of members? Will you focus on a Power 100 or Power 500?
  6. Where will your players discuss the board and their scores? What’s the preferred social network? What’s the main conversation forum for your community? Yammer, Twitter hashtag, Facebook Group etc.
  7. What other services will you offer your player & follower community? Are there other services you can offer your community? Training, breaking news, e-commerce, face to face events?

Asset List

You’ll need the following assets to get started with your Power 100 leaderboard:

  1. A Twitter account
  2. A Rise.global account (signed in with your twitter account)
  3. A spreadsheet or twitter list of 100 players[1]
  4. A name for your Rise board
  5. A colour for your Rise board (hexadecimal web colour)
  6. Image assets for your Rise board
  1. Web: 100x100 icon, 300x200 logo, 1920 x200 background
  2. Email (optional): up to 4 260x200 images or up to 2 560x200 images.
  1. Descriptive copy for your Rise board (around 200 words – what is the board, who can be on it, what’s it’s purpose, how is it scored)
  2. (Optional) A blog post or web site to embed the leaderboard

Step by Step - Setup

Once you have your assets ready to go, it’s time to get started with the tool itself.

  1. Under Create Board choose the Power 100 leaderboard, give it a name and choose your Twitter List. (or manual if you are importing players from a spreadsheet)
  2. Once the setup genie has run, after 5 minutes you should have a new Power 100 leaderboard.  Rise will have automatically collected a Klout score for each individual on your twitter list and will have ranked them in order of these Klout scores.
  3. Now go to the Board Settings / Appearance and add yourImage assets and Description copy.
  4. Under Board Settings – Privacy: check the privacy of the board (eventually you’ll want it to be public so Google can index it and so that people discover it when searching for “public boards” on Rise itself - the objective is to grow the number of followers of the board) but for now, keep it in Stealth mode till you are ready to launch.
  5. Under Board Settings / General Options - set your board’s timezone to your local time, change the displayed name of the players to something more in keeping with your board’s name.
  6. Now it’s time to set your score algorithm (your scoring rules) – are you going to show the Klout score to everyone, or keep that under the wraps and show a home grown “Power score”? It’s up to you what you choose to do and how you name the score itself.  As you become more accustomed to using Rise, you will be able to add further metrics to help you create a more complex score, or perhaps to just add interest to the board.
  7. Under releases go to edit the release and add some article commentary – particularly as this is the first ever release you’ll want to say that!
  8. [Optional] Under Share / Widget - grab the code to embed the leaderboard on your website

Step by Step - Launch

  1. Start by emailing out a notification about the first release to everyone subscribed (unless you’ve added a few colleagues, that’ll just be you to begin with).
  2. Now you are ready to send out the tweets – this is what really launches the board. There is a tweet notification that you can send from your Twitter account (“The power 100 is now launched” etc) – if you’ve written a launch blog post or press release then now is the time to include a link to it.
  3. Once announced now tweet out a rank to each player on your board. This tweet out works much like “mail merge” you can customize the main message and then the engine will insert the twitter address of the particular player instead of the merge tag(s). TOP TIP: Set the time between tweets to a long period - e.g. 10 minutes, otherwise Twitter may think you are spamming and will block your account.

    In the Twitter settings you can decide whether you want to tweet out to the top 20, top 100, just the newcomers, the climbers and so on. You will probably change this for the first few weeks as you find out what works for your audience.  For a fuller guide on how to “tweet-out” to players, please read this help article.

    Once you hit the preview and send button you can sit back and watch the Twitter stream explode. You should expect plenty of retweets, “wow”, “thank yous”, “what’s this?” and engagement in general as people discover themselves on your board for the first time and delightedly tell their own followers.

    Obviously not everyone will engage but if all has worked according to plan you should see between 2% and 10% of your players engaged in some way (whether with a favorite, reply, retweet or a follow). Your next task is to then build on this engagement and relationship next week.

Step by Step - Running your board each week

Running a Power 100 Rise board on a weekly basis requires a little attention to make sure that the score is collected and calculated correctly. Your players are watching closely!

The key tasks you need to consider are:

  1. If you’re vetting the joining of newcomers to the board, you need to “include” or “exclude” these newcomers.  Under Board Settings -> Notifications, set the right values for receiving notifications about when newcomers request to join the board and when the board gets new followers.  Under Players -> Excluded, tick the check boxes to include those players you wish to accept.  The inclusion of new players has to be done before this week’s scheduled Klout score collection process begins.
  2. Next, check that the Klout Scores have been collected ok:
  1. Go to Reports -> Schedule page.  See that the sequence of data collection and release process has happened in the right chronological order - data collection for the period in concern must have happened before the release starts.
  2. Another way to check that the data collection has completed properly is by looking at the "Data Entries" page. There should be a recent (the time should be consistent with when you expected your auto-scheduled collection to occur in the week) Klout score for each player.
  3. To get more detail on the data collection process, click on “Logs” in the “Data Collectors” page under Board Settings, and then click on the Klout collector link.  This will give you information about whether there have been any failures in collecting the Klout scores.  Also check that there are enough polls left for the next few weeks’ score collection process.

If any of these checks mean that the data collection hasn’t occurred properly, you will have to re-poll the Klout data collector and then re-release your Power100 board.

  1. Check that the Release has been automatically created ok (under "Releases" there should be a release for this week).  The release needs to have been created after the Klout score-collection process has ended.  It takes about 1 hour to collect 500 Klout scores, so schedule your release to start accordingly.  Check that there is remaining credit for next week’s automatic release to occur by looking at Board Settings / Releases.
  2. Check the Release (just view the leaderboard and sanity check it)
  3. If all ok, then:
  1. Add some brief commentary ("Releases" - edit - release article)
  2. Send out Twitter announcement ("The beauty index is updated..." etc)
  3. Send Tweet notifications to each player ("Your score is X , rank is X" this week
  4. Send out emails to subscribed followers
  5. Engage on Twitter with those players that retweet, like, reply back to your tweet notifications.

If not ok then

  1. delete the release for this week
  2. collect klout scores again (under Board Settings / Data Collectors" click Poll Now)
  3. when it's finished create the new release (under "releases" click Create)

When running a board if you hit any road blocks be sure to reach out to our support team – support@rise.global who will be keen to assist you in making sure your board is correct, accurate and delightful for your players.

Any final tips?

I think the crucial one is just to get started and not to worry about getting it slightly wrong. As with any community marketing initiative, as long as your heart is in the right place, i.e. you are seeking to drive value for the players (in addition to selling your wares), then they will forgive any getting it wrong to begin with. There’s always next week’s release to get it right!


Appendix A - Big Checklist

Set up

  1. Clear business objective
  2. Target Audience
  3. Create a list of players
  4. Players / player display name e.g. bloggers
  5. Decide list repository
  1. Rise
  2. Spreadsheet
  3. Twitter List
  1. Name the board
  2. Primary conversation channel e.g. a hashtag
  3. Joining instructions
  4. Scoring system
  1. What metrics?
  2. Fully transparent or opaque?
  1. Release period weekly/monthly?
  2. Automatic schedule set up
  3. Subscription paid for

Content

  1. About board (Rise)
  2. Top 100 page & embed
  3. On the move page & embed
  4. Press release
  5. How scoring works
  6. Any additional rules
  7. Monetisation
  1. Links
  2. Adverts and Logos
  3. Sponsor content

Design

  1. Logo
  2. Icon
  3. Background image
  4. Badge
  5. Primary theme colour

Release Distribution & Notification

  1. Week 1 Content Plan
  1. Tweet to top 100
  1. Tweet copy decided
  2. Includes hashtag?
  3. Correct link?
  4. Sponsors credited?
  5. No character overruns?
  1. Email to self
  2. Press release to relevant bloggers
  1. Week 2 Content Plan
  1. Tweet to top 100
  2. Tweet to top 40 climbers
  3. Tweet to top 20 newcomers
  4. Email to all followers
  1. Week 3 Content Plan
  1. Tweet to top 20
  2. Tweet to top 40 climbers
  3. Tweet to top 20 newcomers
  4. Email to all followers
  1. Plan additional content
  1. Top 5 tagged in an image
  2. Top 5 fallers
  3. Top 5 newcomers
  4. Board average score
  5. Infographic

Commentary

There are several commentary opportunities available with your board, this builds further engagement:

Tracking

  1. Success criteria  agreed
  2. Targets and expectations (low, medium, high)
  3. Mechanism for counting tweets and engagement

Appendix B - Sourcing Your Initial List of Players

Sourcing your initial list is a mixture of skill and patience. Here are some approaches we’ve found that work, I’ve used IOT (internet of things) as an example here.

Use Rise’s in-built Twitter search

Rise can help you find players for your board.

  1. Create a Power 100 board
  2. Sign in with your Twitter handle
  3. Choose the “I don’t have a twitter list” option “try searching.”
  4. This will search twitter on the most popular hashtag for your community - e.g. for Internet of things you might use #IOT (you can test on Twitter itself too if you want)
  5. Once the board is created and the first release created, you can then go through the list and exclude anyone who doesn’t really fit and then re-release the board.

Internet Research including existing Twitter Lists

  1. Find an existing list that someone has already made on Twitter, subscribe to it and then use that to populate the Rise board
  1. To do this, find a person who is representative of your target community e.g. https://twitter.com/AGlaser_IoT 
  2. Find out what lists they are a member of  by adding “/memberships” to their Twitter URL e.g. https://twitter.com/AGlaser_IoT/memberships.
  3. Search the various lists he is on. i.e.  https://twitter.com/intechWiFi/lists/influencing-iot and https://twitter.com/Camille_Lenor/lists/iot-2 
  4. Find what you consider the highest quality curated list and follow it. You can now use this list on Rise.
  1. Look at the speakers at events and add them one by one by searching for their Twitter handles
  1. e.g. find an event and the list of speakers http://launch.brinc.io/speakers/
  2. search twitter for an individual’s name and click on “accounts” to find just potential accounts https://twitter.com/search?f=users&vertical=default&q=CHRISTINA%20BECHHOLD&src=typd
  3. add their twitter account to your Rise board.
  1. Look for any published "influencer" lists of IOT individuals and make sure everyone is on yours

Don’t forget that because lists are public and new players can easily join you only need to be 80% right to begin with for it to be accepted by the community.

Appendix C - Why it Works!

Rise Power 100 boards - although they are simple to look at - actually leverage recent findings in social psychology, management thinking, behavioural economics and gamification.

If you’re interested in reading more consider the following key principles:

  1. Social proof – we are much more influenced by our peers than we realize [Asch - conformity experiments]
  2. Social identity theory - we like to categorise ourselves as being “in” a certain group [Tajfel - Social Identity Theory]
  3. Social comparison theory (aka “the frog pond effect”) – we care more about being a big fish in a small pond than being a small fish in a big pond [Festinger - Social Comparison Theory]
  4. Management by measurement – you can’t manage what you can’t measure, you get what you inspect not what you expect. This is as true when it comes to self management as when you are managing others.
  5. Tracking beats being measured – when we choose to keep score ourselves, when we opt-in to a success tracking program, this is more motivating for us [Coonradt - Scorekeeping for Success]
  6. Social design – we want to be able to express our identity to our friends online [Fisher - Social Design Strategy]
  7. Intrinsic motivation – we’re ultimately more motivated by intrinsic desires (who we want to be) than extrinsic factors (what we can get) [Daniel Pink - Drive]
  8. Medium is part of the message – different media have different levels of impact for a particular message, a Rise board is a digital medium that chimes with any communication about digital issues
  9. Coaching over managing - rather than telling someone what to do, coaches help each individual to reach their potential by giving them regular, relevant feedback on their performance
  10. Data Storytelling - Stories beat stats - reading a story about yourself “you’re up to number 4!” is more engaging than viewing dry statistics on a graph
  11. Success Tracking - FitBit, Strava, Nike+, WeightWatchers are all examples of success tracking programs. [What is Success Tracking - Rise Blog]

What all this means for your Rise board is that it is designed with many of these thoughts in mind.  

Additionally the Rise platform offers a social utility for both managers and players to run a transparent scorekeeping program. The “powered by Rise” logo on any score is designed to build trust (scores and ranks hosted by an independent 3rd party) which leads to deeper engagement.

The key here is intrinsic motivation – the focus of the program must be on the benefit for the player. Rise boards don’t work well as a competition for prizes – all that does is drive “comping”(competition only) behavior – people engaging simply to win a prize of some kind, and is ultimately short-lived. Once the prize is awarded, the engagement ends.  

Instead with a Rise board the engagement can continue – if I’ve decided I want to be a great mummy blogger then getting comparative, peer feedback is going to be relevant for as long as I am trying to be a great blogger.  This is the power of your Rise board.

Appendix D - More Rise boards to check out

www.rise.global/pages/power100 

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[1] See Appendix B - Sourcing your initial list of players for tips on how to create this list