CMES Undergraduate Digest

Aggregated opportunities for undergraduates interested in the Middle East and North Africa

CMES Undergraduate Digest

New & Upcoming Courses

Summer 2017

NES 190D: Islamic Studies- Representation of Islam in Media and Cultural Production

NESTUD R1A: Reading and Composition in Near Eastern Studies- Agency and Transformation in the Literature and Film of Palestine and Israel

NESTUD R1A 002: Reading and Composition in Near Eastern Studies- Which Way Home? Narratives of Pilgrimage from Islamicate Lands

NESTUD 18: Introduction to Ancient Egypt

NESTUD 146A: Introduction to Islam

Persian 20: Intensive Intermediate Persian

ARABIC 10: Intensive Elementary Arabic

ARABIC 30: Intensive Intermediate Arabic

IAS 197: Transboundary Water Conflict Resolution: The Israeli –Arab Case

Fall 2017

NES 10: Introduction to the Near East

Funding Opportunities

Townsend Conference & Lecture Grants

Fellowship & Job Opportunities

Summer Internships at MEI

Summer Study Abroad with UC Davis

Al-Quds Bard Summer Language Intensive (AQB SLI)

Calls for Papers

Berkeley Undergraduate Journal

New & Upcoming Courses

Summer 2017

NES 190D: Islamic Studies- Representation of Islam in Media and Cultural Production

Dr. Hatem Bazian, 4 Units, TuTh 1-4:30 PM, CCN: 15296

Learn more on the Near Eastern Studies website.

NESTUD R1A: Reading and Composition in Near Eastern Studies- Agency and Transformation in the Literature and Film of Palestine and Israel

N/A, 4 units, M, Tu, W, Th 1:00 pm - 2:59 pm, CCN# 12534

This course examines the way in which Palestinian and Israeli writers and artists develop their own theories of agency and transformation in their projects. Through a diverse collection of readings, videos, lectures, and discussions, students will gain a broad understanding of how cultural production generates change large and small and the limitations of its workings. Using Palestinian and Israeli novellas, short-stories, poetry, film and installation art from 1948 to contemporary works in addition to short theoretical readings, the class will examine the construction of agency, what its modes may be (active, passive, defensive, vulnerable, generative, disruptive, individual, collective, narrative, political, etc.) and the role of agent. This course places a strong emphasis on written assignments and active class participation.

NESTUD R1A 002: Reading and Composition in Near Eastern Studies- Which Way Home? Narratives of Pilgrimage from Islamicate Lands

Aria Fani, 4 Units,  M, Tu, W, Th 10:00 am - 11:59 am, CCN# 12535

Pilgrimage is a shared practice among all human cultures. Pilgrims embark on arduous journeys to strengthen their faith, define their place in an imagined community, pay homage to a site of national or tribal memory, seek personal adventures, gain access into political and scholarly networks, fulfill an obligatory task, form solidarity with a certain cause, and search for moral and spiritual meaning. Many pilgrims have documented their experiences through arts and composition; these narratives speak to economic, social, cultural, artistic and political facets of their world. In Which Way Home?, we will consider pilgrimage narratives as a genre and subject it to scrutiny: who is a pilgrim? What forces, personal and institutional, sustain the institution of pilgrimage? Upon what terms do pilgrims articulate notions of faith, territory and community? We will narrow our focus to Islamicate lands; by Islamicate (as opposed to Islamic), we refer to a vast ecumene broadly marked by cultural forms of Islam. We will engage documentaries, movies, paintings, nonfiction, stories and poetry. Join us on this exciting journey!

NESTUD 18: Introduction to Ancient Egypt

Jessica E. Kaiser, 4 Units,  M, Tu, W, Th 11:00 am - 12:59 pm, CCN# 15355

A general introduction to ancient Egypt, providing overview of ancient Egyptian culture and society (history, art, religion, literature, language, social structure), Egyptian archaeology (pyramids, tombs, mummies, temples, cities, monuments, daily life), and the history and development of the modern discipline of Egyptology. Assumes no prior knowledge of subject. Almost all lectures are illustrated extensively by slides. Course includes visits to the Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology, which has the best collection of ancient Egyptian artifacts west of Chicago.

NESTUD 146A: Introduction to Islam

Amin Ehteshami, 3 Units, M, Tu, W, Th, F 10:00 am - 11:59 am, 15356

This course seeks to introduce major themes of Islam as they developed from the time of its emergence to the contemporary setting. It will explore the ways in which Muslims have interpreted the message of Islam through philosophical, legal, political, mystical and literary writings. Attention will also be given to the controversies that eclipse present-day Islam. The class will emphasize a seminar-style discussion. Lectures will be supplemented with visual materials, music, and movies where appropriate. This course satisfies Philosophy and Values and Historical Studies breadth requirements.

Persian 20: Intensive Intermediate Persian

Reza Ghahramani, 10 Units, June 19 - Aug 11, M, Tu, W, Th, F 9:00 am - 1 pm, CCN# 15289

The Persian Intensive is an eight-week intensive course that will strengthen skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing of the Persian language. In this course, students will engage with authentic listening and reading materials, learn to speak in detail about a number of topics, learn to offer and support opinions both orally and in writing, utilize important Persian expressions, deepen their knowledge of Persian grammar and become familiar with important features of Persian culture.

This course is equivalent to one full year of intermediate level Modern Persian.

ARABIC 10: Intensive Elementary Arabic

N/A, 10 Units, June 19 - Aug 11, M, Tu, W, Th, F 9:00 am - 12:59 pm, CCN# 10934

An eight-week intensive course intended to teach skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing Arabic. Using up-to-date language teaching and proficiency-oriented methodologies, the course also covers the basics of Arabic morphology, syntax, and grammar. In addition, cultural components from Arabic-speaking countries are incorporated into the daily activities.

This course is equivalent to one full year of Elementary Modern Standard Arabic. We will cover Chapters 1-13 in Al-Kitaab, Part One.

Course Goals: By the completion of Arabic 10 students should be able to:
1. write the Arabic alphabet, connect letters to form words, and recognize and pronounce Arabic sounds
2. express themselves in the present, past and future tenses both orally and in writing
3. comprehend short printed and audio/video texts on familiar topics
4. introduce themselves to native speakers providing information about where they live, work,
their education and family.

Upon completion of Arabic 10, students are prepared to enroll in Intermediate Arabic.

ARABIC 30: Intensive Intermediate Arabic

N/A, 10 Units, June 19 - Aug 11, M, Tu, W, Th, F 9:00 am - 12:59 pm, CCN# 10936

The Intensive Intermediate Arabic is an eight-week course that will strengthen skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic. Students will engage with authentic listening and reading materials, learn to speak in detail about a number of topics, learn to offer and support opinions both orally and in writing, utilize important Arabic expressions, deepen their knowledge of Arabic grammar and its rich morphological system, and become familiar with important features of Arab culture.

This course is equivalent to one full year of intermediate level Modern Standard Arabic.

IAS 197: Transboundary Water Conflict Resolution: The Israeli –Arab Case

4 Units;; M, Tu, W, Th; 10:00 am - 11:59 am; Dwinelle 183

Much of the Earth’s surface is made up of transboundary basins. The shared nature of these water bodies has been a source of water conflicts in many places while fostering cooperation in others. The aim of the course is to demonstrate the effectiveness, efficiency and political feasibility of a wide-range of technological, legal, and institutional mechanisms to resolve transboundary water conflicts. In particular, the course will focus on the water conflicts between Israel and its Arab neighbors. Students will encounter approaches for addressing water conflicts while accommodating climate and political uncertainty. Taught by Visiting Professor Itay Fishhendler (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Fall 2017

NES 10: Introduction to the Near East

Dr. John Hayes, 4 Units, MWF 9-10 AM, CCN#

The Middle East extends from Morocco to Afghanistan, a distance of some 3500 miles. Many people who live in this vast expanse resent the simplistic ways they have been portrayed by the American media. By studying the history, politics, and religions of the Middle East— and by reading literature and watching music videos from the region—we will learn about the tremendous diversity of the peoples living there.

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Funding Opportunities

Townsend Conference & Lecture Grants

The Townsend Center provides small grants for partial funding of public conferences, lectures, and symposia taking place at UC Berkeley. Events that are closed to the public, require an admission fee, take place off of the UC Berkeley campus, or occur before the deadline for application will not be considered for funding. Ongoing/recurring activities and named lecture series are not funded by this program. The Center will fund meetings of professional organizations that take place in Berkeley on a one-time basis only.

Deadlines:

Friday, Sep 16, 2016 | 5:00 pm
Friday, Feb 10, 2017 | 5:00 pm
Monday, May 1, 2017 | 5:00 pm

More information can be found at: http://townsendcenter.berkeley.edu/funding/conference-lecture-grants

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Fellowship & Job Opportunities

Summer Internships at MEI

Application deadline is March 15

MEI offers an array of internship opportunities that engage a wide range of professional interests and talents. On a given day, Charles Lister's research assistant might conduct open-source news analysis of extremist groups on Twitter and YouTube, while our Programs interns might organize and help host a panel to discuss cultural racketeering and antiquities theft in Iraq and Egypt. With over 25 intern positions across 11 different departments, we have a variety of internships that attract a very diverse pool of interns.

Although our internships are unpaid, MEI works to ensure that its interns are compensated for their contributions. We offer a free language class, a SmarTrip card reloaded with $100 each month, a year-long online subscription to The Middle East Journal, and a series of talks, the Intern Development Series, exclusively dedicated to advancing our interns' professional lives and their knowledge of the region.

 Find out more information on our website, or contact us at internships@mei.edu.

Summer Study Abroad with UC Davis

Application deadlines vary

Earn 8 units in 4 weeks while studying abroad this summer!

 

·         Open to all UCB students (freshman through graduating seniors)

·         UCB summer financial aid applies

·         UC Davis courses, led by UC Davis faculty

·         Courses taught in English

Note: UC Berkeley students can request a ninth unit of 199 credit to qualify for financial aid.

Create an online interest profile to receive email updates about programs that interest you (it only takes a minute!). We have 38 faculty-led programs in 25 countries scheduled for summer 2017!

Program Application:

https://studyabroad.ucdavis.edu/programs/summerabroad/index.html

Al-Quds Bard Summer Language Intensive (AQB SLI)

  • Program Dates: June 28th to July 28th, 2017
  • Application Deadline: March 1st, 2017
  • Location: Al-Quds Bard (AQB), a liberal arts college on the campus of Al-Quds University in Abu Dis, a Jerusalem suburb of the West Bank.
  • Description: The AQB SLI is designed for students with at least two years of formal instruction in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA); sections at alternate levels may be added in response to student demand.
  • Immersive Environment: As in any immersion program, the local setting will serve as a living language laboratory to aid students in effectively gaining both linguistic ability and cultural literacy. By the end of the four-week program, students will have consolidated a strong core vocabulary related to the local environment and should be able to discuss a broad range of cultural, social, and political issues in Arabic.
  • Palestinian Colloquial Dialect: Regular classroom instruction in Palestinian colloquial Arabic by an experienced and energetic Palestinian language teacher will be supplemented by:

o   daily one-on-one conversation practice with Palestinian students

o   daily interaction with host families

o   frequent group excursions and extra-curricular activities

  • Speaking Partners: The AQB SLI’s Speaking Partners are current students of Al-Quds Bard College who will function as speaking partners and cultural liaisons and be intimately involved in the all aspects of the program.
  • Homestays: students will live with host families in the beautiful and historical hillside towns of Bethlehem and Bayt Sahour, located just a short, scenic drive from the Abu Dis campus. Host families will provide breakfast and dinner for students five days per week.
  • Excursions and Co-curricular Activities: The vibrant co-curricular programming of the AQB SLI is a fundamental component of the overall learning experience. Events and excursions are carefully selected and scheduled to reinforce specific language skills being learned in the classroom. Examples from last year include:

o   Visits to Ramallah, Jericho, the Dead Sea, Haifa, Akka, the Galilee, and Nazareth

o   Visits to local schools, refugee camps, women’s cooperatives, museums, and cultural centers in Jerusalem and the surrounding areas; attendance of cultural events, musical performances, and film screenings

o   Weekly guest lectures by academics, activists, and artists from a variety of fields

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Calls for Papers

Berkeley Undergraduate Journal

Extended Deadline -- 3/10/17

Do you have a social science or humanities paper you’re proud of?  Submit to BUJ to try your hand at becoming a published author!  

See http://buj.berkeley.edu for details.

Al Noor Call for Submissions

Al Noor is the only undergraduate-run publication represented each year at the MESA (Middle Eastern Studies Association) conference, and is archived in the Library of Congress. Our mission is to shine a non-partisan and unbiased light on the myriad cultures, histories, and perspectives that comprise the Middle East. Previous issues have been distributed across the US and Europe, as well as in Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt, Morocco, Kuwait, Lebanon, Yemen, Turkey, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Israel, and Palestine.
Possible topics for submission are any subject pertaining to the Middle East and Islam, including but not limited to history, religion, culture, art, and politics.
Submissions should be sent to:
submissions@alnoorjournal.org. Each paper should be submitted in Microsoft Word format. Academic papers should be no more than 8,000 words; features and essays should be approximately 1,500 words. Papers should be formatted with endnotes and a complete bibliography.
Students can also submit a photo essay of at least 10 images from their travel and/or research in the Middle East.

More information can be found at:  www.bcalnoor.org

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Please email cmes@berkeley.edu to suggest an opportunity for inclusion here.