CMES Undergraduate Digest

Aggregated opportunities for undergraduates interested in the Middle East and North Africa

CMES Undergraduate Digest

New & Upcoming Courses

Summer 2017

NES 190D: Islamic Studies- Representation of Islam in Media and Cultural Production

NESTUD R1A: Reading and Composition in Near Eastern Studies- Agency and Transformation in the Literature and Film of Palestine and Israel

NESTUD R1A 002: Reading and Composition in Near Eastern Studies- Which Way Home? Narratives of Pilgrimage from Islamicate Lands

NESTUD 18: Introduction to Ancient Egypt

NESTUD 146A: Introduction to Islam

Persian 20: Intensive Intermediate Persian

ARABIC 10: Intensive Elementary Arabic

ARABIC 30: Intensive Intermediate Arabic

IAS 197: Transboundary Water Conflict Resolution: The Israeli –Arab Case

Fall 2017

NES 10: Introduction to the Near East

Funding Opportunities

Townsend Conference & Lecture Grants

 First Annual Anthology of the Ghassan Kanafani Writing Scholarship

Fellowship & Job Opportunities

Summer Internships at MEI

Summer Study Abroad with UC Davis

Al-Quds Bard Summer Language Intensive (AQB SLI)

Calls for Papers

Berkeley Undergraduate Journal

New & Upcoming Courses

Summer 2017

NES 190D: Islamic Studies- Representation of Islam in Media and Cultural Production

Dr. Hatem Bazian, 4 Units, TuTh 1-4:30 PM, CCN: 15296

Learn more on the Near Eastern Studies website.

NESTUD R1A: Reading and Composition in Near Eastern Studies- Agency and Transformation in the Literature and Film of Palestine and Israel

N/A, 4 units, M, Tu, W, Th 1:00 pm - 2:59 pm, CCN# 12534

This course examines the way in which Palestinian and Israeli writers and artists develop their own theories of agency and transformation in their projects. Through a diverse collection of readings, videos, lectures, and discussions, students will gain a broad understanding of how cultural production generates change large and small and the limitations of its workings. Using Palestinian and Israeli novellas, short-stories, poetry, film and installation art from 1948 to contemporary works in addition to short theoretical readings, the class will examine the construction of agency, what its modes may be (active, passive, defensive, vulnerable, generative, disruptive, individual, collective, narrative, political, etc.) and the role of agent. This course places a strong emphasis on written assignments and active class participation.

NESTUD R1A 002: Reading and Composition in Near Eastern Studies- Which Way Home? Narratives of Pilgrimage from Islamicate Lands

Aria Fani, 4 Units,  M, Tu, W, Th 10:00 am - 11:59 am, CCN# 12535

Pilgrimage is a shared practice among all human cultures. Pilgrims embark on arduous journeys to strengthen their faith, define their place in an imagined community, pay homage to a site of national or tribal memory, seek personal adventures, gain access into political and scholarly networks, fulfill an obligatory task, form solidarity with a certain cause, and search for moral and spiritual meaning. Many pilgrims have documented their experiences through arts and composition; these narratives speak to economic, social, cultural, artistic and political facets of their world. In Which Way Home?, we will consider pilgrimage narratives as a genre and subject it to scrutiny: who is a pilgrim? What forces, personal and institutional, sustain the institution of pilgrimage? Upon what terms do pilgrims articulate notions of faith, territory and community? We will narrow our focus to Islamicate lands; by Islamicate (as opposed to Islamic), we refer to a vast ecumene broadly marked by cultural forms of Islam. We will engage documentaries, movies, paintings, nonfiction, stories and poetry. Join us on this exciting journey!

NESTUD 18: Introduction to Ancient Egypt

Jessica E. Kaiser, 4 Units,  M, Tu, W, Th 11:00 am - 12:59 pm, CCN# 15355

A general introduction to ancient Egypt, providing overview of ancient Egyptian culture and society (history, art, religion, literature, language, social structure), Egyptian archaeology (pyramids, tombs, mummies, temples, cities, monuments, daily life), and the history and development of the modern discipline of Egyptology. Assumes no prior knowledge of subject. Almost all lectures are illustrated extensively by slides. Course includes visits to the Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology, which has the best collection of ancient Egyptian artifacts west of Chicago.

NESTUD 146A: Introduction to Islam

Amin Ehteshami, 3 Units, M, Tu, W, Th, F 10:00 am - 11:59 am, 15356

This course seeks to introduce major themes of Islam as they developed from the time of its emergence to the contemporary setting. It will explore the ways in which Muslims have interpreted the message of Islam through philosophical, legal, political, mystical and literary writings. Attention will also be given to the controversies that eclipse present-day Islam. The class will emphasize a seminar-style discussion. Lectures will be supplemented with visual materials, music, and movies where appropriate. This course satisfies Philosophy and Values and Historical Studies breadth requirements.

Persian 20: Intensive Intermediate Persian

Reza Ghahramani, 10 Units, June 19 - Aug 11, M, Tu, W, Th, F 9:00 am - 1 pm, CCN# 15289

The Persian Intensive is an eight-week intensive course that will strengthen skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing of the Persian language. In this course, students will engage with authentic listening and reading materials, learn to speak in detail about a number of topics, learn to offer and support opinions both orally and in writing, utilize important Persian expressions, deepen their knowledge of Persian grammar and become familiar with important features of Persian culture.

This course is equivalent to one full year of intermediate level Modern Persian.

ARABIC 10: Intensive Elementary Arabic

N/A, 10 Units, June 19 - Aug 11, M, Tu, W, Th, F 9:00 am - 12:59 pm, CCN# 10934

An eight-week intensive course intended to teach skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing Arabic. Using up-to-date language teaching and proficiency-oriented methodologies, the course also covers the basics of Arabic morphology, syntax, and grammar. In addition, cultural components from Arabic-speaking countries are incorporated into the daily activities.

This course is equivalent to one full year of Elementary Modern Standard Arabic. We will cover Chapters 1-13 in Al-Kitaab, Part One.

Course Goals: By the completion of Arabic 10 students should be able to:
1. write the Arabic alphabet, connect letters to form words, and recognize and pronounce Arabic sounds
2. express themselves in the present, past and future tenses both orally and in writing
3. comprehend short printed and audio/video texts on familiar topics
4. introduce themselves to native speakers providing information about where they live, work,
their education and family.

Upon completion of Arabic 10, students are prepared to enroll in Intermediate Arabic.

ARABIC 30: Intensive Intermediate Arabic

N/A, 10 Units, June 19 - Aug 11, M, Tu, W, Th, F 9:00 am - 12:59 pm, CCN# 10936

The Intensive Intermediate Arabic is an eight-week course that will strengthen skills in oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic. Students will engage with authentic listening and reading materials, learn to speak in detail about a number of topics, learn to offer and support opinions both orally and in writing, utilize important Arabic expressions, deepen their knowledge of Arabic grammar and its rich morphological system, and become familiar with important features of Arab culture.

This course is equivalent to one full year of intermediate level Modern Standard Arabic.

IAS 197: Transboundary Water Conflict Resolution: The Israeli –Arab Case

4 Units;; M, Tu, W, Th; 10:00 am - 11:59 am; Dwinelle 183

Much of the Earth’s surface is made up of transboundary basins. The shared nature of these water bodies has been a source of water conflicts in many places while fostering cooperation in others. The aim of the course is to demonstrate the effectiveness, efficiency and political feasibility of a wide-range of technological, legal, and institutional mechanisms to resolve transboundary water conflicts. In particular, the course will focus on the water conflicts between Israel and its Arab neighbors. Students will encounter approaches for addressing water conflicts while accommodating climate and political uncertainty. Taught by Visiting Professor Itay Fischhendler (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

NESTUD R1A 001: Agency and Transformation in the Literature and Film of Palestine and Israel

4 Units; M, Tu, W, Th; 1:00 pm - 2:59 pm; Dwinelle 263

This course examines the way in which Palestinian and Israeli writers and artists develop their own theories of agency and transformation in their projects. Through a diverse collection of readings, videos, lectures, and discussions, students will gain a broad understanding of how cultural production generates change large and small and the limitations of its workings. Using Palestinian and Israeli novellas, short-stories, poetry, film and installation art from 1948 to contemporary works in addition to short theoretical readings, the class will examine the construction of agency, what its modes may be (active, passive, defensive, vulnerable, generative, disruptive, individual, collective, narrative, political, etc.) and the role of agent. This course places a strong emphasis on written assignments and active class participation.

Fall 2017

ARABIC 1A: Elementary Arabic

Multiple sections offered; 5 Units, MTWRF

This course emphasizes the functional usage of Arabic in the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Authentic audio, video, and reading materials are presented from the beginning, and students are encouraged to be creative with the language in and out of class.

ARABIC 20A: Intermediate Arabic

Multiple sections offered; 5 Units; MTWRF

Arabic 1B or equivalent is a prerequisite.

This course is proficiency oriented. Authentic reading in modern standard and classical Arabic and the understanding and application of grammatical and stylistic rules are emphasized. Students deliver oral presentations and write academic papers in Arabic.

ARABIC 100A: Advanced Arabic

Multiple sections offered; 3 Units; MWF

Intensive reading and analysis of texts of different genres. Guest lectures, films, documentaries, oral presentations, research papers. Formal and informal styles of writing and correspondence. Extensive vocabulary building.

ARABIC 105A: Modern Arabic Poetry

44639; TuTh 12:30 PM - 1:59 PM; Barrows 271; 3 Units

Arabic 20B is a prerequisite. Readings and analysis of 20th-century Arabic poetry.

ARABIC 108: Islamic Religious and Philosophical Texts in Arabic

12687;        TuTh 2 PM - 3:29 PM; Barrows 271; 3 Units

Arabic 20B is a prerequisite. Readings in the basic texts of Islam (Qur'an, Huran, Hadith, Sira, commentary) and in theological, mystical, and philosophical texts.

ARABIC 111B: Survey of Arabic Literature (in Arabic)

22952; TuTh 3:30PM - 4:59 PM; Dwinelle 259; 3 Units

Arabic 100A is a prerequisite. This course is designed primarily for majors and prospective majors in Arabic studies. The Post-Abbasid and Modern Periods: A literary-historical survey of Arabic literature from the middle of the thirteenth century to the present.

ARMENI 1A: Introductory Armenian

12826; TuTh 11 AM - 12:29 PM; Dwinelle 89; 3 Units

An introduction to Armenian language and culture, aiming to give students basic competence in all four skills and an introduction to traditional and contemporary Armenian culture.

ARMENIAN 100A: Continuing Armenian

12827; TuTh 12:30 PM - 1:59 PM; Dwinelle 263; 3 Units

The purpose of this course is to further develop students' Armenian proficiency in all four language skills, using discussion, oral presentations, written assignments, and a variety of readings (literature, non-fiction, folklore, newspaper articles, etc.) chosen partly for their cultural significance and partly based on student needs and interests. Emphasis on particular skills (e.g. reading) depending on student needs and interests.

ASAMST 128AC: Muslims in America

12929; MW 5 PM - 6:29 PM; Dwinelle 145; 4 Units

The course traces Islam's journey in America. It will deal with the emergence of identifiable Muslim communities throughout the U.S. and focus on patterns of migration, the ethnic makeup of such communities, gender dynamics, political identity, and cases of conversion to Islam. The course will spend considerable time on the African American, Indo-Pakistani, and Arab American Muslim communities since they constitute the largest groupings. It also examines in depth the emergence of national, regional, and local Muslim institutions, patterns of development pursued by a number of them, and levels of cooperation or antagonism. The course seeks an examination of gender relations and dynamics across the various Muslim groupings, and the internal and external factors that contribute to real and imagined crisis. The course seeks to conduct and document the growth and expansion of mosques, schools, and community centers in the greater Bay Area. Finally, no class on Islam in America would be complete without a critical examination of the impacts of 9/11 on Muslim communities, the erosion of civil rights, and the ongoing war on terrorism.

HEBREW 1A: Elementary Jewish

15137; MTuWThF 10 AM - 10:59 AM; Barrows 271; 5 Units

This course emphasizes the functional usage of Hebrew in the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Authentic audio, video, and reading materials are presented from the beginning, and students are encouraged to be creative with the language in and out of class.

HEBREW 11A: Reading and Composition for Hebrew Speaking Students

46339; MTuWThF 9 AM - 9:59 AM; Barrows 275; 5 Units

Designed for heritage students who possess oral skills (speaking/comprehension, though limited) but need to improve their writing and reading abilities, and expand their knowledge of Hebrew grammar and syntax. Completion of 11A-11B will prepare the student to take Hebrew 20A, Intermediate Hebrew.

HEBREW 20A: Intermediate Hebrew

15043; TuWTh 11 AM - 11:59 AM; Barrows 275; 5 Units

Hebrew 1B or equivalent is a prerequisite.
This course is proficiency oriented. Authentic reading in Hebrew and the understanding and application of grammatical and stylistic rules are emphasized. Students deliver oral presentations and write academic papers in Hebrew.

HEBREW 100A: Advanced Hebrew

15138; TuTh 12:30 PM - 1:59 PM; Barrows 275; 3 Units

Hebrew 20A and 20B are prerequisites.

Advanced Hebrew, especially designed for those going on to the study of modern Hebrew literature. Vocabulary building, grammar review, and literary analysis of a sampling of modern texts.

HEBREW 104A: Modern Hebrew Literature and Culture

15044; M 2 PM - 4:59 PM; Barrows 271; 3 Units

100A and 100B are prerequisites.

A close reading of selected works of modern Hebrew fiction, poetry, and drama in their cultural and historical contexts. Topics vary from year to year and include literature and politics, eros and gender, memory and nationalism, Middle-Eastern and European aspects of Israeli literature and culture.

HEBREW 106A: Elementary Biblical Hebrew

15196; TuTh 2 PM - 3:29 PM; Barrows 275; 3 Units

An introduction to the language of the Hebrew Bible.

HISTORY 109B: The Middle East, 1000-1750

44799; MWF 3 PM - 3:59 PM; Moffitt Library 101; 4 Units

The establishment of Turkish power in the Middle East: Seljuks, Mongols, Ottomans, and Safavis.

HISTORY 177A: Armenia: Armenia from Ethnogenesis to the Dark Ages

44812; MW 5 PM - 6:29 PM; Dwinelle 242; 4 Units

This course will cover close to three millennia of Armenian history, from the process of ethnogenesis to the almost complete destruction of the Armenian "feudal" system by the end of the 15th century. This course is based on the broad framework of Armenian political history and institutions, but also emphasizes economic development, social change, and cultural transformations.

JEWISH 39: Freshman and Sophomore Seminar

44225; W 2 PM - 3:59 PM; Dwinelle 279; 2 Units

Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.

JEWISH 120: Special Topics in Jewish Studies

16106; TuTh 9:30 AM - 10:59 AM; Dwinelle 130; 3 Units

Course will focus on specific areas or topics in Jewish studies through a combination of lectures, term papers, and examinations. Instructors and topics to vary from semester to semester. Consult Jewish Studies website for updated course descriptions.

JEWISH 121: Topics in Jewish Music

45137; TuTh 2 PM - 3:29 PM; 2121 Allston Way 110; 4 Units

This course will address topics related to Jewish music, with a format that includes lecture and lab hours.

M E STU 24: Freshman Seminar

22194; M 2 PM - 2:59 PM; 1 Unit

The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment is limited to 15 freshmen.

M E STU 102: Scope and Methods of Research in Middle Eastern Studies

46599; M 2 PM - 4:59 PM; Dwinelle 179; 4 Units

Upper division standing required.

Required for all students majoring in Middle Eastern Studies, open to all students in International and Area Studies Teaching Program focusing on the Middle East interdisciplinary research strategies for the collection, interpretation, and analysis of data. Course integrates the study of the fundamental theories of social science, with the practical techniques of social science research methods.

M E STU 150: Advanced Study in the Middle East

Multiple sections; Consent of Instructor Required

Advanced research in current issues of Middle Eastern Studies. Seminars will focus on specific areas or topics with appropriate comparative material included. A major research project is required as well as class presentations. Topics to vary from semester to semester.

MES 199 -- Social Entrepreneurship in the Middle East

Conducted in cooperation with leading social enterprises in the Middle East and North Africa, this project-based virtual exchange course will offer students the unique opportunity to learn about social entrepreneurship in the region while participating in a meaningful cross-cultural exchange. Looking at issues of sustainability, community engagement, social impact, and the influence of the Arab Spring, the course will be comprised primarily of case studies and an interdisciplinary project, in which UC Berkeley students team up with socially-engaged entrepreneurs from the region to help create innovative solutions with immediate real-world applications.

For more information please contact Michael Lukas at (510) 643-4349 or mdlukas@berkeley.edu.

NE STUD R1A: Reading and Composition in Near Eastern Studies

17984; MWF 2 PM - 2:59 PM; Barrows 80; 4 Units

UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam. 1A is prerequisite to 1B.

Expository writing based on analysis of selected texts or literatures in translation or writings interpreting the material culture of the ancient Near or modern Middle East. Specific topics vary with instructor. R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement, and R1B satisfies the second half.

NES 10: Introduction to the Near East

18026; MWF 9 AM - 9:59 AM; Birge 50

The Middle East extends from Morocco to Afghanistan, a distance of some 3500 miles. Many people who live in this vast expanse resent the simplistic ways they have been portrayed by the American media. By studying the history, politics, and religions of the Middle East— and by reading literature and watching music videos from the region—we will learn about the tremendous diversity of the peoples living there.

NE STUD 18: Introduction to Ancient Egypt

17955; TuTh 2 PM - 3:29 PM; Hearst Field Annex A1; 4 Units

A general introduction to ancient Egypt, providing overview coverage of ancient Egyptian culture and society (history, art, religion, literature, language, social structure), Egyptian archaeology (pyramids, tombs, mummies, temples, cities, monuments, daily life), and the history and development of the modern discipline of Egyptology. Assumes no prior knowledge of subject. Almost all lectures are illustrated extensively by slides. Discussion sections are held in the Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology, which has the best collection of ancient Egyptian artifacts west of Chicago.

NE STUD 24: Freshman Seminars

17882; F 1 PM - 1:59 PM; Barrows 271; 1 Unit

The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester

NE STUD C26: Introduction to Central Asia

17889; TuTh 11 AM - 12:29 PM; Moffitt Library 102; 3 Units

This course will introduce the student not only to ancient and modern Central Asia, but also to the role played by the region in the shaping of the history of neighboring regions and regimes. The course will outline the history, languages, ethnicities, religions, and archaeology of the region and will acquaint the student with the historical foundations of some of the political, social and economic challenges for contemporary post-Soviet Central Asian republics.

NE STUD 103: Religion of Ancient Egypt

44644; TuTh 2 PM - 3:29 PM; Barrows 170; 3 Units

18 or consent of instructor are prerequisites.

A survey of the religious beliefs of the ancient Egyptians, based primarily upon the written sources.

NE STUD 108: Ancient Astronomy

44645; W 2 PM - 4:59 PM; Barrows 271; 4 Units

Consent of instructor is required.

The course focuses on ancient astronomy from Babylonia to the Greco-Roman world. Readings from primary texts, including Babylonian astronomical and astrological documents (MUL.APIN, Enuma Anu Enlil, etc.) and Greek treatises such as Geminos= Introduction to the Phenomena and Ptolemy's Almagest are used. Problems of the calendar and of planetary motion are of special interest. Two different approaches to celestial phenomena are covered, one from cuneiform texts, predominantly arithmetical and linear and the other from hellenistic Greek antiquity, characteristically geometrical and introducing a quantitative dimension only after contact with and borrowing from Babylonian astronomy.

NE STUD 144: Sufism: The Mysticism of Islam

18046; TuTh 12:30 PM - 1:59 PM; LeConte 4; 4 Units

A general presentation of Sufism that, while not aiming at exhaustiveness, will seek to acquaint students with the place and function of Sufism in Islam; the main outlines of its history; doctrinal and ritual features; the relationship between Sufism and literature, especially poetry; the principal Sufi orders; leading figures in the elaboration of Sufism as a distinct mode of Islamic practice; and the great diversity of Sufism as reflected in its geographic spread throughout the Muslim world.

NE STUD 180: The Quran and Its Interpretation

44647; Tu 5 PM - 7:59 PM; Barrows 170; 3 Units

The course introduces students to Quran and to methods of its interpretation, as adopted in the exegetical (tafsir) literature. In addition to being exposed to secondary academic literature on the Quran and its exegesis, students will be offered a high dose of primary exegetical texts in translation. Passages from a number of periods and denominations will be selected, so that students may develop an appreciation of the interpretive range of a constantly-evolving tradition.

PERSIAN 1A: Elementary Modern Persian

18307; MTuWThF 10 AM - 10:59 AM; Barrows 118; 5 Units

Introduction to Persian language, covering basics of the language skills in all aspects of reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking with emphasis on culture and communicative methods.

PERSIAN 11A: Reading and Composition for Persian Speaking Students

18614; MTuWThF 10 AM - 10:59 AM; Barrows 275; 5 Units

Rudimentary knowledge of spoken Persian and consent of instructor.

Designed for heritage students who possess oral skills (speaking/comprehension, though limited) but need to improve their writing and reading abilities, and expand their knowledge of Persian grammar and syntax. Completion of 11A-11B will prepare the student to take Persian 20A, Intermediate Persian.

PERSIAN 20A: Intermediate Modern Persian

18308; MTuWThF 1 PM - 1:59 PM; Barrows 252; 5 Units

PERSIAN 1A-1B or PERSIAN 11A-11B or consent of instructor are prerequisites.

The sequence begins in the fall. This course emphasizes reading of simple literary texts, expository writing and composition, formal conversation, grammar, and syntax. It involves intensive vocabulary building in preparation for advanced reading and comprehension of standard literary texts.

PERSIAN 100A: Advanced Persian

18309; MWF 12 PM - 12:59 PM; Barrows 252; 3 Units

PERSIAN 20A-20B or equivalent, or consent of instructor are prerequisites.

Emphasis on intensive vocabulary building, comprehensive grammar review, reading and analysis of short literary texts of various genres from classical and modern periods, and reading newspaper clips and other original sources in Persian media.

PERSIAN 103A: Classical Persian Poetry

44649; TuTh 11 AM - 12:29 PM; Barrows 271; 3 Units

101A or 101B or consent of instructor are prerequisites.

Systematic study of poems belonging to all genres of classical Persian poetry, with consideration of questions of prosody, rhetoric, and style.

TURKISH 1A: Elementary Modern Turkish

21477; MTuWThF 10 AM - 11 AM; Barrows 8A; 5 Units

This course emphasizes the functional usage of Turkish in the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Authentic audio, video, and reading materials are presented from the beginning, and students are encouraged to be creative with the language in and out of class.

TURKISH 100A: Intermediate Modern Turkish

44650; MTuWThF 11 AM - 11:59 AM; Barrows 8A; 5 Units

Turkish 1A or 1B are prerequisites.

The sequence begins in the fall. This course emphasizes reading of simple literary texts, expository writing and composition, formal conversation, grammar, and syntax. It involves intensive vocabulary building in preparation for advanced reading and comprehension of standard literary texts.

TURKISH 101A: Readings in Modern Turkish

21512; TuTh 12:30 PM - 1:59 PM; Barrows 8A; 3 Units

100A-100B or consent of instructor are prerequisites.

Sequence begins in the Fall.


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Funding Opportunities

Townsend Conference & Lecture Grants

The Townsend Center provides small grants for partial funding of public conferences, lectures, and symposia taking place at UC Berkeley. Events that are closed to the public, require an admission fee, take place off of the UC Berkeley campus, or occur before the deadline for application will not be considered for funding. Ongoing/recurring activities and named lecture series are not funded by this program. The Center will fund meetings of professional organizations that take place in Berkeley on a one-time basis only.

Deadlines:

Friday, Sep 16, 2016 | 5:00 pm
Friday, Feb 10, 2017 | 5:00 pm
Monday, May 1, 2017 | 5:00 pm

More information can be found at: http://townsendcenter.berkeley.edu/funding/conference-lecture-grants

First Annual Anthology of the Ghassan Kanafani Writing Scholarship

Please join us on April 8, 2017, from 6:30pm-9pm at Studio Grand in Oakland (more details below) to celebrate the launch of the anthology and hear from the winners of the 2016 scholarship!

We want to take the opportunity to celebrate Ghassan Kanafani on his birthday, April 8th, as we commemorate him and reflect on why his legacy is significant to us. Ghassan’s writing continues to teach us many things: devotion, determination, commitment, vision, and, indeed, an unshakable belief in victory and liberation. Every time we revisit him, he gives us more reasons to honor him, celebrate him, and follow in his footsteps.

http://www.pymusa.com/ghassan-kanafani-scholarship-1/

Call for Proposals: GRANTS IN CRITICAL REFUGEE STUDIES

The UC Critical Refugee Studies Collective (CRSC) announces three funding initiatives for AY 2017-2018. We invite applications from ladder-rank faculty, graduate and undergraduate students from any campus in the University of California system, as well as community organizations and artists working in the field of Critical Refugee Studies for projects connected to refugee populations in California to be undertaken in the academic year of 2017-18.

Grants for UC undergraduate students: https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/059bcc3c-ec85-4e59-b191-ebb6c6300077

The Art of Rewriting Essay Contest

$1000 Award
Deadline: Monday, May 1, 11:59 pm

The Art of Writing Program values the process of rewriting, which is why we are asking UC Berkeley undergraduates to submit an early draft of an essay they've written on any topic, along with the final draft and a 250-word reflection on their revisions. Send entries to
artowriting@berkeley.edu by May 1st.

The Afaf Kanafani Prize

The Afaf Kanafani Prize is awarded to UC Berkeley students whose academic work focuses on women in the Arab World. One prize of $500 will be awarded to the best paper dealing with any topic related to the subject of women in the Arab world. The paper must have been produced in a UC Berkeley class.

The Kanafani Prize is made possible through a generous donation by Fay Afaf Kanafani from the proceeds of her autobiography, Nadia, Captive of Hope: Memoir of an Arab Woman.

UC Berkeley undergraduate and graduate students registered for the academic year in which they are applying.

The application deadline is Wednesday, May 17, 2017. Late or incomplete applications will not be considered. Results will be announced in early summer.

Applications must include a cover letter introducing the applicant and three copies of the applicant’s submission paper. Applicants must include his or her name, UC Berkeley identification number, email address, phone number, year in school, major, and the class in which he or she produced the paper. The applicant’s name should appear on every page of the application.

Please email applications as a single PDF to
cmes@berkeley.edu with “Afaf Kanafani Prize” in the subject line.

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Fellowship & Job Opportunities

Summer Study Abroad with UC Davis

Application deadlines vary

Earn 8 units in 4 weeks while studying abroad this summer!

 

·         Open to all UCB students (freshman through graduating seniors)

·         UCB summer financial aid applies

·         UC Davis courses, led by UC Davis faculty

·         Courses taught in English

Note: UC Berkeley students can request a ninth unit of 199 credit to qualify for financial aid.

Create an online interest profile to receive email updates about programs that interest you (it only takes a minute!). We have 38 faculty-led programs in 25 countries scheduled for summer 2017!

Program Application:

https://studyabroad.ucdavis.edu/programs/summerabroad/index.html

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Calls for Papers

Berkeley Undergraduate Journal

Extended Deadline -- 3/10/17

Do you have a social science or humanities paper you’re proud of?  Submit to BUJ to try your hand at becoming a published author!  

See http://buj.berkeley.edu for details.

Al Noor Call for Submissions

Al Noor is the only undergraduate-run publication represented each year at the MESA (Middle Eastern Studies Association) conference, and is archived in the Library of Congress. Our mission is to shine a non-partisan and unbiased light on the myriad cultures, histories, and perspectives that comprise the Middle East. Previous issues have been distributed across the US and Europe, as well as in Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt, Morocco, Kuwait, Lebanon, Yemen, Turkey, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Israel, and Palestine.
Possible topics for submission are any subject pertaining to the Middle East and Islam, including but not limited to history, religion, culture, art, and politics.
Submissions should be sent to:
submissions@alnoorjournal.org. Each paper should be submitted in Microsoft Word format. Academic papers should be no more than 8,000 words; features and essays should be approximately 1,500 words. Papers should be formatted with endnotes and a complete bibliography.
Students can also submit a photo essay of at least 10 images from their travel and/or research in the Middle East.

More information can be found at:  www.bcalnoor.org

Narratives of Progress: Global and Local Perspectives

The Van Leer Jerusalem Institute is calling for proposals.

We invite interested participants to send proposals that deal with these or related questions. We also encourage approaching these questions by examining specific case studies, or by examining specific figures relevant to either of these dimensions (e.g., Hegel, Franz Fanon, Muhammad Abduh, to name but a few).
We suggest three formats of proposals:
Round-table discussions of an article or book chapter related to one of the above topics
Panel discussions
20-minute papers

More information can be found here.

Deadline: April 30,2017

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Other

Geneva Summer School: Understanding Islamist Movements

June 26 - July 7, 2017

This course asks how we should understand the various political movements that claim to act in the name of Islam. What do the Islamic State and the various affiliates of al-Qaeda in the Middle East have in common with each other, or with the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, among others? What distinguishes these movements from the Taliban in Afghanistan or Boko Haram in West Africa? Why do some of these groups act or inspire others to carry out attacks in Europe and North America? To what extent can they be explained in political terms, and what exactly is the role of religion? How do they compare with non-Islamic terrorist or revolutionary movements?

Interdisciplinary by its very nature, the course is taught by distinguished faculty in a variety of fields from Europe and the United States, as well as experts from the international community in Geneva.

Registration is now open. Final Deadline: May 1st, 2017For more information, please visit our website: www.genevasummerschools.ch

Women’s Leadership Intensive (WLI)

WLI Applications DUE 11:59pm Fri, April 7, 2017

The third annual Women’s Leadership Intensive (WLI) is a leadership program for women identified [*] students. This year WLI is  centered on establishing solidarity and working along intersections that exist within communities of women [*] as well as challenging and deconstructing existing frameworks that exist within workplaces, the collegiate environment, and society as whole.  This year’s theme is  RESILIENCE, RESISTANCE, and HEALING.

WLI aims to foster knowledge sharing, strategizing, skill building and mentorship in a supportive and rejuvenating environment in addition to methods of consolidating resilience, resistance, and healing in the current political and social climate. The goal is to provide a space to sharpen leadership skills, identify the impact various oppressions have on leadership styles, develop intentionality in space building, holding, and taking, and provide practical strategies on existing and resisting within differing and intersecting identities. Ultimately, WLI exists to develop community, intentional space, confidence, and consciousness among and within leaders who experience or have experienced life through the lens of a woman [*].

We invite women identified [*] students of all ages, abilities, socio-economic and citizenship status, sexualities, religions, and cultural backgrounds to participate.

[*] “women identified”: those who experience life through the lens of woman in body, spirit, identity past, present, future and fluid (UC Berkeley Gender Equity Resource Center)

WLI INFO SESSION:

Fri, Mar 24, 2017 at 2-3pm in GenEq Equity Resource Center, 202 Chavez

UIR’s MEdiNA Studies Program

Hosted in UIR’s “Rabat Political Sciences School”, the Program offers a variety of courses focusing on the history, culture, society and politics of North African, Mediterranean and Middle Eastern regions. It is tailored to meet the individual needs of students and satisfy their academic school requirements, prioritizing the time flexibility and credit transfer needed to provide a mix of a rich cultural immersion and top quality education matching international standards.

Featuring regionally focused, pluri-disciplinary study areas, the Program’s topics cover a wide range of courses from Social Sciences and Law, Arts and Literature, Religion, Gender issues and Identity Politics to Post Arab Spring Dynamics, International Relations, and Business. The core area studies are coupled with an excellent language learning pack that helps develop your language skills fluency and upgrade your cultural immersion in either Arabic or French, as an optional part of your Study Abroad or student exchange at UIR Rabat.

Whether you are in for a semester or a full academic year, the MEdiNA Studies Program offers fully transferable credits for all its courses, the overwhelming majority of which are taught in English; unless other language requirements apply. The MEdiNA Program is also available over the summer, in the format of a summer program.

For more information, please consult the Program’s Facebook page at:

Medina Studies Program - @MEdiNAstudies


Or contact Dr. Najib Mokhtari, Director of MEdiNA Studies Program at:
Phone: +212 5 30 10 30 52
E-mail: medina@uir.ac.ma

Arabic Summer Institute Program (UT Austin)

Program at a Glance
Intensive ten-week summer program equivalent to one full academic year
Open to all qualified students (competitive admission by application)
Meets FLAS fellowship requirements


Program Dates
Orientation and mandatory listening and reading tests will be administered on May 31, 2017
Classes run from June 1 - August 11, 2017 (Intersession break July 7 - 9, 2017)
With the largest full-time Arabic faculty in the country, more courses at all levels of Arabic, and a thriving events and cultural environment, UT’s Department of Middle Eastern Studies is now rated among the best in the country. Set in friendly Austin, our program and our University are committed to continually expanding our curriculum to help students meet their academic goals. The Arabic Summer Institute illustrates our continued commitment to excellence.

The University of Texas at Austin’s ASI will offer an intensive Arabic language and culture program in 2017 for Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced students of Arabic. The ASI is open to all qualified students (competitive admission by application), and exceptional high school students are welcome to apply. This program will run from June 1, 2017 through August 11, 2017 and will feature:

An intensive ten-week summer program equivalent to one full academic year
-Beginning, Intermediate & Advanced training combining instruction in MSA and Colloquial Arabic
-Communicative teaching methodology that emphasizes all four language skills equally: speaking, reading, writing and listening
-21 contact hours per week
-Weekly Dardasha (chat) classes and daily Open Tutoring opportunities to develop oral skills
-A fully incorporated cultural program with lectures, films, hands-on workshops and guest speakers
-Competitive cost of attendance
-Dedicated, supportive faculty trained in Arabic pedagogy
-A Student Support advisor to provide tutoring, advice and guidance
-Instruction is based on a pedagogical approach in which students gain competency in both MSA and colloquial Arabic.

-All ASI courses consist of two sessions: June 1 – July 6 (session 1), and July 10 – August 11 (session 2). Final exams are administered at the end of each session, with continuation to session 2 conditional upon earning a final grade of “C+” or higher in session 1.

Arabic Course Listing
Beginning Level, 12 credit hours, ARA 601C & ARA 611C

Intermediate Level, 12 credit hours, ARA 621K & ARA 621L

Advanced Level, 10 credit hours, ARA 531K & ARA 531L

Please note: These courses do not provide in residence credit at UT.

Deadline to apply: April 17th, 2017

 Summer Language Workshop at Indiana University

The Indiana University Summer Language Workshop continues to accept applications for intensive study of Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS), Chinese, Estonian, Haitian Creole, Hungarian, Japanese, Kurdish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Mongolian, Pashto (online), Persian, Russian, Turkish, and Ukrainian.

The proficiency-based Workshop curriculum features 20-25 contact hours weekly and a rich co-curricular program, including language tables, films, clubs, cooking demonstrations, and lectures with area studies specialists.

All participants pay in-state tuition rates for Summer Language Workshop courses. Program participants earn 4-10 transferable IU credits and have access to university libraries, recreational facilities, and public transit. On-campus housing is available.

Program Dates: June 5 - July 28, 2017

Application Deadline: May 1, 2017

To apply to the Summer Language Workshop, visit http://indiana.edu/~swseel/apply/start.

For more information on the funding opportunities described above and to apply for one or more of them, visit http://indiana.edu/~swseel/funding-costs/fellowships.

Questions? Contact swseel@indiana.edu or 812-855-2889.

“Listening Party”

The Saudi Arabian Association is pleased to announce its first “Listening Party” organized in collaboration with Kerning Cultures.

 

Kerning Cultures started about 2 years ago by a group of journalists in Dubai who wondered why they couldn't see a reflection of their Middle East selves in the English media surrounding the region. As many people feel, the media surrounding the Middle East is heavily politicized, focusing on violence, war, and terrorism. And there's so much more to our region -- so in 2015 Razan Alzayani and Hebah Fisher started Kerning Cultures to podcast stories about culture, history, current affairs, science, and entrepreneurship to tell deeper stories about the Middle East. Stories we'd actually want to listen to and start a conversation with a friend about.

And that's exactly what these listening parties are for. A listening party is an an opportunity to come together, listen to an episode, and have a meaningful discussion.

 

Please join us next Saturday (April 29th 2017) evening in 56 Barrows Hall from 7:00 – 9:00 pm. We’d love to get to know you and hear your valuable thoughts and opinions. Let us together explore the depth and richness of the Middle East.

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Please email cmes@berkeley.edu to suggest an opportunity for inclusion here.