last updated 12 Jun 2018

Welcome

Welcome to the ONE Interpreting Remote CART Captioning Skills Assessment! This service is available for any organization or individual to take advantage of regardless of affiliation with ONE Interpreting. (If you have already reviewed all the information on this site and are ready to register for the assessment, you can do so by scrolling to the bottom and submitting your name, email address, and payment. Once received, we will reply regarding open dates and times.)

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Due to customer requirements, ONE can only refer work to CART captioners who have been assessed, whether by this or a similar assessment, or nationally certified. Assessment results enable us to match job demands and consumer preferences with CART captioner skill sets. Though not the only one, assessment score is the largest factor in determining who is awarded referrals. Once you are awarded a referral for the first time, congratulations! We will set up an account for you and ensure you are comfortable using our system. You will then have unlimited use of a state-of-the-art platform that allows you to expand the delivery of your excellent captioning skills to students and individuals throughout the nation from the comfort of your own home or office, all at no charge to you.

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How does the assessment work?

Unlike certifications which should be psychometrically validated and are generally pass or fail, this is merely an assessment that will evaluate your captioning accuracy and average text delay, whatever they come out to be. Both steno-writers and voice-writers can take this assessment. It is administered completely online and takes approximately an hour to complete. Results are generally available within one week.

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After you have registered and the date and time have been set, this is what happens in a nutshell at the time of the assessment:

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1) You go to www.oneinterpreting.com on your computer and send a chat. (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox browser is required when taking the assessment. Entire assessment happens in the browser.)

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2) The test proctor sends you a link which connects you to a live secure video call. A webcam is required in order to verify identity; please be presentable. You will also be screen-sharing.

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3) The proctor sends you another link which opens a blank pre-formatted secure document within your browser; you are required to write into this document for the assessment. (Please contact us before registering to receive a sample transcript/test document to ensure your software can correctly write into the document.)

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4) A 5-minute audio sample is played for warm-up purposes. After the warm-up period, you clear the caption document. When you are ready, the proctor begins the assessment and you begin CARTing!

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5) After exactly 50 minutes, the audio will conclude. While screen-sharing and in the presence of the proctor, you delete all files made by your equipment/software that contains test material.

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Who is my consumer?

Though CART is used in any number of scenarios, post-secondary education is one of the most common venues that CART captioners find themselves working in. A typical college class may last 50 minutes. Hence all versions of this assessment feature a typical 50-minute undergraduate college lecture (not technical, math, or science) recorded in high quality audio. There is no video of the lecture or presentation slides. Depending on which version of the assessment you choose to take, the instructor either speaks on average about 150 words per minute or about 180 words per minute. All instructors speak native English. There may be student comments which are not directly mic'd. (See below for different ways to handle only partially discernible audio.) Once the assessment begins, the lecture will continue to play without stopping.

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With CART, what is seen in realtime is nearly always more important than the edited transcript produced after class. Hence for the purposes of this assessment, your consumer is an undergraduate college student with moderate hearing loss for whom every part of the lecture has equal value. The student can access any part of the transcript during class but won't ever be reviewing the transcript after class. Thus, you may edit any part of your transcript in realtime but once the audio concludes after the 50 minutes, you will not be able to make any further edits.

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Techniques for Handling Partially Discernible Audio

Because student comments are not directly mic'd, most are only partially discernible. You must at least indicate each time someone off-mic voices a comment or it will be considered an error, after which you may simply insert an [indiscernible] or [inaudible] parenthetical without incurring any errors. However, if you believe you can hear the comment, you are welcome to CART it. If you write it correctly, it will help your score as it will increase your total word count. However, if you CART something different than what was said, you will incur errors. Summarization is another acceptable technique for handling partially discernible audio. Listening silently for a few seconds and then CARTing the main idea of what was said may reduce the risk of hearing incorrectly while still increasing your total word count.

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Substantial Verbatim vs. Strict Verbatim

Most consumers of educational CART accept and even prefer "substantial verbatim" as opposed to "strict verbatim." For the purposes of this assessment, your consumer is an undergraduate college student with moderate hearing loss who prefers substantial verbatim for more readability. Hence your transcript will be rated against a substantial verbatim standard, not strict verbatim. This does not equate to summarizing. Primarily this means that speech disfluencies in the source audio are not required to appear in your transcript. A speech disfluency is defined as any non-lexical vocable:

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False start - a word or sentence that is cut off mid-utterance; a restarted or immediately repeated phrase/word/syllable(s)

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Repaired utterance - when a speaker corrects his/her own words

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Filler or filled pause - a grunt or non-lexical utterance such as "uh", "um", "err"

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Habitual addition - an overused word not needed to fully convey an utterance

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Again, speech disfluencies are not required to appear in your transcript. However, if they do appear in your transcript written correctly as they were spoken, they are not counted against you.

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How is my score for Total Accuracy calculated?

First, the entirety of your transcript is broken up into 10 equal parts (5 minutes worth of lecture each). One predetermined 5-minute section is then set aside for grading which is the same section for everyone who takes that version of the assessment. However, if the length of your transcript is significantly shorter than expected, the part where the largest chunks of text were dropped is chosen for grading instead. (See chart at bottom for a list of what is considered an error and what is not. Rater may stop grading after 200 errors are detected which equates to less than 70% accuracy.)

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×(100) = Total Accuracy %

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If you are not happy with your performance, you may request your assessment not be graded, though payments continue to be non-refundable and cannot be applied to other versions of the assessment. If you wish to retest, you may register again on this website. A different version of the assessment will need to be administered. However, if you believe it would help your score, you may request additional sections of your transcript from this assessment be graded. The cost is $60 for each additional 5-minute section you want graded. The predetermined order in which the sections are graded is the same for everyone and unfortunately cannot be divulged since the integrity of the assessment must be maintained. Each score will be combined with the previous score(s) to produce an overall average. Regardless of how many sections of your transcript you request to be graded, you will always have exactly one score for accuracy and one score for average text delay based on the total accumulated text graded. However, different versions of the assessment are treated separately.

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How is my score for Average Text Delay calculated?

Generally consumers of CART are accustomed to seeing each individual word appear as it is spoken. Several words appearing at once can also be acceptable (similar to how pop-on captions work) so long as there is no significant delay. People react quickly to oral and aural communication so individuals with hearing loss should have equal access. To this end, both text that appears too quickly (such as individual syllables or strokes before they're translated) as well as text that appears too late (such as numerous lines all at once) can have a negative impact on equal access. In general, a good score for average text delay is between 1 and 6 words.

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= Average Text Delay (in words)

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Can my system handle it?

This assessment is administered through a browser. CARTing while streaming live audio, video, and screen-sharing requires significantly more computing power than if you were on-site performing the same work. Hence if your system performs well on the assessment, then it demonstrates your system is capable of most any actual remote CART work.

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Cost

$60 per section graded

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Terms & Conditions

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The following list of errors (21 items) will be used when grading:

last updated 12 May 2016

(S)

(W)

S=Spoken (what the speaker actually said)

W=Written (what your software actually wrote)

 # of errors

1.

Each incorrect word or mistranslate

(S)

(W)

He used a key to access the building.

He used a key to excess the building.

1 error

(S)

(W)

I wish he could just be content.
I wish he could just
beacon tent.


2 errors

2.

Each added word

(S)

(W)

Please tell us about your work history.

Please tell us about your past work history.

1 error

(S)

(W)

She dropped her ice cream cone.

She dropped her I scream code.

3 errors

3.

Each dropped word

(S)

(W)

The light was green as I approached the intersection.

The light green as I approached the intersection.

1 error

(S)

(W)

I was wrong so I'm having to apologize.

I was wrong some having to apologize.

2 errors

(S)

(W)

You sort of know what I mean.

User know what I mean.

3 errors

4.

Each misspelled word

(S)

(W)

I called my doctor yesterday.

I called my docter yesterday.

1 error

(S)

(W)

It’s my party and I’ll cry if I want to.

Its my party and I’ll cry if I want to.

1 error

(S)

(W)

The Johnsons will hold their annual picnic.

The Johnson’s will hold their annual picnic.

1 error

5.

Each incorrect name

(S)

(W)

Mr. Johnson borrowed my car last week.

Mr. Jones borrowed my car last week.

1 error

6.

Transposed phrases that change the meaning

(S)

(W)

I checked my luggage then I went for coffee.

I went for coffee then I checked my luggage.

4 errors

7.

Missing or incorrect punctuation

(S)

(W)

He didn't answer the phone.  He didn't hear it ring.

He didn't answer the phone he didn't hear it ring.

1 error

(S)

(W)

I'm actually going to have you -- I want to try and have you in groups.

I'm actually going to have you I want to try and have you in groups.

1 error

(S)

(W)

There are many different kinds; upper, lower, anterior, inferior, etc.

There are many different kinds, upper, lower, anterior, inferior, etc.

1 error

(S)

(W)

If I had your brains, I wouldn't be here.

If I had your brains I wouldn't be here.

1 error

8.

Each missing space

(S)

(W)

Let's hope that doesn't happen to you.

Let'shope that doesn't happen to you.

1 error

9.

Words compounded or not compounded which change the meaning

(S)

(W)

My workout is usually one hour.

My work out is usually one hour.

1 error

10.

Each omitted capital letter

(S)

(W)

I saw Dr. Smith for the first time in October.

I saw Dr. smith for the first time in October.

1 error

11.

Each incorrect capital letter

(S)

(W)

That goes back to what she said earlier.

That goes back to What she said earlier.

1 error

12.

Each incorrect verb tense

(S)

(W)

I talked with her last Tuesday.

I talk with her last Tuesday.

1 error

13.

Each plural incorrectly written as singular and vice versa

(S)

(W)

I cashed five checks and then made one deposit.

I cashed five check and then made one deposit.

1 error

14.

Each acronym which contains hyphens, or words

(S)

(W)

(W)

I missed last month’s PTA meeting.

I missed last month’s P-T-A meeting.

I missed last month’s P tea A meeting.

1 error

1 error

15.

Each appearance of an untranslate or unresolved conflict

(S)

(W)

(W)

(W)

That's the kind of device used in that situation.

That's the kind of DWIS used in that situation.

That's the kind of [TK-WEUS] used in that situation.

That's the kind of TK WEUS used in that situation.

1 error

1 error

2 errors

(S)

(W)

I can take only one pair of shoes.

I can take only one {pair, pear, pare} of shoes.

1 error

16.

Each number that should be expressed as a numeral

(S)

(W)

My daughter was born July 8, 1980.

My daughter was born July eight, 19 eighty.

2 errors

17.

Each incorrect or irregularly rendered number

(S)

(W)

I've lived here since 1996.

I've lived here since 1966.

1 error

(S)

(W)

720

700 twenty

1 error

18.

Each incorrect or missing identifier (speaker tag)

(S)

(W)

PROFESSOR:  Does anyone know?  

STUDENT:  [indiscernible]

PROFESSOR:  Okay good.  Are there others?

PROFESSOR:  Does anyone know?  Okay good.  Are there others?

2 errors

(S)

(W)

PROFESSOR:  What do you guys think?

STUDENT:  I don't know what others think but I think that does matter.

PROFESSOR:  What do you guys think?

I don't know what others think but I think that does matter.

1 error

19.

Each incorrect or missing parenthetical

(S)

(W)

They basically sleep through life. [LAUGHING] It's fascinating.

They basically sleep through life. [APPLAUSE] It's fascinating.

1 error

(S)

(W)

These are all part of the -- [PHONE RINGING] -- who's the culprit this time?

These are all part of the -- who's the culprit this time?

1 error

20.

Missing formatting in titles (caps, title case, italics, underlining, double quotes, and single quotes are all acceptable formatting)

(S)

(W)

It's called the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

It's called the society for the prevention of cruelty to animals.

2 errors

21.

Partially missing formatting in titles (caps, title case, italics, underlining, double quotes, and single quotes are all acceptable formatting)

(S)

(W)

It's called the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

It's called the Society for the prevention of cruelty to animals.

1 error

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The following (15 items) will NOT be counted as errors:

last updated 3 May 2016

(S)

(W)

S=Spoken (what the speaker actually said)

W=Written (what your software actually wrote)

 # of errors

1.

Transposed words or phrases that do not change the meaning

(S)

(W)

I since have been promoted to manager of sales.

I have since been promoted to manager of sales.

0 errors

2.

Each contraction written as two words and vice versa

(S)

(W)

 He won’t speed down that road again.

 He will not speed down that road again.

0 errors

(S)

(W)

 I do not believe his story.

 I don’t believe his story.

0 errors

3.

Words compounded or not compounded which do not change meaning

(S)

(W)

I gave the receipt to the bookkeeper.

I gave the receipt to the book keeper.

0 errors

4.

An extra space where only one space is required

(S)

(W)

I went to the store for eggs.

I went  to the store for eggs.

0 errors

5.

Words that have more than one accepted spelling

Alright or All right

0 errors

6.

Large numbers may be written as a combination of words and numerals

11 million or eleven million

0 errors

7.

Fractions written as words or numerals

2/3 or two thirds

0 errors

8.

Use of the word “dollars” instead of the $ symbol

$117 or 117 dollars 

(NOTE: Omission of word “dollars” or $ symbol is 1 error for dropped word.)

0 errors

9.

Use of the word “percent” instead of the % sign

30 percent or 30% 

(NOTE: Omission of word “percent” or % symbol is 1 error for dropped word.)

0 errors

10.

Cardinal numbers for ordinal numbers and vice versa

December 5 or December 5th

0 errors

11.

Missing hyphens in compound adjectives

15-page report or 15 page report

0 errors

12.

Hyphen used at the end of a line to divide a word

13.

Punctuation which is part of any other error

14.

Spelling of proper names, except that the same name should be used consistently throughout the transcript

15.

Miss, Mrs., or Ms. used, except that one form should be used consistently throughout the transcript