Grace International School

Citation Policy and Resource Guide
October 2013

Table of Contents

GIS Citation Policy

3rd and 4th Grade Works Cited Guidelines  (No in-text citations)

5th and 6th Grade Works Cited Guidelines (Include in-text citations)

Middle School, High School, and Teacher Citation Guidelines

How to Cite Pictures

How to Create a Works Cited Page

Basic Paper Format Guidelines (Grades 3-12)

Title and Page Numbering Information for Papers (Grades 3-12)

GIS Citation Policy

Grace International School (GIS) exists to educate and prepare our students for lives of service and leadership that will reflect the character of God through the values upon which they live.  As Christians, the standard for our choices and behavior flow from the very nature of God (Deuteronomy 6:4-5).  God is holy and righteous in all He does; He cannot lie (I Samuel 15:29; Titus 1:2).  Those who claim His name and who desire to imitate God’s nature in their lives should exhibit a high standard of integrity and honesty.  GIS believes that the basis for personal and academic development is honesty.  

The basic Judeo-Christian ethical mandate begins with “Thou shalt not steal” (Exodus 20:15). Plagiarism is an act of theft and fraud. To claim others’ work as your own without acknowledgement or citation is an example of academic fraud.  

Grace International School teaches its students and models as a staff and faculty the importance of properly citing any material that is borrowed from other sources. The school’s policy is that any action which knowingly or unknowingly claims others’ work as your own without acknowledgement or citation is an example of plagiarism and essentially fraud. At GIS students and staff are taught that any use of someone else’s words, ideas and data must include a citation of the sources of that information. This use includes papers written, PowerPoint presentations created, posters made, speeches given and any other representation which may include borrowed information.

GIS uses the latest Modern Language Association (MLA) approved style of citation. The MLA style requires crediting sources in two ways.  First, a parenthetical citation in the text must be included indicating the source of a particular quote, paraphrased statement or idea, summarized material, or fact.  Second, a Works Cited page must be included at the end of a paper or project that enables others to locate the sources used.  

Students at GIS begin citing sources in grade 3 with a modified MLA format and move to full MLA citations by grade 7.

Teachers and staff are expected to set the example for proper citation practices. All materials that are used for classroom instruction (handouts, PowerPoint presentations, posters etc.) need to include proper citation. All new resources that are created for classroom use must include proper citations where necessary. Since many are using materials that have been developed over time, GIS will work with all staff and faculty during the course of the 2013-2014 academic year to update the materials being used. Our goal is that by the end of 2014 all material being handed out or shown to students will include proper citation.

This handbook contains examples of the types of resources most often used by students.  Students or faculty who use different types of sources will be directed to the Purdue University Online Writing Lab website for particular details of how to cite any other material. This website will serve as the informational source for all questions pertaining to citation practices as well as paper formatting for classes.

To avoid plagiarizing from print, verbal, or electronic sources, students, staff and teachers must give credit through citations, quotation structure, and a Works Cited page when they use:

3rd and 4th Grade Works Cited Guidelines  (No in-text citations)

Books:        Last name, First name. Title of Book.  Publisher of the book.   Print

example:        Peterson, John.  The Littles.  Scholastic.  Print

Magazines: “Title of the Article.” Name of Magazine. Date of publication (day,mo.,year).  Print

example:  “Butterflies.” Cricket July 1998.  Print

Encyclopedia:  “Title of the Article.”  Name of Encyclopedia.  Print  

Internet:       “Name of Article.”  Webpage. Web.  Date website is accessed (day,month,year)

example: “How to Make Vegetarian Chili.” eHow. Web.  24 Feb. 2012

5th and 6th Grade Works Cited Guidelines (Include in-text citations)

Books:        Last name, First name. Title of Book.  Publisher of the book, Date published.  Print

example:  Peterson, John.  The Littles.  Scholastic, 1990.  Print

Magazines: “Title of the Article.” Name of Magazine. Date of publication: (day,mo.,year) page #s.  Print

example:  “Butterflies.” Cricket. July 1998: 28.  Print

Encyclopedia:  “Title of the Article.”  Name of Encyclopedia.  Print  

Internet:   “Name of Article.”  Webpage. Web. Date of last update. Date website is accessed (day,month,year)

example: “How to Make Vegetarian Chili.” eHow. Web. 10 Jan.2013.  24 Feb. 2012

Middle School, High School, and Teacher Citation Guidelines

Use full MLA citation format including both in-text citations and a works cited page.  

See the Purdue University Online Writing Lab website for complete details.

Other Direct Helpful Links:

In-Text Citations: The Basics

Works Cited Page: Basic Format

Works Cited Page: Books  

Works Cited Page: Other Common Sources  

Works Cited Page: Periodicals  

Works Cited Page: Electronic Sources   

Works Cited Page: Other Non-Print Sources 

MLA In-Text Citations: The Basics  

How to Cite Pictures

Images or pictures that you decide to use in a presentation or research papers must be cited. Only those that are obtained from royalty free clip art, such as the clip art available in Microsoft Word or Powerpoint do not need citing. Any items obtained from the web or scanned from a print source should be attributed to the owner of the copyrighted work (“Citing Sources”).

When citing an image you’ve borrowed from Google images, click on the Visit Page button to be taken to the original location of the document.  Use information from that page to cite your image.

Look here to see how to cite a painting or sculpture found online.  

Example for a Work of Art Accessed online via Google images:

Van Rijn, Rembrant. Christ in the Storm on the Sea of Galilee. 1633. Isabella Stewart Gardner

                Museum, Boston.  Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Collection. Web. 1 Oct. 2013.

The following elements are needed in a citation for a photograph or image borrowed from the web and not located anywhere else:  

Example for a Pepsi Logo borrowed via Google images:

Diet Pepsi Logo 2010-Present.” Logo. Logopedia Wikia, 2010. Web. 2 Oct. 2013.

How to Create a Works Cited Page

  1. Begin your Works Cited page on a separate page at the end of your paper or project. It should have the same one inch margin and last name, page number as the rest of your paper.
  2. Label the page Works Cited.  Do not italicize the words Works Cited or put them in quotation marks.  Center the words Works Cited at the top of the page.
  3. Double-space all citations.
  4. URLs (website addresses) are no longer required for Web entries.  
  5. For each source listed, begin first line at margin and indent each line that follows by five spaces.
  6. Use italics for titles of books, periodicals, and software.
  7. Use quotation marks for titles of articles of magazines.
  8. Capitalize each word in the titles of articles, books, etc., but do not capitalize articles (the, an).
  9. If required information, such as author or place of publication, is not available  just leave it out.
  10. Arrange all sources in one list, alphabetically by first word, which will generally be either the author’s last name or the first important word of the title.

See more details and examples at:  https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/05/

Basic Paper Format Guidelines (Grades 3-12)

  1. A4 White Paper
  2. Double-space
  3. 12 point standard readable font (e.g. times new roman, Calibri, etc.)
  4. Margins – Normal (1”)
  5. Indent 1st line of paragraph by hitting tab one time

Title and Page Numbering Information for Papers (Grades 3-12)

  1. MLA no longer recommends a title page.  We recommend the following format for identifying a research paper.
  2. In the upper left hand corner of the first page, list your name, your instructor’s name, the course, and the date.
  3. Double-space again and center the title. Do not underline, italicize, or place your title in quotation marks. Write the title in Title Case (standard capitalization, not all capital letters).  
  4. Double-space between the title and the first line of the text.
  5. Create a header in the upper right-hand corner that includes your last name, followed by a space with a page number; number all pages consecutively with numerals (1,2,3, 4, etc.)

SAMPLE:


Catlin 1

Beth Catlin   (name of student)          

Mrs. Prus      (name of teacher)

6th Grade Science  (name of class)

20, April 2013 (date)

Famous Volcanic Eruptions in Southeast Asia

          Text of paper – double spaced. Indent each paragraph 5 spaces from the margin

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