____________

____________

High School Course Guide

2016-17

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________

Durham Public Schools

Durham, NC

www.dpsnc.net


Table of Contents

Message from the Superintendent

Directory of High Schools

Comprehensive Schools

Magnet and Specialty High Schools

Other Schools

Magnet Programs and Other High School Options

Magnet High Schools

Other High School Options

The 7 Key Steps for Selecting Your Courses for 2016-2017

Courses Required for Graduation

Information about Learning Opportunities

North Carolina Scholars Endorsement

College/UNC Endorsement

College Endorsement

Global Languages Endorsement

Career Endorsement

University of North Carolina Admission

eLearning Opportunities (Online Courses)

Credit by Demonstrated Mastery (CDM)

Durham Public Schools’ Academic Policies

Academic Integrity

Information about High School Courses

Course Offerings

ENGLISH

MATHEMATICS

SCIENCE

SOCIAL STUDIES

HEALTH &  PHYSICAL EDUCATION

WORLD LANGUAGES

ARTS EDUCATION

CTE CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION

ROTC


Message from the Superintendent

Dear DPS students and families:

 

On behalf of  Durham Public  Schools, we would like to take this opportunity to share an overview of available coursework, programs, and continued innovations available across our diverse and academically challenging  high school campuses. The High School  Course Guide is designed to ensure students and parents are aware of the many avenues available for completion of the North Carolina Graduation Requirements, as well as varied offerings that address college access and credit, career interests and certifications, and overall goals of high school students.

This high school course guide will help you learn about our course offerings, programs of study, graduation requirements, scheduling and many other things that will prepare you for a great learning experience.

Take some time to study this guide and learn more about the wide range of opportunities our high schools provide. Our teachers and counselors are available to answer your questions and help you make decisions about your academic path.

Our goal is for every student to walk across the graduation stage, ready for college and career. We invite you to take advantage of everything Durham Public Schools has to offer. You can build the brightest of futures with us, and we are determined to help you succeed.

 

Sincerely,

 

Bert L’Homme

Superintendent

Durham Public Schools

Dr. Bert L’Homme

Superintendent

Phone: 919-560-3716

Dr. Stacey Wilson-Norman

Deputy Superintendent for Academic Services

Phone: 919-560-3874

Durham Public Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnic origin, gender or disability in its educational programs, activities or employment policies as required by Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendments, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Title II of the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Durham Public Schools expects all employees, students and other members of the school community to conduct themselves in an appropriate manner with concern and respect for all members of the school community. Discrimination and harassment on the basis of race, sex, religion, creed, disability, national origin or language minority status will not be tolerated.

Directory of High Schools

Comprehensive Schools

Hillside High School

3727 Fayetteville St, Durham, NC 27707

Phone: 919-560-3925  Fax: 919-560-2312

Principal: Dr. William Logan

Jordan High School

6806 Garrett Rd, Durham, NC 27707

Phone: 919-560-3912  Fax: 919-560-2620

Principal: Dr. Kerry Chisnall

Northern High School

117 Tom Wilkinson Rd, Durham, NC 27712

Phone: 919-560-3956  Fax: 919-479-3001

Principal: Matthew Hunt

Riverside High School

3218 Rose of Sharon Rd, Durham, NC 27712

Phone: 919-560-3965  Fax: 919-560-3798

Principal: Dr. Joel County

Magnet and Specialty High Schools

J. D. Clement Early College High School

at North Carolina Central University

1801 Fayetteville St, Durham, NC 27707

Phone: 919-560-2696  Fax: 919-560-2698

Principal: Gloria Woods-Weeks

Middle College High School

at Durham Technical Community College

1616 Cooper St, Durham, NC 27703

Phone: 919-536-7203  Fax: 919-536-7294

Principal: Dr. Charles Nolan

Durham School of the Arts (6-12)

400 N. Duke St, Durham, NC 27701

Phone:  919-560-3926  Fax: 919-560-2217

Principal: David Hawks

Southern School of Energy & Sustainability

800 Clayton Rd, Durham, NC 27703

Phone: 919-560-3968  Fax: 919-560-2445

Principal: Jerome Leathers

Hillside New Tech High School

3727 Fayetteville St, Durham, NC 27707

Phone: 919-560-9183  Fax: 919-560-3686

Director: Tounya Wright

The School for Creative Studies (6-12)

5001 Red Mill Rd, Durham, NC 27704

Phone: 919-560-3535  Fax: 919-477-9189

Principal: Renee Price

City of Medicine Academy

301 Crutchfield St, Durham, NC 27701

Phone: 919- 560-2001  Fax: 919-477-3927

Principal: Jacqueline Tobias


Other Schools

Lakeview School (6-12)

3507 Dearborn Dr, Durham, NC 27704

Phone: 919-560-2520  Fax: 919-560-2446

Principal: Jeffery Dockery

Holton Career and Resource Center

401 N. Driver St, Durham, NC 27703

Phone: 919-560-2219  Fax: 919-237-5669

Principal: Danny Gilfort

Hospital School

Duke University Medical Center

Box 3039 Duke South, Durham, NC 27710

Phone: 919-684-5684  Fax: 919-684-5319

Principal: Dr. Rick Lemke

Durham Performance Learning Center

401 N. Driver St, Durham, NC 27703

Phone: 919-530-9190  Fax: 919-560-2214

Principal: Danny Gilfort

Magnet Programs and Other High School Options

Durham Public Schools offers a variety of innovative magnet programs and other options for students. To attend one of these programs, students must apply for entry.  For information about the application process, call the Office of Student Assignment at (919) 560-2059 or visit www.magnet.dpsnc.net.

Magnet High Schools


City of Medicine Academy
| Grades 9-12, www.cma.dpsnc.net

The City of Medicine Academy (CMA) is an academically rigorous high school that contributes to educating future healthcare professionals in preparation for meeting the ever growing healthcare needs of the community. Students graduating from CMA are prepared to enter the healthcare workforce and/or post-secondary healthcare education. The City of Medicine Academy partners with several local universities, along with Durham Technical Community College and Watts School of Nursing, to offer students opportunities for college credit and internships. Students can earn certification in several areas while still in high school.

Durham School of the Arts | Grades 6-12, www.dsa.dpsnc.net 

The mission of Durham School of the Arts is to help students from diverse backgrounds fully realize their individual academic and creative capacities through a rigorous educational program, emphasizing visual and performing arts. Durham School of the Arts offers beginning through advanced arts courses in band, chorus, piano, strings, guitar, art, sculpture, photography, dance, theater, commercial and artistic technologies, and creative writing.  Upon entering high school, all students select one or more of the eleven arts concentration areas to focus on for their four years of high school.


New Tech High School | Grades 9-12, www.newtech.dpsnc.net

The instructional cornerstone for New Tech High School is collaborative project-based learning by utilizing technological resources. The school is partnered with the national New Tech Network and Durham Technical Community College in order to provide opportunities for students to take college level coursework during high school. New Tech will combine rigorous and relevant college preparatory curriculum with several integrated courses, problem-based learning opportunities, and an emphasis on Information Technology. The program offers unique learning opportunities, including collaborative schoolwork with internships with local industry partners and required community service hours. Students will graduate with a high school diploma and up to 12 semester hours of college credit.

Josephine D. Clement Early College High School at North Carolina Central University | Grades 9-12, www.echs.dpsnc.net

The Josephine Dobbs Clement Early College High School (ECHS) is an innovative partnership with North Carolina Central University. Students will graduate with a high school diploma, and up to two years of college credit toward a bachelor’s degree. ECHS is designed to substantially increase the number of minority and female students who will pursue advanced studies and careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

Middle College High School at Durham Technical Community College | Grades 11 & 12, www.mchs.dpsnc.net

The Middle College High School (MCHS) expands opportunities for academically capable high school juniors and seniors to earn a high school diploma and receive credit toward a postsecondary certificate, diploma, or associate’s degree. It is a partnership among the Durham, Chapel Hill-Carrboro, and Orange County School Systems and Durham Technical Community College. Through this partnership, students will experience a rigorous program of study on the campus of a community college. Curriculum offerings include core honors level high school courses and community college courses that will count as career cluster credits or high school diploma elective credits.

Southern School of Energy and Sustainability | Grades 9-12, www.southern.dpsnc.net

Southern School of Energy and Sustainability is a large STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) high school comprised of four smaller schools. The innovative magnet school is the product of a partnership with the NC New Schools and offers students the advantages of a small personalized school environment while being able to participate in the athletics and extracurricular activities of a large high school. Students at the school select one of the following small schools to complete their high school education: Biomedical Technology, Business Management and Sustainability, Computer and Technology Engineering, or Architecture and Infrastructure Engineering.

The School for Creative Studies | Grades 6-12, www.scs.dpsnc.net

The School for Creative Studies is a small secondary school that operates on a year round calendar and prepares students for the growing Creative Economy. The jobs that make up the Creative Economy demand people who are equipped with creative skill sets and who work comfortably and productively in collaborative environments. Instruction at the school is facilitated to develop creativity, divergent thinking, communication skills, and bring relevance to the curriculum. Students will customize their curriculum through specialized coursework, internships, and partnerships in a variety of areas such as Media Arts, Graphic Design, Architectural Design, Broadcasting, Film and Documentary Production, Communication Arts and Entrepreneurship.

International Baccalaureate Middle Years & Diploma Programme at Hillside High School | Grades 9-12, http://goo.gl/T4zaTh

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Programme (MYP) and Diploma Programme (DP) is a high quality program of international coursework developed and authorized by world renowned International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The IB Programme is designed to help develop the intellectual, personal, emotional and social skills to live, learn and work in a rapidly globalizing world. Both programs offer rigorous academic challenge and critical thinking that draws connections among the subject areas and the real world. The Diploma Programme is a college preparatory coursework culminating in a series of internal assessments and examinations which may earn students college credits.


Hillside High School International Baccalaureate Programme Preferred Prerequisites & IB Courses by Grade

MYP

Subject Groups

Language A

Language B

Humanities

Science

Math

Arts/Electives

Technology/

Elective

PE

Grade 9

English 1 MYP

Spanish 1 or 2

French 1 or 2

Mandarin 1 or 2

World History MYP

Earth/

Environmental Science MYP

MATH II  MYP

MATH III MYP

Chorus

Dance I

Art 1

Theatre 1

Band 1

Foundations of Information Tech

or

Technology & Engineering Design

or

Scientific & Tech Visualization

Health & PE

Grade 10

English 2 MYP

Spanish 2 and/or

 3 MYP

French 2 and/or

3 MYP

Mandarin 2 and/or 3 MYP

Civics & Economics MYP

Biology I MYP (first science)

MATH III MYP

Pre-Calculus

Your choice

Art 2

Theatre 2

Band 2

Your choice of elective or level 3 of Language B

Chemistry MYP

(2nd science)

Diploma Subject Groups

Group 1

HL

Group 2

HL

Group 3

HL

Group

HL/SL

Group 5

SL

Group 6

SL/HL

Elective

Elective

Grade 11

IB English A1 HL 11

IB Spanish B SL 11

IB French B SL 11

IB Mandarin B SL 11

IB History of the Americas

IB Biology 11,

IB Chemistry 11,

and/or

IB Physics 11

IB Math Studies

or Math SL 11

IB Math SL 11

IB Psychology 11,

IB World Religions,

IB Geography,

IB Business

Management,

or

IB Computer Science

IB Visual Arts 11

IB Theatre 11

IB Music

11

Theory of Knowledge

 (TOK)

Your

choice

Grade 12

IB English A1 HL 12

IB Spanish B SL 12

IB French B SL 12

IB Mandarin B SL 12

IB 20th Century Topics

IB Biology 11,

IB Chemistry 11,

and/or

IB Physics 11

IB Math Studies

or Math SL 12

IB Math 12

IB Psychology 11,

IB World Religions,

IB Geography,

IB Business

Management,

or

IB Computer Science

IB Visual Arts 12

IB Theatre 12

IB Music 12

Theory of Knowledge

 (TOK)

Your

choice

Magnet Office Contact Information:

Margaret Henderson, Director of Magnet Programs

margaret.henderson@dpsnc.net  |   919-560-2617

 

Mary Griffith, Magnet Recruitment Specialist

mary.griffith@dpsnc.net   |   919-560-2603

Other High School Options

Durham Performance Learning Center | Grades 10-12, www.dplc.dpsnc.net

The Performance Learning Center (PLC) represents an innovative partnership among Durham Public Schools, Communities in Schools of Durham and Communities in Schools North Carolina, Inc. Students may supplement online learning through a variety of internships and job shadowing opportunities. PLC provides an ideal setting for students who need a more flexible schedule in order to complete their high school diploma. Please contact your base school’s counselor for more information.

Holton Career and Resource Center | Grades 9-12, www.HoltonCenter.dpsnc.net

Durham high school students have the opportunity to earn credit in career and technical areas not offered at their base school. Students may enroll in afternoon and evening courses to earn credit towards graduation and industry certifications. The curriculum focuses on specific skill areas which can be paired with small business/entrepreneurship classes giving students the know-how to become small business owners in Durham.


The 7 Key Steps for Selecting Your Courses for 2016-2017

STEP 1: Review the chart below.

Make sure you fully understand the requirements needed to earn your high school diploma.

Graduation Requirements

Content Area

Future-Ready Core:

Course of Study Requirements

For Ninth Graders Entering in

2012-13 & Later

Future-Ready Occupational: Course of Study Requirements

**for select IEP students with EOC proficiency level exemption

English

(North Carolina State Requirement)

4 Credits required

English I, II, III, IV

4 Credits required

OCS English I, II, III, IV

Mathematics

(North Carolina State Requirement)

4 Credits required

MATH I, II, III

plus a 4th Math course higher than MATH  III

3 Credits required

OCS Introduction to Mathematics

OCS MATH I

OCS Financial Management

Science

(North Carolina State Requirement)

3 Credits required

A physical science course, Biology, Environmental Science

2 Credits required

OCS Applied Science

OCS Biology

Social Studies

(North Carolina State Requirement)

4 Credits required

World History, American History I, American History II, American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics

**A student who takes AP US History instead of American History I and American History II must take an additional social studies course to meet the four credit requirement.

2 Credits required

OCS Social Studies I (Government/US History), OCS Social Studies II

(Self-Advocacy/Problem Solving)

Health & Physical Education

(North Carolina State Requirement)

1 Credit required

1 Credit required

.5 Health & .5 Physical Education

Electives

(North Carolina State Requirement)

6 Credits required

2 elective credits in any combination of the following:

• Career and Technical Education (CTE)

• Arts Education

• World Languages

DPS expects for all students to complete a 4 elective credit concentration from one of the following:

• Career and Technical Education (CTE)

To be a CTE concentrator, at least 3 of the 4 elective credits must be foundation courses in a career cluster with one being a Level II or completer course.  The fourth elective credit can be an enhancement course within the same career cluster.

JROTC

• Arts Education

• Social studies

• Science

• Mathematics

• English

• World Languages

• Health/ Physical education

6 Credits required

At least one credit in fine arts recommended

4 Credits CTE required

6 Credits Occupational Preparation required

OCS Preparation I, II, III, IV

300 hours of school-based training

240 hours of community-based training

360 hours of paid employment.

Elective credits/ completion of IEP objectives/Career Portfolio required

Graduation Requirements Continued

Electives

(Durham Public Schools Requirement)

6 credits required

(Durham School of the Arts 2 credits required)

**Students can select electives offered at their school based on college/career plans and individual interest.

Recommended:

at least one credit in an arts discipline

World Languages

Not required for high school graduation.

**A two-credit world language minimum is required for admission to the UNC system and many other universities.

Total

28 Credits

(Durham School of the Arts - 24 credits required)

28 Credits

STEP 2: Complete the course credit worksheet below using your transcript.

Talk to your school counselor and/or teachers if you need help understanding graduation requirements or reading your transcript. Your transcript is a complete record of all the high school courses you took, your grades

and the credits you earned.

Your Name:____________________________________________________________________

Area of Concentration:____________________________________________________________

Post-Secondary Goal: _____________________________________________________________

Courses Required for Graduation

English

Standard

Honors/MYP,

AP/IB, or OCS

___________

English I

English II

English III

English IV

Credit Earned:

Mathematics

Standard

Honors/MYP,

AP/IB, or OCS

____________

MATH I

MATH II

MATH III

4th Math Credit

Credit Earned:

Social Studies

Standard

Honors/MYP,

AP/IB, or OCS

_____________

World History American History I American History II Civics & Economics

Credit Earned:

Science

Standard

Honors/MYP,

AP/IB or OCS

_____________

Earth/Environ

Biology Physical Science or equivalent

Credit Earned:

List other English courses:

Credit Earned:

List other Math

courses:

Credit Earned:

List other Social Studies courses:

Credit Earned:

List other Science courses:

Credit Earned:

List other Physical Education courses:

Healthful Living

Credit Earned:

List other World Language courses:

Credit Earned:

List CTE or ROTC

courses:

Credit Earned:

List Visual or Performing Arts courses:

Credit Earned:

STEP 3: Be sure you understand your teachers’ recommendations.

Courses can be offered on standard, enriched, honors, or Advanced Placement levels. You should follow your teachers’ recommendations concerning the level that would best support your academic success. However, if you, your parents/guardians, and your school counselor discuss other options and agree that a different plan would be appropriate for you, please request a level change.

As a general guideline, DPS encourages you to take the most challenging courses and levels that you can successfully complete. School counselors and teachers use a variety of data to help you make course and level decisions. This data includes:

• your post-secondary goals                 • your grades                                 • your reading level

• your work ethic                         • your standardized test scores

STEP 4: Meet with your school counselor.

Meet with your school counselor to discuss how your course selections can best help you progress towards graduation and meet your goals for post secondary-education.

STEP 5: Complete your school’s registration form and return it by the due date as indicated on the form.

Be sure that you request the courses you really want to take! Schools plan their master schedules based on their students’ requests; therefore, it is unlikely you will be able to make changes to your schedule after the school year begins.

STEP 6: Review your course selections and final schedule.

Review your course selections and final schedule when you receive them from your school. Make sure your schedule includes the required courses  you need for graduation, the correct levels of each course, and the electives you requested.

STEP 7: Change any courses before the first day of school.

If you need to change any of the courses on your schedule, be sure to do so before the first day of school. High schools set aside schedule change sessions before the beginning of the school year. If you need a schedule change, be sure to attend one of these sessions.

Schools must honor these requests from Seniors:

• Requests for courses you need for graduation

• Requests for courses you need based on earning summer school credit(s)

• Requests for courses you need to complete a CTE cluster or other area of concentration

Schools will not honor requests for:

• Specific teachers

• Specific periods

• Specific semesters

Pending space availability, your school may or may not be able to honor requests for:

• Different electives

Information about Learning Opportunities

Students may earn the following endorsements as additional recognitions to their high school diploma.

**Students may earn more than one endorsement.

North Carolina Scholars Endorsement

Students who wish to earn recognition as a North Carolina Scholar must successfully complete these requirements:

• All Future Ready Core course requirements

• A fourth mathematics course that has MATH III as a prerequisite

• A Chemistry or Physics course (to meet the physical science requirement)

• Two credits of the same World Language (other than English)

The student shall complete four elective credits constituting a concentration recommended from one of  

          the following:  Career and Technical Education (CTE), JROTC, Arts Education, Second Languages, any

          other subject area.

• The student shall have taken three higher level courses during junior and/or senior years which carry

          quality points such as:  Advanced Placement; International Baccalaureate; Dual or college equivalent

          courses; Advanced CTE and CTE credentialing courses; Honors level courses.        

In addition, North Carolina scholars must earn an overall four-year unweighted grade point average of 3.5.

College/UNC Endorsement

Students who wish to earn the College/UNC Endorsement must successfully complete these requirements:

• All Future Ready Core course requirements

• A fourth mathematics course that has MATH III as  a prerequisite

• A Chemistry or Physics course (to meet the physical science requirement)

• Two credits of the same World Language

In addition, North Carolina scholars must earn an overall four-year weighted grade point average of 2.5.

College Endorsement

Students who wish to earn the College Endorsement must successfully complete these requirements:

• All Future Ready Core course requirements

• In addition to MATH I, MATH II, and MATH III, the student must successfully complete a fourth mathematics course aligned with the student’s post-secondary plans.  The fourth math course must meet University of North Carolina system Minimum Admission Requirements or be acceptable for earning placement in a credit-bearing college math class under the North Carolina Community College System’s Multiple Measures Placement policy.

 In addition, North Carolina scholars must earn an overall four-year unweighted grade point average of 2.6.

Students should also talk to their school counselors about creating a resume of extracurricular activities, taking national tests such as the ACT or SAT, writing a compelling personal statement, and seeking appropriate recommendations from school personnel such as teachers or school counselors.

Entrance requirements vary among colleges and universities. Students who wish to attend private colleges or universities should be sure they understand entrance requirements specific to the college/university of their choice.

Global Languages Endorsement

The student shall earn a combined 2.5 GPA for the four English Language Arts courses required for graduation

The student shall establish proficiency in one or more languages in addition to English using one of the following options:

• Pass an external exam approved by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction establishing

        “Intermediate Low” proficiency or higher per the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

         (ACTFL) proficiency scale

• Complete a four-course sequence of study in the same world language, earning an overall GPA of 2.5 or      

   above in those courses

• Establish “Intermediate Low” proficiency or higher per the ACTFL proficiency scale using the Credit by

          Demonstrated Mastery policy described in GCS-M-001

Limited English Proficiency students shall complete all the requirements of sections A and B above and reach “Developing” proficiency per the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) proficiency scale in all four domains on the most recent state identified English language proficiency test.

Career Endorsement

The student shall earn an unweighted grade point average of at least 2.6.

• Except as limited by N.C.G.S. §115C-81(b), the student shall complete mathematics sequence of MATH I,

          MATH II, MATH III, and a fourth math including applied math courses found in the Career and

          Technical Education (CTE) domain.

• The student shall complete a CTE concentration in one of the approved CTE Cluster areas

           (http://www.ncpublicschools.org/cte/curriculum/).

The student shall earn at least one industry-recognized credential. Earned credentials can include Career Readiness Certificates (CRC) at the Silver level or above from WorkKeys assessments OR another appropriate industry credential/certification.

University of North Carolina Admission

Requirements:

• Four credits in English

• A fourth mathematics course that has MATH III as a prerequisite

• A life science course such as Biology

• A physical science: Chemistry or Physics

• At least one science that is considered a laboratory course

• Two credits of the same World Language

Students should also talk to their school counselors about creating a resume of extracurricular activities, taking national tests such as the ACT or SAT, writing a compelling personal statement, and seeking appropriate recommendations from school personnel such as teachers or school counselors.

Entrance requirements vary among colleges and universities. Students who wish to attend private colleges or universities should be sure they understand entrance requirements specific to the college/university of their choice.

eLearning Opportunities (Online Courses)

Distance learning opportunities provide students with these opportunities:

• Flexible scheduling

• Individualized pacing

• Opportunity to earn high school and/or college credits

• Opportunity to enroll in courses not offered in your high school

• Opportunity to use your computer skills

Enrollment in these courses requires the approval of the school principal, the school counselor, and the student’s legal guardian. Please contact your school counselor for more information.  Students and their parents should read and discuss the DPS eLearning Handbook, sign the online learning contract and return it to the eLearning Advisor at their school prior to enrolling in an online course.

North Carolina Virtual Public Schools (NCVPS)

NCVPS awards high school course credits to students who successfully complete core courses, Advanced Placement courses, and/or honors courses. Students may use NCVPS courses to meet high school graduation requirements or enhance transcripts for college applications. Registration must occur through the NCVPS Distance Learning Advisors (DLA) at the school. For additional information and specific courses go to: www.ncvps.org.  Online courses for first-time credit and credit recovery are also available through other district-approved vendors.  Please refer to the DPS eLearning Handbook prior to enrolling in an online course.

Career and College Promise through Durham Technical Community College

Durham Public Schools high school students who meet eligibility requirements have the opportunity to enroll in community college courses that provide pathways leading to a credential, certificate, diploma, or a degree. Career and College Promise offers three pathways: Career and Technical Education, College Transfer, and Cooperative Innovative High Schools Program. Students are given the opportunity to earn college credit completely transferrable to all UNC System Institutions and many of North Carolina’s Independent Colleges and Universities. Contact your school counselor or Career Development coordinator or go to: www.durhamtech.edu/admissions/highschoolstudent.htm.

Credit by Demonstrated Mastery (CDM)

Starting in 2015, students are able to earn credit for a course without spending a set number of hours taking the course in a classroom.

What is CDM?

 Who is eligible?

Contact your school for more information, or visit http://www.livebinders.com/play/play/1888394 for the three CDM windows each year, as well as a student application. 

Durham Public Schools’ Academic Policies

10 point grading scale.jpg

Academic Integrity

(Reference: Durham Public Schools Board Policy 3110)

Durham Public Schools expects all students to practice honesty, trust, fairness, respect, and responsibility. Students must maintain high academic standards by obeying their school’s honor code. The honor code will include specific expectations for academic integrity and consequences for plagiarism and cheating. Students must also adhere to Durham Public School’s Acceptable Use Policy for computers and electronic media.

Information about High School Courses

Special Note about Advanced Placement Courses

Advanced Placement (AP) courses are designed to meet the College Board’s rigorous standards for an Advanced Placement class and be the equivalent of a college level course for which students may, depending on the AP Exam score, receive college credit. Extensive course guidelines are provided by the College Board, and teachers are required to maintain current AP authorization. The cost for an AP exam during the 2015-2016 school year was $92. This cost is subject to change. Students are expected to take the AP Exam as the culminating activity for AP courses per DPS Policy 3305.2.  Per funding availability, the State Department of Public Instruction will fund all exams for the courses in which each student is enrolled for 2016-17.

School-specific Course Offerings

See each school’s registration process for school-specific courses.

Course Offerings

ENGLISH

•   Students earn 1 unit of credit for English I, II, III, IV.

•   Foundations of English I is a credit bearing English elective,

    course.

•   All courses use the NC Common Core State Standards for

    English.

•   Honors courses require students to master more rigorous and

    complex material and skills at a faster pace. Honors courses are

    weighted + 0.5 in the calculation of GPA.

•   AP/ IB courses require students to master college level material,

    skills, and pacing. Students are expected to take the AP/IB exam.  

    AP/IB courses are weighted + 1.0 in the calculation of GPA.

Possible English Course Sequences

Students may move from one sequence to another as their needs change.

Course 1

Course 2

Course 3

Course 4

Course 5

Sequence A

Foundations of English I

English I

English II

English III

English IV

Sequence B

English I

English II

English III

English IV

Optional English Elective

Sequence C

Honors English I

Honors English II

Honors English III

Honors English IV

Optional English Elective

Sequence D

Honors English I

Honors English II

AP Language and Composition

AP Literature and Language

Optional English Elective

Sequence E

English II

English III

English IV

Optional English Elective

Sequence F

Honors English II

Honors English III

Honors English IV

Optional English Elective

Sequence G

Honors English II

AP Language and Composition

AP Literature and Language

Optional English Elective

English I & Honors English I | Prerequisite: None

English I students will study literature, informational texts, poetry, drama, biographical works, U.S. documents “of historical and literary significance,” excerpts from an entire Shakespearean play, and art from all genres to gain knowledge of culture, current events and themselves. They will gain the reading and writing skills necessary to write, analyze and evaluate detailed arguments. By the end of English 1, students will read and understand increasingly complex texts at the upper end of ninth grade reading range.

English II & Honors English II | Prerequisite: English I

English II students will study literature, informational texts, poetry, drama, biographical works, U.S. documents “of historical and literary significance,” excerpts from an entire Shakespearean play and art from the Americas (Caribbean, Central, South, and North), Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia, Oceania, and the Middle East to come to a better understanding of world cultures, contemporary issues, and their world. They will fine tune the reading and writing skills necessary to write, analyze and evaluate detailed arguments. By the end of English II, students will read and understand increasingly complex texts at the upper end of the tenth grade reading range. Students are required to take the North Carolina English II Ready EOC.

English III & Honors English III | Prerequisite: English II

English III students will study literature, historical documents, informational texts, poetry, drama, biographical works, and art from American History to better gain a basic understanding of the influence of history on literature and culture. They will develop the complex literacy skills necessary to compile information from sources into a meaningful and well written original text. By the end of English III, students are expected to read and understand increasingly complex texts at the high end of the 11th grade reading range.

Advanced Placement English III | Prerequisite: English II

This intensive, college-level course emphasizes the rhetorical structures of effective writing. Students study Not all courses listed in the High School Program of Studies are offered at all schools. Check your school’s

registration form to view the courses and special programs offered at your school. American Literature and its relationship to the historical and cultural trends of American society. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

English IV & Honors English IV | Prerequisite: English III

English IV students will study literature, historical documents, informational texts, poetry, drama, biographical works, U.S. documents “of historical and literary significance,” a Shakespearean play, and art from Great Britain and Europe to better gain a basic understanding of the influence of Great Britain’s history on world literature and culture. They will master the complex literacy skills necessary to gather and evaluate information into various kinds of original writing. By the end of English IV, students are expected to will read and understand increasingly complex texts at the upper end of the twelfth grade reading range.

Advanced Placement English IV | Prerequisite: English III

This intensive, college-level course emphasizes critical reading and the analysis of literature. Students will write analytical expository essays about the literature they read. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

English Elective Courses

Foundations of English I

Required by Durham Public Schools for identified students as a prerequisite to English I Foundations of English students will be immersed in reading and writing that will accelerate the development of their literacy skills. Through the use of high interest fiction and nonfiction texts, students will develop their reading fluency, comprehension and vocabulary so reading becomes easier and enjoyable. Students will also work on organization, study skills, and test taking strategies.

Foundations of English II | Prerequisite: English I

Foundations of English II students will engage in a concentrated study of reading and writing non-fiction texts of all types. Non-fiction texts from all academic content area classes and student research will be accessed, explored, analyzed and evaluated as students sharpen the literary skills necessary to be a successful reader and writer in school, college, and the workplace.

Public Speaking I | Prerequisite: English I

This course will prepare students to become effective speakers in a variety of situations from personal to professional. By preparing several different types of speeches and presenting them to live audiences, students will gain confidence in their public speaking abilities.

Public Speaking II | Prerequisite: English I, Public Speaking I

This course continues to work begun in level I with a further emphasis on meeting specific goals, setting and keeping time limits, selecting meaningful topics, and setting personal goals for improvement. Students will develop greater fluency, learn to respond to their audience, and learn the art of giving constructive feedback to classmates.

Creative Writing | Prerequisite: English I

Students will take a look below the surface of the page and dig into the ways that creative writing can convey multiple meanings. Students will learn how the choice of words and the use of imagination can evoke hidden themes that will capture the reader’s interest. Journal writing, poetry, and short story assignments will give students a variety of writing experiences.

Writing the Critical Literary Analysis III | Prerequisite: English II

(This is an honors level course.)

Writing the Critical Literary Analysis IV | Prerequisite: English III

(This is an honors level course.)

These intensive writing seminars are designed for students who wish to extend and deepen their capacity to write college-level essays. Students will practice critical analysis by writing essays based on selected texts and by responding to document-based questions. Level IV continues developing these skills using more advanced text selections.

Mythology | Prerequisite: English I

Students study mythology, its symbols, purposes, and meaning. Topics will include stories about the gods and goddesses, the exploits of heroes and heroines, and myths about creation, fertility, initiation, love, and marriage. The course will also investigate how mythology influences art, architecture, literature, music, and even advertising.

Trends in Contemporary Literature | Prerequisite: None

This course will survey the major genres and themes of contemporary literature through high interest novels. Students will engage in multiple discussion forums such as literature circles and Socratic seminars as they discuss the contents of each novel.

African-American Literature | Prerequisite: English I and II

This course focuses on the literary contributions of African Americans authors such as Phyllis Wheatley, Sojourner Truth, Dudley Randall, Paul Laurence Dunbar, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Zora Neale Hurston, Maya Angelou, Alice Walker, August Wilson, and Toni Morrison.

Mass Communications | Prerequisite: English I

In this course, students explore the impact of mass media on our lives. They will learn how to become thoughtful, discriminating consumers of media such as film, advertising, newspapers, television, and more.

Shakespeare | Prerequisite: English II

In this course, students will study and write about Shakespeare’s comedies, histories, tragedies, and poetry. They will explore how other artists have depicted Shakespeare’s work through art, music, dance, and film.

Yearbook Journalism I | Prerequisite: None

As a member of the Yearbook staff, students learn to write and edit copy and captions, design layouts, take pictures, and develop themes. They will learn to use PageMaker or an alternative program for layout.

Newspaper Journalism I | Prerequisite: English 1

This course provides an introduction to the history and jargon of newspaper journalism. Students will learn to write various types of articles such as news, sports, and editorials. They will study the function and style of newspapers, laws that regulate the press, and the language skills needed for quality newspaper writing.

Yearbook Journalism II, III or IV | Prerequisites: Yearbook Journalism I, II, or III

(These are full year courses.)

As members of the Yearbook production staff, students learn leadership and develop high level skills in copywriting and editing, layout design, journalistic photography, marketing, and advanced desktop publishing. Students design specific yearbook pages and are graded on the product.

Newspaper Journalism II

Newspaper Journalism III

Newspaper Journalism IV

Prerequisites: Newspaper Journalism I, II, or III

Students comprise the staff of the school newspaper and are expected to master the skills required to write and edit stories, compose a page, design layouts, sell ads, and distribute the paper.

Honors Yearbook Journalism III

Honors Yearbook Journalism IV

Prerequisites: Yearbook Journalism II or III

(After-school time is required.)

Students take full responsibility for the leadership aspect of publishing the school’s yearbook including copy writing, layout design, editing, journalistic photography, advanced desktop publishing, business planning, advertising, marketing, and distribution of the book.

Honors Newspaper Journalism III

Honors Newspaper Journalism IV

Prerequisite: Newspaper Journalism II or III

(After-school time is required.)

Students master newspaper production including article conception, story/art/photo assignment, reporting, writing/editing/proofreading, layout, desktop publishing, communication with the printer, business planning, advertising, and distribution of the newspaper.


MATHEMATICS

  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed course.
  • All courses use the North Carolina Standard Course of Study for Mathematics.
  • Honors courses require students to demonstrate rigor, manage greater complexity, and apply mathematics concepts more deeply. Honors courses are weighted +.0 5.
  • AP/ IB courses require students to master college level material, skills, and pacing. Students are expected to take the AP/IB exam.  AP/IB courses are weighted + 1.0 in the calculation of GPA.
  • All high school level mathematics  courses will require the use of a graphing  calculator. Students should have either a TI-83+ or TI-84+ graphing calculator to use outside of class.

With the North Carolina Standard Course of Study for Mathematics, high school learners can anticipate a rigorous curriculum which will adequately prepare them for further study and application of mathematics as they pursue college and various career options. Students can also expect a deliberate focus on the mathematical practices to facilitate their learning of this rigorous content:

  • To make sense of problems and persevere in solving them
  • To reason abstractly and quantitatively
  • To construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others
  • To model with mathematics
  • To use appropriate tools strategically
  • To attend to precision
  • To look for and make use of structure
  • To look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

These Mathematical Practices are applied throughout each course, and with the content standards of that course, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Possible Mathematics Course Sequences

Students may move from one sequence to another as their needs change.

Courses marked with an * meet the UNC fourth course requirement for admission.

Course 1

Course 2

Course 3

Course 4

Course 5

Sequence A

Introductory Mathematics

Foundations of Math I and 

MATH I

MATH II

MATH III

ECM*, AFM*, Discrete*, or Pre-Calculus*

Sequence B

Foundations of Math I

MATH I

MATH II

MATH III

ECM*, AFM*, Discrete*, or Pre-Calculus*

Sequence C

MATH I

MATH II

MATH III

ECM*

AFM*, Discrete*, or Pre-Calculus*

Sequence D

MATH I

MATH II or  Honors MATH II

MATH III or Honors MATH III

AFM* or Discrete*

AP Statistics*

Sequence E

MATH I

MATH II or  Honors MATH II

MATH III or Honors MATH III

Pre-Calculus*

AP Calculus (AB)* or AP Statistics*

Sequence F

MATH II or  Honors MATH II

MATH III or Honors MATH III

Pre-Calculus*

AP Calculus (AB)*

AP Calculus (BC)* or AP Statistics*

Introductory Mathematics | Prerequisite: None

(This course is not available to students who have passed MATH I.)

Introductory Mathematics is designed for students who need additional preparation before entering MATH I. It provides students a survey of preparatory topics for high school mathematics, including the foundations for high school algebra and geometry.  Appropriate technology and tools, including manipulatives and calculators, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Foundations of Math I | Prerequisite: None

(This course is not available to students who have passed MATH I.)

Required by Durham Public Schools for identified students as a prerequisite to MATH I, Foundations of Math I students will extend their understanding of middle grades math.  Students will also accelerate their learning of mathematics concepts that are addressed in MATH I.  

MATH I | Prerequisite: None

This rigorous course is designed to formalize and extend the mathematics learned in the middle grades. The topics studied seek to deepen and extend the understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. MATH I uses properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge from prior grades. Culminating units of study tie together the algebraic and geometric ideas studied and also provide students opportunities to have experiences with more formal means of assessing how a model fits data. Students use regression techniques to describe approximately linear relationships between two quantities. They further use graphical representations and knowledge of the context to make judgments about the appropriateness of the linear models. Appropriate technology and tools, including manipulatives and calculators, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Note: Students in this course must take the End-of-Course test for MATH I.

MATH II & Honors MATH II | Prerequisite:  MATH I

This rigorous course focuses on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential functions from MATH I as a continuing study from MATH II. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises, and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratic equations can be solved. The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability and counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through the Pythagorean relationships. Circles, with their quadratic algebraic representations, complete the course. Appropriate technology and tools, including manipulatives and calculators, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Note: Students in this course must take the NC Final Exam for MATH II.

MATH III & Honors MATH III | Prerequisite:  MATH II/Honors MATH II

This course is designed so that students have the opportunity to pull together and apply the accumulation of mathematics concepts learned previously. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data. Students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions, including an intense study of families of functions and the relationships therein. They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles and in the study of trigonometric functions to model simple periodic phenomena. Finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems. Appropriate technology and tools, including manipulatives and calculators, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.  

Note: Students in this course must take the NC Final Exam for MATH III.

Essentials of College Mathematics (ECM) 24082X0  | Prerequisite: Math III

Concepts explored in this course include exponentials, quadratics, equations, measurement, number operations, systems, linear functions, and statistics. Emphasis is on understanding mathematics concepts rather than just memorizing procedures. Students will learn the context behind procedures: for example, why they should use a certain formula or method to solve a problem. This equips them with higher-order thinking skills enabling them to apply math skills, functions, and concepts in different situations. Additionally, students are prepared for college level math assignments.  This course is accepted as the fourth math for admission to UNC System institutions.

NOTE: This course is not designed to prepare students for college-level math in STEM majors. Universities may require students to take other higher math courses as part of entrance requirements for STEM majors.  

Advanced Functions and Modeling | Prerequisite:  MATH III/Honors MATH III

Advanced Functions and Modeling provides students an in-depth study of modeling and applying functions. Home, work, recreation, consumer issues, public policy, and scientific investigations are just a few of the areas from which applications originate. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and graphics software, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Note: Students in this course must take the NC Final Exam for Advanced Functions and Modeling.

Discrete Mathematics or Honors Discrete Mathematics  | Prerequisite:  MATH III/Honors MATH III

Discrete Mathematics introduces students to the mathematics of networks, social choice, and decision making. The course extends students’ application of matrix arithmetic and probability.  Applications and modeling are central to this course of study.  Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Note: Students in this course must take the NC Final Exam for Discrete Mathematics.

Pre-Calculus | Prerequisite:  MATH III/Honors MATH III

(Pre-Calculus is an honors level course.)

Pre-Calculus provides students an honors level study of trigonometry, advanced functions, analytic geometry, and data analysis in preparation for calculus. Applications and modeling will be included throughout the course of study.  Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Note: Students in this course must take the NC Final Exam for Pre-Calculus.

Calculus & Honors Calculus | Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus

This course includes introductory college level work in calculus. It is expected, but not required, that Honors Calculus students will continue to AP Calculus AB the following semester.

Advanced Placement Calculus AB | Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus

(It is recommended that students who enroll in this course have completed or are enrolled in Physics I and earned at least a C average in Pre-Calculus). This course emphasizes introductory calculus with elementary functions. Topics include properties of functions, limits, derivatives and their applications, techniques of integration, the definite integral, and applications of the integral.

Note: Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Advanced Placement Calculus BC | Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus

(It is recommended that students who enroll have completed or are enrolled in Physics I and have earned a B average in Pre-Calculus.) This course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of analytic geometry and elementary functions in addition to college preparatory algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Calculus BC covers the topics of Calculus AB. In addition, sequences and series and elementary differential equations are covered in Calculus BC. Note: Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Advanced Placement Statistics | Prerequisite:  AFM, Discrete, or Pre-Calculus

AP Statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students will observe patterns and departure from pat-terns, decide what and how to measure, produce models using probability and simulation, and confirm models. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and applications software, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Note: Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed course.
  • All courses use the NC Standard Course of Study.
  • Honors courses require students to demonstrate greater rigor, manage greater complexity, and move at a faster pace.
  • AP/ IB courses require students to master college level material, skills, and pacing. Students are expected to take the AP/IB exam. AP/IB courses are weighted + 1.0 in the calculation of GPA.

Computer Programming I | Prerequisite: MATH I

The first semester of this course emphasizes basic programming tools and structures: variables, constants, looping structures (recursion, subprograms, parameter binding) and various program designs (modular and top-down design). Second semester covers advanced data structures: records, one-dimensional and multidimensional arrays. It also covers binary files, text files and the use of units for the creation of multi-file programs.

Advanced Placement Computer Science A | Prerequisite: Demonstration of computer competencies

This is an intense course in computer programming that requires reading and writing actual code in JAVA. This course is intended to serve both as an introductory course for computer science majors and as a course for students who will major in other disciplines that require significant involvement with technology. Topics include programming methodology, basic language (JAVA) features and interacting objects, data structures and algorithms, as well as the ethical and social implications of computer use. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.


 SCIENCE
  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed course.
  • All courses use the NC Standard Course of Study.
  • Honors courses require students to demonstrate greater rigor, manage greater complexity, and move at a faster pace. They are weighted + 0.5 quality point.
  • AP/ IB courses require students to master college level material, skills, and pacing. Students are expected to take the AP/IB exam.   AP/IB courses are weighted + 1.0 in the calculation of GPA.

Possible Science Course Sequences

Students may move from one sequence to another as their needs change. Students who want to pursue careers in the sciences should take additional courses in third area of interest.

Required Science Courses

Earth/Environmental Science | Honors Earth/Environmental Science| Prerequisite:  None

This course investigates the four main branches of earth science: geology, meteorology, astronomy, and oceanography. Students learn about the interrelationships among living organisms and their physical environment through laboratory activities and fieldwork. Students study how humans impact their environment and how the environment influences human life. The honors level is more rigorous with a greater emphasis on problem solving, outside reading, research, and application of concepts to real world problems.

Standard Biology I
Honors Biology I  
Prerequisite: Honors level students must have completed or be enrolled in Common Core Math I

Students survey the history and development of biology including an introduction to biochemistry, cellular biology, genetics, heredity, evolution, and ecosystems. Students will engage in laboratory activities to develop process and problem solving skills. The honors level is more rigorous with a greater emphasis on problem solving, outside reading, research, and application of concepts to real world problems.

One physical science course is required (physical science, chemistry and physics fulfill the State physical science requirement)

Physical Science | Prerequisite: Students should have successfully completed or be concurrently enrolled in Common Core Math I

This course is a quantitative study of matter and energy and their interactions. Topics include mechanics, light, heat, electricity, magnetism, sound, and radiation, as well as a study of the chemical structure and composition of matter. Students will be responsible for laboratory activities and will need to be able to use mathematical formulas and equations.

Chemistry I
Honors Chemistry I
Prerequisites:  Prerequisites:  Completion  of or concurrent enrollment in Common Core Math III

Students study a variety of chemistry topics including chemical equations and reactions; stoichiometry; the periodic table, atomic theory, molecular chemistry, kinetic theory, gas laws, solutions, and acid-base behavior. Students will use their mathematics and problem solving skills to complete laboratory activities. The honors level is more rigorous with a greater emphasis on problem solving, outside reading, research, and application of concepts to real world problems.

Physics I  Prerequisite: Students should have completed Common Core Math II.  
Honors Physics I Common Core Math II or higher is recommended for honors level.

Through laboratory activities and quantitative analysis, students learn about kinematics, dynamics, electricity, wave theory, and optics. The honors level is more rigorous with a greater emphasis on problem ­solving, outside reading, research, and application of concepts to real world problems.

Elective Biology Courses

Honors Biology II | Prerequisites: Biology I and Chemistry I

This course builds on the knowledge and skills students gained in Biology and Chemistry. Extensive laboratory activities and keen problem solving skills will be essential to learning in this course.

Advanced Placement Biology | Prerequisites: Biology I and Chemistry I

This course aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. Three general areas covered in depth in this course are molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations. Textbooks, resources and labs performed by AP students will be the equivalent of those of college students. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Botany | Prerequisite: Biology I, Earth/Environmental, and a physical science course
Honors Botany 

This course focuses on plant anatomy and physiology through extensive activities. Students will spend considerable time in the greenhouse while learning soil preparation, seed germination, transplanting, and proper care for a variety of plants.

Anatomy and Physiology | Prerequisite: Biology I and Chemistry I  
Honors Anatomy and Physiology

This course focuses on the structures and functions of the human body. To help students understand the relationship of anatomical structures, they will participate in animal dissections. Students will use a college-level textbook to supplement class lectures. This is an excellent course for students interested in health field careers. The honors level is more rigorous with a greater emphasis on problem solving, outside reading, research, and application of concepts to real world problems.

Forensic Science | Prerequisites: Biology I.  Chemistry is required for honors level 
Honors Forensic Science

Forensic science is the application of scientific methods to criminal investigations and justice system. Students will learn how crime scenes are investigated including the use of trace evidence, fingerprints, DNA, and methods for determining the time of death. They will also get an overview of forensic anthropology, documentation analysis, forensic psychology, and other crime and lab detection methods.

Honors Molecular Biology | Prerequisites: Biology I and Chemistry

This course is an inquiry based laboratory course focusing on DNA structure and function. Students will study colony transformation, purification and identification of plasmids, transformation of recombinant DNA, restriction analysis, and bacterial cultures.

Honors Scientific Research and Methodology | Prerequisite: Biology I

Students will study current methods for scientific research and learn how scientists design effective experiments. Laboratory investigations and keen problem solving skills will be integral as students engage in independent study and research.

Marine Science | Prerequisite: Biology I
Honors Marine Science

Students learn about the world’s oceans and its inhabitants. The students will review some basic biological and ecological concepts before learning about the general aspects of marine biology including the physical and chemical properties of the oceans that make different marine zones and communities possible. Students will also survey marine organism diversity, explore the relationships between humans and the sea, and learn about careers in marine science.

 

Elective Physical Science Courses

Physics II
Honors Physics II
Prerequisite:  Physics I

This course extends the laboratory and quantitative analysis begun in Physics I  including kinematics, dynamics, electricity, wave theory, and optics.  The honors level is more rigorous with a greater emphasis on problem solving, outside reading, research, and application of concepts to real world problems.

Advanced Placement Physics I | Prerequisites:  Physics I and Common Core Math III

Students explore principles of Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. The course is based on

six Big Ideas, which encompass core scientific principles, theories, and processes that cut across traditional boundaries and provide a broad way of thinking about the physical world. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Advanced Placement Physics II | Prerequisites:  Physics I and Common Core Math III

This course includes in-depth study of rectilinear, circular, and simple harmonic motion; modern physics and light theory; and electricity and magnetism. Laboratory work, mathematical analysis, process skills, and problem solving are important components of AP Physics. Textbooks, resources and labs performed by AP students will be the equivalent of those of college students. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Advanced Placement Physics C Mechanics | Prerequisites:  Physics I and Pre-Calculus

Learn to apply differential and integral calculus in order to solve problems associated with electrostatics, electric circuits, conductors, capacitors, dielectrics, magnetic fields, and electromagnetism. Build your understanding and critical thinking skills through inquiry-based, laboratory investigations that explore these physics concepts. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Advanced Placement Physics C Electricity and Magnetism | Prerequisites:  Physics I and Pre-Calculus

Learn to apply differential and integral calculus in order to solve problems associated with kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion, work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; oscillations; and gravitation. Build your understanding and critical thinking skills through inquiry-based, laboratory investigations that explore these physics concepts. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Chemistry II
Honors Chemistry II
Prerequisite:  Chemistry I

Modeled after freshman college chemistry, this course includes in-depth treatment of molecular structure, reaction kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium. The honors level is more rigorous with a greater emphasis on problem solving, outside reading, research, and application of concepts to real world problems.

Advanced Placement Chemistry |Prerequisite: Chemistry I and completion of or concurrent enrollment in Common Core Math III

This course will include an in-depth study of the structure of matter, kinetic theory of gases, chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, and the basic concepts of thermodynamics.  Textbooks, resources and labs performed by AP students will be the equivalent of those of college students. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Earth / Environmental Electives

Advanced Placement Environmental Science | Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I, and Common Core Math II

Students learn how organisms and their environment interact through field, laboratory and classroom work. Through the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies, students will identify and analyze both natural and human-made environmental problems, evaluate the risks associated with those problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Textbooks, resources and labs performed by AP students will be the equivalent of those of college students. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Astronomy, Honors Astronomy | Prerequisites:  Common Core Math II

This course provides laboratory experiences and a number of evening observation sessions. Students study Newtonian and Keplerian laws as they learn about the physics and chemistry of the universe as it evolved from the big bang and the creation of our solar system. The honors level is more rigorous with a greater emphasis on problem solving, outside reading, research, and application of concepts to real world problems.

Meteorology, Honors Meteorology | Prerequisite:  Earth/Environmental Science

This course takes an in-depth look at the physical characteristics of the earth’s atmosphere, including weather, structure, and air quality. Students learn through daily weather observations using local media and digital weather instruments located on campus. Specific topics of study include tropical weather, El Nino, and climate change.

SOCIAL STUDIES
  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed course.
  • Honors courses require students to demonstrate greater rigor, manage greater complexity, and move at a faster pace. They are weighted + 0.5.
  • AP/ IB courses require students to master college level material, skills, and pacing. Students are expected to take the AP/IB exam.  
  •  AP/IB courses are weighted + 1.0 in the calculation of GPA.

Possible Social Studies Course Sequences

Students are required to earn 4 credits of social studies.

Course 1

Course 2

Course 3

Course 4

Sequence A

World History

American History I

American History II

American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics

Sequence B

Honors World

History

Honors American History I

Honors American History II

Honors American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics

Sequence C

Honors World

History

Optional Social Studies AP Courses or Social Studies Electives

AP United States History

Honors American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics

Required Social Studies Courses

World History
Honors World History

This course will address six (6) periods in the study of World History, with a key focus of study from the mid 15th century to the present. The progression is grouped around a basic core of chronologically-organized periods and events in history; students will study major turning points that shaped the modern world. As students examine the historical roots of significant events, ideas, movements, and phenomena, they encounter the contributions and patterns of civilizations of the past and societies around the world. They broaden their historical perspectives as they explore ways societies have dealt with continuity and change, exemplified by concepts such as civilization, revolution, government, economics, war, stability, movement, and technology.

American History I
Honors American History I |
Prerequisite:  World History

This course begins with the European exploration of the new world and covers American history through Reconstruction. Students will examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States from European exploration and colonial settlement to the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. This course will also provide students the opportunity to study the establishment of political parties, America’s westward expansion, the growth of sectional conflict and the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

American History II
Honors American History II |
Prerequisites: World History and American History I

This course will guide students through American history from the late nineteenth century through the early 21st century. Students will examine the political, economic, social and cultural development of the United States from the end of Reconstruction era to modern times. The desired outcome of this course is for students to develop an understanding of the cause-and-effect relationship between past and present events, recognize patterns of interactions, and understand the impact of events on the U.S. in an interconnected world.

American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics
Honors American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics |
Prerequisite:  World History

This course teaches the skills and knowledge necessary to become responsible and effective citizens in an interdependent world. It provides a framework for understanding the basic tenets of American democracy, practices of American government as established by the United States Constitution, basic concepts of American politics and citizenship, and concepts in macro and micro economics and personal finance. The course is organized under three strands – Civics and Government, Personal Financial Literacy and Economics. Students will gain a practical understanding of legal, political, and economic systems that affect their lives as consumers and citizens.

Social Studies Electives

African-American Studies 

This course is designed to emphasize the significant contributions made by African Americans to the economic, political, social, and cultural development of the United States. Through this course, students discover how African-Americans have always been an integral part of the American experience. African-American history is taught within the broader context of United States history.

International Relations | Prerequisite:  World History

Students examine political systems, 20th and 21st century nationalism, human rights, the global economy, population issues, terrorism, and other international topics of interest. Emphasis is on discussion of current events as they are unfolding with examination of historical roots.

Minority Studies

This course explores the history and culture of minorities in the United States through an interdisciplinary study in the humanities, arts, and sciences. By creating an open learning environment, students will be able to appreciate the history and culture of minorities in America and dismiss negative myths and stereotypes about people of minority ancestry. Students will gain an understanding of the economic, psychological, and social situations of minorities in America past and present.

Advanced Placement United States History | Prerequisites:  World History

This course meets state standards for US History as well as the College Board’s standards for AP US History. It emphasizes using analytical skills and factual knowledge to think critically about the issues and events central to US history. Students will read a variety of historical documents and interpretations of U.S. history, write essay responses to document based questions, and prepare to take the AP Exam. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Advanced Placement European History | Prerequisite:  American History I and American History II or AP U.S. History

This course is equivalent to college level European History from 1450 to the present. It is a reading and writing intensive course that examines the cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world. The course lays the foundation for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of conflict and continuity in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics | Prerequisite:  World History

This course provides an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It involves both general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. political reality is required. Topics include public policy, civil rights and civil liberties, as well as political beliefs and behaviors. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Advanced Placement World History

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes, in interaction with different types of human societies. Students will read a variety of historical documents and interpretations of World History, write essay responses to document based questions, and prepare to take the AP Exam. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Advanced Placement Human Geography

This course emphasizes the importance of geography as a field of inquiry. It shows how the discipline has evolved into the study of diverse peoples and areas organized around a set of concepts. Geographic concepts emphasized throughout the course are location, space, scale, pattern, regionalization, and place. Students learn how to use and make maps. They also learn to apply mathematical formulae, models, and qualitative data to geographical concepts. A significant outcome of the course is awareness of the relevance of academic geography to everyday life and decision making. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017..

AP Macroeconomics | Prerequisite:  World History

AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Contemporary Law and Justice

This course is a practical study in the legal, judicial, law enforcement, and correctional systems of the United States. Students focus on legal principles and the laws and procedures derived from them. They examine relevant examples of civil and criminal laws, law enforcement methods, court procedures, and corrective justice. Students will acquire information through direct observation of local courts and law enforcement practices, interviews with local and state officials, and visits to correctional facilities

Psychology | Prerequisite:  Classification as a sophomore, junior, or senior

This course engages students in the understanding, articulation, and dissemination of psychology as a science. Students study human development, learning, motivation, and personality with an emphasis on the empirical examination of behavior and mental processes. They examine the relationship between biology and behavior; how conditioning, learning and cognition affect behavior; and how interaction with others influences thoughts, feelings, perceptions, and behaviors. They analyze human development throughout the lifespan and study human differences and strategies for coping when those differences create dysfunction.

Advanced Placement Psychology | Prerequisite: Classification as a sophomore, junior or senior

This course is a reading systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students explore the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena of the major sub fields, and the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

World Humanities

This course is an integrated study of the ideas and values inherent in the human journey throughout history. Humanities studies demonstrate the way that human beings historically create and share meaning as individuals, as communities, and as cultures through what they document and produce. The integrated study of the humanities offers content and skills necessary for an engaged global citizenship.

21st Century Global Geography

This geography course will emphasize the increasing interconnectedness of Earth’s people due to globalization, as well as the notion of “spatial variation”—how and why things differ from place to place both physically and culturally on the earth’s surface. This course is a study of people, places, and environment from a physical and cultural perspective. Students will explore the various regions of the world and gain a greater understanding of how people interact with their physical environment as well as how the environment shapes culture and influences the development of civilizations. Using texts, globes, maps, charts, and variety of other resources, students will gain a greater understanding of the diverse communities around the globe.

Sociology

This course concentrates on the systematic study of human society and human interaction. Using observation, the scientific method, and cross-cultural examination, students will discover how patterns of behavior develop, culture is learned, and social predictions are made. They will analyze human behavior in terms of conformity and deviance, human relationships in terms of inequality and stratification, and the changing nature of society and the collective responses to change.

Poverty in America | Prerequisite: World History

This course focuses on the history, causes, and effects of poverty in the United States, and the role that poverty plays in American society today. In addition to building a strong foundation of

factual knowledge, emphasis will be placed on the development of analytical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

World Religions | Prerequisite:  World History

(The course is designed to follow DPS Board Policy 3030.) This is a survey course that introduces the basic perspectives and practices of major world religious traditions. Topics include Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Confucianism, Taoism, and Islam. The course will also explore the impact of these religions on society.


HEALTH &
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed course.
  • All courses use the NC Standard Course of Study.
  • All students must take and pass 1 unit of Health/Physical Education for graduation. If a medical or religious reason will prohibit your participation, talk to your principal about an exemption.
  • Female students are encouraged to participate in the elective courses listed below.

Required Health & PE Courses

Health/Physical Education | Prerequisite:  None

The health component of this course teaches students the habits and practices that will help them maintain a healthy lifestyle now and in the future. Topics include: stress management, substance abuse, nutrition, weight management, self protection, and relationships. Students also learn how to avoid serious health risks, manage their own behavior, and build self-esteem. Sex education stresses the benefits of abstinence until marriage, the importance of avoiding out-of-wedlock pregnancy, and the need to prevent sexually-transmitted diseases. The physical education component includes personal fitness, recreational dance, game and sport skills, and gymnastics. Students must dress out and participate actively if they are to acquire a better understanding of and appreciation for the importance of lifetime fitness. Physical Education teachers will administer fitness testing.

 

Elective Health & PE Courses

Combination Sports  | Prerequisite: Physical Education I

(This course may not be repeated for credit.)

This course focuses on physical conditioning; self-testing exercises; officiating, and assuming responsibility for organizing and directing activities. Individual, dual, and team sports depend on the availability of facilities, equipment, and staff at each school.

General Physical Conditioning/Fitness I  | Prerequisite: Physical Education I

(Course may not be repeated for credit.)

This course is designed to develop and test strength, endurance, speed, agility, and flexibility. Students will gain self-confidence as they participate in calisthenics, running, weight training, plyometrics, and stretching.

Weight Training | Prerequisite: General Physical Conditioning/Fitness I

(Course may not be repeated for credit.)

This course is designed to develop and maintain higher levels of physical strength and conditioning. Students participate in weight training, strength assessment, aerobic testing, and exercise routines.

Advanced Weight Training | Prerequisite: Weight Training

(This course may not be repeated for credit.)

This course is designed to develop maximum muscular strength. Students participate in a variety of weight lifting routines to build bulk and light sprint work to stay fit. Students will monitor their weight and muscular gains quarterly.

Advanced Physical Conditioning  | Prerequisite: Advanced Weight Training

(Course may be repeated for one unit of credit.)

This course is designed to develop maximum muscular strength. Students participate in a variety of weight lifting routines to build bulk and light sprint work to stay fit. Students will monitor their weight and muscular gains quarterly. Athletes are encouraged to sign up for the advanced classes.

Responding to Emergencies | Prerequisite: Health I and Physical Education I

Students learn how to respond to emergencies by studying first aid and CPR, and by becoming more knowledgeable about the impact of alcohol and drugs. By successfully completing this course, students can earn American Red Cross certification.

Sports Medicine I | Prerequisite: Biology I

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of athletic training and sports medicine. Students learn emergency first aid treatment, rehabilitation, anatomy, and physiology. Students will also learn taping and wrapping procedures for acute athletic injuries. Practical experience hours after school may be required.

Sports Medicine II |  Prerequisite: Sports Medicine I

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a practical understanding of sports medicine and athletic training. Topics include first aid and CPR, injury recognition and evaluation, injury management and treatment, and organization and administration. Students have opportunities to continue improving their athletic taping and wrapping proficiencies and will continue their study of emergency first aid, anatomy, and physiology. Students will help care for athletes and be required to contribute after school hours.

Sports Medicine Practicum (Sports Medicine III) | Prerequisite: Sports Medicine II and Teacher Approval

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of athletic training from both a theoretical and practical viewpoint. Topics include upper/lower extremity injuries, head/facial injuries, spinal injuries, and abdominal injuries. Students will continue to learn how to prevent and manage injuries including recognizing specific injuries and learning how to treat and rehabilitate them. Students will also learn how to organize and administer athletic programs including understanding how to educate and counsel athletes. Students help design and implement health care programs for sports injuries. Practical experience hours after school may be required.

Sports Medicine Internship (Sports Medicine IV) | Prerequisite: Sports Medicine  Practicum and Teacher Approval

This course is a self-paced study of advanced athletic training skills. Students investigate current trends in sports medicine and experience practical application of advanced skills. Students are expected to serve as trainers for various sports teams after school.

Fitness for Life | Prerequisite: Health and Physical Education

Students work with a physical education instructor to plan, and implement a self-created fitness program using a wide variety of activities. The following is a list of some of the activities/exercises: jump rope, aerobics, dance, circuit training, distance/sprint running, isotonic exercises, and agility drills. Students will also learn how to monitor their heart rate and ensure proper nutrition for specific sports or training programs. Students evaluate their fitness program, monitor their progress, and modify their fitness plan and/or goals as needed.

Outdoor Education I | Prerequisite: Health/Physical Education, junior or senior status

In this experiential course, students participate in a variety of activities including: outdoor cooking, rappelling, orienteering, kayaking/canoeing, adventure trip planning, and initiative games. Through these experiences, students gain self-confidence and learn how to trust, cooperate, and communicate more effectively. Field experience will be optional with space limitations considered.

Outdoor Education II | Prerequisite: Outdoor Education, senior status

Outdoor Education I activities will be enhanced in level II. Additional activities may include an extensive snowshoe project, advanced kayaking, fly fishing, and backcountry trip planning. Students will leave campus for various activities including a conservation project focused on the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. Optional overnight and day trips involving backpacking, kayaking, fly fishing or caving will be offered with space limitations considered.

 

WORLD LANGUAGES
  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed course.
  • All courses use the NC Essential Standards.
  • Level I and II are standard courses.
  • Level III and above are honors courses which require students to demonstrate greater rigor, manage greater complexity, and move at a faster pace. They are weighted + 0.5.
  • AP/ IB courses require students to master college level material, skills, and pacing. Students are expected to take the AP/IB exam.  
  •  AP/IB courses are weighted + 1.0 in the calculation of GPA.

Level I: Modern World Languages Courses

This course introduces students to the target language and its culture. This class develops listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, real-world situation and students’ experiences to practice these skills. Students develop an appreciation for how languages and cultures work by comparing the target language and culture(s) to their own. Classes are conducted primarily in the target language. Heritage speakers or students who have lived abroad may be placed into higher levels of language without taking a prerequisite, based on a proficiency assessment.  These students are not awarded credit for the level(s) they may skip.  It is recommended that students enrolled in this course have  passed ELA with a “C” or above.

Level II: Modern World Languages Courses

Students further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. By the end of the course, students will be able to interact with others on issues of everyday life. Students also continue to learn about the differences between languages and cultures, and how different cultures influence each other.  It is recommended that students enrolled in this course pass level I with a “C” or above.

Level III:  Modern World Languages  Courses

Students’ skills with listening, speaking, reading, and writing progress to allow them to participate in conversations, read short literary texts and other material about familiar topics, and write short cohesive passages using the present, past, and future tenses. In discussions, presentations, and written texts, students will be able to identify the main ideas and significant details. As they continue to build their knowledge of the target culture, students develop a deeper understanding of the interrelationships of other cultures to their own and will be able to exhibit behaviors appropriate to the target culture.  It is recommended that students enrolled in this course pass level II with a “C” or above.

Level IV: Modern World Languages  Courses

Students learn to communicate in writing and in extended conversations on a variety of topics. As they become more proficient in independent reading, they will be able to narrate, discuss, and support increasingly complex ideas and concepts. Short stories, poetry, excerpts from various periods of literature, and current events are included. Students study the finer points of grammar to aid oral and written communication along with a more in-depth study of the target culture(s) and their influence throughout the world. Students develop the ability to interact in culturally appropriate ways in most social situations they will encounter in the target culture(s).  It is recommended that students enrolled in this course pass level III with a “C” or above.

AP: Modern World Languages  Courses

Advanced Placement courses emphasize the use of language for active communication. Students develop language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) that can be used in various activities and disciplines rather than focusing on any specific subject matter. Emphasis is placed on comprehension of the spoken and written target language in various contexts; coherent and resourceful communication; and the organization and writing of compositions. Extensive course guidelines are provided by the College Board, and teachers are required to maintain current AP authorization. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Modern World

Languages Instruction

Effective instruction in modern world languages requires that teachers and their students use the target language as exclusively as possible.

Students at all levels should be aware that their teachers will speak the target language about 90% of the time.

Teachers have many strategies to help students adjust to having 90% of their instruction given in the target language.

Modern World Languages Offerings

Prerequisites

French I

Spanish I

Russian I

Italian I

Chinese I

None

French II

Spanish II

Russian II

Italian II

Chinese II

Modern World

Language I

Honors

French III

Honors

Spanish III

Honors

Russian III

Chinese III

Modern World

Language II

Honors

French IV

Honors

Spanish IV

Modern World

Language III

Honors

French V

Honors

Spanish V

Modern World

Language IV

AP French

Language

AP Spanish

Language

Modern World

Language IV

AP Spanish

Literature

Modern World

Language IV

Additional Language Courses

Latin I | Prerequisite: None

Latin I is an introduction to the study of the Latin language and Greco-Roman culture. Students will  learn basic functions of the language, become familiar with some elements of its culture and increase their understanding of English vocabulary and grammar. Students will learn to read and understand adapted Latin texts.

Latin II | Prerequisite: Latin I

This course continues the study of the Latin language and Greco- Roman culture. Through continued reading of adapted Latin texts, students learn more complex grammar and syntax, gain a greater understanding of the culture, and continue to gain insight into English vocabulary and grammar.

Honors Latin III | Prerequisite: Latin II

This course focuses on advanced Latin grammar and introduces students to Latin literature through authentic Latin texts. Students also examine the interrelationships between Greco-Roman cultures and their own culture and continue to gain insight into English grammar and vocabulary.

Honors Latin IV | Prerequisite: Honors Latin III

A major focus of Latin IV is on reading authentic Latin texts which includes a more in-depth study of grammar. Students will study figures of speech; analyze what they read, write essays, and study the influence of Greco-Roman culture throughout the world.

AP Latin: Vergil: | Prerequisite: Latin IV

Students will study excerpts from Virgil’s epic the Aeneid as selected by the College Board. To better understand the Aeneid, students will study Early Roman history, the reign of Augustus, and the major events that led to the downfall of the Republic. Students will also need to develop excellent skills with translating and interpreting Latin poetry. The AP exam will draw upon all of these topics. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

American Sign Language I | Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the study of American Sign

Language and its Deaf culture. The emphasis is placed on the development of the three skills of expressive, receptive, and written language within a given context that focuses on the students’ lives and experiences. Grammar is integrated throughout the course, and there is a general introduction to Deaf cultural norms.

American Sign Language II | Prerequisite: ASL I

Students continue to develop their expressive, receptive, and written language skills by participating in simple conversational situations and combining and recombining learned elements of the language. They are able to satisfy basic survival needs, and interact on issues of everyday life in the present and the past. They compose related sentences which narrate, describe, compare, and summarize familiar topics.

Honors American Sign Language III | Prerequisite: ASL II

Students expand their expressive, receptive, and written language skills as they create with the language. They study short literary texts and authentic materials, initiate and maintain face-to-face communication, and identify main ideas and significant details in discussions, presentations, and written texts in present, past, and future time. They demonstrate behaviors appropriate to the target culture by applying their knowledge and skills inside and outside of the classroom setting.

Honors American Sign Language IV | Prerequisite: ASL III

Students communicate in extended conversations on a variety of topics. They will study short stories, poetry, and excerpts from various periods of literature, current events, and authentic materials. Mastery of the finer points of grammar enhances and expands expressive and receptive communication. There is more in-depth study of the target culture and its influence throughout the world.

Spanish for Native Speakers I | Prerequisite: Native oral proficiency in Spanish

This course is designed specifically for native/heritage speakers of Spanish who already have substantial oral language proficiency. Students develop, maintain, and enhance proficiency in Spanish as they listen, speak, read, and write in a variety of contexts and for a variety of audiences. Students explore the cultures of the Hispanic world and gain a better understanding of the nature of their own language. This course is taught entirely in Spanish.

Honors Spanish for Native Speakers II | Prerequisite: Native oral proficiency in Spanish

This course is designed specifically for native/heritage speakers of Spanish who have good reading and writing skills in Spanish as well as substantial oral proficiency. Students study the Spanish language in the context of Hispanic literature and cultures. Reading, writing, and speaking skills are taught at an advanced academic level through the acquisition of more extensive vocabulary, application of advanced grammar concepts, and mastery of all verb tenses. This course is taught entirely in Spanish.

ARTS EDUCATION
  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed course.
  • All courses use the NC Arts Education Essential Standards.
  • Students may repeat courses for credit within a given proficiency level.
  • All Proficient or Advanced courses in each arts discipline receive Honors credit. They are weighted + 0.5
  • AP/ IB courses are equivalent to college level courses. Students are expected to take the AP/ IB exam.  AP/ IB courses are weighted +1.0.

The NC Arts Education Essential Standards reflect four levels of proficiency for high school courses for credit. Arts Education no longer has a numerical sequence of courses due to the new organization by proficiency levels.  Mastery of the standards for each proficiency level is the criteria for advancement.  Therefore students may repeat courses for credit within a given proficiency level before moving to the next level. Students who take coursework at the Proficient or Advanced levels enter those studies having completed a minimum of 270-300 hours of instruction within that arts discipline (dance, music, theatre arts, or visual arts).  Proficient or Advanced level courses include Honors, AP, and/or IB courses.

High School Arts Proficiency Levels

Beginning

Standards are for students with no or limited K-8 progression in the arts education discipline  (dance, music, theatre arts, or visual arts).

Intermediate

Standards are for students who have had a complete K-8 progression or who have achieved beginning level standards in the discipline at the high school level.

Proficient

Standards are for students who have achieved intermediate level standards in the discipline at the high school level.

Advanced

Standards are for students who have achieved proficient level standards in the discipline at the high school level.

Visual Arts

Visual Arts (Beginning) 5415 | Prerequisite: None

Students will experience 2D media, such as drawing, painting, and design, and basic 3D media. Using the elements of art and principles of design, they will complete technique assignments and create their own work. Students will learn to analyze visual images, critique their own artwork and the artwork of others, and write short essays about a variety of visual art topics while studying the basics of Art History.

Visual Arts (Intermediate) 5416 | Prerequisite: Mastery of Beginning Visual Arts

Students will learn to use more sophisticated techniques as they complete projects using 2D and 3D media. Assigned projects will develop the artistic problem solving abilities of the students and call upon them to use their use their design skills with greater inventiveness. Written work focuses on art criticism, topics in art history, and aesthetic awareness.

Visual Arts (Proficient) [Honors] 5417 | Prerequisite: Mastery of Intermediate Visual Arts

Students will begin building a portfolio of their work using a variety of media. In building a portfolio students create work that demonstrates their increasing command of the elements of art and design principles and conveys a clear sense of their developing personal style. Students will continue their study of art appreciation, criticism, and aesthetics. Students will also study individual artists with the goal of analyzing how they reflect the historical conditions and arts trends of their time.

Visual Arts (Advanced) [Honors] 5418 | Prerequisite: Mastery of Proficient Visual Arts

Students will work to assemble a high quality portfolio suitable for submission as part of an art school application. Students will refine their artistic problem solving skills using a variety of media and techniques as they create 20 high quality works by the end of the class. Students will also continue their study of contemporary art and should expect to spend time outside of class working on their portfolios and completing written assignments.

Visual Arts Specialization (Beginning) 5461: General Interest Arts | Prerequisite: None

(This course does not serve as a prerequisite for Intermediate Visual Arts. Students interested in pursuing upper level art courses should register for one Beginning Visual Arts.)

In this introductory course, students will learn how the elements of art combine to make a work of art effective. Students will also learn about the basic principles of design. By the end of this course, students will have a greater appreciation of visual arts.


Visual Arts Specialization (Intermediate) 5462: Crafts—Applied Arts | Prerequisite: Mastery of Beginning Visual Arts

The focus of this class is the design process. Beginning with an idea or concept, students will first create and refine sketches/models, and then figure out how to make an effective final product using 2D or 3D media. To solve structural and other design issues central to applied arts projects, students will learn new technical skills. As they study applied arts, students will investigate and write about traditional and contemporary sculptors and craftspeople.

Visual Arts Specialization (Intermediate) 5462: Sculpture I | Prerequisite: Mastery of Beginning Visual Arts

This course focuses on creating sculptures using 3D media, such as clay, cardboard, found objects, metal, and more. Students will explore hand-building skills and will learn construction techniques that can be used with a variety of materials.

Visual Arts Specialization (Proficient) [Honors] 5463: Sculpture II | Prerequisite: Mastery of Visual Arts Specialization (Intermediate) Sculpture

In this course, students further develop their skills and personal style in creating sculptures using 3D media and learn more advanced construction techniques using a variety of materials. Written work focuses on art criticism, art history, and aesthetics.

AP Studio Art Drawing 5452
AP Studio Art: 2D Design 5453
AP Studio Art: 3D Design 5454
Prerequisite: Mastery of Intermediate Visual Arts

(Students are responsible for all expenses the incur in creating their portfolio.) AP Studio Art requires students to create a portfolio. Students will submit slides of their work (25-40 slides) to the College Board in May of their senior year. Pending the College Board review and approval of the college or university, students may receive college credit.

AP Art History 5448 | Prerequisite: World History

In the AP art history course, students examine major forms of artistic expression from the ancient world to the present and from a variety of cultures. Students will learn to analyze works of art within their historical context and to articulate what they see or experience in a meaningful way. AP Art History is not a studio class. It involves extensive reading, writing, and research. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

Photography

Special Notes for Photography Students: Although not required, it is strongly recommended that students have access to a film or digital camera. Equipment specifications vary by school. Check with the instructor. Class size may be limited based on the number of enlargers. (Three students will share one enlarger).

Visual Arts Specialization (Beginning) 5461 Digital Photography | Prerequisite: None

(This course does not serve as a prerequisite for any darkroom based photography courses.)

This course introduces students to digital photography as a 21st century art form. Students will explore traditional and innovative techniques and concepts.

Visual Arts Specialization (Beginning) 5461: Beginning Photography | Prerequisite: Classification as a sophomore

This course introduces students to photography as an important art form, from its beginning in the 1800’s to today. Students will learn how to use 35mm cameras, develop film, and make prints using traditional black and white darkroom techniques.

Visual Arts Specialization (Intermediate) 5462: Intermediate Photography | Prerequisite: Mastery of Beginning Photography

Students further develop their picture taking and darkroom skills through independent projects. Class discussion will focus on understanding photography as an art form and on learning how to use design principles to critique their own and their classmates’ photographs.

Visual Arts Specialization (Proficient)[Honors] 5463: Proficient Photography
[Honors] |
Prerequisite: Mastery of Intermediate Photography

This course continues the work begun in Intermediate Photography. In addition, students will focus on making darkroom decisions that will make their work more expressive and on developing personal

style.

Visual Arts Specialization (Proficient)[Honors] 5464: Advanced Photography [Honors] | Prerequisites: Senior Status and Mastery of Proficient Photography

Students develop a high quality portfolio that they will be able to use as part of their application to an art school or art department. The focus of the course will be on developing keen problem solving skills and using a variety of picture taking and darkroom techniques.

Performing Arts Courses

Special Notes for Performing Arts Students

Theatre Arts

Theatre Arts (Beginning) 5315 | Prerequisite: None

Students will experience creative dramatics, mime, reader’s theater, interpretive movement, and oral interpretation as they explore the actor’s craft. In addition, they will learn how directing, theatre history, and theatre management contribute to a stage production. Behind the scenes, students explore how costumes, makeup, props, and scenery along with special effects, lighting, and sound bring magic to the stage.

Theatre Arts (Intermediate) 5316 | Prerequisite: Mastery of Beginning Theatre Arts and audition with the teacher

This course further develops the skills and vocabulary learned in Beginning Theatre. Through classroom scene work and the study of acting techniques in different historical periods, students will refine their acting skills. Participating in ensemble acting and student directed plays will provide additional opportunities to portray a variety of roles. Students will learn how to critique their own and others’ performances and will continue learning about technical theatre and theatre management. They will perform scene work and original work.

Theatre Arts ( Proficient) [Honors] 5317 | Prerequisites: Mastery of Intermediate Theatre Arts, classification as a junior or a senior, and placement audition with the teacher

The focus of this class is on learning how to direct. Once students select their scene, they will analyze the script, audition actors from among their classmates, plan rehearsals, make decisions about blocking, and develop a plan for set and lighting design. Each student directed scene will be showcased for a live audience. This course involves in-depth application of theater arts knowledge, skills, and processes. Students will study a variety of playwrights and different historical periods.

Theatre Arts ( Advanced) [Honors] 5318 | Prerequisite: Mastery of Proficient Theatre Arts and audition with the teacher

These advanced acting ensembles focus on student-created productions which include writing scripts, acting in each other’s productions, developing the assigned characters, learning advanced movement techniques, and overseeing of all aspects of their productions. Students will continue their study of the different styles of theater, film and television and learn more about the business of professional acting. Students continue to refine adapting works from different historical periods, and researching different acting styles. Students will have opportunities to prepare a performance for competition and/or for a showcase. Students function as a performance and production ensemble.

Theater Arts Specialization (Beginning) 5361: History of Film | Prerequisite: None

Students study films representative of each decade. They study the work of actors and directors. They study how films reflect American culture in any given point of our history.

Technical Theatre

Theatre Arts Specialization (Beginning) 5361: Beginning Technical Theatre | Prerequisite: None

In this hands-on course, students study current trends in technical theatre and learn how to design lighting, sound, sets, props, and costumes. Some time outside of class is required for school related productions.

Theatre Arts Specialization (Intermediate) 5362: Intermediate Technical Theatre | Prerequisite: Mastery of Beginning Technical Theatre 

Students refine Beginning Technical Theatre skills and perform in leadership positions on production crews, which will require time outside of class.

Theatre Arts Specialization (Proficient) [Honors] 5362: Proficient Technical Theatre [Honors] | Prerequisite: Mastery of Intermediate Theatre Arts or 90 hours after school crew work or teacher recommendation

Students refine their skills with lighting and sound, sets, props, and costumes. They will select one of these crew fields to be their specialization. Participation on a tech crew requires time outside of class.

Theatre Arts Specialization (Advanced) [Honors] 5362: Advanced Technical Theatre [Honors]  | Prerequisites: Mastery of Proficient Theatre Arts, teacher recommendation for Crew Chief position

Students will specialize in a crew/designer position and will be responsible for all the duties of their position for the entire production season. Students will demonstrate increased leadership, inventiveness in solving problems and creating designs responsive to the artistic vision of the director. Participation on a tech crew requires time outside of class.

Dance

Dance (Beginning) 5115 | Prerequisite: None

Students study the body in motion by exploring the elements of dance: space, time, and energy. Students develop an awareness of the body as an instrument for self-expression, learn about the benefits of dance for healthful living, and study the role of dance in other cultures and in different historical periods.

Dance (Intermediate) 5116 | Prerequisite: Mastery of Beginning Dance and audition with the teacher

Students focus on developing their dance technique, exploring dance as a performing art, and learning about anatomy as it applies to technique and injury prevention. Group and solo choreographic assignments help students apply their knowledge of dance: its technique, history, and connection to other art forms.

Dance (Proficient) [Honors] 5117 | Prerequisite: Mastery of Intermediate Dance and audition with the teacher

The emphasis in this class is on technical development and on learning how to combine movements and perform them rhythmically and fluidly using a variety of dynamic qualities. Through more complex choreographic studies and improvisation, students learn to construct expressive phrases and combine them to create short dances. This course focuses on more advanced technique, building choreography, and the study of dance history.

Dance (Advanced) [Honors] 5418 | Prerequisite: Mastery of Proficient Dance and audition with the teacher

These courses continue to focus on technique, improvisation, and choreography. Students study dance history, learn to describe, analyze, and critique dance works from different cultures and times. Dance research focus on how dance reflects the culture and time period in which they originate. Students will study 20th Century dance by exploring traditional approaches to Choreography and interdisciplinary dance works using media technology. Students are becoming dance artists: performers and choreographers. They will create solo and group choreographic works that include costuming, production, and lighting. Teachers will assist students with audition videos, as needed for application to dance schools or departments.

General Music

Music Specialization (Beginning) 5216: Adventures in Listening | Prerequisite: None

Students get an overview of music from the Renaissance though today’s top hits. They will increase their knowledge and understanding of composers, musical styles, and music theory as they listen and analyze a variety of musical styles. This course will be valuable to students who have musical training and to students who do not.

Music Specialization (Intermediate) 5217: Music Theory/History | Prerequisite: Prior musical experience

Music Theory explores advanced topics including ear training; rhythmic, harmonic and melodic dictation; four-part writing; sight singing; advanced rhythmic training; active listening; score study; and music history. Students with prior musical training will benefit from this opportunity to become more knowledgeable musicians.

Advanced Placement Music Theory 5215 | Prerequisites: Two years of experience in a music ensemble and ability to read music. Teacher interview and audition will ensure correct placement. Students are required to take the AP Exam.

This course prepares students for university-level music theory and ear-training classes. Students will learn to recognize, understand, and describe the materials and processes of the music they hear or see in a score. Study topics will focus on developing aural, sight singing, written, compositional, and analytical skills. Students are expected to take the AP exam in May 2017.

Vocal Music

Vocal Music (Beginning) 5230: Beginning Women’s Choir Beginning Men’s Choir Beginning Mixed Choir | Prerequisite: None, but students may sing for the instructor to ensure correct placement

In these courses students will sing songs from today’s popular music as well as songs from other times and other cultures. Students will develop skills with music reading and ear training as they learn to listen critically to music and evaluate its significance.

Vocal Music (Intermediate) 5231: Intermediate Women’s Choir Intermediate Men’s Choir Intermediate Mixed Choir | Prerequisite: Mastery of Beginning Vocal Music and audition with the teacher

These courses continue to build on the comprehensive music education program introduced in Beginning Vocal Music. Students broaden their knowledge of different musical genres and will have opportunities to perform alone and in ensembles.

Vocal Music (Proficient) [Honors] 5232: Proficient Women’s Choir Proficient Men’s Choir Proficient Mixed Choir | Prerequisite: Mastery  of Intermediate Vocal Music and audition with the teacher

These courses are for students who want to improve their vocal technique and increase their knowledge of music. Students will perform music of varying degrees of difficulty and work to improve accuracy in sight singing. Singers may perform alone and in ensembles.

Vocal Music (Advanced) [Honors] 5233: Advanced Women’s Choir Advanced Men’s Choir Advanced Mixed Choir | Prerequisite: Mastery of Proficient Vocal Music or audition with teacher

In these courses, students refine their musical skills through the rigorous study of music theory, history, appreciation, and analysis. Students will improve their vocal technique, accuracy with sight singing, and ability to perform solo and ensemble music. In addition to class work, students will attend musical events, complete special projects, and write reports.

Music Specialization (Beginning) 5216 : Musical Theater | Prerequisite: None or audition with the teacher

In this introduction to musical theater, students will explore vocal and acting techniques and learn about the roles of the director, musician, choreographer, makeup artist, and technical director. In addition,  students will learn about the history of musical theater through the work of some of the leading lyricists and composers. Students may have opportunities to perform in a musical theater production or participate in the behind-the-scenes work.

Music Specialization (Proficient) 5217
Music Specialization (Advanced) 5218
Independent Study in Music
Prerequisites: Mastery  of Intermediate or Proficient (respectively) Vocal Music, Band, or Orchestra and permission from the teacher

This course is designed for students who wish to major or minor in music at a college level. Students will strengthen their knowledge of music theory and music history.

Band

Music Specialization (Beginning) 5216: Ninth Grade Band | Prerequisite: Three years of band or audition with the band director

Musical training in Ninth Grade Band focuses on reading, notating, listening, and analyzing. Students will also study different styles of music to expand their understanding of the role music plays in culture and history. Development of technical competence, discipline, and responsibility are important aspects of this course.

Band (Beginning) Marching Band 5255
Band (Intermediate) Marching Band 5256
Band (Proficient) Marching Band [Honors] 5257
Band (Advanced) Marching Band [Honors] 5258
Prerequisites: For Beginning Ability to play a band instrument and audition with the band director; For the other levels Mastery of the preceding course and audition with the band director

The Marching Band courses focus on developing skills with music performance, reading, and notating as well as listening, analyzing, and evaluating diverse musical styles. As students develop their technical skills, they will have opportunities to compose, arrange, and improvise. The level of discipline, responsibility, and difficulty all increase as  students progress in proficiency levels. Extracurricular opportunities may include jazz band, pep band, district/state level honors band, chamber ensembles, and solo recitals.

Band (Beginning) Symphonic Band 5255
Band (Intermediate) Symphonic Band 5256
Band (Proficient) Symphonic Band [Honors] 5257
Band (Advanced) Symphonic Band [Honors] 5258
Prerequisites: For Beginning Ability to play a band instrument and audition with the band director; For the other levels Mastery of the preceding course and audition with the band director

The Symphonic Band courses focus on developing skills with music performance, reading, and notating as well as listening, analyzing, and evaluating diverse musical styles. As students develop their technical skills, they will have opportunities to compose, arrange, and improvise. Students will build skills with listening, appreciation, and historical understanding culminating in written reports and musical compositions. Students will have opportunities to work with existing music technologies. The level of discipline, responsibility, and difficulty all increase as students progress in proficiency levels. Extracurricular opportunities may include jazz band, pep band, district/state level honors band, chamber ensembles, and solo recitals.

Band (Beginning) Percussion Ensemble 5255
Band (Intermediate) Percussion Ensemble 5256
Band (Proficient) Percussion Ensemble [Honors] 5257
Band (Advanced) Percussion Ensemble [Honors] 5258
Prerequisites: For Beginning Audition with the band director; For the other levels Mastery of the preceding course and audition with the band director

Students in this class serve as the band’s percussion section. As students progress in proficiency levels, they will strengthen their technical skills and have the opportunity to play more demanding music. Extracurricular opportunities may include jazz pep band, district/state level honors band, chamber ensembles, and solo recitals.

Band (Beginning) Concert Band 5255
Band (Intermediate) Concert Band 5256
Band (Proficient) Concert Band [Honors] 5257
Band (Advanced) Concert Band [Honors] 5258
Prerequisites: For Beginning Three years of band or audition with band director; For the other levels Mastery of the preceding course and audition with the band director

The concert Band courses focus on developing skills with music performance, reading, and notating as well as listening, analyzing, and evaluating diverse musical styles. The level of discipline, responsibility, and difficulty all increase as students progress in proficiency levels.

Band (Beginning) Jazz Ensemble 5255
Band (Intermediate) Jazz Ensemble 5256
Band (Proficient) Jazz Ensemble [Honors] 5257
Band (Advanced) Jazz Ensemble [Honors] 5258
Prerequisites: For Beginning Audition with the band director; For the other levels Mastery of the preceding course and audition with the band director

Singers and Instrumentalists will work together on a wide range of musical styles and perform in small vocal groups, string ensembles, jazz combos, and as soloists. As students progress in proficiency levels, they will play an increasingly advanced level of music selections which will require them to refine their skills with reading, notating, composing, conducting, critiquing, and improvising.

 


Band (Beginning) Wind Ensemble 5255
Band (Intermediate) Wind Ensemble 5256
Band (Proficient) Wind Ensemble [Honors] 5257
Band (Advanced) Wind Ensemble [Honors] 5258
Prerequisites: For Beginning Ability to play a band instrument and audition with the band director; For the other levels Mastery of the preceding course and audition with the band director

The Wind Ensemble courses focus on developing skills with music performance, reading, notating, listening, analyzing, and evaluating diverse musical styles. As students develop their technical skills, they will have opportunities to compose, arrange, and improvise. The level of discipline, responsibility, and difficulty all increase as students progress in proficiency levels. Extracurricular opportunities may include jazz band, pep band, district/state level honors band, chamber ensembles, and solo recitals.

String Orchestra

Band (Beginning) Strings 5240
Band (Intermediate) Strings 5241
Band (Proficient) Strings [Honors] 5242
Band (Advanced) Strings [Honors] 5243
Prerequisites: For Beginning – Depending on the school, from 0-2 years of prior experience playing the violin, viola, cello or bass; for the other levels Mastery of the preceding course and audition with the teacher

Students will learn to play the violin, viola, cello or bass. These courses focus on developing skills with reading, notating, listening, analyzing, and evaluating musical styles from different cultures and time periods. The level of discipline, responsibility, and difficulty increase at each proficiency level. Students will prepare and present concerts locally and may participate in district and statewide festivals and competitions. Proficient and Advanced courses have demanding standards for performance, mastery of music theory, notating, appreciation, and history. Proficient and Advanced students will perform as members of one or more chamber ensembles and as soloists.


CTE
CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION

  • All courses use the NC Essential Standards.
  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed semester course.
  • Some CTE courses must be taken for two blocks and/or two consecutive semesters.  Students will earn 2 or more credits for these courses. Check course description for this information.
  • Future Ready Core students may choose to complete 4 credits in a career cluster with one being a completer course to meet the elective requirement for a CTE concentrator.
  • Completer courses are listed in the course title.
  • Some CTE courses coordinate with Community College degree requirements.

Work-based Learning & Higher Education Opportunities in CTE

Cooperative Education (Co-Op) | Prerequisite: Classified as a junior or senior and enrolled in a Career and Technical Education course. Some Career and Technical Education Program Areas offer a Co-Op opportunity for students.

Students electing to take cooperative courses receive classroom instruction each day and work in related on-the-job training, for which they are paid by their employers. Students must work a minimum of 150 hours to receive an academic credit for the cooperative work experience. The teacher/coordinator and employer develop a training plan for each student which is the basis for evaluating the student’s progress on the job and in the classroom.

Student Certifications & Credentialing

Students interested in earning an Industry Certification should meet with their school’s Career Development Coordinator (CDC). Students who complete an Industry Certification will have the qualifications to apply for a variety of jobs after graduation. Below is a list of the Industry Certifications that CTE programs prepare students for:

 

Internships

CTE Internship

A CTE Internship allows for additional development of career and technical competencies within a general career field. Internships allow students to observe and participate in daily operations, develop direct contact with job personnel, ask questions about particular careers, and perform certain job tasks. This activity is exploratory and allows the student to get hands on experience in a number of related activities. The teacher, student, and the business community jointly plan the organization, implementation, and evaluation of an internship, regardless of whether it is an unpaid or paid internship.

Career and College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Courses

CTE Community College

Students may include one or more approved Community College courses, either online or face-to-face, in their program of studies that leads to a concentration in a Career Cluster. The course must meet requirements of the Operating Procedures for the Enrollment of High School Students in Community College Courses.

University Courses

CTE University

Students may include one or more courses from a four-year college or university, either online or face-to-face, in their program of studies that leads to a concentration in a Career Cluster.

Agricultural, Food & Natural Resources Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for Agricultural and Natural Resources Technologies courses. FFA leadership activities are an integral component of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster

  • Career Management        
  • Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher
  • Marketing        
  • Principles of Business & Finance        

  • Introduction to Culinary Arts
  • CTE Internship

Foundation Courses

Agriscience Applications | Prerequisite:  none

Students study the environment, natural resources, food production, and agribusiness using the principles of biology and the physical sciences as they apply to agriscience technology. Topics include pest management, plant science, landscaping, animal science, agricultural engineering, leadership and agriscience careers. (Jordan, Northern)

Biotechnology and Agriscience Research I | Prerequisites:  Biology recommended

This course provides instruction in the technologically advanced world of agriculture and life sciences. Students learn about the latest techniques in plant and animal biotechnology. Topics include applied genetics, micro biology, DNA, laboratory safety, and protocol. (Jordan)

Biotechnology and Agriscience Research II  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite:  Biotechnology and Agriscience Research I

Students study genetic engineering, plant tissue culture, hydroponics, integrated pest management, environmental science, food science, agri medicine, and ethics. Much of the learning is hands-on using advanced laboratory techniques as an integral component of individual and class research projects. (Jordan)

Animal Science I  | Prerequisite:  Biology

Students learn the basic scientific principles and processes involved in animal physiology, breeding, genetics, diseases, and nutrition. They also learn the role showmanship and marketing play in animal science careers. (Jordan, Northern)

 

Animal Science II Small Animal   (Completer Course) | Prerequisite:

This course focuses on small animals that are served by veterinarians. Students learn animal husbandry including topics such as breeding, grooming, housing, nutrition, health care, anatomy, and physiology. (Jordan, Northern)

Veterinary Assisting 1 | Prerequisite:

This course provides instruction for students desiring a career in animal medicine. Topics include proper veterinary practice management and client relations, pharmacy and laboratory procedure, advanced animal care, and surgical/radiological procedures.  (Jordan, Northern)

Foods I | Prerequisite:  None

This course examines the nutritional needs of human beings with a special focus on how diet impacts health. Students learn kitchen and meal management along with food preparation.

(Jordan, Northern, Riverside)

Foods II Technology | Prerequisite: Foods 1 or Culinary Arts and Hospitality 1

This course explores the food industry from the farm to the table using skills in food science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.  Government regulations, emerging trends, biotechnology, and technological career opportunities from scientists to technicians will be presented.  The student examines production, processing, preparation, preservation, and packaging principles along the farm to table continuum. (Jordan, Northern)

Horticulture I |  Prerequisite:  None

This course provides instruction on the broad field of horticulture with emphasis on the scientific and technical knowledge for a career in horticulture. Topics in this course include plant growth and development, plant nutrition, media selection, basic plant identification, pest management, chemical disposal, customer relations, and career opportunities. (Jordan, Northern)

Horticulture II (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Horticulture I

This course covers instruction that expands scientific knowledge and skills to include more advanced scientific computations and communication skills needed in the horticulture industry. Topics include greenhouse plant production and management, bedding plant production, watering systems, light effects, basic landscape design, installation and maintenance, lawn and turfgrass management, and personal development. (Jordan, Northern)

Principles of Family and Human Services | Prerequisite: None

Students learn core functions of the human services field; individual, family, and community systems; and life literacy skills for human development. Emphasis is placed on professional skills, human ecology, diversity, analyzing community issues, and life management skills. Activities engage students in exploring various helping professions, while building essential life skills they can apply in their own lives to achieve optimal wellbeing. (Riverside)

Personal Finance | Prerequisite: None

This course prepares students to understand economic activities and challenges of individuals and families, the role of lifestyle goals in education and career choices, procedures in a successful job search, financial forms used in independent living, and shopping options and practices for meeting consumer needs. The course also prepares students to understand consumer rights, responsibilities, and information, protect personal and family resources, and apply procedures for managing personal finances. (CMA, Hillside, Northern, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

CTE Advanced Studies | Prerequisite: Two technical credits in one Career Cluster

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. (Hillside, Northern, Jordan, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Architecture & Construction Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for the Architecture and Construction Cluster. FCCLA and or SkillsUSA leadership activities are an integral component of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster

        Career Management

        Multimedia & Webpage Design

        Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher

        Microsoft Excel & Access

        Marketing

        Fashion Merchandising

        Entrepreneurship I (BFIT & MEE)

        CTE Advanced Studies

        CTE Internship

Foundation Courses

Interior Design I | Prerequisite:  Principle of Business and Finance

Students focus on housing needs and options of individuals and families at various stages of the life cycle. Emphasis is placed on selecting goods and services and creating functional, pleasing living environments using sound financial decisions and principles of design. Topics of study include elements and principles of design, backgrounds and furnishings, architectural styles and features, and functional room design. (Jordan)

Interior Design II  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Interior Design I

This course prepares students for entry-level and technical work opportunities in the residential and non-residential interior design fields. Students deepen their understanding of design fundamentals and theory by designing interior plans to meet living space needs of specific individuals or families. Topics include application of design theory to interior plans and production, selection of materials, and examination of business procedures. (Jordan)

Drafting I | Prerequisite:  None

Students learn to use graphic tools such as sketching, geometric construction, Computer Assisted Design (CAD), orthographic projection and 3D modeling. These visual communication skills are valuable tools for representing ideas in the fields of architecture, manufacturing, and engineering. (Southern)

Drafting II – Architectural (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Drafting  I

This course focuses on the principles, concepts, and use of complex graphic tools used in the field of architecture, structural systems, and construction trades. Emphasis is placed on the use of computer assisted design (CAD) tools in the creation of floor plans, wall sections, and elevation drawings. (Southern)

Drafting III-Architectural | Prerequisite:  Drafting II

This course introduces students to advanced architectural design concepts. Emphasis is placed on the use of computer assisted design (CAD) tools in the design and execution of site and foundation plans as well as topographical information and detail drawings of stairs and wall sections. (Southern)

Core and Sustainable Construction | Prerequisite: None

This course covers the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) Core certification modules required for all of the NCCER curriculum-area programs, and an additional Green module. The course content includes: basic safety, introduction to construction math, introduction to hand tools, introduction to power tools, introduction to blueprints, material handling, basic communication skills, and basic employability skills, and “Your Role in the Green Environment.” (Southern)

 

Carpentry I |  Prerequisite: Core and Sustainable Construction

This course provides a basic introduction to construction work and the technical aspects of carpentry. Topics include learning how to use a variety of tools, equipment, fasteners, and lumber. As part of their construction education, students also learn to read construction plans and elevations, use construction math, and take accurate measurements. (Southern)

Carpentry II (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Carpentry I

Students learn more advanced carpentry techniques and continue to develop their problem solving skills using construction math. Topics include plans, framing, footings, foundations, roofing, flashing, wall sheathing, insulation, vapor barriers, gypsum board, wall and ceiling framing, and underlayment. (Southern)

Carpentry III | Prerequisite: Carpentry II

This course develops advanced technical aspects of carpentry with emphasis on development of skills. The course content includes roofing applications, thermal and moisture protection, exterior finishing, cold formed steel framing and drywall installations. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, internship, and job shadowing. This course helps prepare students for National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification. (Southern)

Principles of Business and Finance | Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to topics related to business, finance, management, and marketing to cover business in the global economy, functions of business organization and management, marketing basics, and significance of business financial and risk management. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, PLC, Northern, Riverside, Southern)

Personal Finance | Prerequisite: None

This course prepares students to understand economic activities and challenges of individuals and families, the role of lifestyle goals in education and career choices, procedures in a successful job search, financial forms used in independent living, and shopping options and practices for meeting consumer needs.The course also prepares students to understand consumer rights, responsibilities and information, protect personal and family resources, and apply procedures for managing personal finances. (CMA, Hillside, Northern, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Project Management I | Prerequisite: None

This course will introduce students to the principles, concepts, and software applications used in the management of projects. Through project-based learning, students will understand how to use the framework of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project in authentic situations. (CMA, Southern)

 

Project Management II – Global | Prerequisite:  Project Management I

This project-based course focuses on the impact of cultural differences and exchange rate fluctuations on business practices and the marketing mix in global markets. Students will understand factors that affect manufacturing and research location selection, the impact of local government policies and procedures on market decision making, and the use of strategic alliances to acquire additional necessary experience. (CMA)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Art,  Audio/ Video Technology & Communications Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for the Art, Audio/Video Technology & Communications Cluster. FCCLA and or SkillsUSA leadership activities are an integral component of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster

Career Management        

CTE Advanced Studies

CTE Internship

Interior Design I        

Principles of Business & Finance        

Personal Finance        

Microsoft Excel & Access

Foundation Courses

Adobe Video Design | Prerequisite: Adobe Digital Design

This course is a project-based video course that develops career and communication skills in video production using Adobe tools. This course is aligned to Adobe Premiere certification. English language arts are reinforced.  (DSA)

Adobe Visual Design | Prerequisite: None

This course is a project-based course that develops ICT, career, and communication skills in print and graphic design using Adobe tools. This course is aligned to Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator certification. (DSA)

Multimedia and Web Page Design | Prerequisite: None

This revised course focuses on desktop publishing, graphic image design, computer animation, virtual reality, multimedia production, and webpage design. Communication skills and critical thinking are reinforced through software applications. (Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, Riverside, Southern)

Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, &  Publisher | Prerequisite: None

Students in Microsoft IT Academies benefit from world-class Microsoft curriculum and software tools to tackle real-world challenges in the classroom environment. In the first part, students will learn to use the newest version of Microsoft Word interface, commands, and features to create, enhance, customize, share and create complex documents, and publish them. In the second part, students will learn to use the newest version of Microsoft PowerPoint interface, commands, and features to create, enhance, customize, and deliver presentations. In the last part, students will learn to use the basic features of the newest version of Publisher to create, customize, and publish a publication. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, Northern, Riverside Southern)

Marketing   | Prerequisite: None

In this course, students develop an understanding of the processes involved from the creation to the consumption of products/services. Students develop an understanding and skills in the areas of distribution, marketing-information management, market planning, pricing, product/service management, promotion, and selling. Students develop an understanding of marketing functions applications and impact on business operations. (Hillside, Jordan, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Fashion Merchandising | Prerequisite: None

Students study the history of fashion and learn how today’s fashion industry operates. Topics include merchandising, promotion, and fashion show production. Students also learn about careers possibilities in fashion. (Northern)

Principles of Family and Human Services | Prerequisite: None

Students learn core functions of the human services field; individual, family, and community systems; and life literacy skills for human development. Emphasis is placed on professional skills, human ecology, diversity, analyzing community issues, and life management skills. Activities engage students in exploring various helping professions, while building essential life skills they can apply in their own lives to achieve optimal wellbeing. (Riverside)

Digital Media |  Prerequisite: None

Students use a variety of digital media technologies to develop audio and video products. As they develop proficiency with these media, they will explore product design concepts and learn

non-linear editing. (DSA)

Advanced Digital Media  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Digital Media

This course focuses on more advanced topics in audio and video media and on the skills needed for a career in interactive technology (IT) communication industries. Students become proficient with non-linear editing and learn to use web-based interactive media. (DSA)

Scientific and Technical Visualization I  | Prerequisite: None

This state-of-the-art course introduces students to the use of complex graphic tools for visualizing technical, mathematical, and scientific ideas. Visualization activities include creating models for molecular structures, topographical maps, stratospheric and climate changes, and statistical analysis. (DSA, Hillside)

Game Art Design (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Scientific and Technical Visualization I

This course introduces students to techniques used in the electronic game industry. Students will focus on the principles used in game design including mathematical and virtual modeling. Emphasis is placed on areas related to art, history, ethics, plot development, storyboarding, programming, 2D visual theory, and interactive play technologies. Students develop physical and virtual games using hands-on experiences and a variety of software.

(DSA, Hillside)

Advanced Game Art and Design (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Game Art Design

This course is a continuation in the study of game design and interactivity. Emphasis is placed on visual design, evaluating, scripting and networking protocols, and legal issues as well as 3D visual theory. Students compile a game portfolio. Advanced topics include the use of audio and visual effects, rendering, modeling, and animation techniques. Students work in collaborative teams to develop a final 3D game project. (DSA)

Entrepreneurship I  | Prerequisite: Marketing or Principles of Business and Finance or Personal Finance

In this course students evaluate the concepts of going into business for themselves and working for or operating a small business. Emphasis is on the exploration of feasible ideas of products/services, research procedures, business financing, marketing strategies, and access to resources for starting a small business. Students develop components of a business plan and evaluate startup requirements. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Business, Management & Administration Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for the Business, Management & Administration Cluster. FBLA or DECA leadership activities are integral components of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster

        Career Management

        Multimedia and Webpage Design

        Microsoft Excel & Access

               Marketing

        CTE Internship

        CTE Community College

        CTE University

        Personal Finance

Foundation Courses

Microsoft Word, PowerPoint &  Publisher | Prerequisite: None

Students in Microsoft IT Academies benefit from world-class Microsoft curriculum and software tools to tackle real-world challenges in the classroom environment. In the first part, students will learn to use the newest version of Microsoft Word interface, commands, and features to create, enhance, customize, share and create complex documents, and publish them. In the second part, students will learn to use the newest version of Microsoft PowerPoint interface, commands, and features to create, enhance, customize, and deliver presentations. In the last part, students will learn to use the basic features of the newest version of Publisher to create, customize, and publish a publication. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Microsoft Excel and Access  | Prerequisite: None

Students in Microsoft IT Academies benefit from world-class Microsoft curriculum and cutting edge software tools to tackle real-world challenges in the classroom environment. The first part of the class is designed to help you use the newest version of Microsoft Excel interface, commands, and features to present, analyze, and manipulate various types of data. In the second part of the class, students will learn how to create and work with a database and its objects by using the new and improved features in newest version of Microsoft Access. (Northern)

Accounting I | Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to help students understand the basic principles of the accounting cycle. Emphasis is placed on the analysis and recording of business transactions, preparation, and interpretation of financial statements, accounting systems, banking and payroll activities, basic types of business ownership, and an accounting career orientation. (Hillside, Southern)

Principles of Business and Finance | Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to topics related to business, finance, management, and marketing to cover business in the global economy, functions of business organization and management, marketing basics, and significance of business financial and risk management. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, PLC, Northern, Riverside, Southern)

Business Law (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Principles of Business and Finance

Students learn how laws impact their lives when they purchase insurance, rent or own real estate, sign a contract, or buy something on credit. They also learn how businesses develop hiring and firing guidelines, write contracts, and maintain eBusiness practices. (HillMA)

Business Management  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Principles of Business and Finance

This course expands student understanding of management, including customer relationship management, human resources management, information management, knowledge management, product-development management, project management, quality management, and strategic management. Economics, finance, and professional development are also stressed throughout the course. (Hillside, Jordan)

Entrepreneurship I  ME11 (Completer Course) | Prerequisite:  Marketing or Principles of Business and Finance or Personal Finance

In this course students evaluate the concepts of going into business for themselves and working for or operating a small business. Emphasis is on the exploration of feasible ideas of products/services, research procedures, business financing, marketing strategies, and access to resources for starting a small business. Students develop components of a business plan and evaluate startup requirements. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Entrepreneurship II  | Prerequisite:  Entrepreneurship I

In this course students develop an understanding of pertinent decisions to be made after obtaining financing to open a small business. Students acquire in-depth understanding of business regulations, risks, management, and marketing. Students develop a small-business management handbook. (Hillside, Jordan, Southern, Northern, Riverside)

Project Management I | Prerequisite:  None

This course will introduce students to the principles, concepts, and software applications used in the management of projects. Through project-based learning, students will understand how to use the framework of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project in authentic situations. (CMA, Southern)

Project Management II  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite:  Project Management I

This project-based course focuses on the use of information technology to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of project management and integrated enterprise. Students will learn operational strategies for managing advanced technology and innovation as well as how to map the high technology operations environment to business settings. (CMA)

CTE Advanced Studies | Prerequisite:Two technical credits in one Career Cluster

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. (Hillside, Northern, Jordan, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Virtual Enterprises International (VEI)  |  Prerequisite: Accounting I or Business Management or Entrepreneurship I

In this two-credit year-long course a simulated business is set up and operated by students with the guidance of a teacher/facilitator and a business partner. Virtual Enterprises I allows students to experience all facets of being an employee in a firm in an actual business environment. Students are involved in every aspect of running a business, including human resources, accounting, product development, production, distribution, marketing and sales, and they engage in trade with other practice firms (VEs) around the world. This simulation enables students to understand how employees, workgroup teams, and departments interact with each other and work together for the goal of the company. In addition, the simulation conveys the expectations of the workplace. (Southern)

Virtual Enterprise II  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite:  Virtual Enterprises International (VEI)

Virtual Enterprise II is a continuation of the concepts learned in Virtual Enterprise I, but concepts are explored in a much deeper and enriched manner.  Course objectives which will receive particular emphasis include:  intense business and marketing vocabulary development; professional workplace terminology and processes;  in-depth studies of economics, especially supply and demand; and research and development techniques for developing and marketing new products.  The Seniors who take VE II share additional duties with the VE instructor and will act as the class leadership. (Southern)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Finance Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for the Finance Cluster. FBLA leadership activities are integral components of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster

        Career Management

        Microsoft word, PowerPoint, & Publisher

        Marketing

        CTE Internship

        Project Management I

Foundation Courses

Accounting I  | Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to help students understand the basic principles of the accounting cycle. Emphasis is placed on the analysis and recording of business transactions, preparation, and interpretation of financial statements, accounting systems, banking and payroll activities, basic types of business ownership, and an accounting career orientation. (Hillside, Southern)

Accounting II (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Accounting 1

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge of accounting procedures and techniques utilized in solving business problems and making financial decisions. Emphasis includes departmental accounting, corporate accounting, cost accounting, and inventory control systems, managerial accounting and budgeting, and further enhancement of accounting skills. (Hillside, Southern)

Honors Accounting III  (College Level Accounting) | Prerequisite:  None

This course includes financial accounting, managerial accounting and financial statement analysis topics. Compared to the traditional stand-alone financial accounting and managerial accounting courses, this pilot course encompasses more topics and learning outcomes than the traditional financial accounting course, and at least a quarter of the topics and learning outcomes in a traditional managerial course. (Hillside)

Principles of Business and Finance  | Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to topics related to business, finance, management, and marketing to cover business in the global economy, functions of business organization and management, marketing basics, and significance of business financial and risk management. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Personal Finance  | Prerequisite: None

This course prepares students to understand economic activities and challenges of individuals and families, the role of lifestyle goals in education and career choices, procedures in a successful job search, financial forms used in independent living, and shopping options and practices for meeting consumer needs.The course also prepares students to understand consumer rights, responsibilities and information, protect personal and family resources, and apply procedures for managing personal finances. (CMA, Hillside, Northern, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Microsoft Excel & Access  | Prerequisites: None

Students in Microsoft IT Academies benefit from world-class Microsoft curriculum and cutting-edge software tools to tackle real-world challenges in the classroom environment. The first part of the class is designed to help you use the newest version of Microsoft Excel interface, commands, and features to present, analyze, and manipulate various types of data. Students will learn to manage workbooks as well as how to manage, manipulate, and format data. In the second part of the class, students will learn how to create and work with a database and its objects by using the new and improved features in newest version of Microsoft Access. Students will learn how to create, modify, and locate information as well as how to create programmable elements and share and distribute database information. (Hillside, Jordan, Northern, Riverside, Southern)

Business Law  | Prerequisite: None

Students learn how laws impact their lives when they purchase insurance, rent or own real estate, sign a contract, or buy something on credit. Students also learn how businesses develop hiring and firing guidelines, write contracts, and maintain ethical business practices. (Hillside, Jordan, Northern, Riverside)

Entrepreneurship I | Prerequisite: Marketing or Principal of Business and Finance or Personal Finance

In this course students evaluate the concepts of going into business for themselves and working for or operating a small business. Emphasis is on the exploration of feasible ideas of products/services, research procedures, business financing, marketing strategies, and access to resources for starting a small business. Students develop components of a business plan and evaluate startup requirements. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

CTE Advanced Studies  | Prerequisite:Two technical credits in one Career Cluster

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster.The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel.The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. (Hillside, Northern, Jordan, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Academy of Finance Courses

AOF Principles of Finance | Prerequisite:  None

This is the first course students take in the Academy of Finance and introduces students to the financial world. Students develop financial literacy as they learn about the function of finance in society. They study income and wealth; examine financial institutions; learn how businesses raise capital; and study key investment-related terms and concepts. They also research how innovations have changed the financial services field. Finally, students explore careers that exist in finance today. (Hillside)

AOF Business Economics | Prerequisites:  AOF Ethics in Business or AOF Entrepreneurship

Business Economics introduces students to the key concepts of economics as they pertain to business. This course discusses the American economy and the factors that influence the success of businesses and products. It describes forms of business ownership, discusses the relationship of labor and business, and provides a broad overview of the global economy. Students also examine careers in business, both as employees and as business owners. (Hillside)

AOF Principles of Accounting | Prerequisite: None

Principles of Accounting provides students with an understanding of the accounting process and how it facilitates decision making by providing data and information to internal and external stakeholders. Students learn that accounting is an integral part of all business activities. They learn how to apply technology to accounting by creating formulas and inputting data into spreadsheets. (Hillside)

AOF Financial Planning | Prerequisite: None

Financial Planning provides students with an overview of the job of a financial planner. Students learn to consider how all aspects of financial planning might affect a potential client, and learn about the importance of financial planning in helping people reach their life goals. This course includes lessons on saving, borrowing, credit, and all types of insurance, and covers various types of investments. Students also examine careers in financial planning. (Hillside)

AOF Entrepreneurship | Prerequisite:  None

Entrepreneurship introduces students to the critical role entrepreneurs play in the national and global economy. Students learn the skills, attitudes, characteristics, and techniques necessary to become successful entrepreneurs. They explore starting a business and learn about the operational issues and financial risks that new businesses face. Students examine ethical issues and develop a framework for managing them. (Hillside)

AOF Insurance | Prerequisite:  AOF Principles of Accounting or AOF Managerial Accounting

This course introduces students to the insurance industry and to its critical role in the financial services sector and in society. It covers common types of insurance, including life, health and disability, property, liability, and forms of commercial insurance. Students examine the business model underlying the industry and how underwriting, actuarial science, and investment practices affect an insurance company’s financial success. (Hillside)

AOF Business in a Global Economy | Prerequisite: AOF Ethics in Business or AOF Entrepreneurship

Business in a Global Economy provides students with an understanding of how and why businesses choose to expand their operations into other countries. This course exposes students to the unique challenges facing firms doing business internationally, and to the potential opportunities available to those businesses. (Hillside)

AOF Financial Services | Prerequisite: AOF Principles of Accounting or AOF Managerial Accounting

This course gives students an overview of banks and other financial services companies. It introduces students to the origins of money and banking and examines the early history of banking in the United States. Students study the financial services industry and the types of companies it includes in depth. They learn about the services offered by such companies and analyze the ways these companies earn profits. Finally, students examine careers in financial services. (Hillside)

 

AOF Managerial Accounting | Prerequisite: None

Managerial Accounting introduces the fundamentals of management accounting, including manufacturing and cost accounting, budgeting, accounting for managerial decision-making, and financial statement analysis. Students learn how to use accounting information for internal decision-making and planning and control. Regardless of the career path they choose, this course gives students the financial acumen necessary to make informed personal and business decisions.(Hillside)

AOF Ethics in Business | Prerequisite: None

This course introduces the importance of ethics in business. Students focus on the significance of ethics to stakeholders; examine who bears responsibility for monitoring ethics; and explore ethical situations common in organizations. Students examine how ethics affects various business disciplines and consider the impact of organizational culture. Students also explore ethics as social responsibility, the evolution of ethics in international business, and how the free market and ethics can coexist. (Hillside)

AOF Applied Finance | Prerequisite:  AOF Principles of Finance

Students learn to identify the legal forms of business organization and continue to develop an understanding of profit. They learn about various financial analysis strategies and the methods by which businesses raise capital. Students also have the chance to explore, in depth, topics of high interest in the field of finance, and explore the types of careers that exist in finance today. (Hillside)

 

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Health Science Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

This cluster is only offered at the City of Medicine, which is a choice school. Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for Health Sciences Cluster courses. HOSA leadership activities are an integral component of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster

        Career Management

        Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher

        Microsoft Excel & Access

        Marketing

        Entrepreneurship I (BFIT & MEE)

        Principles of Business & Finance

        Personal Finance

        CTE Advanced Studies

        CTE Internship

Foundation Courses

Health Sciences I   | Prerequisite: None

This course focuses on human anatomy, physiology and human body diseases and disorders, and biomedical therapies. Students will learn about health care careers within the context of human body systems. (CMA)

Health Sciences II   (Completer Course) | Health Sciences I

Through classroom study and a 65 hour clinical internship, students become proficient with the skills needed to become valued health care team members. Students learn emergency care and safety skills as well as the record keeping skills required by a medical facility. (CMA)

Biomedical Technology   | Prerequisite: None

Students survey current medical and health care practices using computerized databases, the internet, the media, and by visiting health care professionals. They become fluent with the language and terminology of medicine and get an overview of biomedical technology, specialties and ethics. (CMA)

Health Team Relations  | Prerequisite: None

It takes a team of healthcare professionals to provide quality patient care. Students learn how to be productive, valued health care team members by becoming aware that patients have different needs and cultural preferences. A study of medical terminology, the history of health care, and the services offered by different health care agencies will help students to understand the roles and responsibilities of health care team members. (CMA)

Nursing Fundamentals   |  Prerequisite: Health Science II

This course is designed for students interested in medical careers where personal care and basic nursing skills are used. This course is an enhanced adaptation of the North Carolina Division of Health Service Regulation (DHSR) Nurse Aide I (NAI) curriculum and helps prepare students for the National Nurse Aide Assessment (NNAAP). Students who pass the NNAAP become listed on the NC NAI Registry. (CMA)

Emergency Medical Technology I | Prerequisite: None

This course is aligned to the EMT Basic certification available from the North Carolina Office of Emergency Medical Services and is part I of a two course sequence required to meet the mandatory hours of training. The course includes skills in each area, using resources from the community to help deliver instruction to the students. (CMA)

Emergency Medical Technology II  | Prerequisite: Emergency Medical Technology 1

This course is aligned to the EMT Basic certification available from the North Carolina Office of Emergency Medical Services and is part II of a two course sequence required to meet the mandatory hours of training. The course includes skills in each area, using resources from the community to help deliver instruction to the students. (CMA)

Pharmacy Technician  | Prerequisite: Health Science II

This course has self-paced, online instruction designed to prepare high school seniors for a pharmacy technician career. Topics included in this course are federal law, medication used in major body systems, calculations, and pharmacy operations. (CMA)

Project Lead The Way Courses

PLTW Principles of Biomedical Sciences  | Prerequisite:  None

This course is designed for students to investigate the human body systems and various health conditions. They determine factors that lead to the death of a fictional person and investigate lifestyle choices. English language arts and science are reinforced in this course. (Southern)

PLTW Human Body Systems  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: PLTW Principles of Biomedical Sciences

In this course students examine the human body systems, design experiments and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions and often play the role of the biomedical professional. English language arts and science are reinforced in this course. (Southern)

PLTW Medical Interventions  | Prerequisite: PLTW Human Body Systems

This course allows students to investigate the interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is a “How-To” manual for maintaining overall health. English language arts and science are reinforced in this course. (Southern)

PLTW Biomedical Innovations | Prerequisite: PLTW Medical Interventions

This course allows students to apply their knowledge and skills to answer questions or solve problems related to biomedical sciences. Students design innovative solutions to the health care challenges of the 21st century. Students work on independent projects and may work with a mentor in the healthcare industry. (Southern)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Hospitality & Tourism Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for Hospitality and Tourism Cluster courses.  FCCLA or DECA leadership activities are an integral component of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster

        Career Management

        Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher

        Microsoft Excel & Access

        Agricultural Production & Management

        Principles of Business & Finance

        Personal Finance

        Multimedia and Webpage Design

        CTE Internship

Foundation Courses

Foods I   | Prerequisite: None

This course examines the nutritional needs of human beings with a special focus on how diet impacts health. Students learn kitchen and meal management along with food preparation. (Hillside, Jordan, Northern, Riverside)

Foods II Enterprise  | Prerequisite: Foods 1 or Culinary Arts and Hospitality I

This course focuses on advanced food preparation techniques while applying nutrition, food science, and test kitchen concepts using new technology. Food safety and sanitation receive special emphasis, with students taking the exam for a nationally recognized food safety credential. Students develop skills in preparing foods such as beverages, salads and dressing, yeast breads, and cake fillings and frostings. (Jordan, Riverside)

Project Management I  | Prerequisite: None

This course will introduce students to the principles, concepts, and software applications used in the management of projects. Through project-based learning, students will understand how to use the framework of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project in authentic situations. (CMA, Southern)

Project Management II  Global   | Prerequisite: Project Management

This project-based course focuses on the impact of cultural differences and exchange rate fluctuations on business practices and the marketing mix in global markets. Students will understand factors that affect manufacturing and research location selection, the impact of local government policies and procedures on market decision making, and the use of strategic alliances to acquire additional necessary experience. (CMA)

Principles of Business and Finance  | Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to topics related to business, finance, management, and marketing to cover business in the global economy, functions of business organization and management, marketing basics, and significance of business financial and risk management. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, PLC, Northern, Southern)

Introduction to Culinary Arts and Hospitality   | Prerequisite: None

In this course, basic safety and sanitation practices leading to a national industry-recognized food safety credential are introduced. Commercial equipment, smallwares, culinary math, and basic knife skills in a commercial foodservice facility are taught. (Northern)

Culinary Arts and Hospitality I   |  Prerequisite:  Introduction to Culinary Arts and Hospitality

This course focuses on basic skills in cold and hot food production, baking and pastry, and service skills. (Northern)

Culinary Arts and Hospitality II   (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Culinary Arts and Hospitality

This course provides advanced experiences in cold and hot and food production, management (front and back of the house), and service skills. Topics include menu planning, business management, and guest relations. (Northern)

Marketing I   | Prerequisite: None

Students learn the basic concepts that contribute to effective marketing including product distribution, pricing for maximum profits, advertising and promotion, selling, and product service management. (Hillside, Jordan, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Hospitality and Tourism   (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Marketing or  Sports and Entertainment Marketing 1

Students already familiar with marketing basics learn how to apply them the travel and tourism industry. Students learn how to manage customer relations, seek out travel destinations, and promote tours and travel. (Northern)

Sports and Entertainment Marketing I  | Prerequisite: None

Students learn how to market sports, entertainment, and special events. They study branding, licensing, and naming rights along with on-site merchandising, concessions, promotion, and safety and security requirements. (Hillside, Jordan, Northern, Southern)

Sports and Entertainment Marketing II   (Completer Course)  | Prerequisite: Sports and Entertainment Marketing I

Students expand their knowledge of sports and entertainment marketing through simulations and projects that demonstrate their knowledge of event and facilities management, legal issues and contracts, and promotion. (Hillside, Jordan, Northern, Southern)

CTE Advanced Studies   | Prerequisite:Two technical credits in one Career Cluster

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. (Hillside, Northern, Jordan, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Entrepreneurship I   | Prerequisite: Marketing or Personal Finance or Principles of Business and Finance

In this course students evaluate the concepts of going into business for themselves and working for or operating a small business. Emphasis is on the exploration of feasible ideas of products/services, research procedures, business financing, marketing strategies, and access to resources for starting a small business. Students develop components of a business plan and evaluate startup requirements. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Entrepreneurship II   | Prerequisite: Entrepreneurship I

In this course students develop an understanding of pertinent decisions to be made after obtaining financing to open a small business. Students acquire in-depth understanding of business regulations, risks, management, and marketing. Students develop a small-business management handbook. (Hillside, Northern, Southern)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Human Services Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for Human Services  Cluster courses.  FCCLA or SkillsUSA leadership activities are an integral component of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster

        Career Management

        Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher

        Microsoft Excel & Access

        Foods I

        Entrepreneurship I

        CTE Internship

Foundation Courses

Principles of Family and Human Services  | Prerequisite: None

Students learn core functions of the human services field; individual, family, and community systems; and life literacy skills for human development. Emphasis is placed on professional skills, human ecology, diversity, analyzing community issues, and life management skills. Activities engage students in exploring various helping professions, while building essential life skills they can apply in their own lives to achieve optimal wellbeing. (Riverside)

Parenting and Child Development  | Prerequisite: None

Students study how children develop from infancy through their teen years and discuss the emotional, social, and physical needs of children as they grow and mature. Students learn about the critical role parents and caretakers play and the kinds of practices that can best nurture a child at each stage.

(Hillside, Jordan, Northern, Riverside)

Cosmetology I  | Prerequisite: None -Students are required by the NC State Board of Cosmetic Arts to wear a clean school color uniform, black shoes, and a name badge. Students must purchase a supply kit and mannequin. Students earn 4 credits for this course.

This 4 credit course gives students extensive experience with salon techniques. Students learn and practice giving facials, manicures, and pedicures and style hair through a variety of hair cutting techniques, chemical relaxing, wet hair styling, roller techniques, pin curls, and hair coloring. Students also learn cosmetology ethics, grooming, hygiene, and salon safety including sterilization and sanitation. (Holton)

Cosmetology II  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Cosmetology I -Students are required by the NC State Board of Cosmetic Arts to wear a clean school color uniform, black shoes, and a name badge. Students earning 1200/1500 hours of training may sit for the Cosmetology Licensing Board Exam. Students earn 4 credits for this course.

The course continues the work from Cosmetology I while adding additional salon techniques such as wig styling, facial massage, hair analysis, artificial nails, hair removal, and permanent waving. Classroom instruction will give students the foundation and practice to pass the Cosmetology Licensing Board Exam. (Holton)

Barbering I  | Prerequisite: None

Students earn 4 credits for this course. Students learn the basics of working in a barber shop. Topics include: implements and tools, haircutting and styling, shaving, facial massage and an overview of safety, sanitation and infection control techniques. Students also explore career information required for the barbering industry. (Holton)

Barbering II  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Barbering I- Students earning 1528 hours of combined instruction and clinical can sit for the NC Apprentice Barber Examination.

Students earn 4 credits for this course.

Students build on the barbering skills they learned in Level I and add skills such as hair coloring, chemical servicing, hair piece styling, women’s hair cutting, and manicuring. Students also learn how to identify and treat disorders of the skin, scalp, and hair and explore barbershop management and licensing laws. This course will prepare students to take the State Barber Board Exam. (Holton)

CTE Advanced Studies   | Prerequisite:Two technical credits in one Career Cluster

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. (Hillside, Northern, Jordan, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Personal Finance   | Prerequisite: None

Students learn the financial skills they will need to live independently as adults. Topics include financial planning, shopping skills, managing a bank account and credit/debit cards, and managing assets. (CMA, Hillside, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Principles of Business and Finance   | Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to topics related to business, finance, management, and marketing to cover business in the global economy, functions of business organization and management, marketing basics, and significance of business financial and risk management. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Information Technology Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for the Business Management and Administration Cluster. FBLA or DECA leadership activities are integral components of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster

        Career Management

        Entrepreneurship I

        CTE Internship

        Personal Finance

Foundation Courses

Microsoft Excel & Access    | Prerequisite: None

Students in Microsoft IT Academies benefit from world-class Microsoft curriculum and cutting-edge software tools to tackle real world challenges in the classroom environment. The first part of the class is designed to help you use the newest version of Microsoft Excel interface, commands, and features to present, analyze, and manipulate various types of data. Students will learn to manage workbooks as well as how to manage, manipulate, and format data. In the second part of the class, students will learn how to create and work with a database and its objects by using the new and improved features in newest version of Microsoft Access. Students will learn how to create, modify, and locate information as well as how to create programmable elements and share and distribute database information. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Multimedia & Webpage Design   | Prerequisite: None

This course focuses on desktop publishing, graphic image design, computer animation, virtual reality, multimedia production, and webpage design. Communication skills and critical thinking are reinforced through software applications. (DSA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, Riverside, Southern)

CTE Advanced Studies        | Prerequisite:Two technical credits in one Career Cluster

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. (Hillside, Northern, Jordan, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Introduction to Computer Science  | Prerequisite:  None

This course of study is designed to allow students to explore a variety of computer science topics, such as Web design, human computer interactions, programming, and problem solving.   Students will also learn how computers work and demonstrate problem solving skills.  Activities will include the construction of web pages, graphics, programs and animations. The course will offer hands-on collaborative projects. (Jordan, Riverside, Hillside )

Computer Engineering Technology   | Prerequisite: Recommend  Foundations of Information Technology

This course includes basic computer hardware, software, applications, troubleshooting, and customer service as integral parts of the course requirements. (Hillside)

Computer Engineering Technology II   (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Computer Engineering Technology

This course includes advanced computer hardware, software, applications, troubleshooting, and customer service as integral parts of the course requirements. (Hillside)

Principles of Business & Finance   | Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to topics related to business, finance, management, and marketing to cover business in the global economy, functions of business organization and management, marketing basics, and significance of business financial and risk management.

(CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

 

Foundations of Information Technology  | Prerequisite: None

This introductory course provides students with the foundation to pursue further study in information technology. Emphasis is on network systems, information support and services, programming and software development, and interactive media. (Hillside)

Microsoft Word and PowerPoint   | Prerequisite: None

Students in Microsoft IT Academies benefit from world-class Microsoft curriculum and software tools to tackle real-world challenges in the classroom environment. In the first part, students will learn to use the newest version of Microsoft Word interface, commands, and features to create, enhance, customize, share and create complex documents, and publish them. (Hillside, Jordan, Northern, Riverside, Southern)

Academy of Information Technology Courses

Digital Video Production  | Prerequisite: None

This course provides a hands-on introduction to digital video production. It guides students through all phases of digital video production, from planning, executing, and managing video shoot to editing footage. Students explore methods of sharing and broadcasting digital videos, including platform versions, CDs/DVDs, and web delivery. They also learn about publicizing a digital video, using techniques such as search engines to direct viewers to the production. (Hillside)

Computer Systems  | Prerequisite: None

This course walks students through the intricacies of setting up hardware, installing software, connecting to a network, and connecting to the Internet. Students get hands-on practice upgrading operating systems. They get practice assembling and disassembling computer hardware including peripherals, motherboards, FRUs, and connectors. Students also learn troubleshooting techniques. (Hillside)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

   


Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for the Business Management and Administration Cluster. FBLA or DECA leadership activities are integral components of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster

        Career Management

        Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher

        Entrepreneurship I

        CTE Internship

        Personal Finance

Public Safety I  | Prerequisite:  None

This course provides basic career information in public safety including corrections, emergency and fire management, security and protection, law enforcement, and legal services. Additionally students will develop a personal plan for a career in public safety. The course includes skills in each area, using resources from the community to help deliver instruction to the students. (Holton)

Public Safety II  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite:  Public Safety I

This course covers additional career information in public safety and advanced skills in corrections, emergency and fire management, security and protection, law enforcement, and legal services. The course includes advanced skills in each area, using resources from the community to help deliver instruction to the students. (Holton)

Fire Fighter Technology I  | Prerequisite:  None

 This course covers part of the NC Fire Fighter I/II combination certification modules required for all firefighters in North Carolina.  The modules include: Fire Department Orientation and Safety; Fire Prevention, Education, and Cause; Fire Alarms and Communications; Fire Behavior; Personal Protective Equipment; Portable Fire Extinguishers; and Fire Hose, Streams, and Appliances.  (Holton)

CTE Advanced Studies   | Prerequisite: Two technical credits in one Career Cluster

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. (Hillside, Northern, Jordan, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Marketing Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for Marketing Cluster courses.  DECA leadership activities are an integral component of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster:

        Career Management

        Multimedia & Webpage Design

        Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher

        Microsoft Excel & Access

        Business Law

        Personal Finance

        CTE Internship

Foundation Courses

Marketing   | Prerequisite: None

Students learn the basic concepts that contribute to effective marketing including product distribution, pricing for maximum profits, advertising and promotion, selling, and product service management. (Hillside, Jordan, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Fashion Merchandising  | Prerequisite: None

In this course students are introduced to the fashion and merchandising industries. Students acquire transferable knowledge and skills among the concepts of the business of fashion, fashion promotion events, the evolution and movement of fashion, the fashion industry, career development, merchandising of fashion, and the selling of fashion. (Jordan, Northern)

Marketing Management   (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Marketing or Fashion Merchandising

This course is designed to build on the concepts students learned in Marketing or Fashion Merchandising. Students learn how to recruit, hire, train and evaluate employees and study information management, purchasing, pricing, ethics, sales management, and financing. (Southern)

Entrepreneurship I   (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Marketing or Personal Finance or Principles of Business  and Finance

In this course students evaluate the concepts of going into business for themselves and working for or operating a small business. Emphasis is on the exploration of feasible ideas of products/services, research procedures, business financing, marketing strategies, and access to resources for starting a small business. Students develop components of a business plan and evaluate startup requirements. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, PLC, New Tech, Northern, Riverside, Southern)

Entrepreneurship II   | Prerequisite: Entrepreneurship 1

In this course students develop an understanding of pertinent decisions to be made after obtaining financing to open a small business. Students acquire in-depth understanding of business regulations, risks, management, and marketing. Students develop a small business management handbook. (Hillside, Northern, Southern)

Principles of Business & Finance   | Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to topics related to business, finance, management, and marketing to cover business in the global economy, functions of business organization and management, marketing basics, and significance of business financial and risk management. (CMA, Hillside, Jordan, New Tech, Northern, PLC, Riverside, Southern)

Honors Strategic Marketing  | Prerequisite:  It is suggested that a student be at least a Junior or Senior who has successfully completed a Marketing Education Course.

This fast-paced course challenges students by combining into one course the concepts taught in the Marketing and Marketing Management courses. The curriculum, activities, and resources utilized in this course are written at the freshman college level. The Strategic Marketing course focuses on the impact of marketing on society, procedures used in buying behavior, procedures to manage marketing information, procedures to develop and manage products, pricing procedures, promotion, marketing channels, supply chain management, retail operations, and global marketing. (Southern)

Virtual Enterprises   | Prerequisite:   Accounting I or  Business Management  or  Entrepreneurship I

In this two-credit year-long course a simulated business is set up and operated by students with the guidance of a teacher/facilitator and a business partner. Virtual Enterprises I allows students to experience all facets of being an employee in a firm in an actual business environment. Students are involved in every aspect of running a business, including human resources, accounting, product development, production, distribution, marketing and sales, and they engage in trade with other practice firms (VEs) around the world. This simulation enables students to understand how employees, workgroup teams, and departments interact with each other and work together for the goal of the company. In addition, the simulation conveys the expectations of the workplace. (Southern)

CTE Advanced Studies  | Prerequisite: Two technical credits in one Career Cluster

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. (Hillside, Northern, Jordan, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Virtual Enterprise II   | Prerequisite:  Virtual Enterprise I

Virtual Enterprise II is a continuation of the concepts learned in Virtual Enterprise I, but concepts are explored in a much deeper and enriched manner.  Course objectives which will receive particular emphasis include:  intense business and marketing vocabulary development; professional workplace terminology and processes;  in-depth studies of economics, especially supply and demand; and research and development techniques for developing and marketing new products.  The Seniors who take VE II share additional duties with the VE instructor and will act as the class leadership. (Southern)

Project Management I  | Prerequisite: None

This course will introduce students to the principles, concepts, and software applications used in the management of projects. Through project-based learning, students will understand how to use the framework of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project in authentic situations. ( Southern)

Project Management II  Global   (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Project Management I

This project-based course focuses on the impact of cultural differences and exchange rate fluctuations on business practices and the marketing mix in global markets. Students will understand factors that affect manufacturing and research location selection, the impact of local government policies and procedures on market decision making, and the use of strategic alliances to acquire additional necessary experience.  (Southern)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Science Technology, Engineering, And Mathematics Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for the Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Cluster.  TSA or SkillsUSA leadership activities are an integral component of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for  this Cluster:

        Career Management

        Multimedia & Webpage Design

        Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher

        Microsoft Excel & Access

        Biotechnology & Agriscience Research I

        Personal Finance

        CTE Internship

        Entrepreneurship I

        Principles of Business & Finance

Foundation Courses

Drafting I    | Prerequisite: None

Students learn to use graphic tools such as sketching, geometric construction, Computer Assisted Design (CAD), orthographic projection and 3D modeling. These visual communication skills are valuable tools for representing ideas in the fields of architecture, manufacturing, and engineering. (Riverside, Southern)

Drafting II Engineering    (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Drafting

This course introduces students to engineering graphics including symbol libraries and sectioning techniques. Students learn how to use coordinate systems and study the principles of machine processes including cams and gears. Students will construct 3-D wireframe models using Computer Assisted Design (CAD). (Riverside)

Drafting III – Engineering  | Prerequisite: Drafting II Engineering

This course introduces the student to advanced engineering concepts using computer assisted design (CAD) tools. Topics studied include descriptive geometry, geometric tolerancing, and advanced engineering design concepts such as surface and solid modeling. (Riverside)

Project Management I  | Prerequisite: None

This course will introduce students to the principles, concepts, and software applications used in the management of projects. Through project-based learning, students will understand how to use the framework of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project in authentic situations. ( Southern)

Project  Management II  Technology  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite:  Project Management

This project-based course focuses on the use of information technology to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of project management and integrated enterprise. Students will learn operational strategies for managing advanced technology and innovation as well as how to map the high technology operations environment to business settings. (Southern)

Scientific and Technical Visualization I   | Prerequisite: None

This state-of-the-art course introduces students to the use of complex graphic tools for visualizing technical, mathematical, and scientific ideas. Visualization activities include creating models for molecular structures, topographical maps, stratospheric and climate changes, and statistical analysis. (DSA, Hillside)

Scientific Visualization II    (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Scientific Visualization I

Students use statistical, graphic, and conceptual visualization computer applications as they work with increasingly complex data and mathematical/scientific models. They learn to analyze and communicate a variety of phenomena and explore careers that rely on this technology. (Hillside)

Technology Engineering and Design  | Prerequisite: None

Through engaging activities and hands-on project-based activities, students are introduced to the following concepts: elements and principles of design, basic engineering, problem solving, and teaming. Students apply research and development skills and produce physical and virtual models. (Hillside, New Tech, Riverside)

Technological Design   (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Technology Engineering and Design

This course continues to apply the skills, concepts, and principles of design. The design fields of graphics, industrial design, and architecture receive major emphasis. Engineering content and professional practices are presented through practical application. Working in design teams, students apply technology, science, and mathematics concepts and skills to solve engineering and design problems. Students research, develop, test, and analyze engineering designs using criteria such as design effectiveness, public safety, human factors, and ethics. (New Tech, Riverside, Hillside).

Robotics I   | Prerequisite: Technology Engineering & Design

The Robotics course is a modular and project-based curriculum that introduces students to the design process in an engaging and hands-on manner. By applying STEM principles to actual engineering projects, the curriculum helps students quickly understand the relevance of what they are learning, and mastering the fundamentals of engineering. No prior robotics experience is required; beginners are able to advance sequentially through the units to gradually increase their knowledge and skill level. The Autodesk VEX Robotics Curriculum meets content standards for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Vex Robotics competitions will be available for students through TSA. (New Tech)

Robotics II  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Robotics I

This course is a modular and project-based curriculum that engages students in advanced robotic design processes. Programming and engineering concepts are reinforced as students design and build robots to compete in simulated robotic competitions. (New Tech)

CTE Advanced Studies         | Prerequisite:Two technical credits in one Career Cluster

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to postsecondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. (Hillside, Northern, Jordan, Riverside, Southern, PLC)

Project Lead The Way Courses

Honors Introduction to Engineering Design | Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra and/or Geometry is highly recommended.

Students learn the process of product design using computer modeling software and solve design problems by developing, creating, and analyzing product models. This is one of three foundation courses required for the pre-engineering cluster and is a prerequisite for all subsequent engineering courses. (Riverside, Southern)

Honors Principles of Engineering (POE)   | Prerequisite: Project Lead The Way Introduction to Engineering Design. Successful completion of Algebra and/or Geometry is highly recommended.

Students explore engineering careers, technology systems and manufacturing processes. Through project-based studies, they learn how to strategies for solving problems using math, science, and technology. This is one of three foundation courses required for the pre-engineering cluster. (Riverside, Southern)

Honors Digital Electronics (DE)   (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Project Lead The Way Principles of Engineering     Students learn the fundamentals of electricity and electronics and use computer simulation software to design, test, and build various circuits and devices. This is one of three foundation courses required for the pre-engineering cluster. (Riverside, Southern)

Honors Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA)  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Project Lead The Way Principles of Engineering

Students collaborate on the development of community-based building projects and work on the entire process from conceptual design to project presentations. (Riverside, Southern)

Honors Aerospace Engineering (AE)  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Project Lead The Way Principles of Engineering

Students design problems related to aerospace information systems, astronautics, rocketry, propulsion, the physics of space science, space life sciences, the biology of space science, principles of aeronautics, structures and materials, and systems engineering. Using 3-D design software, students work in teams utilizing hands on activities, projects, and problems and are exposed to various situations encountered by aerospace engineers. (Riverside)

Honors Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM)  (Completer Course)| Prerequisite:  Project Lead The Way Principles of Engineering

In this course, students answer the questions: How are things made? What processes go into creating products? Is the process for making a water bottle the same as it is for a musical instrument? How do assembly lines work? How has automation changed the face of manufacturing? As students find the answers to these questions, they learn about the history of manufacturing, a sampling of manufacturing processes, robotics and automation. The course is built around several key concepts: computer modeling, Computer Numeric Control (CNC) equipment, Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software, robotics, and flexible manufacturing systems. (Riverside)

Honors Computer Science and Software Engineering (CSE)– (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Project Lead The Way Principles of Engineering

This course is project and problem based with students working in teams to develop computational thinking and solve open-ended, practical problems that occur in the real world. The course is not a programming language course; it aims instead to develop computational thinking, to generate excitement about the field of computing, and to introduce computational tools that foster creativity. Students completing the course will be well-prepared for a first course in Java or other object oriented language. (Riverside)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

Transportation, Distribution and Logistics Cluster

Special Notes about this Cluster:

Work-based learning strategies are appropriate for Marketing Cluster courses.  DECA leadership activities are an integral component of each course and provide many opportunities for practical application of instructional competencies.

Enhancement Courses for this Cluster:

Career Management

Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, & Publisher

Microsoft Excel & Access

Principles of Business & Finance

CTE Advanced Studies

CTE Internship

Personal Finance

Intro to Trade and Industrial Education

Automotive Computer System Diagnostics

Foundation Courses

Introduction to Automotive Service  | Prerequisite: None

This course introduces basic automotive skills in Service & Safety, Engine Repair, Automatic Transmissions & Transaxles, Manual Drivetrain and Axles and job opportunities in the auto repair industry. As part of the NATEF accreditation, topics are aligned to the Maintenance and Light Repair (MLR) requirements. (Northern)

Marketing Management  (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Marketing  OR Fashion Merchandising

In this course, students acquire an understanding of management environments of marketing concepts and functions. Topics include human resources, marketing information, products/services, distribution, promotion, and selling. (Southern)

Automotive Service I    |  Prerequisite:    Introduction to Automotive Service

This course introduces basic automotive skills in Suspension & Steering, Heating & Air Conditioning and Engine Performance. As part of the NATEF accreditation, topics are aligned to the Maintenance and Light Repair (MLR) requirements. (Northern, Southern)

Automotive Service II   |  Prerequisite:  Automotive Service  I

This course builds on knowledge and skills introduced in Automotive Servicing I and develops advanced knowledge and skills in vehicle system repair and/or replacement of components in the brakes, electrical systems, drivetrain, engine, HVAC and steering & suspension systems, emphasizing hands-on experience.  (Northern, Southern)

Automotive Service III   |  Prerequisite: Automotive Service II

This course builds on skills and knowledge introduced in Automotive Service I & II. Building advanced automotive skills and knowledge in vehicle servicing, testing, repair, and diagnosis of brakes, electrical systems, drive train, engine, HVAC and steering & suspension systems, while emphasizing hands-on experience. As part of the NATEF accreditation, topics are aligned to the Maintenance and Light Repair (MLR) requirements. (Northern, Southern)

Entrepreneurship I   | Prerequisite:  Marketing or  Personal Finance or  Principles of Business & Finance

In this course, students evaluate the concepts of going into business for themselves and working for or operating a small business. Emphasis is on the exploration of feasible ideas of products/services, research procedures, business financing, marketing strategies, and access to resources for starting a business. (Northern, Southern)

Project Management I   | Prerequisite: None

This course will introduce students to the principles, concepts, and software applications used in the management of projects. Through project-based learning, students will understand how to use the framework of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project in authentic situations. (Southern)

Project Management II Global   (Completer Course) | Prerequisite: Project Management  I

This project-based course focuses on the impact of cultural differences and exchange rate fluctuations on business practices and the marketing mix in global markets. Students will understand factors that affect manufacturing and research location selection, the impact of local government policies and procedures on market decision making, and the use of strategic alliances to acquire additional necessary experience.  (Southern)

Marketing:  | Prerequisite: None

In this course, students develop an understanding of the processes involved from the creation to the consumption of products/services. Students develop an understanding and skills in the areas of distribution, marketing-information management, market planning, pricing, product/service management, promotion, and selling.(Northern, Southern)

Any approved Career & College Promise and Technical Education Pathway Course may be applied to this cluster.

ROTC
  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed course.
  • ROTC programs are designed as 4-year programs. Students are encouraged but not required to complete the 4 years.
  • Students receive regulation military uniforms free of charge. Uniforms must be worn once each week and for military functions.
  • ROTC classes meet one period each day.
  • NO MILITARY SERVICE  OBLIGATION RESULTS  FROM ROTC PARTICIPATION.

Army ROTC at Hillside High School

The curriculum includes academic instruction, military drills, leadership development and supervised athletic activities. Students make trips to military facilities to observe military operations and to other schools for color guard, drill team and other competitive events. Students who complete two or more years of JROTC may receive advanced placement after completion of Army Basic Training.

Army Junior ROTC I | Prerequisite:  None

This beginning course in Leadership Development introduces students to ROTC and the Army. Students learn drills and ceremonies, first aid, and map reading while building their ability to communicate and become leaders. Students will also discuss current events.

Army Junior ROTC II | Prerequisite: Army Junior ROTC I

Leadership Development continues to be an important aspect of ROTC II. Students learn intermediate drills and ceremonies and study first aid, map-reading, and communication skills in greater depth. Students study biographical sketches and historical campaigns and discuss opportunities for scholarships and other career benefits.

Army Junior ROTC III | Prerequisite: Army Junior ROTC II

Army JROTC III stresses military leadership and managerial techniques, including a review of the duties of a leader/manager. Students increase their skills with applied map reading, land navigation, and techniques of communication and study of the role of the Army in United States history. Students will also discuss opportunities available to today’s soldier in the area of vocational knowledge and skills.


Army Junior ROTC IV | Prerequisite: Army Junior ROTC III

ROTC IV is the culmination of the JROTC program. Students

learn advanced leadership techniques as they study the psychological and moral aspect of leadership and examine group relations and behavior. In a special seminar focusing on leadership and management, students gain insight into decision making as it applies to implementing new ideas, maintaining discipline, and managing people. Cadets have multiple opportunities to assume leadership roles including preparing and presenting a lesson to the class, leading everyday functions of the corps, and reviewing how  staff responsibilities are organized and carried out.

Air Force Junior ROTC (AFJROTC) at Northern and Riverside

AFJROTC students are engaged in three  periods per week of academic  instruction, one period per week of military drills and leadership development, and one period a week of physical fitness. Students will have the opportunity to visit military installations and facilities to observe military operations and life first hand. They may also be able to take orientation flights aboard military aircraft. AFJROTC units will perform color guard and drill demonstrations at school and community events.

After graduation, students with three years of AFJROTC who qualify to serve in the military will be offered these opportunities:

  1. They may enlist in one of the Armed Forces in an advanced grade.
  2. They may have the first year of college ROTC waived upon request.
  3. They may compete for a four year ROTC scholarship with paid tuition, fees and books. The scholarship includes a tax free stipend each month for the scholarship recipient.

Aerospace Science I | Prerequisite:  Approval by Senior Aerospace Science Instructor (SASI)

The Aerospace Science curriculum for entry-level cadets consists of an introduction to aviation history. Cadets explore the subject of aviation from ancient times until present day, to include rocketry, astronomy and space exploration. The leadership curriculum for  this course includes topics pertaining to AFJROTC organization, Air Force traditions and customs, citizenship, and character development. In addition, cadets learn about and practice drill and ceremonies.  Cadets also learn about substance abuse, CPR, first aid and techniques for stress reduction, fitness and weight management. The wellness curriculum consists of one day per week of required fitness activities to include: one-mile run, push-ups, pull-ups, curl-ups, shuttle run and sit-and-reach components. Additionally, once the required elements have been completed, cadets will have an opportunity to participate in activities or sports to foster team building.

Aerospace Science II and Aerospace Science III | Prerequisite:Approval by Senior Aerospace Science Instructor (SASI)

The subject matter taught in the Aerospace Science portion of the curriculum will rotate between three different subject areas: Science of Flight, Space Exploration and Global/Cultural Awareness.

Science of Flight: Topics include the atmospheric environment, human requirements of flight, the principles of aircraft flight, the physics of flight, and basic navigation methods.

Space Exploration: Topics include history of astronomy and space flight, the solar system, space exploration and technology, manned and unmanned flights, space missions and various types of space vehicles.

Global/Cultural Awareness: Topics include historical, geographic, religious, ethnic, economic and political issues that have shaped and continue to impact on  six major geographic regions of the world including: the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Russia & the former Soviet Republics, Latin America and Europe.

 

The Leadership Education portion of this course builds students’ knowledge and ability to successfully lead/participate in squadron drill and larger formations. Additionally, students will explore the following topics:

Leadership Education 200 emphasizes effective communication skills, understanding group/team dynamics, preparing for leadership roles, conflict resolution and personal development. Students will

be given opportunities to develop and practice both written and oral communication skills.

 

Leadership Education 300 emphasizes life skills and career opportunities. Students will begin to investigate various career opportunities including college, vocational and workforce options. Students will be provided with opportunities for developing a college or job-related resume and will practice interviewing skills.  Additionally, students will be provided information on financial planning and will get hands-on experience in developing a budget.

The wellness curriculum consists of one day per week of required fitness activities to include: one-mile run, push-ups, pull-ups, curl-ups, shuttle run and sit-and-reach components. Additionally, once the required elements have been completed, cadets will have an opportunity to participate in activities or sports to foster team building.

Aerospace Science IV | Prerequisite: Approval by Senior Aerospace Science Instructor (SASI)

In this course, cadets focus on developing advanced leadership skills. Leadership Education 400 focuses on the principles of management and the key activities of managers: planning, organizing and leading. Students will be involved in the development of a cadet corps strategic plan, strategic goals and action plans to focus cadet corps activities throughout the school year. In the Aerospace Science 400 portion of the curriculum, students will have multiple opportunities to organize activities, schedule/conduct staff meetings, give briefings to the corps, prepare lessons for classroom presentation, conduct uniform inspections and lead/direct junior-level cadets in drill. The wellness curriculum consists of one day per week of required fitness activities to include: one-mile run, push-ups, pull-ups, curl-ups, shuttle run and sit-and-reach components. Additionally, once the required elements have been completed, cadets will have an opportunity to participate in activities or sports to foster team building.

Aerospace Science Drill and Ceremonies (Riverside only) | Prerequisite: Approval by Senior Aerospace Science Instructor (SASI)

Students will learn advanced techniques in both regulation and exhibition military drill. Cadets will have the opportunity to compete in several drill meets against other JROTC drill teams both in state and out of state. There is a cost associated with this class to attend the drill meets. The course meets after school each day and is a fall semester class only. Students receive one credit upon successful completion.

ESL COURSES
  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed course.
  • All courses are aligned to the ESL Essential Standards/Common Core Standards for each content area.

ESL courses provide language support with the goal of preparing students to succeed in regular education courses. Students should consult with their ESL teacher and guidance counselor to determine course placement. Course selection should be based upon language proficiency scores, number of years in US schools and classroom performance. ESL students advance in language proficiency at different rates, so they are not required to follow a rigid course sequence. They may skip to more advanced ESL courses such as ESL II or III if the criteria mentioned are met.

ESL Level 1A (10382S1A) (Jordan – 10382Y1A) |Prerequisite: None

This course is for English Language Learners, new to the English Language, within the first year in US schools. The course will focus on listening, reading, speaking and writing skills in English to prepare students’ transition to content area classes. It is also an introduction to U.S. schools and American culture.

ESL Level IB (10382S1B) (Jordan 10382Y1B) | Prerequisite: None (preferred ESL Level 1 A) ESL Level II A (10382S1B)

This course is a beginner course that students could take during the 2nd semester of their first year in US schools. Some students from ESL Level IA might be able to move to ESL Level II A. The course will focus on listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to help students progress in social and academic contexts in English.

ESL Level II   (10382S2)

This course is a continuation of ESL Level IA for English Language Learners who are within the first two years in US schools and beginning to understand language and use it in a limited capacity. The course will include a focus on listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to help students progress in social and academic contexts in English. This course is designed to prepare students in academic language skills that will be used in the content classes.

ESL Level III (10382S3) | Prerequisite: Level II or Recommendation by ESL Teacher

This course is a continuation of ESL Level II and it is for intermediate or high intermediate English Language Learners. These students participate well in most everyday situations whose language needs are with academic and idiomatic language. This course would include a focus on developing listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to help students progress mainly in academic context in the core content areas.

ESL Level IV (10382S4) | Prerequisite: Level III or Recommendation from the ESL teacher/content teacher

This course is for advanced English Language Learners whose academic language skills are expanding. These students need support with complicated literary text and academic writing. The course will emphasize reading and writing skills to help students succeed in academic contexts in the core content areas.

Advanced Reading and Writing 10292NES | Prerequisite: Level IV or recommendation from content and/or ESL teacher

This course focuses on refining reading and writing skills to help English Language Learners with the goal of exiting students from ESL Services.

Advanced Reading and Writing in the Content Area (10292NCS) | Prerequisite: Level IV or recommendation by content and/or ESL teacher

This course focuses on refining reading and writing skills to help English Language Learners with the goal of bridging the gaps in Science and Social Studies content areas and preparing them for college.

Additional ESL Sheltered Courses  | Mathematics, Health/PE, Science, Social Studies, and Career Technical Course

These courses are not offered at every school. Check with your guidance counselor or ESL teacher for information about specific courses.

ESL Sheltered Math Courses

These mathematics  courses have the same requirements as their non-sheltered versions. See the math section for complete course descriptions.

ESL MATH I | Prerequisite: None, all students take the MATH I End-of-Course Test

ESL MATH II | Prerequisite:   MATH I

ESL MATH III | Prerequisites: MATH I and MATH II, all students take the MATH II NC Final Exam Test.

ESL Sheltered Health/PE Course

ESL Health/PE has the same requirements as its non-sheltered version. See the Health/PE section for a complete course description.

ESL Health/PE | Prerequisite: None

 

ESL Sheltered Science Courses

These Science courses have the same requirements as their non-sheltered versions. See the science section for complete course descriptions.

Earth/Environmental Science | Prerequisite: None

ESL Biology I | Prerequisite: None

Physical Science | Prerequisite: Students should have successfully completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH I (Chemistry and Physics also meet the state physical science requirement.)

ESL Sheltered Social Studies Courses

These Social Studies courses have the same requirements as their non-sheltered versions. See the social studies section for complete course descriptions.

World History | Prerequisite:  None

ESL American History I | Prerequisite: ESL World History

ESL American History II | Prerequisite: ESL World History and American History I

ESL American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics | Prerequisite: ESL World History

ESL Sheltered English Courses

These English courses have the same requirements as their versions for native English speakers and are offered at every high school. These courses may be taught by an ESL teacher or a certified English teacher trained in ESL strategies.

ESL English I (10212S) | Prerequisite: Complete ESL Level 1(10382S)        

ESL English III 10232S) | Prerequisite: ESL English II

ESL English II (10222S)  | Prerequisite: ESL English I

ESL English IV(10242S) Prerequisite: ESL English III

OCCUPATIONAL COURSE OF STUDY
  • Students earn 1 unit of credit for each successfully completed course.
  • All courses are aligned with the North Carolina Common Core Standards.

Future Ready Occupational Course of Study Course Descriptions (OCS)

Occupational Course of Study English Courses (Total 4 Credits)

OCS English I  | Prerequisite: None

Students in OCS English I will use a variety of genres of literature to study literature in order to gain a better understanding of different cultures and current events in relationship to themselves. Students will be exposed to reading and writing skills necessary to write, analyze, and evaluate detailed arguments. OCS students are required to take the English I NC Final Exam (NCFE).

OCS English II  | Prerequisite: OCS English I

Students in OCS English II will study literature from a global perspective including, informational texts, poetry, drama, biographical works, and art designed to help students better understand how world cultures differ and how current  events impact their lives.  Students will continue to develop the reading and writing skills necessary to further develop analytical and persuasive writing skills. This course is directly aligned with Future Ready Core English II and OCS students are required to take the English II End of Course Exam (EOC).

OCS English III  | Prerequisite: OCS English II

OCS English III continues building on information and skills introduced in OCS English I and II.  Instruction will continue to focus on developing the ability to comprehend and utilize a variety of literary and informational texts from within the US and across the globe to better understand different cultures and the impact on current events.  Students will learn to use communication skills appropriate for a variety of settings, including formal and informal settings within employment, post-secondary education/training, independent living, and community participation.  Students will learn to critique written information, utilize decision-making skills, and express personal viewpoints within a variety of settings and life domains (including, but not limited to, employment and independent living situations).  Students will learn how to complete written forms using templates such as guides and informational resources.  Emphasis is also placed on students generating original writings. OCS students are required to take the English III NC Final Exam (NCFE).

OCS English IV  | Prerequisite: OCS English III

OCS English IV builds on the information and skills developed in OCS English I, II, and III.  In addition to continuing to develop the ability to utilize various types of written text to obtain information, students will learn to access information needed to carry out adult and independent living tasks. Instruction is provided on formal versus informal communication and completion of written forms without templates and/or guides. Students learn to discriminate between subjective and objective information in order to analyze current events and develop personal viewpoints.  Students will apply skills learned throughout the four English courses to produce a variety of written materials routinely used in employment, post-secondary education, adult and independent living, as well as within the community.  OCS students are required to take the English IV NC Final Exam (NCFE).

Occupational Course of Study Science Courses (Total of 2 Credits)

OCS Applied Science  | Prerequisite: None

Students learn about energy, the environment, conservation, and chemical exposure. The students also study the systems of the human body and learn how they work together to regulate health. Students explore these topics through hands-on activities and by applying the concepts to real world situations.

OCS Biology  | Prerequisite: None

OCS Biology exposes students to the history and development of biology including cellular biology, genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and life processes.  Students develop process and problem solving skills through hands-on activities and the application of the scientific method.  This course is directly aligned with the Future Ready Core Course of Study Biology I course.  OCS students are required to take the Biology I End of Course Exam (EOC).

Occupational Course of Study Mathematics (Total of 3 Credits)

OCS Introduction to Mathematics | Prerequisite: None

Students learn basic computation skills including the manipulation of whole numbers, decimals, fractions and percentages.  Instruction is provided in measuring time, predicting patterns, and graphing.  Students are also exposed to basic algebraic concepts.  Students will apply mathematical concepts to solve problems.

OCS MATH I | Prerequisite: OCS Introduction to Mathematics

OCS MATH I is a rigorous math course that builds on the core math concepts presented in OCS Introduction to Mathematics.  OCS MATH I students explore basic math operations, geometry, measurement, probability and statistics, and are introduced to discrete algebra.  Students will use ratios to solve problems and exponents to simplify mathematical expressions and factor algebraic expressions.  Students will also learn to analyze statistical distributions. Appropriate technology and tools, including manipulatives and calculators, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment. Students are required to take the MATH I End of Course Exam (EOC).

OCS Financial Management | Prerequisite: OCS MATH I

OCS Financial Management provides students with a foundation in financial planning and money management needed for independent living.  Students are introduced to the concepts of income and other forms of financial compensation for work performed along with state and federal income tax requirements.  Students learn about credit and how to maintain a positive credit rating.  Additional course objectives include an understanding of fiscal responsibility, including the concept of “needs vs. wants”.  Students learn about different types of insurance and how to analyze differences between banks and credit unions.  Students have opportunities to practice basic computation skills throughout this course. Occupational Course of Study Social Studies (Total of 2 Credits)

OCS American History I  | Prerequisite: None

OCS American History I introduces students to US historical events starting with the  European exploration of the “new world” and the colonial settlement, American Revolution, establishment of the US Constitution, the westward expansion, the US Civil War and reconstruction following the war.  Students also learn about the establishment of the different political parties.  Students should take this course prior to taking OCS American History II. Students are required to take the American History I NC Final Exam (NCFE).

Occupational American History II  | Prerequisite: OCS American History I

OCS American History II will guide students from the late nineteenth century time period through the early 21st century.  Starting with the end of Reconstruction through present time, students will examine the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the United States.  Students will trace the change in the ethnic composition of American society, the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women, and the role of the United States as a major world power. An emphasis is placed on the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts as well as the continuing tension between the individual and the state. The desired outcome of this course is for students to develop an understanding of the cause-and-effect relationship between past and present events, recognize patterns of interactions, and understand the impact of events on in the United States in an interconnected world.  An emphasis is also placed on individual rights, responsibilities, and self-advocacy.  Students should take this course after completing OCS American History I.  Students are required to take the American History II NC Final Exam (NCFE).

Occupational Course of Study Occupational Preparation (Total of 6 Credits)

OCS Occupational Preparation I  | Prerequisite: None

OCS Occupational Preparation I (OCC Prep I) is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals, attitudes, behaviors and habits needed to obtain, maintain, and advance employment in their chosen career fields. Students will participate in school-based learning activities designed to develop positive work ethics, job-seeking skills, decision-making skills, and self-management.  School-based work training activities will include activities such as school-based enterprises and hands-on vocational training activities completed throughout the school campus. Students begin formal career planning in this OCC Prep course and continue this process throughout the strand of OCC Prep courses.   This course is part of a sequential series of courses designed to be taken in order.

OCS Occupational Preparation II  (2 credits required) | Prerequisite: OCS Occupational Preparation

Two credits of OCS Occupational Preparation II are required for graduation with a diploma in the OCS Diploma Pathway. The two sections of OCC Prep II are designed to be offered in back-to-back course periods during the same semester.  This schedule allows students time to participate in school-based and, as appropriate, community-based vocational training.  This course is designed to allow students to develop soft skills appropriate to all careers.  Students have opportunities to develop appropriate interpersonal and problem solving skills with an understanding cultural diversity.  Students will have opportunities to develop and apply self-advocacy skills. This course provides students with opportunities to work in teams. Course activities may take place in a variety of settings including the classroom, whole school environment, and community.  

OCS Occupational Preparation III  (2 Credits Required) | Prerequisite: 2 Credits of OCS Occupational Preparation II

Two credits OCS Occupational Preparation III are required for graduation with a diploma in the OCS Diploma Pathway. It is designed to be offered in back-to-back course periods during the same semester.  This schedule allows students time to participate in school-based and community-based vocational training during the school day, if appropriate.  Students have an opportunity to apply skills learned in OCS OCC Prep I and II and continue to develop the employability skills necessary for competitive employment.  Multiple opportunities are provided for students to develop leadership and self-determination skills.

OCS Occupational Preparation IV | Prerequisite: 2 Credits of OCS Occupational Preparation III

OCS Occupational Preparation IV gives students the opportunity to synthesize all the skills acquired in previous the Occupational Preparation courses and apply them to competitive employment.  This course provides students with opportunities to apply problem-solving skills in a variety of work-related situations.  Students continue focusing on completing the remainder of school-based and community-based work training hours in addition to finding and maintaining competitive employment aligned with postsecondary goals.  Students will continue developing work portfolios outlining their educational and vocational high school experiences.  Students are required to formally present their work portfolio to a panel of DPS staff.


Future Ready Occupational Course of Study Diploma Pathway

Graduation Requirements

Content Area

OCS Requirements

English

(NC DPI Requirement)

4 Credits

OCS English I*, II**, III*, IV*

Math

(NC DPI Requirement)

3 Credits

OCS Introduction to Math, OCS MATH I**, OCS Financial Management

Science

(NC DPI Requirement)

2 Credits

OCS Applied Science, OCS Biology**

Social Studies

(NC DPI Requirement)

2 Credits

OCS American History I* & II*

Health/PE

(NC DPI Requirement)

1 Credit

Career and Technical Education (CTE) (NC DPI Requirement)

4 Credits

Electives

(DPS Requirement)

6 Credits

(At least one credit in an art discipline recommended)

Additional Course Requirements

(NC DPI Requirement)

6 Credits

OCS Occupational Preparation I, II***, III***, IV

Additional Graduation Requirements:

(NC DPI Requirements)            

•  Vocational Training Hours                                                                      

          • 150  School-Based

          • 225  Community-Based

          • 225 Paid, Competitive Employment vs. Combination of

                     paid competitive, school-, and community-based****

•  OCS Work Portfolio, including formal presentation

•  Evidence of IEP Goal Mastery

*Student is required to take the NC Final Exam (NCFE)

**Student is required to take NC End of Course Exam (EOC)

***Student is required to take two credits of OCS Occupational Preparation II & III

****Student is required to submit copies of official paystubs to document completion of paid, competitive employmen

Future Ready Occupational Course of Study | Transcript Audit

Name: ________________________________________________________________________    

 Counselor: _____________________________________________________________________

Post-School Goals: _______________________________________________________________

Graduation Requirements:

OCS English

Credit Earned

OCS Math

Credit Earned

OCS Science

Credit Earned

OCS Social Studies

Credit Earned

I

Intro. to Math

Applied Science

American History I

II

OCS MATH I

Biology

American History II

III

Financial Manage.

IV

CTE Courses

Credit Earned

Occupa-

tional Prep

Credit Earned

Electives

Credit Earned

Health/

PE

Credit Earned

CTE #1

OCC Prep I

Elective I

CTE #2

OCC Prep II (2 credits)

Elective II

Health

 (.5 Credit)

CTE #3

OCC Prep III (2 credits)

Elective III

PE

(.5 Credit)

CTE #4

OCC Prep IV

Elective IV

Elective V

Elective VI

Vocational Training Hrs

OCS Work Portfolio

150

School-Based

Document

Presentation

225 Community-Based

225

Paid vs. Combination of Paid, Scho0l-, and Community-Based

Learning Strategies | Prerequisite: None

This course is designed for students with a disability who have a documented need for specialized instructional support as determined by the IEP team.  Specific learning strategies are taught to promote their success in all academic areas.  Students learn to strengthen their organizational skills.  They also learn strategies with test taking, listening, note taking, writing, and vocabulary taught by a special education teacher.  Students may spend part of each class period implementing the learned strategies in their current coursework.

Decision-Making | Prerequisite: None

This course is designed for students with disabilities who require specialized instructional support in social skills instruction including behavior management techniques and social skill development as documented in the IEP.  Students learn to respond appropriately to life situations by adapting their behavior to different roles and settings.  Students learn to consider the consequences for their decisions, to take ownership of their choices, and to solve problems.

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Chrissy Pearson

Chief Communications Officer

919-560-9112

chrissy.pearson@dpsnc.net

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