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A
THRIVING

LĀHUI

* A compiled list of resources and opportunities to help our community 
stay connected to the widely held goal of a thriving lāhui 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Mālama Mauli Ola

‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i

Historical roots

Current issues affecting Hawai‘i

Cultural practices

Resources for keiki and ‘ohana

Resources for kumu

Examples of Hawaiian culture based education

* This is an organic, living list curated by the community (last updated 3/31/20)

Mālama Mauli Ola

Resources that help ʻohana to ensure that the well-being of their homes and everyone in the ʻohana are taken care of. It also includes opportunities for you to kōkua with ʻohana in need.

Resource

Type

Description

Show Aloha Challenge

Food

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#ShowAlohaChallenge is a collaborative effort with the goal of delivering 7,600 FREE meals to homebound seniors over 10 days. From Monday, March 30, through Wednesday, April 8, 2020, eleven restaurants will each prepare 60 meals a day.

Sign up today! Seniors must meet the following criteria to qualify for the program and each request will be assessed on a case by case basis:

  • Must be 60 years or older
  • Have an underlying health condition that puts them at risk for further medical complications
  • Have limited resources such as limited family support to prepare meals or no reliable transportation
  • Not receiving services from other government-subsidized meal programs, including home delivered meals.

Seniors who would like to sign up for the meal delivery service may call St. Francis Healthcare System at (808) 547-6501. https://www.showalohachallenge.com/

Mortgage Payment Forbearance

Housing

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The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act provides relief for homeowners with government-guaranteed mortgages.  Homeowners with mortgages backed by the FHA, USDA, VA, HUD Section 184a, Fannie Mae, or Freddie Mac are eligible for loan forbearance for up to one year without fees, penalties, or additional interest.

Homeowners who are facing a financial hardship, either directly or indirectly, from the coronavirus may receive the forbearance by submitting a request to their servicer stating they are experiencing a hardship related to the virus.  The forbearance will be granted for 180 days and may be extended for up to another 180 days at the borrower's request.

Homeowners in need of the forbearance should reach out to their mortgage servicers as soon as possible or contact a HUD approved housing counselor.  Contact information for a homeowner’s mortgage servicer can be found in monthly mortgage statements or coupon book.  The nearest housing counselor can be found here or by calling (800) 569-4287.

Eviction Moratorium for Renters



Housing

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Until July 26, 2020, property owners are prohibited from filing for eviction against or charging any fees for unpaid rent and fees to a tenant in properties with federally-guaranteed loans or participating in federal housing programs.  Property owners must also issue a notice to tenants to vacate 30 days before an eviction and the notice to vacate cannot be issued during this 120-day period.

This protection covers properties that receive federal subsidies such as public housing, Section 8 assistance, USDA rural housing programs, and Low Income Housing Tax Credits, as well as properties that have a mortgage issued or guaranteed by a federal agency (including FHA and USDA) or Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.

Additionally, owners of multifamily buildings with federal loans in forbearance may not evict tenants for unpaid rent or charge late fees or penalties until the loan exits forbearance.

Renters seeking information on whether they are covered by the moratorium should contact Legal Aid Society of Hawaii or a HUD approved housing counselor.  You can find the nearest housing counselor here or by calling (800) 569-4287.

Fabric Mask Template

Masks

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With new research showing that wearing masks can help slow the spread of COVID-19, people in the community like Kini Zamora are providing fabric templates to make masks for yourself or others. In addition, here's a video sewing tutorial explaining how to sew the project. If you would like one that allows for the addition of a disposable inner layer (e.g., a HEPA filter), this video tutorial accommodates that addition.

Kahiau Community Assistance Program

Financial Assistance

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This Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement Kahiau Community Assistance Program (KCAP) provides one-time emergency financial assistance (up to $2000) to Native Hawaiian beneficiaries facing hardship due to an unexpected crisis.  KCAP is made possible through a grant from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and aims to provide stability for Native Hawaiians during emergency situations.

Keep Hawaii Cooking - Split the Bill with Central Pacific Bank

Food

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Central Pacific Bank Foundation will reimburse anyone in Hawaii for 50% of the cost of a takeout, delivery, drive-through, or curbside pick-up meal (up to $100) in order to support our local restaurants, their employees, and our hard-hit community to help #KeepHawaiiCooking. CPB Foundation will keep the promotion going until $100,000 is given back to the community.* The money will be sent to you via Venmo or Paypal. If you do not have Venmo or Paypal, you can create an account with either money transfer program. 

A really great opportunity to enjoy some ʻawa and ʻai or help others in need of kōkua through awaandai.com.

Department of Labor and Industrial Relations

Website

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State established NEW Unemployment Webform for filing unemployment Claims

Job opportunities at DLIR

Contact Info:

Oahu: 586-8970

Hilo: 974-4086

Kona: 322-4822

Maui: 984-8400

Kauai: 274-3043

Password Reset:  762-5751

Make an appointment to setup a claim over the phone: 762-5752

In-person claims not accepted at this time.

DOE “grab and go” meals for keiki and ‘ōpio


Meals for keiki and ‘ōpio (18 and under)

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Breakfast service hours: 7:30 to 8 a.m.

Due to food safety, the meal must be consumed by 10 a.m.

Lunch service hours: 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. (noon)

Due to food safety, the meal must be consumed by 2 p.m.

 

Honolulu District

  • Kaimukī High
  • McKinley High Central
  • Sanford B. Dole Middle School
  • Farrington High

Central Oʻahu District

  • Leilehua High
  • Makalapa Elementary
  • Waialua High & Intermediate

Maui District 

  • Hāna High & Elementary
  • Kahului Elementary
  • Kalama Intermediate
  • Lāhaina Intermediate
  • Lānaʻi High School
  • Molokaʻi High

Kauaʻi District 

  • Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School
  • Kapaʻa High
  • Waimea High

Windward Oʻahu District

  • Kahaluʻu Elementary
  • Kahuku High & Intermediate
  • King Intermediate
  • Waimānalo Elementary & Intermediate
  • Kailua Elementary

Leeward Oʻahu District

  • August Ahrens Elementary
  • Campbell High
  • Kapolei High School
  • Maili Elementary
  • Nānāikapono Elementary
  • Nānākuli High & Intermediate
  • Waiʻanae Intermediate
  • Waiʻanae High
  • Waipahu Elementary

Hawaiʻi Island District

  • Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary
  • Kohala High
  • Konawaena High
  • Pāhoa High & Intermediate
  • Honokaʻa High
  • Kahakai Elementary
  • Waimea Elementary  
  • Waiākea High

Kūpuna Hours

Food and essentials

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For kūpuna to keep them safer from Covid-19 while shopping or banking

  • Target will reserve the first hour of shopping on Wednesdays for senior citizens.
  • Foodland will set aside the first hour of business at stores statewide on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday to serve only those 60 and older and their caretakers. The program will start Thursday and continue through March 31.  As a bonus, Seniors are given a 5% discount on grocery purchases on Thursday only.
  • Times Supermarkets will reserve the first hour of its store opening every day for seniors and people with serious chronic medical conditions. The change will go into effect on Friday until further notice.
  • Tamura’s Market will open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 7:15 to 8 a.m. for seniors (age 60 and older) and an accompanying family member or caregiver. This will start Friday and continue through March 30.
  • Whole Foods Market stores will open for seniors 60 and older one hour before opening.
  • American Savings, Bank of Hawaii, and  First Hawaiian banks will be temporarily closing some branches. Other branches will offer a Kupuna Hour during the first hour of operation, with slight differences among the different banks. Please click on the above hotlinks to see the specifics.

Hawaiʻi Resilience Fund

Community fund to combat Covid-19

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Hawaiʻi Community Foundation and Pierre and Pam Omidyar have joined together to create the Hawaiʻi Resilience Fund to rapidly deploy resources and encourage community giving to address the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Funding will be used to support the work of the public health sector and community-based nonprofits to implement actions targeted at reducing the spread of the COVID-19. This includes protecting the health care workers on the front-lines who are playing a critical role in testing and screening. The Fund will also expand regional test sites and screenings, and support self-quarantine measures, such as home visits and distribution of food supplies to populations disproportionately impacted by the outbreak.

Grants will be provided to specific health care organizations and nonprofits currently working in appropriate spaces. In an effort to move resources swiftly and to reduce the burden on organizations serving on the frontlines, HCF is forgoing a formal application process at this time. As fundraising continues to address the outbreak and the future recovery phases of the crisis, additional funding will be awarded on a rolling basis, making it possible to quickly adapt to evolving needs. Information on grantees to date can be found here.

For those who want to give during this critical time, the newly-established Hawaiʻi Resilience Fund provides community members with the ability to respond to the growing needs across our state.

If you would like to make a gift to the Fund, credit card gifts are preferred and may be made here.

Aloha Harvest

Food

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Aloha Harvest will rescue unused food from canceled events and deliver it to nonprofits feeding the hungry. Call 808-537-6945 or email info@alohaharvest.org

Chef Hui

Food

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A network of chefs and restaurateurs that want to support their community in any way we can. In good times and bad we serve our community and make sure that everyone is uplifted in some capacity. We believe that it is our kuleana as chefs and as part of the local community here in Hawai’i, to do our best to take care of the people and place all around us.

Hale Kealoha ʻAi Pono Meal Service

Meal Service for kūpuna and ‘ohana

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You can sign up for your ‘ohana or sponsor meals for kūpuna. They are also looking for help delivering meals. ‘Ohana meals 7 dinners for 4, $300. Kūpuna meals, 7 single packaged dinners, $50. To order, call 808-425-2516. Payment can be made through Venmo @Nanye-Hong. Kupuna delivery only & ‘ohana meal pick up available on certain days.

Hawaiʻi Grinds at Home

Food

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Inspired by Dining at a Distance on the East Coast, Hawaii Grinds @ Home is a crowdsourced database of restaurants in Hawaii that are offering take out, delivery, or gift card sales, allowing you to feed your family while also supporting Hawaii businesses.

Food delivery, takeout, and curbside pickup

Food

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Find restaurants offering take-out, delivery, or curbside pick up

Safeway Delivery Service

Food

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For ʻohana who cannot get out to shop, Safeway stores have a delivery service for certain areas in Hawaiʻi. Certain fees may apply.

Find a Farmer

Food

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With many of the farmers’ markets closed, it can be difficult to find locally grown produce. Here’s a list of farmers that may have produce and CSA boxes.

Hawaii Foodbank

Food

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The Hawaii Foodbank’s Food Assistance program distributes food through their non-profit partner agencies. See listing for locations and hours of operation.

Feeding our Keiki and Kūpuna

Community service, food distribution  group

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This weekly program continues for Honokaʻa, via the Peace Committee of Honoka‘a Hongwanji Buddhist Temple. Fridays, 4-5:30p.m., take out only.

HONU: COVID-19 Resources for Nonprofits

Resources for Nonprofit

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HANO has collected a number of resources to help nonprofit organizations manage and respond to the effects of COVID-19. The resources currently consist of:  Resources for Your Employees, What Nonprofits Need to Know, Hawaii-Specific Information, Managing Events and Conferences, Human Resources and Telework, Webinars to Help You Navigate COVID-19 Issues, Free or Discounted Services

Hawaiʻi Meals on Wheels

Food

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If you are under 60, but have difficulty getting around or preparing meals, you may be eligible for services. Call them directly at 988-6747 for more information. Hawaiʻi Meals on Wheels are  also in need of volunteers  to deliver meals to our Kūpuna.  Contact Brad Akamu, Volunteer Coordinator, by email or at (808) 784.2756.

Aloha United Way: COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund

Community fund to help those affected by COVID-19

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Aloha United Way’s Hawaii COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund was activated to swiftly raise and deploy flexible resources to local nonprofit agencies supporting those affected by the coronavirus outbreak. Through trusted partnerships, the Fund will provide support for local nonprofit organizations to address: Food insecurity, Housing and shelter needs, Rent/utility access, Disaster/crisis response, Medical needs, andChildcare and eldercare

Mālama Meals

Food distribution group

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Provides food security to communities in need or at risk due to actions taken to contain COVID-19 by distributing nourishing, freshly made meals and supplies prepared under strict health and safety protocol. If you or your community’s food security has been impacted by COVID-19, please use the Request Mālama Meals contact form or phone our call center Monday – Saturday  9am – 5pm at (808) 943-MEAL (6325). We are able to reliably provide meals for large groups. However, please understand that we do not service individuals.

Kūpuna Sponsorship Program 

Food Distribution, Kūpuna Service

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Connect kūpuna with sponsors that are COVID-19 free and are willing to pick-up groceries, medication, and necessary supplies so that the kupuna can stay home while the COVID-19 outbreak passes.Sign up a kupuna here.

Activate Hawaiʻi Aid

Community Resource Hub; Food Distribution

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Activate Hawaiʻi Aid is a concerted effort to bring the community together and activate an island wide network of resilience hubs to help the most vulnerable get the support they need during this public health emergency. To help AHA distribute care packages to keiki, island wide donate today. The packs are roughly $15 and  include food, a few school supplies, recipes for families to try, and mental health support resources for parents. Click here to make a donation.

Foodland: Market for Produce and Products

Resource for Farmers

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Aids local farmers and ranchers affected by the COVID-19 by providing an outlet to buy and sell local produce

Pop-up Mākeke

Online market

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This Pop-Up Mākeke is intended to support Hawaiiʻs small business owners, particularly our Native Hawaiian-owned businesses, who depend heavily on community events, gatherings, craft fairs, and farmers markets to feed their families. Its goal in this window of Covid-19 limitations is to create a centralized online marketplace for customers to have easy access to local products.

This mākeke will feature weekly facebook live segments that will highlight products from the mākeke, talk story sessions with some of Hawaii’s top talent.

This mākeke is organized by the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement with a grant from the Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority.

If you are interested in selling products in this mākeke, please check out this Pop-up Mākeke website for more information and an application.

If you are interested in purchasing locally made products to help out Hawaiʻi crafters, artisans, and other small locally made product producers, please stay tuned for more information.

Spectrum 60-day free internet service (for new customers only)

 Internet Service for NEW customers

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For new customers. Families with children in school/college who currently donʻt have internet service - Spectrum is offering a free internet promotional service for 60 days.  To access this service, encourage families to obtain instructions for discontinuing the service to avoid being financially responsible after the 60 day period.

  1. Call Spectrum: 1-855-243-8892
  2. Speak to the Sales Team
  • AUTOMATED QUESTION - Phone Number: say, "I don't have an account" or press 2
  • AUTOMATED QUESTION - What are you calling about: say "Setting up a new account" or press 2
  •  Say or Enter your Zipcode
  1. When speaking with the Sales Team operator:
  • Let them know that you have a student in your home that is in pre-school - college and ask to take advantage of the free 60 day service due to the Coronavirus epidemic.
  1. The sales team will set families up during the phone call and make arrangements for equipment pick up or for the equipment to be mailed to the families. Families need to provide a physical and mailing address. The operator may ask for the name of the children's school(s).
  2.  After the 60 days are done, families will need to cancel the service and return the equipment to avoid being charged.

Tax relief

Taxes

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The IRS has established a special section focused on steps to help taxpayers, businesses and others affected by the coronavirus. This page will be updated as new information is available.

Filing and Payment Deadline Extended to July 15, 2020

The Treasury Department and Internal Revenue Service announced March 21, 2020 that the federal income tax filing due date is automatically extended from April 15, 2020, to July 15, 2020.

Taxpayers can also defer federal income tax payments due on April 15, 2020, to July 15, 2020, without penalties and interest, regardless of the amount owed. This deferment applies to all taxpayers, including individuals, trusts and estates, corporations and other non-corporate tax filers as well as those who pay self-employment tax.

Taxpayers do not need to file any additional forms or call the IRS to qualify for this automatic federal tax filing and payment relief. Individual taxpayers who need additional time to file beyond the July 15 deadline, can request a filing extension by filing Form 4868 through their tax professional, tax software or using the Free File link on IRS.gov. Businesses who need additional time must file Form 7004.

The IRS urges taxpayers who are due a refund to file as soon as possible. Most tax refunds are still being issued within 21 days.

IRS has several online resources to help taxpayers.

  • Free File - prepare and file your federal income tax return for free using tax preparation and filing software.
  • Where's My Refund? - is an online tool that will track your tax refund. You will need your Social security number or ITIN, your filing status and your exact refund amount to use the tool.
  • Online Payment Agreements - you can apply for a payment plan online to pay off your balance over time.
  • IRS2Go mobile app - Check your refund status, make a payment, find free tax preparation assistance, sign up for helpful tax tips, and more!
  • Online Account – use this tool to view: Your payoff amount, updated for the current calendar day, the balance for each tax year for which you owe, up to 24 months of your payment history and key information from your current tax year return as originally filed.

Healthcare plans

Health

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The Internal Revenue Service on March 11th, 2020 advised that high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) can pay for 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)-related testing and treatment, without jeopardizing their status. This also means that an individual with an HDHP that covers these costs may continue to contribute to a health savings account (HSA).

In Notice 2020-15 (PDF), posted on March 11th, 2020 on IRS.gov, the IRS said that health plans that otherwise qualify as HDHPs will not lose that status merely because they cover the cost of testing for or treatment of COVID-19 before plan deductibles have been met. The IRS also noted that, as in the past, any vaccination costs continue to count as preventive care and can be paid for by an HDHP.

This notice applies only to HSA-eligible HDHPs. Employees and other taxpayers in any other type of health plan with specific questions about their own plan and what it covers should contact their plan.

Small Business Administration Disaster Loan Program 

Loans for small businesses affected by Coronavirus

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Hawai‘i small businesses suffering financial losses due to the impact of COVID-19 can now file for low-interest working capital loans of up to $2 million from the Small Business Administration (SBA).

The SBA approved a certification request submitted by Gov. David Ige, clearing the way for Hawai‘i small businesses to participate in the SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan Assistance Program. The loans can be used to pay fixed debts, payroll and other bills that can’t be paid because of a disaster’s impact.

Interest rates are 3.75 percent for small businesses without credit available elsewhere. The interest rate for non-profits is 2.75 percent. Terms are determined on a case by case basis, based upon a borrower’s ability to repay.

For more information, please go to this State of Hawaiʻi Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism site. 

Academic Labor United - UH Community 

Hardship Fund

UH Student aid

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For UH students who are in need of assistance in this time of Covid-19 uncertainty, or for anyone who might be able to offer them aid. This portal shares information about where donations can be directed and provides a way for UH students to seek help.

Loan Assistance

Loans

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 American Savings qualifying customers experiencing hardships due to Covid-19 may receive assistance for up to 3 months in the form of a:

  • Loan forbearance
  • Loan deferment
  • Loan extension

Bank of Hawaiʻi’s Loan Forbearance Program

  • Provides loan forbearance for up to 6 months for residential mortgages, home equity loans and home equity lines.
  • Forbearance amount can include a partial loan payment up to full payment based on the amount the borrower can afford to pay.
  • The total amount of payments deferred will be due on the first due date following the end of the forbearance term, or according to terms of the repayment plan.

Extension Program

  • Provides a loan extension for up to 6 months for products, including: direct installment (personal loans) and indirect loans (auto).
  • Principal and interest payments will be deferred for the term of the extension.
  • Full payments are due on the first due date following the end of the term of the extension.

First Hawaiian Bank

  • Personal Loans
  •  First Hawaiian Bank is offering loan assistance in the form of consumer loan deferrals and mortgage loan forbearance. Loan deferrals with extensions of up to three months are available for personal loans, auto loans and credit cards.
  • First Hawaiian Bank’s mortgage forbearance program allows for a customized, flexible partial payment program designed to fit your needs. To learn more about either of these loan relief programs, click here or call 808-844-4444 or toll free at 1-888-844-4444.
  • Small business:  First Hawaiian Bank offers a wide range of relief options including payment deferrals and fee waivers to help you through this difficult time. Please reach out to your banker or call 808-844-4444 or toll free at 1-888-844-4444 for assistance.

Centers for Disease Control: Mental Health and Coping

Website

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Information and resources for addressing mental health during this time of crisis. Topics include: Reducing stress in yourself and others, information for parents, information for responders, and information for people released from quarantine.

The Trevor Project

Lifeline

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The Trevor Project is the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer & questioning (LGBTQ) young people under 25.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255)

Lifeline

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National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. The Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals.

Aloha Viral Facebook Group

Facebook Group

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Connect with the community, get connected to resources you might need, share resources and help others in need.

Coronacare Hawai‘i

Facebook Group

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Solidarity not charity. Coronacare Hawai‘i is a solidarity network built to meet the needs of our communities during the COVID-19  novel coronavirus crisis.We are not a charity. We are a mutual aid network based on human solidarity. We give according to our ability, and receive according to our needs. We recognize that what hurts one, hurts all. We share a common interest in the struggle against the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as against those who seek personal profit while people suffer and die. We know that individually we are weak, but together we are strong.

We are limited in our resources but are offering what support we can, and are looking to evolve and grow along with people’s needs. If you or someone you know is in need of any of the following services, please email us at help@coronacarehi.org.

  • Grocery or supply pick-up/drop-off
  • Childcare
  • Petcare
  • Cooking/cooked food
  • Transportation
  • Conversation/Companionship

Members of our network are educated on basic disease prevention techniques. We do everything in our power to limit the spread of the virus while we provide services.

We are always looking to expand our network, so if you are willing to volunteer or have resources to offer, message or email us at volunteer@coronacarehi.org!

Hawaiʻi Children's Action Network

Community Resources

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Provides a map and information of all remaining open childcare programs for essential employees, food vendors, and keiki food pick-up locations.

Hawai‘i Music Artists Stay at Home Virtual Performances

Facebook Group

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Hawaiʻi has always been a hub for many of the music industryʻs most talented musicians.  With the recent effects of this global pandemic, many are now suffering loss of income due to performance cancellations as a result of government and health officialsʻ orders to keep everyone under quarantine.  

While income may be a huge part of the loss they are experiencing, an even greater loss comes from the joy they get from simply sharing their music and aloha.  This has led to a surge of FREE online performances for all who care to listen.  

As such, this group is intended to serve as a virtual comprehensive calendar for ALL who are interested in knowing about upcoming LIVE virtual performances from our Hawaiʻi Artists, both locally and abroad.

Crisis Text Line

Lifeline

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Text from anywhere in the USA to text with a trained Crisis Counselor.

Every texter is connected with a Crisis Counselor, a real-life human being trained to bring texters from a hot moment to a cool calm through active listening and collaborative problem solving. All of Crisis Text Line's Crisis Counselors are volunteers, donating their time to helping people in crisis.

Become a volunteer Crisis Counselor for Crisis Text Line

Lionrock Anxiety Support Meetings

Online support group

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Free online anxiety support meetings via Lionrock. Everyone struggling with anxiety about COVID-19 is welcome! Together, we will learn to feel more centered and empowered in the face of this great challenge.

Starting Monday March 23rd, Lionrock will offer a support meeting for people struggling with anxiety related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Structured as an on-going workshop (it is not psychotherapy), the COVID-19 Anxiety Support Meeting will teach coping skills and be a place to share and connect with others also feeling the effects of this crisis.

MindTrails Project

Website

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The MindTrails Project is a web-based, public research site that offers free interpretation bias training programs to promote healthier thinking patterns for people with anxiety and other emotional difficulties. Research shows that people prone to anxiety tend to think about situations negatively. MindTrails programs give you practice thinking about situations in new ways. This encourages more flexible thinking styles in your everyday life. Learn more about the science. Developed by an interdisciplinary team of clinical psychologists, computer scientists, and engineers at the University of Virginia, MindTrails aims to efficiently test which training programs work best for different people and problem areas.

Utilities Updates

Utilities

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Check out the latest updates and modified payment options from utilities providers:

HECO has suspended disconnections for non-payment for at least 30 days, until April 17, and may extend that period depending on the situation at the time.  Customers who are having trouble paying their electric bills because of the coronavirus emergency are encouraged to call HECO about payment options and schedules.

Allstate

Insurance

Customers facing financial challenges can now request a special payment plan that allows auto and property insurance premium payment to be delayed for 60-days without penalty.

Geico 

Insurance

From 3/20 through 4/30, Geico will be pausing cancellation of coverage due to non-payment to support those experiencing the economic strains of the Coronavirus.

Simplicityhr by Altres 

Employer Resources

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Provides resources for employers across the State regarding unemployment insurance assistance and Federal assistance programs

Online Fitness

Physical Fitness

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Free online fitness offerings that you can do at home:

Access to a limited collection of online yoga and meditation classes.

Access live yoga classes on the Open Space website.

Free access to all apps - Down Dog, Yoga for Beginners, HIIT, Barre, and 7 minute workouts - until May 1. Free access until July 1 for all students, teachers, and healthcare workers.

New 30-minute workout video each day, featuring some of its most popular coaches from around the world. According to the fitness center, the workouts don't require any special equipment, but may feature everyday household items.

Live streaming "Work-Ins" at 1pm  everyday on Facebook. The company said its trainers, and occasionally surprise celebrity guests, will lead the 20-minute workouts, which are free for everyone.

Online, on-demand classes for free. There are classes for various age groups, from kids to kūpuna.

Offering cardio dance live streams twice a day on YouTube. The sessions are held at 6am and 12pm.

Tiny Habits

Webinars

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Free 15-45 minute sessions to apply Behavior Design to coronavirus challenges. Topics include: Tiny Habits for Generosity, Tiny Habits for Staying Upbeat on Lockdown, Bodyweight Strength Training at Home, 3 Tiny Habits for Strengthening Your Immune System, How to Foster Calm During Uncertainty, and Tiny Meditation Habits for Fostering Resilience to Stress. Check the page often, as new trainings will be added frequently.

Tiny Habitscreated by Dr. BJ Fogg, a world-renowned Behavior Scientist at Stanford University—is based on 20 years of research and Dr. Fogg’s experience personally coaching over 40,000 people. This system—what Dr. Fogg has coined “Behavior Design”—cracks the code of habit formation.

Meditation

Websites

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Free online offerings that you can do at home:

The world's largest collection of free guided meditations, with over 30,000 titles.

Calm includes collections of meditations, Sleep Stories, mindfulness tools, nature scenes and music for focus, relaxation and sleep. One week free trial membership.

Headspace includes guided meditations, animations, articles and videos.

Daily Inspiration

Website

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Free online Kamehameha Schools Our Faith  publications and resources of daily devotionals and scripture passages, mele, and stories of faith.

Kanu Hawaiʻi

Website

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COVID-19: Respond with Aloha - Kanu focuses on connecting community organizations with individuals wishing to volunteer, along with additional resource listings.  Their goal is to help minimize the spread of COVID-19 while supporting community efforts, as long as it’s safe to do so.

  • Support local businesses and trade the skills you have to get what you need through the Kokua Exchange, a Hawaii focused time bank.

https://kokuaexchange.timebanks.org/directory 

  • Volunteer - Give time and find volunteers
  • Supporting Items needed and items that can be donated.

Hawaiʻi Public Health Institute: COVID-19 Impact Webinars

Webinars

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The Hawai‘i Public Health Institute (HIPHI) will be offering a series of webinars on the impact of COVID-19 on our communities.

The  webinar will offer participants a practical guide on the latest information on prevention and management of the Coronavirus and its effect on public health. Join experts in this webinar series to learn strategies and practices of sheltering in place and social distancing to prevent the spread of disease.

‘ŌLELO HAWAI‘I

Resources to help you learn and enjoy ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi

Resource

Type

Description

Kaniʻāina

Audio recordings

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Listen to mānaleo from across the pae ʻāina share moʻolelo and mele of ʻāina, traditions, history, and much more. These audio interviews, with some transcripts, were conducted by Larry Lindsey Kauanoe Kimura from 1972 to 1988 for the “Ka Leo Hawaiʻi” radio program. Hear dialectal differences, traditional phone greetings, ʻōlelo noʻeau, humor, a ia mea aku, ia mea aku e ulu ai ka hoi. Perform topic/word searches. This collection is part of Ulukau.org. E nenea ka pepeiao i nā leo o ka ʻāina!

Mānaleo video archive in Kaʻiwakīloumoku

Video

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Eight episodes of precious ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi conversations with mānaleo.

‘Ōlelo Online

Online ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi lessons and learning resources

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Learn Hawaiian language at your own pace with interesting audio, video, and textual lessons.

ʻŌlelo Online offers video lessons about Hawaiian grammar and structure given in plain English language in a "pen and blackboard" format, with accompanying documentation. There are also audio samples for absolute beginners, intermediate beginners, and budding Hawaiian language speakers. Listen to them to test your comprehension and practice your pronunciation.

Described in the videos are the Hawaiian grammatical structures and their relationships to English grammar. You will also learn about Hawaiian culture and how the language carries cultural understandings which can help inform learners who may not be familiar with the Hawaiian culture or the "local" culture here in the Islands.

E Hoʻoulu Lāhui

College-level ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi resources

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University of Hawaiʻi Maui College, Hawaiian Studies and Language resources for students in HAWN 301 - 402, including moʻolelo, mele, and analula.

Kauakūkalahale

Articles

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‘Ōlelo Hawaiʻi editorial columns by Lāiana Wong and friends published in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser and archived in this website.

Duolingo

Mobile or desktop app

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This is a free interactive app that offers 30 ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi lessons that involve common everyday contexts that we all encounter. It’s a fun way to learn anytime, anywhere you have internet connectivity and a device (phone, tablet, laptop, etc.).

Tinycards - Duolingo

Mobile or desktop app

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Tinycards by Duolingo is a free and fun flashcard app that enables you to create your own online flashcards to use for yourself or share with others.  The bite-sized lessons help you  to master anything , including the Hawaiian language.  Itʻs a fun way to learn anytime, anywhere you have internet connectivity and a device (phone, tablet, laptop, etc.).

Lehulehu

Mobile Application

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Developed by Ke Kula ʻo Samuel M. Kamakau Hawaiian-focused Charter School, this application allows users to practice their ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi with others in a format similar to Words with Friends and Scrabble.  Download it from your favorite app store.

Kulāiwi

Video Lessons

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These online lessons offer a free guide to learning ‘ōlelo Hawaiʻi. Enjoy the 24 lessons hosted by Kumu Ekela Kaniaupio Crozier and a host of her friends that joined in too.

Nā Kai ʻEwalu - Learn Hawaiian

Videos

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These online lessons by Kumu Ahonui are based on the Hawaiian language textbook Nā Kai ʻEwalu - Book 1 (Chapters 1-10) published by UH-Hilo.

Useful phrases and vocabulary

Helpful starter phrases and vocabulary

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This ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi ʻOe website offers easy phrases and vocabulary to jumpstart people using ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi in everyday contexts like eating, shopping, enjoying a hula performance, and fun things like that. If folks rather have a hardcopy to print out, here are some for when you are:

Nā Puke Wehewehe ʻŌlelo

Hawaiʻi

Website

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A compilation of the Hawaiian Dictionary, Parker Dictionary, Māmaka Kaiao, Andrews Dictionary, Place Names of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Place Names, and the Combined Hawaiian Dictionary - an Ulukau Project.

ʻŌleloflix



Netflix, Disney Plus, and Amazon Prime Video

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ʻŌleloflix, to be released in March 2020, is an ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi lāhui-sourced captioning and dubbing platform for streaming movie services. It allows anyone — you — to contribute to Hawaiian language renormalization and learning efforts, and makes enjoying mainstream movies in ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi a reality!  With the click of the  button, the ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi captioned and dubbed movies are made available to people who have installed the ʻŌleloflix Chrome Extension and watch movies on popular streaming services such as Netflix, Disney+, and Prime Video.
Additional information:
Draft video |  website |  about 

Ulukau

Website

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This online resource provides access to an online Hawaiian dictionary and access to old Hawaiian language newspapers. It includes resources like nupepa.org, wehewehe.org, and a whole lot more.

Niuolahiki

Website

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This online resource offers  self-directed online Hawaiian language lessons offered by the ‘Aha Punana Leo.  These lessons are user-friendly, self-paced, convenient, and affordable.  Cost is $30 per chapter.

Ka Leo ‘Oiwi

Website

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This online resource provides a good foundation in Hawaiian through the interaction of characters and suggestions for practical use in daily conversations

Manomano

Website

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Developed by Ke Kula ʻo Samuel M. Kamakau Hawaiian-focused Charter School, this online resource provides access to an online Hawaiian dictionary, words of the day, and flashcards. 

Clinton Kanahele Collection

Website

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Clinton Kanahele (1902-1979) spent his career as an educator in Hawaiʻi. He spoke fluent Hawaiian and was dedicated to the preservation of the Hawaiian language.  From June-September 1970, Kanahele interviewed 20 kūpuna from around the pae ʻāina, whose exceptional knowledge of language, culture, and history would prove valuable to future generations.  This collection, curated by the Joseph F. Smith Library at Brigham Young University Hawaiʻi, is a rare archive of the audio recordings of those interviews in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi, with line-by-line transcriptions and translations in both ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi and English.  Most of the interviewees in this collection were living at the time of the Overthrow and witnessed many changes to the lāhui in their lifetimes.  Colloquialisms and regional language variations of mānaleo, captured in first-person audio, make this primary-source collection especially valuable for modern-day listeners and language learners.

HISTORICAL ROOTS

Resource

Type

Description

Ruling Chiefs of Hawaiʻi, by Samuel Kamakau

Ebook

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Ruling Chiefs is a translation and compilation of a series of nūpepa articles by historian Samuel Mānaiakalani Kamakau. His articles detailed the reigns of Hawaiʻi ruling chiefs from the time of ʻUmi a Līloa to Kamakau’s own time of the mid-1800s. This classic, along with many other titles made available by various publishers, can be found on Ulukau in both pdf and text searchable forms.

Act of War


Video

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This documentary takes a look at the Overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom Government in 1893, relying upon expert interviews and primary source material

Pa‘a ke Aupuni: The Reel History of Hawai‘i


Video

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Paʻa Ke Aupuni is a unique 60-minute hand-drawn, animated film that gets straight to the point. It zooms in on key facts explaining how the Hawaiian Kingdom came to be, how it evolved to stand firmly on the international world stage of sovereign nations, and how the United States came to claim Hawai‘i.

In many ways, Ke Aupuni Hawai‘i, the Hawaiian government, remains pa‘a—steadfast and enduring. Yet “pa‘a” can also describe something that is stuck or retained, in this case by powers holding fast to control over Hawai‘i.

Pa‘a Ke Aupuni lays bare the realities of this history. It’s a set of facts we all need to know as the push to reestablish a Hawaiian nation gains momentum.

Hawaiʻiʻ’s Story by Hawaiʻi’s Queen



Ebook

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In this book by Queen Liliʻuokalani, she recounts stories from her childhood, major events that defined the reigns of former monarchs before her, and the events surrounding the overthrow of her government in 1893.

We are who we were 

Video

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This documentary takes a look at the failed treaties of annexation between the United States and the Provisional Government.

History of Hawaiian education

Website

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The DOE Office of Hawaiian Education provides a brief timeline and history of how education in Hawaii started as Hawaiian-language medium education, how  the language was banned in 1896, and it was not heard in schools for four generations. The Hawaiian renaissance of the 1970s provided the spark to re-establish cultural and language-based learning and is the foundation we continue to build on.

A Timeline of Revitalization

Website

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‘Aha Pūnana Leo provides an  extensive timeline of ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i revitalization efforts.

Mo‘oaupuni: Resources on Hawaiian Political Landscapes

Website

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Moʻoaupuni seeks to provide resources from a wide array of perspectives in an open, neutral setting. However, it is not a comprehensive source on every and all aspects of Hawaiian governance. It is but one hālau sharing information about Hawaiʻi’s political history and current nation-building landscape.

Papakilo Database

Website

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The Office of Hawaiian Affairs’ (OHA’s) Papakilo Database, is the ongoing development of a cutting edge and comprehensive “Database of Databases” consisting of varied collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawai'i’s history. This online repository of data will greatly increase our ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices, thus providing an invaluable resource to educate other regulatory agencies, Native Hawaiian beneficiaries, and the general public.

 

Pidgin:  The Voice of Hawai‘i

website

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Born on sugar plantations and spoken by more than half of Hawaiʻi’s population, the Pidgin language – part English, part Hawaiian, with influences from other languages – captures the essence of multi-ethnic Hawai‘i. The film, by Marlene Booth and Kanalu Young, profiles the rise of this working-class language from plantation jargon to its status as a source of island identity and pride. The film draws on a variety of sources, including archival, academic and other expert commentary, and man-on-the-street interviews and performances to shed light on this colorful language. This website offers a trailer and options for purchasing this video.

CURRENT ISSUES FACING HAWAI‘I

This is not a comprehensive list, but a good starting point

Resource

Type

Description

ʻŌiwiTV Channel on YouTube

Videos

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Produced by ʻŌiwi TV and presented primarily in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi with English subtitles, this YouTube channel offers mele, moʻolelo, language-learning resources, documentaries, symposia, and other videos for entertainment and learning.

Ola i ka Wai

Video

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The Hawaiʻi State constitution, Article XI Section 7 says the state has an obligation to protect, control, and regulate the use of Hawaiʻi water resources for the benefit of its people for now and future generations. But why are the laws not being enforced? And what are the impacts of this failure in the Nā Wai ʻEhā districts of West Maui? Watch this video to discover the answers to these questions and more.

Ola i ka Wai: Water is Life|East Maui

Video

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The Hawaiʻi State constitution, Article XI Section 7 says the state has an obligation to protect, control, and regulate the use of Hawaiʻi water resources for the benefit of its people for now and future generations. But why are the laws not being enforced? And what are the impacts of this failure in East Maui? Watch this video to discover the answers to these questions and more. Dive in deeper still with this article.

 Pōhakuloa: Now that you know, do you care?

Video

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Hawaiʻi finds itself in the cross hairs between the military’s needs and the need to protect our ‘āina and its people. We learned from Kahoʻolawe that the impacts of continued bombing will reverberate long after we are gone. So why are we making the same mistakes?

This documentary takes a look at the military’s use of Pōhakuloa, including its failure to disclose to communities about their use of depleted uranium and the potential impacts of this radioactive metal on human health.

Like a Mighty Wave


Video

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This short film takes a look at the movement around Maunakea and the significance of this crucial issue to the continued vibrancy of our environment and culture.

Public Land Trust: Justice Delayed is Justice Denied

Video

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Justice Delayed Is Justice Denied tells of the ongoing struggle to ensure that the State of Hawai‘i fulfills its commitments to the Native Hawaiian people stemming from the loss of their ancestral lands.

It takes a village

Video

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Hawaiʻi's high cost of living and unaffordable housing market is putting more and more pressure on local families. How many more people and generations can we squeeze into our homes just to be able to afford to live here? How many more of our family members have to move away before we say enough is enough?

The long-term solution is that we need to push for better policies to create enough TRULY affordable housing (below 100% AMI). Unfortunately we have a homeless crisis to deal with right now and new housing programs for the homeless, like Housing First, are working well but are very limited in scale.

We, as a society, are unable to provide solutions to this housing and homeless crisis right now so what do we do for our most vulnerable people who are living unsheltered every day that this problem continues?

Protecting Pa‘akai in Hanapēpē

Video

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From Mauna Kea to Hanapēpē, development threatens sacred spaces and Native Hawaiian cultural practices across the pae ʻāina.

Right off the coast of Kauaʻi, 22 salt maker families of Hanapēpē have passed on the traditional methods of making paʻakai (Hawaiian salt) for generations. Each year, the families dig wells, harvest a special clay from the area, and mālama the salt bed to produce paʻakai for the community. However, outside forces such as a powerful Las Vegas-based helicopter company, flooding, pollution, and homelessness all endanger this cultural practice. In this video, the Hanapēpē salt makers share their story.

Hawaiians taxed out of their ancestral lands

Video

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Many Native Hawaiians are being forced to sell their ‘Āina Kūpuna (ancestral lands) due to outrageous property taxes that continue to increase due to real estate speculation and resort development.

ʻAs the land value around us increases, so do our property taxes.' - Keiki Chang Kawaiʻaeʻa

Families like the Chang-Luʻuwai-Kukahikos have had to devise unique strategies just to raise enough money to pay those taxes, and are in an endless battle with the county tax assessor whose objective is to get as much money out of the land as possible.

In some cases, kūpuna are buried on their lands.

Maui Council Member Keani Rawlins-Fernandez, OHA and Native Hawaiian community advocates are working together to draft legislation to help ease the tax burden for families that are at risk of losing their generational lands. If you or your 'ohana is being similarly affected, please fill out this form.

Native Hawaiian Data Portal

Website

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The Native Hawaiian Data Portal facilitates access to data sources and information on Native Hawaiian well-being. It helps to facilitate connections  to local and national data sources, while making  reports in the data portal easy to search.

Hūlili: Multidisciplinary Research on Hawaiian Well-Being

Website

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Hūlili is a multidisciplinary forum for current research that examines the nature,

needs and strengths of Hawaiians, their families, and their communities.

Through collaboration and critique, Hūlili fosters new connections

and shared insights to mobilize greater Hawaiian well-being. All Hūlilil content is available for free download via pdf including the newly published issues 11.1 and 11.2.

Nā Maka o Ka ‘Āina Video Series

Video

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Na Maka o ka ‘Aina, established by Puhipau and Joan Lander, with the intent to give voice and face to Hawaiian language, culture, arts, politics and history.  This resource offers a catalog of videos to purchase for a minimal fee.

Symphony of Hawaiian Birds

Website

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The Hawaiian Islands were once inhabited by over a hundred endemic birds. Today, few residents of the Hawaiian Islands have even seen a native forest bird. Hawai‘i’s native birds continue to face a number of threats through diseases, loss of habitat, and competition with non-native species. Because our surviving endemic forest bird species represent a considerable value to both the integrity of Hawai‘i’s natural ecosystems as well as cultural and intrinsic value, it is important to educate people on how to protect them.

This site contains education resources (Hawaiian forest bird education unit plan, learn a hula about native birds, bird calls vs. instruments, questions about going to an orchestra concert) and other resources (bird call audio, video presentations on Hawaiian birds).

Hawaiʻi Futures

Website

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Hawai‘i has a year-round growing season, every formation of clean energy, and diverse soils and microclimates. YET, over 90% of us live in costly and congested urban areas importing 90% of our food and energy…RECOVER AHUPUA‘A.

AN INTERVENTION FOR ISLAND URBANISM. HAWAI‘I FUTURES summons the habits of mind in which the cycles and surfaces of wai (water) organize the physical and emotional processes that craft city life. This virtual intervention creates a space to reclaim the notion of the city according to what it means to live on the volcanic islands of Hawaiʻi, versus a continent.

Hawaii Resilience Fund

Website

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The purpose of the Hawaiʻi Resilience Fund (HRF) is to provide one-time emergency financial assistance (up to $1000 per household) to Hawaiʻi residents facing hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic. HRF is made possible through a partnership between the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, Hawaiʻi Community Foundation, and Pierre & Pam Omidyar.  The program aims to provide stability to families during this emergency situation.

what we fund

The Hawaiʻi Resilience Fund currently funds:

  • mortgage payment
  • rent payment
  • utility services
  • certified childcare services

CULTURAL PRACTICES
If you can’t be out with the ‘āina for whatever reason, here are some virtual ways to stay connected

Resource

Type

Description

Auamo.org

Website

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Auamo.org strives to support communities in achieving ‘Āina Momona with a focus on marine resources through an ahupua‘a approach.

ʻĀina Momona: Healthy ecosystems, healthy communities, food sustainability throughout a vibrant healthy archipelago whose natural and cultural resources are well managed, collaborative, adaptive and informed by local knowledge, place, history and its people.

One way communities can ground themselves on a pathway toward ʻāina momona is to deepen their understanding of their resources. Community characterization, observation, assessment and various monitoring techniques are a few tools that can help. Auamo.org offers support to begin your kilo practice.

ʻŌiwiTV Channel on YouTube

Videos

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Produced by ʻŌiwi TV and presented primarily in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi with English subtitles, this YouTube channel offers mele, moʻolelo, language-learning resources, documentaries, symposia, and other videos for entertainment and learning.

Kumukahi

Website

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A  rich and diverse online resource that features a community-based approach to presenting living Hawaiian culture for learners of all ages. More than 60 topics are covered--from ahupuaʻa to ʻai pono, loina to lāhui, moʻolelo to moʻokūʻauhau--explained by practitioners and community experts from across the paeʻāina. Includes engaging videos, text pieces and other activities and resources.

Nūpepa.org

Website

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Nūpepa.org houses the richest trove of information and insights about Hawaiian history and cultural practice, as seen through the eyes of its thousands of authors who contributed millions of pages of newspaper text in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi for over a century spanning the 1830s through the 1940s.

Hawaiian Place Names

Website

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Separate from the Place Names of Hawaiʻi listing within wehewehe.org, this resource includes some 20,000 additional place names, thousands of which have GPS coordinates attached to them, allowing users to view the location of the place names in interactive Google maps.

Kaʻiwakīloumoku Virtual Archive

Website

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A multimedia haven for online cultural learning. Here you’ll find videos, snapshots, articles, recipes, interviews, profiles of Hawaiian elders, and more. This website is the virtual counterpart to the Kaʻiwakīloumoku Hawaiian cultural Center at Kamehameha Schools Kapālama.

AVA Konohiki

Website

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AVA Konohiki, or Ancestral of Visions of ʻAina - ʻĀina means "land that one eats from." This website provides in an easily accessible manner documents that were written and produced in the 1840s and 1850s, when lands in Hawaiʻi first went into private ownership. These land records, written by our ancestors, include detailed descriptions of land management practices. The website includes numerous early maps from various archival sources.  

Hawaiian Plant Descriptions

Website

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These websites provide descriptions of well-known and little-known native and Hawaiian-introduced plants, including images, characteristics, uses, cultivation, and care.

ʻIke ʻIkena: Lāʻī Planting and Care

Video

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Lāʻī, also known as ti leaf, is one of the humblest but most important plants that we have around. Lāʻī can be used for ceremony, cooking, hula, lei, and more. Hawaiians always have a use for ti leaf, so we make sure to always have it around. It used to be that you could tell a Hawaiian household because there was always lāʻī planted all around the house and yard. Now it’s a little trickier because we don’t all have yards, but lāʻī is hardy, resilient, and easy to cultivate.

Ānuenue Pūnua gives some tips on how to grow and use lāʻī in the first of two ʻIke ʻIkena videos that we filmed at her family home in Kāneʻohe.

‘Ike ‘Ikena: Lei Making

Video

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Oftentimes, if we wear a lei, someone will ask us, “is it your birthday?” And while birthdays are of course great occasions to wear lei, so is every other day of our lives. Lei are for special times, but they can also be given or worn anytime that you want someone to feel special.

Join Ānuenue Pūnua and her two daughters Koʻiahi and Maʻaloa as she talks about learning how to make lei from her mother and teaches us three common but elegant lei that we can make and give to our loved ones. Pua kenikeni is not always as easy to find, but pua melia and lāʻī are quite common and abundant. With these three lei in your repertoire, you can make use of the beautiful pua and lāʻī that we see around us so often. As Ānuenue reminds us, a lei is so much more special when it comes from you and the materials come from this ʻāina. Lei making is a tradition in the Pūnua family, and even if it isn’t a tradition in yours, it’s never too late to start.

Keu a ka ʻOno: Laulau Palula

Video

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Hawaiian food isn’t just for special occasions. Check out this easy and super ʻono ʻai pono recipe for laulau palula (sweet potato leaf laulau), and learn some Hawaiian measurements at the same time. Make an assembly line with your keiki, and you can get dinner done in no time! ʻUala (sweet potato) is easy to grow and generous with its leaves (palula), so this is a dish you can enjoy all the time. He keu a ka ʻono! For a longer step-by-step recipe featuring kumu Kaulana Vares, go to: kanaeokana.net/youtube

ʻIke ʻIkena|Hale Lashing: ʻŪ Paʻa

Video

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This video  features Keahi Piiohia at Paepae o He’eia giving a step-by-step description of how to do an ʻū paʻa lashing used in lashing traditional hale (structures), mākāhā (fishpond sluice gates), waʻa (canoes), and more. The ʻū paʻa is one of the more versatile and sturdy lashings to learn, useful for all sorts of applications. With this ʻike, how will you ʻū paʻa?

Mele Helu Pō Moon phases and hand game

Video

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A video demo and follow-along of Mele Helu Pō, the moon phase mele and hand game. Try it out along with these fun folks!

Ke Ala O Ka Mahina

Website

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The Hawaiians in traditional times used a calendar based upon the phases of the moon. The year had twelve months of 29.5 phases; every three to six years, a thirteenth lunar month was added. Each month started with the new moon, Hilo and ended with Mauli or Muku, the dark moon.

This interactive 2020 moon calendar displays moon phases and fishing/planting practices associated with each.

RESOURCES FOR KEIKI AND ‘OHANA

Resource

Type

Description

Kumukahi

Website

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A rich and diverse online resource that features a community-based approach to presenting living Hawaiian culture for learners of all ages. More than 60 topics are covered--from ahupuaʻa to ʻai pono, loina to lāhui, moʻolelo to moʻokūʻauhau--explained by practitioners and community experts from across the paeʻāina. Includes engaging videos, text pieces and other activities and resources.

Lei Ānuenue

Webinar

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Huddle up everyone in the hale to enjoy some time to hang out with the lāhui...virtually. Join Lei Ānuenue as it connects us across the pae ʻāina and beyond. It’s a time for all of us—kamaliʻi, ʻōpio, mākua, and kūpuna—to enjoy learning together. Familiar lāhui friends will be sharing with us a wide spectrum of fun cultural riches. It might be the beautiful melody and manaʻo of a mele, a cool craft project, or maybe it’s moʻolelo time! Who will be our alakaʻi will be a surprise from session to session. Enjoy all the shades of Lei Ānuenue. Join all 9:00 kakahiaka (morning) or 2:00  ʻauinalā (afternoon) free live webinar sessions by using these links:

Recorded sessions are posted at: kanaeokana.net/lei

Wao Kanaka

Video Game

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Wao Kanaka is a first-person, exploration and puzzle game. The gameplay is based on Kānaka Maoli stories and knowledge, and focuses in particular on the central concept of aloha ‘aina (“love of the land”) as a guide for shaping both narrative and gameplay. The game is set in contemporary Hawai‘i, yet is directly linked to past and future Kānaka Maoli relationalities to Hawaiian lands and waters.

You have always listened to the captivating stories that your Tūtū (grandmother) has told, but you know that this story isn’t like other others she has told before. Humanity is forgetting our responsibility to uphold aloha ‘aina to ensure the health and safety of our future generations. As you grow older, Tūtū leaves Wao Kanaka and now you must explore the world to learn from the mo‘olelo told by members of your community to rewrite Tūtū’s story of the future. You then use the knowledge entrusted to you to irrigate the lo‘i kalo (taro fields), fish sustainably at the loko i‘a (fish pond), and practice your ‘oli (chanting) from the newspaper. Only once you have listened to the teachings of your community and put them into practice will your dream for the future be revealed.

He Ao Hou

Video Game

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He Ao Hou is a point-and-click adventure game. The gameplay is based on kānaka maoli (Native Hawaiian) stories and knowledge, and focuses in particular on the uses of the native kukui nut, itself a symbol of knowledge. It is set in the far future, when kānaka maoli have attained the next level of navigation: space travel. While your grandfather, a great navigator, is on his deathbed, your sister goes missing. Entrusted with your grandfather’s space canoe, you set out to find her, along the way meeting interesting individuals and learning about their relationships to their planets. On the water (Wai) planet you learn that you can use the kukui to clarify water that is cloudy, thus finding a helpful shark. On the lava (Pele) planet, you learn how hula dancing is used to make kukui plants grow. On the plant (Ahupua’a) planet, you use the kukui as a projectile, hitting the boar-like, eight-eyed demi-god, Kamapua’a, to wake him up. Finally, you unlock enough knowledge to find your sister—but she is now much more than she ever was before.

Pāhana ʻĀina Lupalupa Resource Site

Website

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The Pāhana ʻĀina Lupalupa Hawaiian culture-based science reader series is targeted to learners in grades K-3 as well as those who support their learning. All 20 books in the first Life Science set (16 levelled readers and 4 teacher/mentor texts) can be downloaded in pdf form in either ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi or English. The site also includes a wide variety of support materials for educators about the series, how it was created, and instructional documents.

Lau Nehenehe: Storytime for the ʻOhana

Videos

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Produced by Kamehameha Publishing and presented in both ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi and English, Lau Nehenehe brings to life some of Hawaiʻi’s popular children’s titles through animation, imagination, sound and story.

ʻŌiwiTV Channel on YouTube

Videos

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Produced by ʻŌiwi TV and presented primarily in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi with English subtitles, this YouTube channel offers mele, moʻolelo, language-learning resources, documentaries, symposia, and other videos for entertainment and learning.

Lehulehu

Video Game

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Scrabble… but in ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i?! Play with your friends, learn some new hua ‘ōlelo. This video game is for iOS devices.  

Ulukau

Website

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This online resource provides access to an online Hawaiian dictionary and access to old Hawaiian language newspapers. It includes resources like nupepa.org, wehewehe.org, and a whole lot more.

Ka Nohona Ahupuaʻa: Life in the Ahupuaʻa

Website

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Interactive Ahupuaʻa experience.

Huakaʻi to Mauna ʻAla- The Royal Mausoleum

Website

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Virtual Huakaʻi to Mauna ʻAla

E Hoʻomau: Why Maui Snared the Sun

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Why Maui Snared the Sun is a Hawaiian legend - Long ago, Kalā (the sun) raced across the sky as he pleased, leaving the land and its people with short days and long, dark nights. Among those suffering from the lack of daylight was the goddess Hina, mother of Māui, the demigod. In order to make things pono (right), Māui summons all his courage and travels to the highest summit of Haleakalā, where he confronts the Mighty Kalā.

E Hoʻomau: Pele searches for a home

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Pele, the primal force of volcanic heat and lava, leaves her ancient home of Kahiki and searches out a new home for herself and her family. As she travels down the Hawaiian island chain, she is pursued by and battles her eldest sister Nāmaka, the goddess of water and the sea. After a climactic battle on the island of Maui, she finally finds refuge in Kīlauea on the Big Island of Hawai‘i.

E Hoʻomau: Menehune and the Birds

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Kēhau, a young Menehune boy, and his best friend, a little ‘elepaio bird, discover that a group of men has been killing the birds of the Kaua‘i rainforest in order to harvest their feathers faster. Kēhau and ‘Elepaio seek out the Menehune Chief and his warriors to help save their friends and find a way to change the habits of these men or risk losing the beautiful birds forever.

Patrick Ching | Hawaiʻi's Nature Artist

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Free downloadable Hawaiʻi based coloring sheets for education and enjoyment.

Hawaii State Public Library

Library

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Don’t worry about fines and due dates. Due dates and holds for materials already checked out or reserved will automatically be extended  to accommodate the covid-19 closure period.

We are always open at librarieshawaii.org with many amazing online resources available to access from home 24/7. Our online collection includes:

  • eBooks and e-audiobooks
  • Digital subscriptions to newspapers and magazines
  • Online classes
  • Online language learning
  • Many online resources for homework, recreation and research

 

Access these resources and more for free using your library card.

Purple Maiʻa’s Code Haumana

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This event will be the first in a series of online lessons about coding by playing Code Haumana. Over upcoming events, we’ll talk about concepts like code syntax, loops, variables, and multiplayer - all while playing a game for our hero to rescue those in need, collect treasures, and vanquish enemies! First session starts on Tuesday, March 24, 10:00am - 11:00am. Online.

Audible

Online recorded books

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Just go to audible.com/stories to access audiobooks for preschoolers through teens. No catches, no credit cards.  Even better? There are stories available in Spanish, French, German, Italian, and Chinese, too.

Mo Willems Drawing Lessons

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Mo Willems⁠—a bestselling author and illustrator⁠—has announced that he will be teaching drawing every weekday on YouTube to kids who are now at home. Mo will be having sessions called Lunch Doodles where he will occupy the little ones by doodling together with them.  The 20-30 minute sessions will take place every weekday at 7 am HST.

P.E. with Joe

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Joe Wicks, famous as The Body Coach, has said he will become 'the nation's P.E. teacher' by giving daily online P.E. classes for kids.  Starting from Monday 3.23.20 he will be holding kids' workout classes on his You Tube channel, and he will be doing them every weekday at 9am during the school closures.  The workouts are designed to be kid friendly, will last half an hour, and won't need much space so they can be done indoors if you're self-isolating.

StorylineOnline Read Aloud Videos

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StorylineOnline is a YouTube channel where celebrities like Oprah Winfrey, Chrissy Metz, Kristen Bell, Wanda Sykes, Sarah Silverman and many more read stories that your children will love. Each video also has moving illustrations from the book to keep your children even more entertained.

Read the World Choice Boards

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Kristin Ziemke and Katie Muhtaris, authors of Amplify: Digital Teaching and Learning in the K-6 Classroom and Read The World : Rethinking Literacy for Empathy and Action in a Digital Age created Choice Boards with embedded links and resources for primary and intermediate children.

30 Virtual Field Trips

Google Doc

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Check out links to 30 websites that provide virtual field trips to museums, zoos, and farms.

Oxford Owl

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Free ebooks, phonic guide, and math activities for ages 3-11

ʻImiloa Astronomy Center

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Resources for backyard explorers online page offers  downloadable make at home crafts, science and astronomy video clips, virtual field trips, workshops and more!

Student/Parent Continuity of Education (HIDOE)

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Updated HIDOE COVID-19 for students, parents, and caregivers; Features a student and parent/caregiver portal with grade-level at-home learning choice boards and resources.

Kilo Books Hawaiʻi

Website, books for purchase,, blog

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Age level: 3 to 8 years old. Kilo Books Hawaiʻi (for a fee) provides families with young children an educational tool to connect with nature and the elements that sustain our lives. Kilo Books values analog first over digital experiences and seeks to build observational, experiential, and forecasting skills in children.

RESOURCES FOR KUMU

Resource

Type

Description

Waihona

Website

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This is a platform where teachers and their supporters can share learning and teaching resources with one another.  

If you have a learning resource (a handout, worksheet,  lesson, video clip, set of images, etc.) that you think a teacher might find useful, please share it in the Waihona.  If you want to browse through what folks have started to share, you’re welcome to do so too. Go to waihona.net to get started. There are also some quick videos to get you started:  

Kumukahi

Website

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A  rich and diverse online resource that features a community-based approach to presenting living Hawaiian culture for learners of all ages. More than 60 topics are covered--from ahupuaʻa to ʻai pono, loina to lāhui, moʻolelo to moʻokūʻauhau--explained by practitioners and community experts from across the paeʻāina. Includes engaging videos, text pieces and other activities and resources.

UHM Personal Learning Network Tool Browser

Online teaching tool   locator

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This University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Center for Language and Technology website enables users to select from a “wish list” of tool functions they want to use to create online materials, and the website filters the web and app tools that serve those purposes. The tools identified are briefly described and hotlinked to those websites and apps.

Teach from Home by Google

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A temporary hub of information and tools to help teachers during the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis. Visit the website and Join the #teachfromhome discussion on Twitter.

Virtual Huakaʻi: Kahaluʻu Ma Kai and Makalawena

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This series of innovative virtual huakaʻi (field trips) grounded in Hawaiian Culture-Based Education integrates STEM and ʻāina-based learning.

This companion website offers access to information useful to creating engaging experiences for haumāna  with the virtual huakaʻi and/or preparing for a physical site visit. The website also contains detailed information and ways to adapt the experience to specific learning environments.

Waters to the Sea: Kauaʻi Adventure

Interactive Website

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Produced in partnership with Hawaiʻi organizations such as Limahuli Gardens and Ke Kula Niʻihau o Kekaha, Hamline University adapted and tailored  its resource originally created for the Mississippi River to the environments of Kauaʻi. It includes dozens of activities, map-based exploration, and short videos related to sustainability, science, engineering, and social studies. It could easily be used by students for self-guided exploration. While the examples are from Kauaʻi, they include concepts appropriate for haumāna from any island. Under the Teacher Resources tab, kumu can see the content in this interactive website that addresses specific Next Generation Science Standards. It even includes some ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi resources, including a wonderful retelling by two haumāna of the moʻolelo of the famous chief, ʻĪmaikalani (shared in ‘ōlelo Niʻihau).

Papakilo Database

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This resource was created by OHA and is often referred to at the “Database of Databases”.  This resource provides access to  collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawai'i’s history.

https://www.papakilodatabase.com/

Zoom Tips for Teachers

Google Slideshow

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Check out this teacher created Google slideshow with great tips for using Zoom with students.  A wonderful starter kit!

NOAA - Coral Reef (Curricula & Lesson Plans)

Website

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Over 50 lesson plans and two full curricula in the Life Science and Earth Science subject areas, from grades 3rd to 12th, are included. These curricula and lesson plans were developed through a partnership between teachers, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and various branches of NOAA.

Each lesson plan or curriculum is available as a pdf download. Supplemental materials are also identified and linked for select lesson plans.

NOAA HCBE Contact - Kalani Quiocho | Kalani.quiocho@noaa.gov

NOAA Office of Education | Additional Contacts

PhotoVoice

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PhotoVoice believes everybody should have the opportunity to represent themselves and tell their own story. They  work in partnership all over the world on projects and activities which combine ethical photography and community participation to help deliver positive social change

Hawaii Lab Cohort

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The Hawaii Lab Cohorts are teacher learning communities that offer an ongoing, job embedded, differentiated approach to professional learning for teachers to keep them renewed and accountable to continuous learning and growth in their profession.

Hawaiʻi Alive

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Explore Hawaiian culture, society, history, contemporary issues, and more through the cultural collections of Bishop Museum. Examines a wide range of topics, including surfing, tattooing, mana and the authority to rule, kalo and the preservation of culture, and the role of the US government in the overthrow.

Kīpuka

Website

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OHA’s map-based database of historic sites, moku, ahupuaʻa, ʻili, land awards, crown lands, and TMKs.

Ulukau

Website

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This online resource provides access to an online Hawaiian dictionary and access to old Hawaiian language newspapers. It includes resources like nupepa.org, wehewehe.org, and a whole lot more.

Pāhana ʻĀina Lupalupa Resource Site

Website

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Features the Pāhana ʻĀina Lupalupa Hawaiian culture-based science reader series targeted to learners in grades K-3 as well as those who support their learning. All 20 books in the first Life Science set (16 levelled readers and 4 teacher/mentor texts) can be downloaded in pdf form in either ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi or English. The site also includes a wide variety of support materials for educators about the series, how it was created, and instructional documents.

DLNR teaching resources

Teaching materials

Produced by the State of Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Natural Resources. Lessons and printable materials made available around aquatic resources education (specifically around fishing) and forestry & wildlife education (endangered animals, watershed, forest jewels, birds, ʻōhiʻa).  While lessons are in English, there is an opportunity for learning in another language.

NOAA - Coral Reef (Curricula & Lesson Plans)

Website

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Over 50 lesson plans and two full curricula in the Life Science and Earth Science subject areas, from grades 3rd to 12th, are included. These curricula and lesson plans were developed through a partnership between teachers, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and various branches of NOAA.

Each lesson plan or curriculum is available as a pdf download. Supplemental materials are also identified and linked for select lesson plans.

NOAA HCBE Contact - Kalani Quiocho | Kalani.quiocho@noaa.gov

NOAA Office of Education | Additional Contacts

Hawaiʻi C3 Hub (Social Studies)

Website

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The Hawai‘i C3 Hub is a community workspace that is leading the way in developing culturally relevant C3 Framework related curriculum and instructional materials for the people of Hawai‘i. It is organized into ten main sections: Place, History of the C3 in Hawai‘i, Hawaii Core Standards in Social Studies , Inquiries, Informed Action, C3 Practitioner Blog, Professional Development opportunities, Research, C3 Hawai‘i Community Partners, and Connections. Grounded in a deep sense of place and a commitment to bringing people together to move forward, the Hawai‘i C3 Hub is designed to build community, inspire inquiry, and strengthen social studies education in the Hawaiian Islands and beyond.

Pa‘ēpa‘ē o nā wai ‘ekolu (Stream Biodiversity)

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Hands-on, citizen science research projects are a powerful way for teachers and students to connect with the natural world, build an affinity for the health of the ecosystem, and challenges students to solve pressing real-world problems.  An additional benefit is the integration of modern scientific approaches and traditional cultural knowledge into a curriculum designed to foster a sense of place through a Hawaiian framework.

We hope to share the scientific equipment, training, and curriculum that would enable schools to participate in building a scientific database of information, in analyzing and interpreting data used to monitor and manage watershed health, and develop a greater scientific understanding of watershed biodiversity, climate, and issues such as infectious disease, flood mitigation, and pollution.

Kanehunamoku Voyaging Academy

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Kanehunamoku Voyaging Academy has been providing educational services in traditional Hawaiian navigation to primarily Native Hawaiian youth for over 14 years.  They began as a voyaging program within Halau Kū Māna Public Charter School in 2001 and later expanded to working with other schools, programs, and eventually building its own independent programming.  Currently there are two programs, Papahana Hoʻolauna and Halau Holomoana.  Their curriculum provides STEM lessons utilizing NGSS and Common Core Math grounded in Waʻa.

HFCS Culturally Relevant Assessment

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Seventeen Hawaiian Focused Charter Schools participate in the Culturally Relevant Assessment (CRA) project that cascades from the HFCS Vision of the Graduate.  Project objectives include cultural competency, readiness for the next level, and academic growth.  The CRA Toolkit tab features a suite of six assessment tools, literature reviews, and background information.

UHM Research Guides

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Under the Hawaiʻi Tab there are 51 sections ranging from Ahupuaa Research to Anthropology and Archaeology in the Pacific, Historic Newspapers from Hawaiʻi, DOE - Kupuna Program, Hawaiian & Polynesian Warfare, Hawaiian Music, Hawaiʻi Censuses, Hawaiian Cultures & Cuisines, Genealogy - Native Hawaiian Resources, Mahele Indexes, Mary Kawena Pukui Annotated Bibliography, Hawaiʻi Newspapers, Hawaiʻi Place Names, Moʻokūʻauhau, ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi - Hawaiian Language Resources, to name a few.

Midkiff - Hawaiʻi Pacific Collections

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Ka Waihona ʻIke Hawaiʻi a me ka Pākīpika, The Hawaiʻi-Pacific Collection provides students, teachers and staff with a full range of materials pertaining to Hawaiʻi and the Pacific.  The collection includes over 12,000 books, periodicals, pamphlet files, pictures, charts, maps, DVDs, CDs, videotapes, audiotapes, vinyl records and music sheets. This website also includes numerous compilations of online resources.

Nā Honua Mauli Ola

eBook

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Hawaiian cultural guidelines with support strategies to assist learners, educators, families, schools and institutions, and communities with a way to examine and attend to the educational and cultural well-being of all its learners. The intention of these pathways is not to provide a checklist, but to shift the focus of teaching and learning from one that talks about the Hawaiian language and culture to one that teaches and learns through the Hawaiian language and culture.

Community Tool Box

website

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Millions of people use the Community Tool Box each year to get help taking action, teaching, and training others in organizing for community development. Dive in to find help assessing community needs and resources, addressing social determinants of health, engaging stakeholders, action planning, building leadership, improving cultural competency, planning an evaluation, and sustaining your efforts over time.

Read the World Distance Learning Supports

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Kristin Ziemke and Katie Muhtaris, authors of Amplify: Digital Teaching and Learning in the K-6 Classroom and Read The World : Rethinking Literacy for Empathy and Action in a Digital Age curated set of resources they use with students to  promote curiosity, student agency and deep thinking across the curriculum.

UH Mānoa College of Education Ethnomathe-

matic Curriculum

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The work of educators around the world in ethnomathematics and STEM is truly inspiring. We invite you to explore our UH Mānoa College of Education  curriculum resources created and implemented by P-20 educators in our Ethnomathematics Program!

Symphony of Hawaiian Birds

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The Hawaiian Islands were once inhabited by over a hundred endemic birds. Today, few residents of the Hawaiian Islands have even seen a native forest bird. Hawai‘i’s native birds continue to face a number of threats through diseases, loss of habitat, and competition with non-native species. Because our surviving endemic forest bird species represent a considerable value to both the integrity of Hawai‘i’s natural ecosystems as well as cultural and intrinsic value, it is important to educate people on how to protect them.

This site contains education resources (Hawaiian forest bird education unit plan, learn a hula about native birds, bird calls vs. instruments, questions about going to an orchestra concert) and other resources (bird call audio, video presentations on Hawaiian birds).

Education Incubator: rEInvent Learning at Home

Webinar Classes

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During this time of adjustment to learn-from-home, work-from-home, Education Incubator is offering opportunities for social connection and a little structure in your day.  Through a series of short live video calls to start and end our days, a movement activity in the early afternoon, and highlighting a short project, practice, or exploration you do every day, we want to help you in your journey to #rEInventlearningathome!

EXAMPLES OF HAWAIIAN CULTURE BASED EDUCATION

Resource

Type

Description

Kawaikini: Learning from the Land

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Grandmother. Mother. That which feeds. ‘Āina is that and so much more.  

Founded in 2008, Kawaikini is a Hawaiian culture, language, and ‘āina-based K-12 school on Kauaʻi. Their haumāna spend a lot of time learning on the land, but more importantly, learning from the land. Kalaemanō, Keālia, Pa‘aiki, Nā Pali are not just places on a map, they are precious kumu to Kawaikini haumāna.

Although they have their normal campus space with whiteboards and walls, their learning environment is vast and extends out in all directions. You can find the Kawaikini students at the sea cultivating limu at Kalaemanō, in the lo‘i at Keālia, in the forests of Pa‘aiki, up on the ridges of Na Pāli, and everywhere in between. The world is their classroom and ‘āina nurtures, guides, and grows them every step of the way, a way of learning that builds connections that last.

As these students in this video show us, Hawaiian culture is something that goes way beyond a simple subject or a single period in a day’s schedule. It’s a way of life that generations of kānaka have thrived on, a way to live harmoniously with the natural world, an urgent change in lifestyle that can be applied worldwide as humanity faces the extreme challenges of a world approaching a point of no return.

When we as kānaka listen and learn from and with the land, we strengthen our connections, and together, grow practices of aloha ʻāina that will feed us and generations to come.

Mālama Honua: Teaching Tomorrow’s Navigators

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He waʻa, he moku; he moku, he waʻa. Our canoe is an island, our island is a canoe. In Waimānalo, Mālama Honua Public Charter School is using the values of the waʻa Hōkūleʻa’s Worldwide Voyage to prepare their students to solve the problems of the future. The students participate in place- and ʻāina-centered projects, connecting with other organizations working to benefit the community. Their Mind of the Navigator framework teaches haumāna to envision both Hawaiʻi, and the larger Earth itself, as a canoe, caring for your resources and your fellow crew the way you would on a voyage.

Papa Wa‘a: School at Sea

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One of the hallmarks that sets Hawaiian culture-based education apart from more standard educational practices is its reliance on culture,ʻāina, and kai-based projects to teach our haumāna everything from ʻōlelo and moʻolelo to physics, chemistry, and math. At Hālau Kū Māna New Century Public Charter School, each grade level is involved in this kind of aloha ʻāina-centered education, giving the students real world knowledge about so many of the things important to us as Hawaiians from the ocean, to the mountains, to voyaging canoes, to traditional crafts, and kalo farming.

The freshman class of Hālau Kū Māna’s entire curriculum revolves around traditional voyaging techniques. This class is known as Papa Wa‘a. Voyaging is the lens through which all of their education that first year of high school is founded upon, and this film Papa Waʻa documents their final test of the year, sailing the ship Makani ʻOlu out and back across the Kaiwi Channel, one of the most challenging channels in the world. Join the haumāna on their 225-mile sail, a voyage that took them past Molokaʻi to Lānaʻi, all the way to Maui, and then back to Kāneʻohe Bay where they started. As they travel across the vast and deep ocean guided by ancestral knowledge passed down through the generations, they will put all of their learning to the test, using it to lead them into the future.

He Waʻa He Moku, He Moku He Waʻa

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Ola ʻo Maui Nui! Watch how the 1,200 students of Kamehameha Schools Maui were Inspired by Hōkūleʻa’s decades of voyaging and message of Mālama Honua to make Maui Nui thrive again. In the uplands above Honolua Bay, they helped the Maui community plant 5,000 native plants and learned what it meant to “plant canoes.”

The story of ‘ai‘ai and how it relates to you

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Our hula, mele, and oli are often seen as ways to connect to our pasts, but this hula drama put on by the Kula Kaiapuni o Maui ma Pāʻia reminds us that our moʻolelo often show us the way into our futures. The haumāna performed mele and hula that told the story of Kūʻulakai, his son ʻAiʻai, and how they built the first fishpond. Moʻolelo and traditions like these have contributed to and helped drive the resurgence in restoring traditional Hawaiian fishponds. In today’s world, where we are facing issues of food insecurity and climate change, traditional agriculture and aquaculture have become even more important, as they remind us how to live as aloha ‘āina, in relationship with the land and sea rather than exploiting them as mere resources.

He Ao Hou: A New World

Video + Playable Video Games

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Standing upon a foundation of our culture, language, and practices, we can see across vast distances, even to new worlds. “He Ao Hou,” A New World, is a short video game that is the product of Kanaeokana’s collaboration with the Montreal-based Initiative for Indigenous Futures. IIF ran a three-week workshop that gave haumāna room to envision sustainable new worlds for Hawaiian moʻolelo and values to populate and then gave them the skills necessary to bring them into being. In the final five days of the workshop, the participants created this Hawaiian-language game based on an original story they had come up with, set in a universe filled with our stories and traditions. They did everything from coding to graphics to voice acting. Download the games Wao Kanaka  and He Ao Hou and immerse yourself in the new world that these haumāna have imagined.

  A Thriving Lāhui • Examples of Hawaiian culture based education

March 2020