Project Justification

User Assumptions

My audience is made up of 6th grade art students. My students are able to read the words I chose to characterize and are familiar with the terminology associated with my unit. Reading abilities for this group range from slightly below grade level to far above a 6th grade reading level. My students had prior knowledge about basic color wheel concepts and have experience using watercolor paints for mixing. Because my unit is about the color wheel, my graphics include color and emphasis on the concepts. The color wheel is a visual representation for artists to use color and this unit helps students understand how to read use the wheel to understand color.

Graphic Description & Design Process

        

Selection

To apply this concept I created an instructional graphic that helps the learner focus on  my message through the figure-ground concept. Figure is considered the element of the message that the learner focuses on while ground is the area the the learner does not focus on.

This lesson will serve as an introduction for the activities students will be doing when they create their own color wheel. I think my image will be successful because I have created a good balance of the figure-ground relationship.   According to the section on Actions and Tools on page 111 I have used contrast as a way to make important information stand out.  I have drawn a bold outline around the complementary color combination on each of my color wheels.  This helps focuses your eye on the important information using a visual magnification strategy.  The outline creates contrast and improve the figure-ground distinction from the rest of the colors on the wheel.

The next element I utilized was Adding Elements to a Diagram from page 115. By placing a double sided arrow pointing to each of my complimentary colors I created emphasis on the principle of complementary colors being opposite of one another on the color wheel.  These arrows help students understand that opposite colors are not just vertical or horizontal but can be across the color wheel in other ways too.

Color and depth

I have analyzed color and the many ways it can be used to help create instructional messages. Through the readings I learned when to use color and also when color can become a distraction to the learner. For this project I incorporated the concepts about color and depth into my design for understanding Tint, Tone, and Shade. This project will serve as an illustration for how to create color values for tint, tone, and shade.

I created this image using color because I see it as necessary to aid students in showing associations, interpret related data, and emphasize the meaning of the information.  According to our text on page 267, color selection make important information stand out. Out of all of the colors, I chose to use red as my pure hue because it is a warm color which tends to advance and it is the the first color in the color spectrum.  I colored each of the circles to convey meaning from what the mixing process would look like.  I used the principle of contrast for backgrounds and foregounds as discussed in the page 2 color insert in creating the images and balance with the text.  I organized my information both vertically and horizontally so the information aligned for the learner to conceptualize.

Organization

For this graphic, I focused on Organization and its role as a design element in an instructional message. Organization includes the chunking strategy and how it can be used to help lead the learner through a lesson. Organization is an important tool when designing an instructional image because it directs the learner to view specific points of your graphic. I have created the following image according to these concepts.

Students will have knowledge from preceding lessons on the terminology and the color mixing process.  This project will serve as an illustration for how to name and locate the tertiary colors on a color wheel.

I used lines around each of the tertiary colors to create hierarchy and show importance of these colors according to the techniques listed on page 146.  Another organizational technique I used was chunking. I created chunks in my information to make it easier to read and retrieve information by changing the direction and size of the text in the color wheel.  According the page 139 of the text, I used larger font for the tertiary colors and aligned it the the shape because that is where I wanted the most emphasis. For the primary and secondary colors I used a smaller text and left the alignment horizontal for all pieces.  This strategy still provides my reader with key information, however; it chunks the important elements.

Color and space

This week we looked at the ACE model as a design process. ACE stands for analyze, create and evaluate, while principles, actions, and tools (PAT) are a subset of the Create phase of the ACE model. For our assignment this week, we were to create a graphic that will help students synthesize the content of our final project. I created a graphic organizer to introduce my students to the process of color mixing.

Students will be able to understand basic math principles and recognize the use of addition when combining colors together. I think this design model will be successful in breaking down the color mixing process for students because I started the design by using a completed version of the color wheel students will be asked to create from the week 6 assignment.  From page 85-86 in the course text, I used the tools as the core elements of design. Students will recognize the use of shape and line to identify and to organize color into schemes.  In this weeks design I have added the use of tools such as color and type to my design.

I used the ADDIE model from page 91 of our text to analyze my instruction and identify a problem and design a solution to help students make sense of the information. Often times students have trouble reading the color wheel because they do not understand the principles of the color schemes, primary, secondary, and tertiary. To a novice art student the color wheel can create confusion because it only works when you know how to read it. By breaking the words down into their number meanings it allows students to relate to the information in a new way which will apply to the additive color mixing processes.

Color and Whitespace

White space is an an important part of an instructional image because it helps the learner better understand and process the presented information.This graphic introduce students to the process of creating box letters which will be an aspect of completing their final project. This graphic will serve will serve as an illustration for step-by-step instructions for boxed letters. The students have high and low reading levels and are familiar with the format.

According to page 274 in our text, I used space as a tool for clarifying text. I created separate boxes for each of the four instructions to enable readers to see the structure of the document and access the more relevant pieces of information.  According to the principle of creating contrast on page 268, I used different colored lines to signify the steps in the process for creating boxed letters. I used the concept of space and balance from page 275 to arrange the elements vertically and create balance between each of the steps.

CARP Project

Contrast, alignment, repetition, and proximity (CARP), the four Actions of PAT framework, constitute this week's theme. These are all element one considers when designing effective learning materials. For this weeks assignment I created a handout of step by step instructions for creating a "Name Color Wheel" project.  

This will be the an introduction to the final project for a unit on color theory which asks students to demonstrate their understanding of the primary, secondary, and intermediate colors. Students will have knowledge from preceding lessons on the terminology used and color mixing principles.  Students will have access and familiarity using necessary tools to complete this project.

The integration of the CARP principles will make this design successful because it increases the effectiveness of my instructional design. On page 201, I used contrast with a clear and bold typeface. I used a shaded box to break the process into the preparation and painting portions of the project.  For alignment I used vertical and horizontal rows to display images and text.  For repetition on page 203, I used the same image of a rectangle and information display for every step in the process.  I integrated the principle of proximity to chunk information into each step.

Design Process Model

This week we looked at the ACE model as a design process. ACE stands for analyze, create and evaluate, while principles, actions, and tools (PAT) are a subset of the Create phase of the ACE model. For our assignment this week, we were to create a graphic that will help students synthesize the content of our final project. I created a graphic organizer to introduce my students to the process of color mixing.

This lesson will serve as an introduction for the activities students will be doing from week 6 when they will be using paint to mix the color wheel.  Students will be able to understand basic math principles and recognize the use of addition when combining colors together.

I think this design model will be successful in breaking down the color mixing process for students because I started the design by using a completed version of the color wheel students will be asked to create from the week 6 assignment.  From page 85-86 in the course text, I used the tools as the core elements of design. Students will recognize the use of shape and line to identify and to organize color into schemes.  In this weeks design I have added the use of tools such as color and type to my design.

I used the ADDIE model from page 91 of our text to analyze my instruction and identify a problem and design a solution to help students make sense of the information. Often times students have trouble reading the color wheel because they do not understand the principles of the color schemes, primary, secondary, and tertiary. To a novice art student the color wheel can create confusion because it only works when you know how to read it. By breaking the words down into their number meanings it allows students to relate to the information in a new way which will apply to the additive color mixing processes.

References

Lohr, L. L. (2008). Creating graphics for learning and performance, Upper Saddle River, NJ:

Pearson.

Smith, P. L., & Ragan, T. J. (2005). Instructional Design (3rd ed.), Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley &                                                                sons, Inc.