SYLLABUS -

The Wrigley Field Program in Hawaii

Fall 2014

Course Numbers

EARTHSCI 117/EARTHSYS 117: Earth Sciences of the Hawaiian Islands (4 units)

BIO 116/EARTHSYS 116: Ecology of the Hawaiian Islands (4 units)

ANTHRO 118/EARTHSYS 118: Heritage, Environment and Sovereignty in Hawai‘i (4 units)

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (3 Units)

Syllabus Contents

General Description

Teaching Team

Objectives

Overarching Themes

Format

Prerequisites

Enrollment Details

ACADEMIC INFORMATION

Module Faculty & Calendar

Who This Course Is For

Expectations

Attendance

Participation

Assignments

In-module Assignments

Final Project

Grading

Assessment

Evaluation

LOGISTICAL INFORMATION

Travel Schedule

Calendar

Location Details

Travel Logistics

Syllabus Online

Feedback



General Description

The Wrigley Field Program in Hawai‘i is a 10-week exploration of the connections between earth systems and the ways they can be studied and taught outdoors in the natural “laboratory” of Hawaii. Based out of four ecologically unique locations on the islands of Hawai‘i and Kaua‘i, the course uses a hands-on approach to teach students how to conduct field research in variety of disciplines, while simultaneously capitalizing on unique aspects of the Hawaiian islands to teach the fundamentals of geology, ecology, and culture. The Wrigley Field Program consists of three courses and an independent research project; the courses are taught through a series of ~7 day modules by Stanford professors who come to Hawai‘i and live and work with the students. This program is supported by a generous gift from Julie Wrigley.

Teaching Team

2014

Peter Vitousek (Faculty Director)

Sara Cina (Program Director)

Dan Reineman (Curriculum Coordinator)

Elise Debuysser (TA)

Devin Leopold (TA)

Objectives

While each professor’s module will have specific learning objectives, we broadly expect that students who participate in the Wrigley Field Program in Hawai‘i will:

Overarching Themes

While our objectives will be directly addressed through each module, throughout the quarter we will often come face to face with the realities of environmental science and fieldwork. Some of these realities can be thought of as the overarching themes and values for the course that we will return to many times and that we hope to instill in every participant. They include:

Format

The general format of the course is for students to be joined by a different professor every 5-8 days. Each professor provides some context for the scientific content of their module and leads the class into the field. Fieldwork is generally focused on learning the system of interests, its related methods, and then collecting real data. Working alone, in teams, or in a large group, students will use the data they’ve collected to address a concept or hypothesis about the system. At the end of the module, they report on their observations, experiences, and conclusions through either an oral presentation or written document. Regular discussions will be scheduled in order to identify connections between module content and the trajectory of the course, to track student learning, and to facilitate progress on final projects. Additionally, we will meet regularly as a team to go overview course logistics, planning, housekeeping, etc.

Prerequisites

The most important prerequisite for participation in the Wrigley Program is enthusiasm for working and learning outdoors. However, students should have completed at least one related introductory science course for a letter grade before applying. Examples of such courses include, but are not limited to, GES 1, BIO 43, HUMBIO 2A, etc. Please contact Peter Vitousek or Sara Cina with additional questions about specific academic preparation.

Enrollment Details

EARTHSCI 117/EARTHSYS 117: Earth Sciences of the Hawaiian Islands (4 units)

Through the study of volcanoes, erosion, and soil formation, students will be introduced to the Earth processes at work in Hawai‘i . Focus will be placed on the processes that formed the Hawaiian landscape. Specifically, we will compare the landscapes and soils of a young and volcanically active island (Hawai‘i) with an old, eroding Island (Kaua‘i), and examine how these features influence the local ecosystems.

BIO 116/EARTHSYS 116: Ecology of the Hawaiian Islands (4 units)

In this course terrestrial and marine ecosystems will be explored and investigated. On land, focus will be placed on the origin, evolution, and ecology of flora and fauna, the development of communities and ecosystems on new islands and new lava within islands, and the reasons for the concentration of threatened and endangered species in Hawai‘i. In the ocean, emphasis will be placed on the ecological processes that maintain biodiversity, community organization, and the impacts on marine ecology due to rising sea surface temperatures.

ANTHRO 118/EARTHSYS 118: Heritage, Environment and Sovereignty in Hawai‘i (4 units)

How does culture, both pre- and post-contact, interact with nature? How were Hawaiian resource demands met on a small island? Are these approaches sustainable? These questions and others will be addressed in a course focusing on Hawaiian anthropology and sustainable agriculture.

Independent Research: Details TBD (3 Units; Enrollment varies by student; default EARTHYSYS 197)

The research project is an integral part of the Hawai‘i Program. Working with faculty, students will engage in a research project to address an area of interest (Life, Earth, or Human Sciences). During the first four weeks of the program students will propose an answerable question and outline project methodology. Field data will be collected during specific times during the program and the project will culminate in a presentation to the group and in a final written report due at the end of the program.


ACADEMIC INFORMATION

Module Faculty & Calendar

Faculty*

Module

Dates

Peter Vitousek 

Ecology

23 SEP - 26 SEP

Paul Segall

Volcanology

03 OCT - 05 OCT

Mike Wilcox

Anthropology

07 OCT - 11 OCT

Steve Palumbi

Marine Biology

13 OCT - 18 OCT

Scott Fendorf &

George Hilley

Soil Science &

Geomorphology

19 OCT - 30 OCT

(Taught simultaneously)

Peter Vitousek

Biogeochemistry, Heritage, & Service Learning

02 NOV - 08 NOV

Tad Fukami

Community Ecology

11 NOV - 16 NOV

Meg Caldwell

Natural Resource Management

18 NOV - 20 NOV

Peter Vitousek

Indigenous Agriculture & Sustainability

21 NOV - 26 NOV

Peter Vitousek

Final Projects

29 NOV - 12 DEC

* Some modules will be taught with an additional postdoc or graduate student who works with that module’s faculty lead.

Who This Course Is For

This course is for undergraduate students of any major with an interest in exploring environmental and cultural experiential education in the context of a small field-based program. A strong scientific background is not needed, though students with such a background will have ample opportunity to ask questions and explore at any level.

Expectations

General

This is not a typical Stanford quarter. We ask a lot of our students, both academically and physically. We expect that students will

Likewise, we also ask a lot of the program’s teaching team. Students can expect that the teaching team will:

Attendance

We will be living and working together closely all quarter. Days off are scheduled in between most modules and on major holidays. Note that these off days do not necessarily correspond with weekends! We expect that all students will join in all scheduled activities unless they are ill or injured; in that case, please let us know immediately if you don’t feel well or are hurt!  

Participation

Students are expected to participate in the following ways: actively listening, asking questions, answering questions, completing readings or writings or other assignments on time, engaging constructively with all members of the teaching team and with guest speakers and with each other, and by respecting the ideas and opinions of others. Students are expected to stay together in the field. Students are expected to share equally in all assigned duties, whether they be fieldwork, group assignments and presentations, or housework like cooking and cleaning. If, for any reason, a student feels unable to participate fully as described here or has other concerns over his or her participation, please let a member of the teaching team know as soon as possible.

Assignments

In-module Assignments

Each module professor will provide their own description of assignments during their module. In previous years, these assignments have varied from mini- research projects to journal entries to oral presentations.

Final Project

The anchor experience of the Wrigley Field Program is the final project. Working in small groups or individually, students will design and carry out an independent research project. The final two weeks of the program are devoted entirely to student final projects, however, this time will be primarily for data collection, analysis, synthesis, and presentation preparation. Project conception and design will be nurtured throughout the quarter according to the following timeline:

Week

Stage

Deliverable (Due Date)

1

Reflection on previous cohort’s projects, workshop ideas

None (NA)

3

Potential research interests, to be workshopped into questions, and then into testable hypotheses

List of potential research questions (OCT 11)

4/5

Developing a list of sources

None (NA)

5

Background Research

Annotated bibliography (OCT 24)

8

Methods Workshop

Method section (NOV 16)

9

Project Proposal

Complete proposal (NOV 23)

10-11

Field work, analysis, synthesis, writing

NOV 29 - DEC 11

11

Final Project Due December 12

1-page Project Summary AND

Final Presentation

Grading

Assessment

This is not a typical academic quarter. There are no problem sets, midterms, or finals. We will instead measure your learning through the ways that you participate in the course activities. To the extent feasible, we will provide clear instructions and expectations for each of these activities and, where appropriate, we’ll provide rubrics.

Individual module faculty will coordinate together at the quarter’s end to assign final grades. Course grades will be combined from individual modules; participation will be assessed by individual faculty during each module and over the whole quarter; the final project (and independent study credit) will be determined from the final presentation/paper. Students can inquire about their progress at any time, but will not be able to receive a “grade” until the conclusion of the course. If a student is underperforming, he or she will be notified as soon as possible.

Traditionally, students who work hard perform well during the quarter and in the final assessment. And, traditionally, all students work hard. We do not want students to worry about his or her grade – you will be too busy worrying about learning native plants, practicing your snorkeling skills, collecting and analyzing your own data, etc. We can’t pretend that grades don’t matter to you, and we can’t pretend that you will all receive an A+ just for showing up. But if you work hard and do good work, it will be reflected when eventually you receive your grade. If have any questions or concerns, don’t hesitate to ask a member of the teaching team. Otherwise, relax. Learning is more important than grading, and you will be very busy working on your learning.

Evaluation

Students will be apprised of their own learning and progress in many ways throughout the course.


LOGISTICAL INFORMATION

Travel Schedule

Date

Move/Event

Dwelling Location

21 SEP

Students must arrive in Hilo, Hawai‘i

Volcano NP, Hawai‘i

22 SEP

Course begins; Orientation

06 OCT

Move to Waimea

Waimea, Hawai‘i

26 OCT

Fly to Kaua‘i

Kōkeʻe SP, Kaua‘i

04 NOV

Move to Naue

North Shore, Kaua‘i

09 NOV

Fly back to Big Island

Waimea, Hawai‘i

27 NOV

Thanksgiving

12 DEC

Final Presentations

13 DEC

Course ends; students can fly home

*Air travel bolded *

Calendar

A detailed program calendar is available at:

http://www.keepandshare.com/calendar/show_month.php?i=2242318&cat=0&fclick=y 

Location Details

Volcano National Park, Big Island

        19.434226 N, 155.274085 W

        http://www.kmc-volcano.com/ 

We stay in the Kilauea Military Camp;

Dorm-like setting;

Cafeteria dining.

Waimea, Big Island

        20.027869 N, 155.695659 W

        www.hpa.edu

We stay together in one, large group house at Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy;

Shared bedrooms;

Some meals delivered HPA cafeteria, some prepared ourselves.

North Shore, Kaua‘i

        22.223956 N, 159.553435 W

We stay in a beachfront YMCA camp with rustic cabins;

Prepare our own food.

Kōkeʻe State Park, Kaua‘i

        22.131093 N, 159.659128 W

        We stay in the Kōkeʻe Civilian Conservation Camp;

        Dorm-style;

        Prepare our own food.

Travel Logistics

Students must coordinate their own travel to arrive in Hilo, Hawaii on September 21st and to depart on December 13th (depart either from Kona, Hawai’i or Hilo, Hawai’i) (financial assistance is available if needed; contact Sara Cina). All other travel (including inter-island flights) will be coordinated and paid for by the Program. All meals and lodging are covered. Emergency contact and medical history forms and liability waivers must be completed and turned in to Sara Cina before the beginning of the program.


Syllabus Online

This syllabus is a living document and is constantly evolving. The most current version can always be found online here:

http://goo.gl/dnQIth 

Feedback

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