ATL Toolkit

This document is meant to be a quick resource of activities to incorporate into your teaching and learning after choosing an approach to learning (ATL) that supports your MYP objective.  This list will hopefully grow, and is by no means official to the IB.


I. Communication skills

Exchanging thoughts, messages and information effectively through interaction; and

Reading, writing and using language to gather and communicate information.

ATL Indicators

Placemat Consensus

The placemat is an activity that allows each participant's voice to be heard, but requires the group to negotiate and come to a consensus.

  • Negotiate ideas and knowledge with peers and teachers

See-Think-Wonder

A visible thinking routine for exploring creative works, new ideas, or processes.  

  • Give and receive meaningful feedback

Correction Codes

Having a shorthand correction code that students are familiar with can help all teachers give effective language feedback on tasks.

  • Give and receive meaningful feedback


II. Collaboration skills

Working effectively with others.

ATL Indicators

Placemat Consensus

The placemat is an activity that allows each participant's voice to be heard, but requires the group to negotiate and come to a consensus.

See-Think-Wonder

A visible thinking routine for exploring creative works, new ideas, or processes.  

  • Give and receive meaningful feedback

Constructive Collaboration (meta)

As a class, students negotiate and build consensus on key traits of positive, constructive collaboration.  Using the agreed outcomes of the process, students then work in small groups to construct visual representations of those traits, while exemplifying the characteristics on which they are focusing.  

Structured Group Roles

Using specific roles within groups can provide students with structure when they approach a collaborative task.  By breaking down the roles, students can focus on a specific component of the task and have an avenue to contribute to the group.  All members have responsibility for success.  Various roles can be selected depending on the task, such as : CEO/leader, resource manager, recorder, presenter, safety manager, time keeper, webmaster, etc.  To see it in action check out this video.

  • Delegate and share responsibility for decision-making
  • Take responsibility for one’s own actions
  • Manage and resolve conflict, and work collaboratively in teams
  • Listen actively to other perspectives and ideas
  • Exercise leadership and take on a variety of roles within groups
  • Advocate for one’s own rights and needs


III. Organization skills

Managing time and tasks effectively.

ATL Indicators


IV. Affective skills

Managing state of mind.

ATL Indicators


V. Reflection skills

(Re)considering the process of learning; choosing and using ATL skills.

ATL Indicators

Linking Learner Profile to classroom tasks

After instructions for classroom activities  are shared and understood, students reflect together on which learner profile traits will be important to successful completion of the activity.   After group sharing, each student selects a LP trait of their own and reflects through an end-of-class exit card on their success in that area of emphasis.  

  • Identify strengths and weaknesses of personal learning strategies (self-assessment)

See-Think-Wonder

A visible thinking routine for exploring creative works, new ideas, or processes.  

  • Focus on the process of creating by imitating the work of others

Socrative

Headlines


VI. Information literacy skills

Finding, interpreting, judging and creating information.

ATL Indicators

CRAPPY Source Analysis

Lessons on Google Searching

Lessons from Jeff Utecht on how to successfully Google search.  Lessons are broken down into age appropriateness.

  • Collect, record and verify data
  • Access information to be informed and inform others                         
  • Identify primary and secondary sources


VII. Media literacy skills

Interacting with media to use and create ideas and information.

ATL Indicators

Socrative


VIII. Critical-thinking skills

Analysing and evaluating issues and ideas.

ATL Indicators

Question Matrix

An updated version of Wiederhold’s Question Matrix that includes debatable starters.  Use this matrix to help shape students shape their own inquiry questions.  Great to start an inquiry to identify factual knowledge and then move towards conceptual understanding and debatable topics.Question Matrix.png

  • Formulate factual, topical, conceptual and debatable questions         

See-Think-Wonder

A visible thinking routine for exploring creative works, new ideas, or processes.  

  • Recognize unstated assumptions and bias
  • Consider ideas from multiple perspectives

I used to think…

Now I think...

A thinking routine for analyzing how our thinking has changed as a result of an experience.

  • Revise understanding based on new information and evidence


IX. Creative-thinking skills

Generating novel ideas and considering new perspectives.

ATL Indicators

Padlet Shared Space

Padlet.com provides a tech solution to allow students space to generate and share new ideas and consider new perspectives of their classmates and peers.  

See-Think-Wonder

A visible thinking routine for exploring creative works, new ideas, or processes.  

  • Practise flexible thinking—develop multiple opposing, contradictory and complementary arguments


X. Transfer skills

Using skills and knowledge in multiple contexts.

ATL Indicators