Aaron Bartell Speaking Sessions

Table of Contents

Profile Picture

Biography

Labs

Intro To PASE

My First Rails App

My First Node.js App

Sessions

First Step Into Cloud

Intro to Git

Intro to Node.js

Node.js transacts with DB2 and RPG

Building Your First Node.js App With Expressjs

IBM i IFS Containers

Intro To Open Source On IBM i

WebSockets, Node.js, IBM i, and Watson

Why Rails?

Intro To Ruby

Intro to Rails

Ruby and RPG, talking at last

Retired

Profile Picture

http://mowyourlawn.com/pics/aaron_profile_painting.jpg

Biography

Aaron Bartell has two primary focuses in his role as Director of IBM i Innovation at Krengeltech; IBM i cloud hosting (litmis.com/spaces) and open source (litmis.com/jump-start-program). Through consulting engagements, Aaron jump-starts Node.js, Ruby, and Git development initiatives while serving as an extension of internal development teams. Aaron facilitates adoption of open source technologies through internal staff training, speaking engagements at conferences, and the authoring of best practices within IBM i industry publications and litmis.com/learn.   Connect with Aaron via email at abartell@krengeltech.com.

Aaron lives with his wife and five children in Southern Minnesota.  He enjoys the vast amounts of laughter having a young family brings, along with camping and music.  He believes there's no greater purpose than to give of our life and time to help others.

Labs

Requirements: All labs take place on an IBM i in the cloud that is preconfigured with applicable technology stacks (i.e. Ruby, Node.js, etc).  Each attendee needs to have their own laptop, either provided by the conference or bring their own. All that's required is an internet connection and a Chrome browser on Windows, Mac, or Linux (Chromebooks don't yet work).  All command line and code editing is done via browser-based applications - nothing to install on the user's laptop.

Intro To PASE

Timeslot length: 1hr (average)

Requirements: click here

Actual Lab: click here

Facetious title: Visiting The In-Laws

Abstract: New to the PASE environment on IBM i?  Don't even know what it is?  This session is for you.  PASE is the Linux-y side of the IBM i operating system.  It is where all the open source goodies like Node.js, PHP, Ruby, Python, Java, OpenSSL, Git run (and much much more).  

In this lab you will learn how to do the following:

My First Rails App

Timeslot length: 2.5hrs (average)

Requirements: click here

Actual Lab: click here

Abstract:  Tim O’Reilly, Founder of O’Reilly Media has this to say: “Ruby on Rails is a breakthrough in lowering the barriers of entry to programming.  Powerful web applications that formerly might have taken weeks or months to develop can be produced in a matter of days.”

Such a bold statement deserves scrutiny and the best way to prove it is to see it.  Participate in this lab and learn about many of the streamlined features of Ruby on Rails to gain an understanding of how so much time is saved.  The goal will be to develop a web application from scratch and walk through things like:

My First Node.js App

Timeslot length: 2.5hrs (average)

Requirements: click here

Actual lab: click here

Abstract:  Node.js is a hot hot hot technology right now.  It can be used for many networking type scenarios including building web applications.  In this hands-on lab you will accomplish the following:

Sessions

Intro to Git

Facetious title: Squirrel Rashes

Slides: click here

Abstract: In short, Git allows you to keep a detailed history of source code changes with very little effort.  Git is free, open source, and easy to install on IBM i.  You can even use Git to manage RPG source.  What are you waiting for?

Git is a distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency. Git is arguably the most popular way to manage source code versions industry wide.

What we will cover:

Intro to Node.js

Facetious title: Employment Insurance

Slides: click here

Abstract: Node.js is here.  Yep, Javascript on the server side of things.  Is this a good thing?  That's what we'll be looking to decipher as we walk through the following points at a high level, all the while relating it to the RPG programmer mindset to more easily draw similarities.

And seriously, Javascript is employment insurance.  You have life insurance and car insurance, and, and, and;  well, why not employment insurance.  Learn something (Javascript, and inherently Node.js) that is applicable to every single website on the internet.

In this session we will learn about the following:

Node.js transacts with DB2 and RPG

Facetious title: "Those aren't pillows!"

Slides: click here

Abstract: When IBM introduced Node.js to IBM i they included a full fledge DB2 for i database driver written directly against the SQL CLI APIs.  No middle layer JDBC or MySQL in the mix.  They also provided the iToolkit, a seamless way to call RPG (or any other type of resource or program on IBM i) directly from Node.js.  Very cool.  This means adopting Node.js doesn't mean abandoning your huge investment in RPG; instead you can revitalize it.  That makes good business sense.

In this session we will do the following:

Building Your First Node.js App With Expressjs

Facetious title: Bernie Sanders Braids Trump's Combover

Slides: click here

Abstract: Node.js is a hot topic in IBM i circles because of its recent port.   Doing a "Hello World" app in Node.js is very simple, but what about developing something more substantial with full model-view-controller capabilities?  This session aims to take you beyond your first pass at Node.js and show how to use one of the most popular Node.js web frameworks, Express.js.

In this session we will learn about the following:

IBM i IFS Containers

Formerly: "Swim in the Ocean of Open Source"

Facetious title: So Help Me Rubbermaid

Slides: click here

Abstract: In this session we will introduce the ibmichroot (IBM i Chroot) open source project.  Think of this technology being similar to being able to create a bunch of micro instances of IBM i all on a single instance of IBM i.  This is accomplished by using PASE's chroot utility and is what I'm terming "IFS Containers".

This technology is excellent for those running applications in PASE (i.e. Node.js, Ruby, Python, PHP).  It will keep PASE applications completely separate from one another so there is no toe stepping.  I often use this technology for creating separate environments for development, testing, staging and production.

Further, the ibmichroot project facilitates the download and install of AIX binaries from perzl.org.  perzl.org hosts hundreds of open source programs from the Linux world that have been made to work on AIX.  Some of the more notable ones include: gcc, Git, Nginx, joe (server-side editor), bash, zsh, Perl, bzip2, ghostscript, Ruby and many more.  Having these tools on IBM i brings about a new level of parity with other platforms.

On final note, yum support was recently added to the ibmichroot project and we will be talking about how that is a game changer for IBM i and open source.

In this session we will learn the following:

Intro To Open Source On IBM i

Slides: click here

Facetious title: Who Moved My Cheese?

Abstract: Open source on IBM i is growing at an incredibly fast pace.  Is it for you?  Why should you consider it?  

We'll walk through the reasoning of why pursuing open source is as much of a business decision as it is a technology decision.  We'll discuss commercial vs. open source software and associated costs.

Then we'll dive into describing the PASE environment on IBM i and how it facilitates open source.  We'll describe how to access and navigate PASE.  And lastly we'll describe some tangible examples of how you can adopt open source at a small scale to "test the waters".

In this session we'll discuss the following:

WebSockets, Node.js, IBM i, and Watson

Slides: click here

Facetious title: What Programmers Say for $500

Abstract: HTML5 gave us WebSockets.  IBM gave us Watson.  Did you know we can easily access Watson from IBM i for our own business purposes?  Did you know there is a free tier for Watson so you can get started without spending a dime? Sooooo stinkin' cool.

In this session we will learn the following:

Why Rails?

Slides: click here

Abstract: Languages are interesting animals.  They can evoke great unity or spark potent dissension.  A geek is to their language or operating system as a jock is to their favorite sports team - wholey, and sometimes unreasonably, devoted.  That’s been my life with RPG for over a decade.

Then a few years ago I started doing RubyOnRails development on Linux.  After the excitement of learning something new wore off I realized something different and special was occurring in the world of Ruby and Rails - specifically, the Ruby and Rails community are prolific in recognizing patterns, and, in organized fashion, developing automations around those patterns to expedite the building of technology solutions.  As of Oct 8th, 2013 there is a freely available and formally supported port of the Ruby language and Rails web framework for IBM i named PowerRuby (www.PowerRuby.com).  

Attend this session to learn more about all of the components that make the Ruby language and Rails web framework so successful and plain old fun.  Topics covered will include Ruby, Rails, ActiveRecord, gems, bundler, social coding, agile practices, Convention Over Configuration, open source apps built with Rails, and who's using it for high-end public sites.

Intro To Ruby

Slides: click here

Abstract: Ruby is a dynamic, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity. It has an elegant syntax that is natural to read and easy to write.  And guess what? It is now formally ported to IBM i!   Attend this session to gain an introductory perspective about the language, how to install it, where to get support, how to write a sample program, invoke it, and much more.  We will also dive into the awesome reality of “gems”, how they work, and how to get them.  Lastly we will look into some real-world scenarios of how you can use the Ruby language on your IBM i to do basic system administration tasks.

Intro to Rails

Slides: click here

Abstract: “Rails is an open-source web framework written in the Ruby language that's optimized for programmer happiness and sustainable productivity.  It lets you write beautiful code by favoring convention over configuration.”  Are all these statements true?  That’s what we aim to find out by walking through the creation of a small application from start to finish and calling out the various features of the Rails framework and how useful they are.  

Not sold yet?  Check out what James Duncan Davidson had to say about Rails - somebody that wasn’t necessarily inclined to be a Kool-Aid drinker because of being entrenched in the Java world.    “Rails is the most well thought-out web development framework I’ve ever used. And that’s in a decade of doing web applications for a living. I’ve built my own frameworks, helped develop the Servlet API and have created more than a few web servers from scratch. Nobody has done it like this before.” - James Duncan Davidson, Creator of Apache Tomcat and Ant

Ruby and RPG, talking at last

Slides: click here

Abstract: Let’s say you’re considering learning Ruby but know one primary requirement is that existing RPG business logic must be easily accessible from Ruby.  Problem solved, because that’s where XMLSERVICE fits in.

XMLSERVICE is a single library of open source RPG code that enables XML scripting calls of IBM i resources using most any language available on your platform. XMLSERVICE RPG library does not require any licensed programs or any other language product to run on your IBM i, however various language teams may provide a precompiled version of XMLSERVICE with any given product offering (i.e. PowerRuby).

In this session we will walk through the various features and ways to communicate with an existing RPG program and other IBM i resources directly from a Ruby program that is running on the same IBM i!

First Step Into Cloud

Facetious title: <nothing yet, but something will come to me> 

Slides: click here

Abstract: I know, I know.  Doing IBM i in the cloud can be scary.  Some would rather sit through 10hrs of presidential debates than attempt IBM i in the cloud.  But what if the risk was minimal and the initial cost was low?  What if you could easily hit the delete button if things didn't work out?

Web application workloads have been leaving IBM i because of our hesitancy of "sticking our box on the web".   What if you could instead stick someone else's IBM i in the cloud, install your web app there, and have it seamlessly connect to your back office IBM i via an encrypted line?  There is a way to ease into using an IBM i in the cloud and this session will teach you how.

This session will cover:

Retired

I've done a lot of presentations over the years and have retired many.  I thought I'd make a section for those retired ones in case they are of interest to anyone.  Some of them were created in OpenOffice, some in PowerPoint, and some in Apple's Key software.  That means the conversion might have altered some of them and made them look wonky.  It is what it is.