Introduction:

Who are we?

Dick Dower - 65 year old male weighing in around 170 lbs.   Best on-sight - 5.11b                  

Natalie Neal Dower - 49 year old female weighing in around 150 lbs.   Best red point - 5.11a

Training for The 24 Hours of Horseshoe Hell (24HHH) - 2014

 

Natalie and I have competed in the 24HHH for 9 years now as team Leather and Lace.  In those years we have experimented with several training methods.  This past year, 2014, is the first year that we tried a very structured approach and we obtained our best result yet with each of us climbing 152 routes.   The routes included 12 x 5.10, 38 x 5.9, 46 x 5.8, and 56 5.7 and under.  As you can see, we were heavy on the low end of the grades.   In previous years we have done a lot more 5.10s but ended up scoring less.  But, take all the stats with a grain of salt since one year it rained and we were on course of a best score and had already done 30 5.10's.   The addition of all the easy/moderate routes to the ranch in the last few years also skews the results.   The thing that made this year unique is that I convinced Natalie to do more of the training I had been doing for years.   She had her best year by far when it comes to route count, points and, most importantly, her power and energy level throughout the event.        Let's face it, this is an endurance event.   Either Nat or I had to lead a route every 4.7 minutes for 24 hours.    We did 12 routes each our first hour or a route every 2.5 minutes.  Your entire body needs to be ready for this amount of stress, not just your forearms.    If we were willing to give up our 150 route goal, I am sure we could have front loaded with more hard routes and that would have upped our points.   But, as you know, if you want route count, you must get the easier routes before it gets dark or you will be faced with lines.   The 24HHH doesn't always measure your ultimate ability since you sometimes get blocked in your quest by other people pursuing their goals.

                    Our methods are really aimed more toward the older, average climber like us.   If you are a young gun with under 10% body fat, you can probably train much harder or even come in with a lot less volume.  We have both been injury and tendonitis free for several years and do not try to push our red point level every year.  At our age, we sometimes have to work very hard to stay in one place.   If your goal is to try to improve on your best red point, there are better plans for that.   We do quite a bit of low level cardio and laps in the gym.  Those activities are not conducive for ultimate strength/power needed for most red point projects but may help if your target projects are very long and pumpy.      One thing I can attest to for sure is that my bouldering level definitely increased and I was able to do more 5.11 gym routes in a row without pumping out.  Another note is that I did a birthday challenge during this period that consisted of doing 65 challenges in the 65 days before my 65th birthday on August 10th.  I did more work during that period than Natalie since she didn't need some of that intense work for HCR planning.  So from June 6 to August 10 there were some birthday specific workouts that would not be part of a "normal" plan and it caused me to try to peak twice, once around my birthday and then for the 24.

65th Birthday Challenge  

 

References:

I combined the ideas from multiple places to come up with our plan but they were mainly from:

 

"Training for the New Alpinism" by Steve House - this gave us our guide for cardio

"The Rock Climber's Training Manual" by Mark and Mike Anderson - this gave us our hang board and campus board plans and Supplemental exercises

Training Beta podcasts - specifically the one by Steve Bechtel - for our system board

                    

Our main thrust this year was to follow a modified structured plan based on "The Rock Climber's Training Manual".   First a strength phase with emphasis on hang board.  Next move to power with campus board and bouldering.  Finally power endurance that for us was more endurance/stamina.   Meanwhile, doing a lot of low level cardio and regular Supplemental exercises.   Our goal was to increase our Maximum Steady State i.e. the highest climbing grade we could climb without getting overly pumped.   This was fairly easy for us to monitor since we have access to great autobelays and route setting at the Red Rock Climbing Center in Las Vegas.  Each of the 5 autobelays has at least one 5.9, multiple 5.10's and usually a 5.11.   We never did any route under 5.9 during this type of training.  Doing laps on autobelays for 30 minutes to an hour is a modified version of ARC training detailed in the "The Rock Climber's Training Manual" in that, even though we had to wait for the autobelay to lower us, we climbed continually with little or no rest.  Bottom line: Get stronger and more powerful so we have reserves when we try to use as little strength and power as possible for 24 hours.   If you can climb 5.11, 5.9 should be easy.   Applied to stronger climbers, if you can climb 5.13 then 5.11 should be easy.  But easy for one burn isn't the same as climbing that easy grade for 24 hours.   So, we had to add lots of stamina/endurance work and climb a lot to make our movement as relaxed and smooth as possible.  You don't get that by hanging on a board or hiking 5 mile.   We tried to climb a lot, inside and out, to improve our movement and expose ourselves to as many different problems to solve as possible.   Thus, we hit Red Rock Climbing Center, Sender One, IBEX, and Monster Mountain climbing gyms and climbed a lot in Red Rock and HCR, concentrating on routes that were new to us and always trying to climb with relatively short rest periods.

You will see from our calendar near the end, we took few full rest days.   Our rest days were usually 30 minutes of elliptical.  That is really active rest and was better than doing nothing IMHO.   We tried to make movement a lifestyle so that each day it was more of the mindset of "what we would do" rather than "if we would work out".

 

" The Rock Climber's Training Manual " talks about tweaking your plan from year to year as you see what you can handle and how you performed.   At our age, we don't have a lot of years to experiment and tweak previous years so we were hoping our application of the plan would be as optimal as possible.


Terminology/Equipment

                    We have a pretty nice climbing specific workout gym in our garage.   Our hang board is by Trango and featured in "The Rock Climber's Training Manual"  Note in the picture below the pulley system used to remove weight.  We don't do chin-ups on the hang board, we just HANG!  We also hang weight from our harness to add resistance on bigger holds.

                    IMG_5378 (2).JPG

 


Campus Board (in the center of the picture) has medium and small Metolius campus rungs.  We don't climb the campus board like the big boys.  We put our feet on the wooden slats below to make it possible.    This also allows for multiple laps for endurance work.

System Board (on the right) has pairs of hold of the same type on the right and left to stress each side of the body equally.

TRX suspension straps (shown hanging between the campus board and system board)  handles and foot straps.

Elliptical on the left and C2 rowing machine next to it for cardio.

DSC_0001.JPG

I have always been a person to get some sort of climbing workout several times a week.   I also was getting my cardio via fairly hard trail runs.        My supplemental exercises consisted mainly of chin ups,  pushups and leg ups.  My hangboard workouts used to be based on weighted chins on the minute on various size holds and always finishing a set by being sure my hanging lasted 10 to 12 seconds.   I had used this method for several years.

An example would be:

Metolius Simulator

40lbs 5x3 chins on large edge - 20lbs 5x4 chins on medium edge - no weight 5x3 chins on small edge - 5x2chins on pinch

 

Starting in mid-April we changed to the very structured methods in the "Rock Climber's Training Manual" and switched to the Trango board.   I switched from weighted chins to simply hanging from various holds.   We changed our cardio protocol to much less stressful trail runs to hiking the uphills and only running the flats and downhills and using the Elliptical.  I will go through the reasons why we changed.   I will give some details of how we trained from mid-April until the 24.

 


Cardio:

To understand why we switched from hard trail runs to lower level aerobic training you need to buy "Training for the New Alpinism".  It has way more scientific explanations of all the energy systems and how they work in climbing than I could reproduce here.   I will give some quotes to give you some of the reasoning.

 

 "The limitation imposed on high-intensity work by the low-intensity aerobic system is a salient point not understood by some popular exercise trends (such as CrossFit) that emphasize high-intensity training all the times.  This is a very common misunderstanding, so let us look in more detail to the mechanisms involved."

"The better the aerobic capacity of the ST (slow twitch) fibers, the more lactate they are able to utilize as fuel"

"Even though the FT (fast twitch) fibers are the ones largely responsible for the higher muscle power outputs that give you the faster pace, the length of time that you can sustain this fast pace is almost completely dependent on the aerobic capacity of the ST fibers."

"The enhanced aerobic capacity of the trained slow twitch fibers is manifested as an elevation of the individual's aerobic threshold."

"Raising the aerobic threshold to its highest level puts you in the best position to raise your anaerobic threshold."

"The higher the muscle's maximum sustainable lactate level and the power produced at that level (the anaerobic threshold), the faster you can climb."

"Training to improve these thresholds is the primary goal of any successful program for any endurance sport."

WOW, that's a lot to digest.  So, what is the recommendation?

"We cannot overemphasize that the aerobic base building period is the most essential phase of training, as it plays a critical role in the development of aerobic power."

"You do not want to apply the finishing touches, such as higher intensity aerobic/anaerobic training, to your training until you are sure that the base can support it.  If you shortcut this base phase or mix in too many hard aerobic/anaerobic efforts, the specific training phase later on will be much less effective.  This is the foundation of all training for any endurance sport lasting longer than about two minutes.  Omit it at your peril."

 

We train mainly in Zone 1/2:

Zone 1: 55-75 percent max heart rate (HR).  Basic aerobic.  This is the key component of the big motor.  It is done at or below your nose-breathing limit

Zone 2: 75-80 percent max HR.  High-end aerobic.  Used by advanced athletes with years of base.

Zone 3: 80-90 percent max HR.  Max aerobic effect, fun, hard

Zone 4: 90-95 percent max HR.  Strong anaerobic component.  This zone is used sparingly at best.

 

We do a lot of Elliptical cardio for multiple reasons.

1.  It is easy on our knees and we both have developed a little knee pain this year perhaps from a lot of trail running previously.

2.  It is convenient and easy to watch Netflix while doing it.  

3.  I can easily monitor my heart rate.

4.  I think it is a great recovery workout for climbing since you are doing small contractions of forearms, lats, and pecs for the entire session.        

 

I keep my heart rate around 120 bpm with my max supposedly at about 160 based on my hr monitor test.  This gives me training right at the Zone 1/Zone 2 level.  My resting hr is between 42 and 45.  (fyi: My "own zone" based on Polar's own zone calculation is 49.  Polar Own Zone comparison)

 

Elliptical workouts are between 30 and 45 minutes and sometimes an hour.  Natalie did mainly 1 hour workouts.  Our  running/hiking sessions consist mainly of uphill hiking and running on the down hills and flats.   They are anywhere from 4 miles to 7 miles and vary from easy 15 minute miles to normally around 12 minute miles.   These times seem very slow but there is elevation, steep and long uphills, and rocky trails to maneuver and I did go up to 7:10 for a trail run mile during a birthday challenge day.

 

May cardio:

Elliptical 15 times

Hike/trail run sessions - 6

June Cardio - Kansas City and HCR trip near end of month

Elliptical - 11

Hike/trail run sessions-  2

July cardio

Elliptical - 14

Hike/trail run sessions- 4

August cardio

Elliptical - 17

Hike/trail run - 7

September cardio - drive to midwest mid month - HCR twice

Elliptical - 4

Run - 2

 


Supplementals:   These are exercises that supplement our climbing and hit the opposing muscles.  These are for core, muscle balance, and injury prevention.  We have a standard set we do most of the time but I add some different ones sometimes for variety.  These were done after a hang board or campus board workout so usually twice a week.  Some of my supplementals consisted of chin ups for my birthday challenge.  Nat did some chin up sets but they were normally using our pulley system to take of weight so she could do reps.  Yes, Natalie can barely do one chin up so don't think doing tons of chin ups is your path to 24HHH mastery.

 

TRX suspensions -  here is a link to a little video I made to explain these and info on how to make your own set:

TRX do it yourself and sample exercises

IMG_6239 (2).JPGIMG_6240 (2).JPG

                    Extensions                                                                                                                   Butterfly

IMG_6242 (2).JPGIMG_6243 (2).JPG

                                    Knee Up Start                                                                              Knee Up Finish

Our normal TRX workout:

3 sets of 8 reps that combine the butterfly with the extension with knees on the ground to allow full extension (on your toes for you strong bodies).

3 sets of 20 Knee ups to chest with hands in handles and feet in straps.

Then:

3 sets of max push ups

Shoulders - 3 sets of 8 - hold dumbbells at your side and lift to above shoulder height with the front of the dumbbell tilted down then move to in front then lower.

Dumbbell curls - 3 sets of 8 - 10 with each arm

Sometimes - Max weighted chins - one to three sets with max weight for three reps max.

 

As we neared the 24 we started doing some planks.  Normally just 1 or 2 minutes on, 1 minute rest twice.  This was after our TRX and pushups so our abs were already worked a bit.

 

April - 8 sessions

May - 8 sessions

June - 8 sessions - but I did lots of chin-up sessions for my bday challenge  - (example: 65 chins in 65 min with 65 lbs)

July - 11 sessions  -mainly chin-ups of various kinds and modified TRX for bday challenge - (example: 650 chins in 89 sets)

August - 6 sessions

September - 4 sessions but 2 were Tabata (20 seconds work, 10 seconds rest x 8 then 1 minute rest - repeat for 4 full sets - first set=pushups/mountain climbers, second set=leg raises/crunches, third set=air squats/lunges, forth set=squat thrusts/cobra pose to downward dog)

 


Hang board:

Natalie and I did slightly different hang board routines that we got from the "Rock Climber's Training Manual".

Hers involved the beginner's routine: 10 second hangs with 5 seconds rest for 6 repeats then a 3 minute rest all repeated 7 times. (27 minutes)

Mine was the Intermediate routine: 7 second hangs followed by 3 seconds rest for 7 repeats followed by 3 minutes rest all repeated 13 times. (50 minutes)

We kept notes on how much weight we added or took off using the pulley system mentioned in the intro.   For each set Natalie changed to a different hold size/type while I did two sets on each hold.        The holds we used were : Jugs, Large Edge, Medium Edge, 3 finger pocket, 2 finger pocket (sets with ring and middle finger and sets with middle index fingers), pinch.

 

Hangboard session:

 Apr - 6

May - 5

July - 3

Aug - 1

The gap for June was because of a trip to Kansas City where we didn't have access our usual training environment.  But, it was a good time to rest from that workout for a bit.

An example of Nat's improvement on the 3 finger pocket.  She started needing to take off 40 lbs on Apr 14,  30 on Apr 17, 25 on May 8,  20 on May 12,  15 on July 24, 0 weight on August 12!!        Note the progressive overload.  I followed a similar path but my improvements were less dramatic since I have been doing hang board workouts much longer.

 

For our workouts we use Seconds Pro on the iPhone that would count down with beeps for each set.  The beeps start with 5 seconds remaining in the set with one beep a second.   It made it easy to concentrate on the work without needing to see the timer at all.   You can add music to any of the work or rest periods if you wish and for some other workouts that had longer work periods, it was nice (System board workouts).

 

Campus board:

Our campus board started with the Metolius Large and Medium rungs and ended up with just the Medium and Small ones.   As you can see in the pictures in the intro we have boards below the campus board to allow us to use our feet.   Rungs are numbered 1 to 5 from bottom to top.  

Our normal campus board routine:

Match on each rung, 1,2,3,4,5 starting with right hand then next set start with the left

Alternate 1,2,3,4,5 starting with right hand then next set start with the left

Alternate 1,3,5 starting with right hand then next set start with the left

Bump one hand from rung to rung 1,2,3,4,5 starting with right hand then next set start with the left

 

As we progressed, we started doing right hand first and left hand first without coming off the wall.  Then we added coming back down.  Finally we added double sets so we would try 1,3,5,3,1 starting with the right followed by the same with the left and try to do 2 full sets.

 

We would add different things after our base workout like 1,4  and 1,5 and bumps that would to up and down before going to the next rung (1,2,1,3,1,4,1,5) or (1,2,1,2,3,2,1,2,3,4,3,2,1).  Overall it is really fun and our sessions lasted between 30 and 40 minutes.  Nat was better at this than I was and she would sooth my ego by saying it was because my legs were too long so I couldn't get my ass as close to the board as she could on the bottom rungs.

 

Sample campus board workouts

Campus sessions:

May 3

 June 2

 Aug 5

Sept 2

 

System board:

Our system board (refer to picture in intro) consists of paired holds of the same type (crimps, side pulls, pinches, gastons) on a 4x8 board at about 15-20 degree angle.  Our workout consists of 30 seconds of hard work on small or difficult holds followed by 30 seconds of resting on jugs.  This is repeated for a total of 4 sets.  This is followed by 3 minutes rest then repeated for 3 more sets.   You have to use your own judgment on which holds and how to move but we like to do a set using crimps, another using side pulls and another using pinches but mix it up when it gets desperate.  We only did a few of these and they are shown in calendar later.

 

 

 


Gym climbing:

The bulk of our climbing training for the 24 has always been based on laps in the gym.  Before moving to Vegas we would either lead or top rope with each of us doing two laps then the other doing two.  In Red Rock Climbing Center, we split up and use the autobelays.  We never go below 5.9 and usually work all the routes on one autobelay before moving to another.  There are three main autobelays we use and two others we use occasionally that don't have the same mix of hard routes and are move vertical.  The three autobelays we use typically have two or three 5.10s, one or two 5.11s and one or two 5.9s.  As we get closer to the 24 we start doing two laps on each route and moving up our speed.   Typically we maintain 2 minutes / route but just before the 24 I got in 36 in 36 minutes.   Typically I would work laps for time for an hour then rest a bit more between laps and do the harder 5.11s.    As mentioned in the intro, this was how we improved our Max Steady State.   Climbing harder routes faster but keeping up the work for at least an hour.

 

We also made a trip to Sender One and were able to on-sight 42 routes 5.10a to 5.11c our first day and get another 23 routes in the next day (65 routes for my bday challenge)   That trip let us know our training was on track even if the ratings were REALLY soft.    On our trip to Kansas City, we climbed at IBEX and Monster Mountain and made do as best we could.  We were used to the "no trick" type of climbing from Red Rock Climbing Center that is great for training.   The Midwest gyms were more into tricky moves, some reachy routes and seldom had more than one route on a rope that was in our range.  So we worked on on-sights and two laps each before having to move to a new rope.   To go from on-sighting 5.11c and multiple 5.11a's at Sender and RRCC to not being able to even climb most 5.10s at one gym was pretty strange!

 

Outside climbing

Since we live 5 miles from Red Rock, that was our main climbing venue.   But, our emphasis was getting in laps or climbing in areas that were new to us and we did very little trad during the summer.   As the 24 approached we needed the outside climbing to toughen up the tips that inside climbing doesn't seem to do very well.   Our trips to HCR were used to preview new routes and to dial in the beta on our harder routes.   We did preview a lot of 5.10s that we ended up not doing in the 24 but it was good for the training.   Nothing makes you better at outside climbing than climbing as many different routes as you can OUTSIDE.

 


Putting it all together.  Note the volume of strength training early (hangboard).  That is followed by more campusing.

   Legend

hang board = red

campus board = orange

system board = brown

gym climbing = light green

outside climbing = green

cardio Elliptical =  light blue

hike/run = blue

Supplemental = dark red

 

APRIL -focus on hang board - started in mid month since that is when we changed to the new hang board routines

Hang - 6

Supplemental - 8

hike/run - 7

Gym climb - 3

Outside climb - 1

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

 

14

Hang

 

15

16

17

Hang

hike/run - 7 miles

Supplemental

18

Gym climb 45 min

19

hike/run 4 miles

Supplemental

20

21

Hang

hike/run 4 miles

Supplemental

22

Gym climb 1 hour

23

 

24

Hang

Supplemental

25

Gym climb 1 hour

26

hike/run 6.5 miles

Supplemental

27

hike/run 4 miles

Supplemental

28

Hang

hike/run 4 miles

Supplemental

29

Outside climb

Sport

Ultra Man Wall

30

Hang

hike/run 4.75 miles

Supplemental

 

 

 

 May - move from hang board to campus board- get outside more

Hang - 5

Campus - 3

Supplemental - 8

hike/run - 6

Elliptical - 15

Gym climb - 6

Outside climb - 7

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

 

 

 

 

1

Outside climb

Trad -Birdland

2

Outside climb

Sport -Walkup Wall

3

Supplemental

4

Gym climb 1:20

Elliptical

5

hike/run 2.4 miles

 

6

Hang

Elliptical

7

hike/run 7.6 miles

 

8

Hang

Supplemental

Elliptical

9

Outside climb

Trad -Black Coral

10

Outside climb

Trad Group Therapy

11

hike/run 3 miles

12

Hang

Supplemental

Elliptical

13

Gym climb 1 hour

Elliptical

14

Elliptical

15

Hang

Supplemental

Elliptical

16

Outside climb

Sport -Family Crag

17

Gym climb 2 hours

 

18

Elliptical

19

Campus

hike/run 5.5 miles

Supplemental

20

Elliptical

 

21

Outside climb

Sport -Sweet Pain

4 x 5.11

22

Hang

Supplemental

 

23

Elliptical

24

Outside climb

Sport - Cannibal

hike/run 6 miles

25

Gym climb 1:30

Elliptical

26

Campus

Supplemental

Elliptical

27

hike/run  4 miles

 

28

Gym climb 1:30

Elliptical

29

Campus

Supplemental

 

30

Gym climb 1 hour

Elliptical

31

Elliptical

 

 June - travel to KC and HCR near end of month so regular style training disrupted

Hang - 0

Campus -2

Supplemental - 8

hike/run - 2

Elliptical - 9

Gym climb - 10

Outside climb - 6

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

Gym climb 1:15

Elliptical

2

Supplemental

Elliptical

3

Campus

Supplemental

4

Elliptical

5

Gym climb 1:15

Elliptical

6

hike/run 4.5 miles

Supplemental

7

Gym climb

65 routes 93 min

8

Gym climb 1 hour

Elliptical

9

Supplemental

65 chins + 65lbs

Elliptical

10

Elliptical

11

Outside climb

Sport -Black Corr

Campus

12

Gym climb 1 hour

Elliptical

Supplemental

13

Outside climb

Sport - Black Corr

14

Gym climb 1 hr +

 

15

Supplemental

Elliptical

16

 

17

Gym climb 2+ hrs

 

18

Supplemental

19

Gym climb 1:30

 

20

hike/run 4 miles

 

21

Supplemental

 

22

 

23

Gym climb 45 hard

24

Gym climb 1:30

25

 

26

27

Outside climb

HCR 9 hard

28

Outside climb

HCR 18 routes

29

Outside climb

HCR 26 routes

30

Outside climb

HCR 12 routes

 

 

 

 

 

 

July- return from KC early in the month

Hang - 2

Campus -1

Supplemental - 11

hike/run - 3

Elliptical - 14

Gym climb - 10

Outside climb - 2

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

 

 

1

 

2

hike/run 6.5 miles

3

Supplemental

4

 

5

Gym climb short

6

Gym climb 1 hour

Supplemental

7

DRIVE

8

DRIVE

9

Gym climb 1 hour

Elliptical

Supplemental

10

Hang

Supplemental

Elliptical

11

Elliptical

12

Outside climb

Sport - 7x5.7

13

Gym climb 45 hard

Elliptical

Supplemental

14

Elliptical

Supplemental

15

Hang

Supplemental

Elliptical

16

Elliptical

17

hike/run 4.5 miles

 

18

Gym climb 1:30

Elliptical

Supplemental

19

hike/run 4 miles

 

20

Gym climb 1:30

Elliptical

21

Campus

Supplemental

hike/run 5.5 miles

22

Row

23

Gym climb 1:30

Elliptical

 

24

Hang

Supplemental

Elliptical

25

Outside climb

Sport -Panty Wall

26

Elliptical

 

27

Gym climb 1:30

Elliptical

28

Supplemental

 

29

Elliptical

 

30

Gym climb 6.5 hrs

 

31

Gym climb 4.5 hrs

 

 

 

 


August - more campus, less hang   Both gym climbing and outside climbing increase toward the 24 with the emphasis in the gym being "do more routes in an hour at higher grades".  

Hang - 1

Campus -5

Supplemental - 6

hike/run - 6

Elliptical - 14

Gym climb - 9

Outside climb - 5

System - 3

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

 

 

 

 

 

1

Elliptical

2

Campus

System

hike/run 4.25 miles

3

Gym climb 2 hrs

Bouldering

Elliptical

4

Elliptical

Supplemental

5

Campus

hike/run 6.5 miles

6

Elliptical

 

7

Outside climb

Sport -55 pitches RR

8

Outside climb

Sport -10 pitches RR

9

Elliptical

 

10

Gym climb 1 hour

Elliptical

11

Campus

System

12

Hang

Supplemental

Elliptical

13

Gym climb 2 hrs

 

14

Elliptical

 

15

Gym climb 1:30

Bouldering

 

16

Campus

Supplemental

hike/run 2 miles

Elliptical

17

Gym climb 1:30

4x4 on ropes

18

Elliptical

19

Elliptical

20

Outside climb

Sport - 2 hrs

System 4 sets

21

Gym climb 1:45

 

22

hike/run 6.75  miles

Supplemental

 

23

Outside climb

Sport-Panty Wall

Flash 5.11 tr

24

Elliptical

25

Gym climb 1:30

40 in 80 min

 

26

Campus

hike/run 2 miles

Supplemental

27

Outside climb

Sport - Magic Bus

Elliptical

28

Gym climb 2 hours

40 in 80 min

 

29

hike/run 5 miles

Supplemental minor

30

Gym climb 2 hours

60 in 90 min

31

Elliptical

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 September - fine tuning, peaking and tapering for GAME DAY  Note the "taper" as we get closer to the 24.  The taper involves  keeping the intensity up but cutting the volume down.  Unlike red-point tapering, it is important to keep a fairly high level of endurance training since de-training from endurance work is faster than that for strength and power.

Hang - 0

Campus -3

Supplemental - 3 - tabata - 2

hike/run - 2

Elliptical - 2

Gym climb - 7

Outside climb - 10

System - 2

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

 

1

Outside climb

Sport - 4 hrs

2

Gym climb 1:30

44 in 60 min

 

3

Outside climb

Sport - Black Cor

Campus

System

Supplemental

4

Gym climb 2 hours

51 in 60 min

84 total

 

5

Elliptical

6

Outside climb

Sport - Gallery

Campus

System

7

Elliptical

Supplemental

8

Outside climb

Sport - Gallery

Campus

9

Gym climb 1:30

Supplemental

10

Gym climb 1:30

36 in 36 min

72 total

Last 9 hardest 5.11s

11

 

12

13

Outside climb

HCR

11 x 5.10

5 x 5.9

14

Outside climb

HCR

3 hrs fast then

harder

15

tabata

16

Gym climb 1:45

 

17

hike/run 2 miles

tabata

18

Gym climb 2 hours

 

19

20

Gym climb 1 hour

Up/down 4 sets

2 laps each then

2 hard 5.10+

21

hike/run 2 miles

22

Outside climb

HCR

Trad beta

2 x 5.10b, 1 x 5.10a

23

Outside climb

HCR

2 x 5.9

24

Outside climb

HCR

Trad beta on 2

1 x 5.10c

25

26

Kicked Ass

27

Kicked Ass

Results for team Leather and Lace

152  routes each - 12.66 routes/hour - 1 route every 4.7 minutes

Natalie 2nd female (of 66) - New route count record female

Me-3rd Masters ( Masters starts at age 45)

3rd co-ed team