LLT 453

Liturgical Theology

Term: Fall 2017

Instructor

Fr. Dennis Kolinski, SJC

dkolinski@holyapostles.edu

860-632-3809

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course demonstrates how the Liturgy is the source and summit of the Christian Life as found in Sacrosanctum Concilium, 10.  It will examine liturgical theology especially in terms of its theological and spiritual aspects, while integrating pastoral and canonical applications.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

3. COURSE SCHEDULE (subject to change)

The schedule below demonstrates how liturgy both forms faith and is an expression of faith. As Sacrosanctum Concilium states it is the “source and summit of the Christian life.” Because it is the living manifestation of Christ within the world, it is therefore vitally important to understand what Catholic liturgy is and what it communicates. This course, thus, examines the theology of Catholic liturgical and sacramental life in its historical development, rich symbolism, varieties of expression, pastoral aspects, spirituality and contemporary issues.

Week 1: What is Liturgical Theology?

Readings

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Liturgy and Life: The Place of the Liturgy in Reality,” 5 – 11.

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), “Theology of Liturgy.”

Jesson, Nicholas A., “Lex orandi, lex credenda: Towards a liturgical theology.”

Mosebach, Martin, “Does Christianity Need a Liturgy?”

Required Videos

“The Mass”

“Mass”

Supplemental Reading

“The Sacrament of the Eucharist,” Catechism of the Catholic Church—nos. 1322 – 1419.

Meyendorff, Paul, “What is Liturgical theology?”

Bux, Nicola, “Theological Foundations of the Liturgy,” The Genius of the Roman Rite, Uwe Michael Lang, editor, 119 – 142.

Discussion Board 1

Introduce yourself and describe what your experience of Catholic liturgy has been.

Week 2: Basic concepts in Catholic liturgy; the Structure and Elements of the Mass

Readings

Vagaggini, Cyprian OSB, “Theological Dimensions of the Liturgy, volume 1” and Louis, Bouyer, “Rite and Man: Natural Sacredness and Christian Liturgy”

Thurston, Herbert, “Symbolism,” The Catholic Encyclopedia.

“The Structure And Meaning Of The Mass” (USCCB)

Structure of the Mass

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Liturgical Form: Posture,” 115 – 127.

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Liturgical Form: Matter,” 140 – 143.

Required Videos

“Sacramental Signs”

“The Propers of the Mass” (by Dr. Jeremy Sienkiewicz)

Supplemental Reading

Sacramentum Caritatis—nos. 43 – 51.

General Instruction of the Roman Missal, Chapter II: The Structure of the Mass, Its Elements, and Its Parts

“How is the Liturgy Celebrated?” Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1145 – 1162.

Zielinski, Christopher M. J., “Liturgy, Ritual and Contemporary Man—Anthropological and Psychological Connections,” Sacred Liturgy: The Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church, Proceedings of the International Conference on the Sacred Liturgy Sacra Liturgia 2013, editor: Alcuin Reid, 237 – 254.

Guardini Romano, Sacred Signs

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Liturgical Form: Gestures,” 128 – 130.

Quiz 1

1. Why are signs and symbols a necessary part of Christian liturgy?

2. What are the three primary aspects of Christian liturgy?

3. As actions with symbolic value, what does standing or kneeling for Communion communicate?


Week 3: The History of the Mass

Readings

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “From Old Testament to New: The Fundamental Form of the Christian Liturgy—Its Determination by Faith,” 20 – 30.

Davies, Michael, A Short History of the Roman Mass

Fessio, Joseph, “The Mass of Vatican II”

Fortescue, Adrian, “Liturgy”

Suggested Videos

Extraordinary Form of the Mass (1940)—narrated by Fulton Sheen

Sandles and Fiddlebacks

Supplemental Reading

Cabrol, Fernand, The Mass of the Western Rites—Preface, Chapters 1 – 4, 9, 11, 12 (Part V: Different Sorts of Masses)

Fortescue, Adrian, “The Liturgy of the Mass”

A summary of: Klauser, Theodor, A Short History of the Western Liturgy (1965)

Introduction

Chapter 1 The Early Liturgy

Chapter 2: The Early Medieval Liturgy

Chapter 3: The Later Medieval Liturgy

Chapter 4: The Tridentine Liturgy

Discussion Board 2

Are signs and symbols used effectively in the average Catholic liturgy today to convey supernatural truths? Comment on how you agree or disagree with the responses of your fellow students.

Week 4: Liturgies of other Rites of the Church

Readings

“Liturgical Diversity and the Unity of the Mystery,” Catechism of the Catholic Church—nos. 1200 – 1209.

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Liturgical Form: Rite,” 98 – 105.

Crouan, Denis, “Rite and Liturgy”

Donovan, Colin B., “Catholic Rites and Churches”

Yurkus, Kevin R., “The Other Catholics: A Short Guide to the Eastern Catholic Churches”

Suggested Videos

Examples of present-day liturgies of other Rites (Catholic and Orthodox)

Supplemental Reading

Cabrol, Fernand, The Mass of the Western Rites—Chapters 5 – 8, 10

Fortescue, Adrian, “Eastern Churches”

Griffin, Patrick, “Rites”

Quiz 2

1. What are the three major parent Rites of Christian liturgy?

2. What are the two surviving non-Roman Rites of the Western Church and where are they found?

Week 5: The Liturgical Movement and Mediator Dei

Readings

Pius X, “Tra le Sollecitudini: Instruction on Sacred Music

Read: Papal Letter to the Cardinal Vicar of Rome – December 8, 1903.

(The above pages are required reading, however, students are encouraged to read the entire document.)

Mediator Dei—nos. 1 – 29.

(The above pages are required reading, however, students are encouraged to read the entire document.)

Guardini, Romano, “The Spirit of the Liturgy”

Supplemental Reading

Guéranger, Dom Prosper, The Prayers and Ceremonies of the Holy Mass

Discussion Board 3

What was the primary and most important concern of the twentieth-century Liturgical Movement? Do you think that it accomplished its goal?

PAPER 1 DUE—by Sunday, 12:00 midnight

Week 6: Sacrosanctum Concilium and the Liturgical Reforms of Vatican II

Readings

Sacrosanctum Concilium

Reid, Alcuin, “’Thoroughly imbued with the spirit and power of the liturgy’—Sacrosanctum Concilium and Liturgical Formation,” Sacred Liturgy: The Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church, Proceedings of the International Conference on the Sacred Liturgy Sacra Liturgia 2013, editor: Alcuin Reid, 213 – 236.

“Towards an Authentic Implementation of Sacrosanctum Concilium,” Address of His Eminence, Robert Cardinal Sarah, Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments to the Conference “Sacra Liturgia UK 2016,” London, England, 5 July 2016.

Conley, Most Rev. James D., “ ‘A Universe Brimming with Fruitful Spiritual Life’: Reflecting Transcendence in the Liturgy.”

“Pope Benedict's last great master class: Vatican II, as I saw it”

Reid, Alcuin, “Elements of the New Liturgical Movement.”

Required Videos

“The Liturgical Reform” (by Father Jeremy Driscoll, O.S.B.)

Supplemental Reading

“Who Celebrated the Church’s Liturgy?” Catechism of the Catholic Church—nos. 1136 – 1144.

Quiz 3

1. What did Sacrosanctum Concilium say about the position of the altar?

2. What did Sacrosanctum Concilium say about sacred music, and in particular, Gregorian Chant?

3. What did Sacrosanctum Concilium say about the use of Latin in the liturgy?

Week 7: Ecclesia de Eucharistia, Sacramentum Caritatis and Summorum Pontificum

Readings

Ecclesia de Eucharistia—nos. 1 – 10, 47 – 52

(The above pages are required reading, however, students are encouraged to read the entire document.)

Sacramentum Caritatis—nos. 6 – 13, 70 – 83

(The above pages are required reading, however, students are encouraged to read the entire document.)

Letter of His Holiness Benedict XVI to the Bishops on the Occasion of the Publication of the Apostolic Letter “Motu Proprio Data” Summorum Pontificum.

Supplemental Reading

Summorum Pontificum

Quiz 4—short essay (maximum 250 words)

How do words (including the language used), specific liturgical form, rubrics and objects used in the liturgy convey the sacred?

Week 8: The Altar and Meal vs. Sacrifice

Readings

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Form and Content of the Eucharistic Celebration,” and “Postscript 2,” 299 – 310, 312 – 318.

Vyner, Owen, “The Form of the Eucharistic Celebration in the Thought of Cardinal Ratzinger/Pope Benedict XVI.”

Ecclesia de Eucharistia—nos. 11 – 16

Heid, Stefan, “The Early Christian Altar—Lessons for Today,” Sacred Liturgy: The Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church, Proceedings of the International Conference on the Sacred Liturgy Sacra Liturgia 2013, editor: Alcuin Reid, 87 – 114.

Supplemental Reading

Sheen, Fulton, “Calvary and the Mass”

Hauke, Manfred, “The ‘Basic Structure’ (Grundgestalt) of the Eucharistic Celebration According to Joseph Ratzinger.”

Quiz 5

1. Why is the primary content of the Mass a sacrifice?

2. Why does the content (i.e., sacrifice) necessarily also need to be embodied in the form of the liturgy?

3. Who is the primary “liturgist” of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass?

Week 9: The Liturgy—Mystical, Cosmological and Eschatological

Readings

Ecclesia de Eucharistia—nos. 17 – 20.

Ranjith, Malcom, “The Sacred Liturgy; Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church,” Sacred Liturgy: The Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church, Proceedings of the International Conference on the Sacred Liturgy Sacra Liturgia 2013, editor: Alcuin Reid, 19 – 39.

Corbon, Jean, “The Liturgy Lived: The Divinization of Man”

Kocik, Thomas M., “Liturgical Renewal and Eschatology”

Elliott, Peter, J., “The Glory of the Liturgy: Pope Benedict’s Vision”

Koliński, Dennis SJC, “Mystery and the Sacred in the Early Church”

Supplemental Reading

“The Liturgy—Work of the Holy Trinity,” Catechism of the Catholic Church—nos. 1077 – 1112.

Sacramentum Caritatis—nos. 30 – 32.

Gilbert, Hugh, O.S.B., “Odo Casel: prophet and mystagogue”

Pope, Charles, “The Biblical and Heavenly Roots of the Sacred Liturgy.”

Barthe, Claude, “The ‘Mystical’ Meaning of the Ceremonies of the Mass: Liturgical Exegesis in the Middle Ages,” The Genius of the Roman Rite, Uwe Michael Lang, editor, 179 – 197.

Hahn, Scott, The Lamb’s Supper: The Mass as Heaven on Earth.

Discussion Board 4

Does the Mass as you experience it today embody for you a clear sense of the transcendent, mystical, cosmological and eschatological? If it does, how does it do this? If not, what meaning does it transmit?

Week 10: Sacred Time—the Liturgical Year

Readings

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “The Relationship of the Liturgy to Time and Space: Some Preliminary Questions,” 31 – 36.

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Sacred Time,” 56 – 69.

Elliott, Peter, “Restoring Sacred Time: How the Liturgical Year Deepens Catholic Faith.”

Guéranger, Prosper, The Liturgical Year, “General Preface,” 1 – 19.

Parsch, Pius, The Church’s Year of Grace, Volume 1, 3 – 18, 197 – 201.

Suggested Videos

Select videos of various observances of the Liturgical Year.

Supplemental Reading

“When is the Liturgy Celebrated?” Catechism of the Catholic Church—nos. 1163 – 1178.

Thurston, Herbert, "Christian Calendar." The Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 3.(New York: Robert Appleton Company,1908).

Quiz 6—short essay (maximum 250 words)

Sacred liturgy is never one-dimensional and through it time is transformed. How does sacred time in the liturgy unite us to past, present and future?

PAPER 2 DUE—by Sunday, 12:00 midnight

Week 11: The Role of Beauty and the Arts in the Liturgy

Readings

Sacrosanctum Concilium, Chapter VII: Sacred Art and Sacred Furnishings—nos. 122 – 129.

Catechism of the Catholic Church: on Art and Beauty—nos. 2500 – 2503.

Benedict XVI, Sacramentum Caritatisno. 41.

Ratzinger, Joseph, “The Beauty and the Truth of Christ.”

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “The Question of Images,” 70 – 83.

Ratzinger, Joseph, “Art and Liturgy – The Question of Images”, Parts I & 2. (from Spirit of the Liturgy)

Required Videos

Catholic Church Architecture—Dr. Denis McNamara, The Liturgical Institute, Mundelein, Illinois

Part 7: Sacred Images

Part 8: Rediscovering Liturgical Imagery


Supplemental Reading

“The Pope Theologian Says: The Proof of God Is Beauty”

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Liturgical Form: Vestments,” 137 – 139.

Quiz 7—short essay (maximum 250 words)

Why does the Catechism of the Catholic Church address the issue of beauty under the Eighth Commandment and why is iconoclasm incompatible with Church teaching?

Discussion Board 5

Why is beauty important in the liturgy? Comment on how you agree or disagree with the responses of your fellow students.

Week 12: Sacred Music and the Liturgy

Readings

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Music and Liturgy,” 84 – 97.

Ratzinger, Joseph, “Music and Liturgy: How does music express the Word of God, the Vision of God?”

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “On the Theological Basis of Church Music,” 421 – 442.

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), “Theological Problems of Church Music.”

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “In the Presence of the Angles I Will Sing Your Praise: The Regensburg Tradition and the Reform of the Liturgy,” 461 – 479.

Required Videos

Chant, polyphony and the new evangelization

Sacred music vs. secular music

Supplemental Reading

Cabrol, Fernand, The Mass of the Western Rites—Chapter 12 (Part II: Chants of the Mass)

Steinschulte, Gabriel M., “Liturgical Music and the New Evangelization,” Sacred Liturgy: The Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church, Proceedings of the International Conference on the Sacred Liturgy Sacra Liturgia 2013, editor: Alcuin Reid, 41 – 62.

Mahrt, William, “The Musical Shape of the Liturgy, Part I: The Gregorian Mass in General,” The Musical Shape of the Liturgy

Mahrt, William, “Active Participation and Listening to Gregorian Chant,” The Musical Shape of the Liturgy

Mahrt, William, “Can Music Really be Sacred?”

“Frequently Asked Questions On Sacred Music,” Church Music Association of America

Quiz 8

1. Why is Gregorian Chant called “Gregorian” and why is it proper to the Roman Rite?

2. How does music affect one’s experience of the liturgy?

Week 13: Liturgical Space and Architecture

Readings

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Sacred Places—The Significance of the Church Building,” 37 – 43.

Ratzinger, Joseph, Sacred Places: The Significance of the Church Building (from: The Spirit of the Liturgy)

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “The Altar and the Direction of Liturgical Prayer,” 44 – 51.

Lang, Uwe Michael, “Sacred Architecture at the Service of the Mission of the Church,” Sacred Liturgy: The Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church, Proceedings of the International Conference on the Sacred Liturgy Sacra Liturgia 2013, editor: Alcuin Reid, 187 – 211.

Dietz, Helen, “The Eschatological Dimension of Church Architecture”

Required Videos

Catholic Church Architecture—Dr. Denis McNamara, The Liturgical Institute, Mundelein, Illinois

Part 1: Architectural Theology

Part 2: Beauty and Architectural Theology

Part 3: Jewish Roots

Part 4: The Classical Tradition

Part 5: Decoration and Ornament

Part 6: Columns

Part 9: Heaven and Architecture

Part 10: Vatican II

Supplemental Reading

“Where is the Liturgy Celebrated?” Catechism of the Catholic Church—nos. 1179 – 1186.

McNamara, Denis, “The Spirit of Mediator Dei”

Lang, Uwe Michael, “Louis Bouyer and Church Architecture: Resourcing Benedict XVI's The Spirit of the Liturgy”

Rigali, Cardinal Justin, “Sacred Architecture: Encountering the Beauty and Mystery of God”

Boorstin, Daniel J., “An Architecture of Light,” Excerpted from The Creators, (New York: Random House, 1992), 246 – 254.

Quiz 9—short essay (maximum 250 words)

How does the layout and furnishing of a church help a person’s understanding and experience of the faith?

Week 14: Non-Eucharistic liturgies—the Sacraments and the Liturgy of the Hours

Readings

“Sacraments,” Catechism of the Catholic Church—nos. 1210 – 1666.

Sheen, Fulton J., These Are the Sacraments—Section I, “The Sacraments”

“Liturgy of the Hours” (USCCB)

“Liturgy of the Hours/Divine Office/Breviary”—EWTN

“Divine Office”

Supplemental Reading

“The Paschal Mystery in the Church’s Sacraments,” Catechism of the Catholic Church—nos. 1113 – 1134.

Sacramentum Caritatis—nos. 16 – 29.

“General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours” (USCCB)

“Reflections on the Theology of the Divine Office”

Quiz 10

What is the relationship of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass to sacramental liturgies, Liturgy of the Hours and devotions?


Week 15:—Ars celebrandi, participation and where we go from here

Readings

Sacramentum Caritatis—nos. 52 – 69.

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Liturgical Form: The Body and the Liturgy—‘Active Participation’,” 106 – 109.

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “On the Structure of the Liturgical Celebration,” 319 – 329.

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Change and Permanence in Liturgy: Questions,” 519 – 530.

Ratzinger, Joseph (Benedict XVI), Collected Works: Theology of the Liturgy, “Worship in the Parish Communities Fifteen Years after the Council: A Sermon Delivered to the Bishops’ Conference in Fulda,” 531 – 535.

Elliott, Peter, “Ars Celebrandi in the Sacred Liturgy,” Sacred Liturgy: The Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church, Proceedings of the International Conference on the Sacred Liturgy Sacra Liturgia 2013, editor: Alcuin Reid, 69 – 85.

Supplemental Reading

Mahrt, William, “The Sacred”.

Hitchcock, James, “The Liturgical Revolution,” The Recovery of the Sacred, chapter 1.

Discussion Board 6

How has this course influenced your previous understanding and experience of the Mass in any way? In what way?

PAPER 3 DUE—by Sunday, 12:00 midnight

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

QUIZZES

Some quizzes will ask for short answers in response to material from the lesson, while others will ask for short essays. Your answers for numbered questions should be brief and to the point: most can be answered in 1 or 2 sentences and should not exceed 50 words. Answers for essay questions MUST NOT exceed 250 words. Your answers to quizzes are due by 12:00 midnight CST on Sunday of the week under which the quiz is listed.

DISCUSSION POSTINGS

You will be required to make periodic Discussion Board postings. In contrast to Quizzes, which test your knowledge of specific subject matter, Discussion Board postings will be subjective comments and reflections on a specific topic. The Discussion Board is a forum for intelligent and civil discussion. IT IS NOT AN OPEN FORUM FOR GRIEVANCES OR RANTS ABOUT LITURGICAL ABUSES. Your posts are due by 12:00 midnight CST on Sunday of the week under which the Discussion Board is listed. You are required to make at least one post addressing the topic and at least one reply to posts of your fellow students. Failure to do either of these will result in a lower grade for the Discussion Board.

PAPERS

There will be three papers required for this course. All papers must be double-spaced, in 12-point font, and with 1” margins. No cover pages are necessary. If you use sources, they must be properly referenced using standard Holy Apostles form for citations. If you need help in properly citing sources or in writing your papers, please make use of the Holy Apostles Online Writing Lab at: http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl/.


Paper 1

3 – 4 pages

Topic: Not only the words, but also the external form of a liturgy conveys meaning to those, who experience it. It speaks a language of its own. Attempt to decipher the signs and symbols and explain what they convey in the Armenian Catholic Divine Liturgy. In particular, explain how the liturgical form, sacred space, vestments, music, gestures, etc. convey such concepts as the sacred, transcendence, etc. This IS NOT a research paper! Your work should be based solely on your watching of the following Armenian Catholic Divine Liturgy. It is also not a simple description of what you see happening. It is supposed to be an attempt to intuitively figure out the significance of the various elements of the Armenian Divine Liturgy.

Use the Armenian Catholic Divine Liturgy found at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuS8xcJSIOc

(with the exception of the homily from time marker 21:35 to 43:50 on the video)

Due: Week 5—Sunday, 12:00 midnight CST

Paper 2

5 – 6 pages

Topic: The primary objective of the twentieth-century Liturgical Movement was to renew liturgical piety by education of both the laity and clergy in order to cultivate a proper understanding of the true nature of the liturgy. Romano Guardini was one of the leading figures in this movement and his book The Spirit of the Liturgy, which had a significant influence on Benedict XVI, played a leading role in the renewal of the liturgy in the recent times. Summarize the primary concept in each of the seven chapters of Romano Guardini’s book The Spirit of the Liturgy (each in a short paragraph) and then show how they relate to present-day culture and liturgy.

Due: Week 10—Sunday, 12:00 midnight CST

Paper 3

5 – 6 pages

Equipped with what you have learned in this class, how would you explain to someone the beauty, the mystery, and the inner meaning of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass? In a manner similar to what you did for Paper 1, decipher the “languages” of the liturgy, its signs, texts, the movements and gestures, the setting (i.e. the sacred space), and other elements of the ritual (music, incense, sacred vessels, vestments, etc.). As if you were preparing a presentation or writing an article to help better inform Catholics, who don’t really understand the Mass, pull back the veil to help reveal for them what lies behind the externals of the Mass.

You may use the Ordinary Form of the Mass or the Extraordinary Form of the Mass of the Roman Rite as the basis for your paper.

Due: Week 15—Sunday, 12:00 midnight CST

Links to YouTube videos that can help you.

Ordinary Form of the Mass “ad orientem”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ish5zre-SRA

Ordinary Form of the Mass “versus populum”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2ZvSOIZ1_E

Extraordinary Form of the Mass

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqkqc2-iteQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eb0R-edS3Y

Full texts for the Order of the Mass can be found at the following links:

Ordinary Form of the Mass

https://mbreal23.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/roman_missal_third_edition.pdf

(The Order of the Mass begins on page 513)

Extraordinary Form of the Mass

(Mass texts in both English and Latin; rubrics in Latin)

http://sanctamissa.org/en/tutorial/ordo-missae-0.html

(Mass texts and rubrics in both English and Latin)

http://www.catholicliturgy.com/index.cfm/FuseAction/TextContents/Index/4/SubIndex/66/TextIndex/17

5. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES:

TO BE PURCHASED:

AVAILABLE ONLINE OR FOR PURCHASE

6. SUGGESTED READINGS and RESOURCES:

7. EVALUATION

Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).


GRADING SCALE:        A 94-100; A- 90-93;

B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83;

C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73;

D 60-69;

F 59 and below


GRADING RUBRICS FOR DISCUSSION BOARD POSTINGS

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Weak response

Response summarizes original posting to which it responds.

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds.

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development.

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development.

GRADING RUBRICS FOR PAPERS

Content

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Absence of Understanding

Posting shows no awareness of the concepts addressed in the topic by shifting off-topic

Misunderstanding

Posting demonstrates a misunderstanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic through an inability to re-explain them

Adequate Understanding

Posting demonstrates an adequate understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic by a re-explanation of them

Solid understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic and uses that understanding effectively in the examples it provides

Insightful understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts of the topic through the use of examples and by making connections to other concepts


Research

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; poor quality of chosen sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format.


Writing & Expression

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Incomplete writing

Posting is only partially written or fails to address the topic

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Posting touches only on the surface of the topic and proceeds to talk about something else; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabu-lary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Posting is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment;  satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors

Solid writing with something interesting to say

Posting is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples;  level-appropriate syntax and diction;  mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error

command-level writing, making a clear impression

Posting is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development ; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage


8. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:


Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required to be in class 3 hours a week and prepare for class discussions 4.5 hours a week. Expect to devote at least 7 quality hours a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

After completing undergraduate studies at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 1974, Fr. Koliński did postgraduate study at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland where he received an M.A. in Slavic Ethnography.

After returning to the United States, Fr. Koliński moved to Chicago where he worked for many years as the Senior Program Officer of the Illinois Humanities Council.

Perceiving that God was calling him to a vocation in religious life, Fr. Koliński was one of the founding members of the Canons Regular of St. John Cantius, a new religious community of men that was founded at St. John Cantius Parish in Chicago in 1998. He received an MDiv degree following the completion of his seminary studies at Holy Apostles Seminary in Cromwell, Connecticut and was ordained to the priesthood in 2004.

After serving as an Associate Pastor at St. John Cantius Parish in Chicago, Fr. Koliński was appointed in 2007 as pastor of his community’s second parish, St. Peter’s in Volo, Illinois. From 2010 until 2016, he was assigned to Holy Apostles Seminary and College as formator and academic advisor for the seminarians of the Canons Regular of St John Cantius. He was also a member of the seminary faculty and helped in seminary formation. Fr. Koliński is presently Associate Pastor at St. John Cantius Parish in Chicago, once again.